Posts by tag: CBX

Honda May 3, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale

By the early 1980s, inline four engines went from being exotic and relatively rare to being widely available, even ubiquitous, at least among the Japanese manufacturers. Inline fours have more moving parts and that adds weight and complexity, big no-nos for motorcycles that historically relied on simplicity to keep weight down and minimize parts that could fail. But Honda’s original CB750 forever shattered that paradigm and started the superbike arms race that led to the Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or seen here.

If you’re not familiar with the Bol d’Or, it’s a 24-hour endurance race held in France. The name translates to “golden bowl,” and Honda was obviously trying to add a bit of a sporty image by associating it with endurance racing. The CB900F2B is a bit of an odd duck, in that it lives in between the classic and modern sportbike eras, as I’m arbitrarily defining them anyway. Early 1980s bikes in general were the last hurrah for dual-shock frames and air-cooled engines, right before the stylistic and performance upheaval heralded by machines like the Suzuki GSX-R750 that set the template for sportbikes moving forward.

Built between 79-83, the CB900 was an improvement over the earlier four-valve, air-cooled DOHC CB750F, with an updgraded frame, larger diameter air forks, and triple disc brakes with dual-piston calipers up front. The updated inline four used an “undersquare” 64.5 x 69mm bore and stroke that gave 95hp, enough the push the 530lb wet machine to a claimed 135mph, although period tests saw 125-130. All of that is pretty underwhelming by today’s standards, but the bike was known for excellent handling at the time and it was enough to go head-to-head against bikes with more displacement and the long-stroke engine’s torque gave it a muscular midrange.

The F2B or Bol d’Or version of the bike had an even shorter run than the regular CB900F, and was made between 1981 and 1982. With its angular, multi-piece fairing, I get the feeling it was really a way to pump a bit of new life into an old model, since it’s basically the CB900F with some extra plastic. But the old saying “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” applies here, and reviews of the bike at the time were very positive.

Call me a pedant [just make sure you look it up before you do], but I’m way more comfortable buying a car or motorcycle from a seller who can at the very least spell the name correctly, and the seller of this rare Bol d’Or even gets the lowercase “d” and apostrophe correct, so we’re off on the right foot!

From the Seller: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale

45,454 mi – $6999.00


Check out this rare 80’s Honda Supersport This was a Europe and Australian market only model referred to as a Bol d’Or model. This one originated out of England, its original owner brought it here to Seattle when he relocated in early 80’s. The current owner purchased it in February 1986 with about 17K miles on it. It has a good paper trail of services performed over the past 30 years along with the $2100 work order we just completed bring it out of a 10 year hibernation.

The bike is not perfect but it is in very good condition and running order for a 38 year old machine. The current owner told us that when he purchased it there was a round 2 inch dent on the top of the tank, it bugged the heck out of him, something must of been dropped on the top by original owner. He decided to have a local restoration center do the repair and also clean up the tail piece from previous boot scuffs. In our eye it looks like the white stripe angle is a bit out of alignment with the fairing stripes. We understand that for some this may be a deal breaker, so we have not priced it as if it was a 9 or a 10 collectible Honda.

Here is what we took care of to prepare for sale

  • Replaced tires and valve stems
  • Replaced fork and dust seals with OEM parts
  • Rebuilt carburetors, properly cleaned all OEM jets and internals, replaced all rubber bits.
  • Rebuilt front & rear brake master cylinder, new cup and lid on front and full system flush
  • Checked compression (145 across the board), inspected valve clearance, replaced valve cover gasket and rubber bolt cushions
  • Completed minor service to take care of the basics

This is from a Honda enthusiast website which also verifies this bikes credentials

Honda CB 900 F2B

  • Period: February ’81 – February ’82
  • Engine number: SC01E-2206870 – 2225154
  • Frame number: SC01-4000342 – 4011049
  • Power: 95 PK/70 kW
  • http://www.hondaboldor.nl/cb900f2b/

Here is some more information on this model we found:

For many, however, the CB900F was the perfect ‘Universal Japanese Motorcycle’ (UJM), the ubiquitous, Japanese, across-the-frame four. Although blighted by the perennial Honda cam chain problem, these were steady, undistinguished motorcycles that improved gradually every year. Updates for 1980 saw needle roller swingarm bearings and an air-assisted front fork. Further improvements for the 1981 CB900FB (pictured here) included a larger-diameter fork (37mm) and dual-piston brake calipers from the racing CB1100R.

Among the other 31 improvements for ’81 were a stronger cam chain tensioner and different valves. Also available was the CB900F2B with a 16-piece, three-quarter fairing and leg shields, housing a clock and voltmeter. Although the CB900F lasted until 1983, by then it had been overtaken by the CB1100F. Where the CB900F excelled was as an everyday riding machine. Motorcycles were less specialized in the early 1980s and the Bol d’Or was forgiving, working well as a high-speed sportster, yet delivering the goods in the city or as a tourer.

The suspension and riding position provided a perfect compromise between sports riding and comfort. Factor in exceptional finish and reliability, all for around three grand, and you can see why the Bol d’Or was a success. It may have been bland but, as a representative of the era of the universal motorcycle, the Bol d’Or was one of the best.

Credits cards accepted, up to $150 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave @ seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

1980s superbikes have long been extremely affordable, but that’s not the case so much anymore, as you can see from the $6,999.00 asking price for this CB900F2B. But that makes sense, since the original CB750s haven’t been cheap for years, and now these later 80s icons are starting to appreciate. This Bol d’Or is certainly one of the rarest, and I was unfamiliar with the model before this one popped up. Miles aren’t particularly low, but this appears to be in excellent condition, and the seller seems very knowledgeable as well, which always a good sign! Classy and reliable, with real-world performance and comfort, this would make an excellent practical classic.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1981 Honda CB900F2B Bol d’Or for Sale
Honda March 9, 2019 posted by

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX

The mighty CBX is one of those bikes that don’t really make a lot of sense to some riders. While a liter bike in size, that size is really the problem. Rather than a twin or even a four-banger, the CBX is a bona fide six lanes wide when viewed from the front. A wild and strong statement by Honda when it was released, there is much about the CBX that is stuff of legends. This was the cusp of the 1980s, and Honda was firing a shot across all bows; they had engineering and technology and were not afraid to use it.

Italian firm Benelli created the first factory inline six cylinder motorcycle, but Honda upped the tech ante and mass produced it. Starting in 1978, the early models were six-banger versions of the bikes of the time: standards. Today the standard is known by the more evocative alias of naked, but that is only because after the discovery of ABS plastic nearly every motorcycle since has been a molded canvas of one stylist or another. I’m not discounting the aerodynamic (or aesthetic) benefits of bodywork, but bikes like this CBX provide that hanging it all out where it can be seen really makes a lasting impression.

From the seller:
Beautiful and very clean 1979 Honda in Pegasus Silver with 2,075 miles since restoration. Please note, true mileage before complete restoration is unknown. Starts very easily and runs strong. Everything is ready to go riding or to be a great collectors piece.

Very reasonable reserve. Here is what is known about the bike.

I had been seeking a 100% stock and complete 1979 CBX in Silver for many years to add to my collection of 12 bikes. (Wife calls it a disease.)
Bike was owned by a gentlemen in Florida who passed away around 2010. Bike had a complete nut and bolt restoration completed by Tim’s CBX International in Georgia. (Verified by Bill @ Tim’s). Tim’s early restorations, when OEM Honda parts were more readily available, are regarded by many as the best CBX restorations to be found. The paint work is fantastic. Chrome is bright.
Spouse eventually sold the bike to Louis Mintrone, distributor of CBX parts in Florida in 2017. I purchased this Bike from Louis Mintrone in 2017.

More from the seller:
I shipped the bike to Preston Marks of CBX Motorworks. Although the bike had very few miles since restoration, I had Preston go completely through the bike again as it had set for awhile. Carburetors were Flushed, Rebuilt and Sync’ed. All fluids including brake fluids were flushed. Amsoil motor oil and brake fluids were used. Many rubber intake boots, seals and gaskets were replaced. New Battery installed. New Swing arm bushings were installed. New Bridgestone Battlax tires, in the correct size were mounted and balanced.
Bike is in stock conditions with a few small exceptions. Brake lines are braided Stainless steel instead of the stock rubber hoses. Brake lines are better than Stock so I kept them. Dyna coils and electronic ignition were installed during the restoration to eliminate the weak stock coils and ignition points. Progressive Shocks are installed in the rear for better handling. I have the original OEM shocks (see photograph) that is included with the sale.

I located a reproduction owners manual and a stock tool kit that is included. The tool kit is complete with the exception of the OEM Shock spanner wrench is missing.

Issues that are know are very , very minor. The right side exhaust muffler has some minor rust “pin holes” on the very bottom of the exhaust collector. Very minor but it is there for full disclosure. (see Photo). Left side muffler is solid. Also a small fin, under the motor and next to the drain plug is chipped. (see Photo) Very minor but again, full disclosure. That is everything known. Bike is available for preview.

Sold with a clean Texas title. Title mileage is marked “EXEMPT” as is standard in Texas for vehicle of this age and again, mileage before restoration is unknown. Since the bike has been in my collection, it has been stored in a climate controlled garage, under a cover with a Battery tender.

More from the seller:
I am selling the CBX because after many years of enjoyment, I am selling my entire collection of 12 motorcycles. This bike is the next to last to be sold. This CBX and my Norton Commando are the last 2 bikes to be offered for sale. It is time for someone else to enjoy.
The bike is located in a Northern Suburb of Dallas. Should you want more information, message me with your phone number or email address and I will get back to you.

Shipping is the responsibility of the buyer. As I have done my best to describe this beautiful bike, it is 40 years old so no warranties. Upon pick up of the bike, if it is not as described, I will refund all deposits.

The CBX is old enough to have a loyal following of riders and collectors who get it. And prices for these mammoth machines proves it. Prices are regularly in the teens for well-preserved or restored examples, and today’s specimen has been gone through not once but twice! The forecast for CBX models continues to remain strong. They may not appreciate in value as quickly as certain homologation machines but with great examples (and parts!) becoming a bit more rare you will find that good examples will always find a home in the market. This is a long-term buy if you’re looking to flip, but an awesome showcase and an interesting, classic rider. The advert claims only 2,000 miles on the restoration, but total mileage unknown. As always, RSBFS recommends you do your homework and ask questions. But there is no doubt that this example is clean, clean clean. Check it out here as there are only a few more days left to go. Bidding has been moderate, and there is still a reserve in place. Good luck!!

MI

Twice as nice: 1979 Honda CBX
Honda January 30, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1979 Honda CBX

Update: eBay shows sold at $15,500. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The 1979 Honda CBX, a six-cylinder behemoth dressed up as a buttoned-down commuter, was an exercise in weird, but impressive, flex from Honda. As the long run of the original CB750 was at its peak, Big Red decided it was time to show off the ultimate evolution of the CB line, but elected to bare its engineering fangs instead of building a taught, sinewed race bike on the CB platform. Honda brass at the time even admitted that, if they had been going for track records, they could have made it with a much lighter, more focused and faster four cylinder.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

But that wasn’t what the CBX was for, so they took the lessons from their tiny 250cc grand prix six cylinders of the 1960s and made a mill four times that size that put out 105 horses at 9,000 rpm. Honda stuck the accessory drives in the middle of the crank, as opposed to at the ends, to keep the crank short for cornering clearance. That also helped balance the big engine, which otherwise would have vibrated mercilessly. Though the technology and thought meant the CBX was a true feat of manufacturing and engineering, it was also heavy, flexy and intimidating. Reports from the time said the handling was more impressive than it had any right to be, but few people were buying it.

This 1979 Honda CBX has been mothballed since 1988, when it was placed on display in a family dealership. The carbs were drained as it was put in storage and the engine was turned over regularly to keep it free. It had a new tank at some point in the 1990s after the original was dented. The tires were last changed in 2001. The seller says he plans to leave it as-is and let the purchaser decide what to do with the bike. Between 1979 and 1988, it covered just 8,400 miles.

From the eBay listing:

This is an original 1979 Honda CBX. It has not been registered or on the road since 1988. It has been stored in a climate controlled garage in Northern Nevada until I purchased it from a friend a few years ago…it had been in their family and on in display in their dealership since the 80’s.

I received the original California small pink slip with 1988 registration ( I have photos of this when I took it to DMV ) I have since registered and titled this in Arizona, it has a clean and clear title in my name.

I bought the bike as it sits today. Carbs were drained and the bike has been in stored conditioned for over 15 years. The engine was turned over occasionally. The tires are from 2001 I believe which I think is when it was last freshened up a bit. I also was told that the original tank suffered a dent while on display in the early to mid 90s and the original tank was replaced with one of the last new oem ones available from Honda. The tank is perfect and like new inside and out as seen.

I am selling the bike as is, I am going to leave it up to the new owner to display as is or make it a runner. I added a new battery and fresh avgas last week and the bike runs and the carbs do not leak, however it only ran on 5 cylinders and did not want to idle. So carbs will need a proper going over if you plan to bring it back to life.

Two other flaws on the bike. The tach was lazy when I started the bike, this might sort it self out with some run time. There is also some scratches on the gauges as shown in the photos.

I have not spent much time trying to detail the bike so it will clean up much better than what is shown in the photos if you dedicate a day or two, but as it sits it is very nice…it has basically been inside the last 30 years!!!

Original owners manual and tool kit in place and perfect. The original keys were lost, I had new ones made. I took photos with the tank, side covers and seat off so you can get an idea of the condition.

I will add a few more photos over the next few days, please email me with any questions or if you need specific photos, have questions etc.

I CAN SHIP ANYWHERE IN THE U.S. and help ASSIST with WORLDWIDE SHIPPING!!!

The asking price for this time capsule is $15,500, for which you are getting a pristine, absolutely unmolested example of a piece of Honda’s corporate history. They do not make them like this any more.

Featured Listing:  Pristine 1979 Honda CBX
Honda February 25, 2018 posted by

Six-y Beast: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale

You might initially be confused by what you’re looking at here, but get past that riot of color and the swoopy bodywork, and the big aluminum brick of an engine could only be one thing: Honda’s 1047cc, 24-valve straight-six CBX motor. But what about the rest of it? What exactly is a Moto Martin CBX?

Honda’s original CBX was a bit of a missed opportunity. It seemed designed to capitalize on the six cylinder racing bikes of the late 1960s, but no real link between the two seems to have been made in advertising the bike. And certainly there was no obvious visual connection, either: the original machines were jewel-like, pure racing motorcycles, while the CBX was a sophisticated, premium machine clearly designed for the road. It was big, heavy, and pretty powerful for the day, but handling was poor due to a flexible frame and the bike’s overall weight.

The main reason to own a CBX was always that huge brick of an engine with its cascade of exhaust pipes sweeping around and under it, the wild shriek of the engine, and its smooth power. But in its original iteration, that was pretty much the only reason to own one. They could be made to get around a race track: some great videos exist of them shaking a leg on track, but they weren’t really suited to it. And styling was relatively bland as well, typically conservative 70s UJM, with just a small duck-tail spoiler at the rear t0 add a bit of zing.

The solution was pretty simple if you had a bit of money and the ability to twirl some wrenches: find a nice, clean CBX, remove the motor and electrical system, and basically ditch the rest. By 1980, the Japanese manufacturers had gotten a handle on the art of making their motorcycles go around corners, but the small frame builders that had sprung up during the 60s and 70s were still around, and the CBX was a perfect candidate for a custom creation. Certainly Frenchman Georges Martin thought so, and his Moto Martin-framed CBXs are often considered the CBXs to have.

There’s no getting around the width of the inline six, and any replacement frame is going to have to figure out how to go over or under, since there’s just no going around… The Moto Martin part hugs the back of the engine pretty closely, making the stock airbox pretty much impossible, and replaces the original twin-shock arrangement with a monoshock setup, with thicker forks up front. Interestingly, it kept the original bike’s geometry, which was basically fine. A finished Moto Martin CBX was both lighter and stiffer than the original bike, with new bodywork, including a one-piece tail, kept the ducktail spoiler but gave the finished bike a much sleeker, more purposeful look, while twin round lamps gave it a bit of endurance racing cred.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale

This is an extremely rare and highly desirable Moto Martin CBX built from a complete Moto Martin rolling chassis with all of the best equipment of the day as fitted by Moto Martin including: Moto Martin aluminium 18inch wheels, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes front and rear with drilled cast iron rotors, braided hoses, De-Carbon under tank rear mono-shock. It has been customised with a different bikini fairing and single piece fibreglass tank and seat unit as in the pictures (and has received a FB like from Georges Martin himself) but the original Moto Martin aluminium tank, fairing, fairing bracket, headlight bracket, seat unit, screen with a spare as shown, are also included in the sale.

The motor is very strong as befitting the bike and is fitted with Carrillo Rods and Arias 1168cc big bore Arias forged piston kit and has done very little mileage since the big bore kit was fitted (hence my reason for sale), being ridden by me only in a few exhibitions for historic motorcycles at our local racetrack.

All in great condition with a few marks and slight damage to the side cover as shown in the photographs. I am the third owner, the previous owner and I each owning the bike for over 15 years.

Your opportunity to own the rarest and most desirable bike in the CBX world!

Seller can help with shipping – I live in a city with a major port.

Like a Spondon or a Rickman, there’s really no “standard” Moto Martin: they were generally sold as kits and built to the customer’s specifications. As few as 50 may exist that are actually titled as Moto Martins, but more kits were probably sold. The listing shows this as a 1980 model, but I believe the Martin kit wasn’t introduced until a bit later, so this might be titled as a Honda CBX, per the donor engine and transmission. The starting bid is $10,000 with no bids as yet. Depending on the reserve, this might be a good opportunity to get a very rare machine for a pretty good price, but note that this bike currently resides in South Africa, so keep that in mind if you’re suddenly having fantasies of wheeling this beast past your local bike hangout.

-tad

Six-y Beast: 1980 Moto Martin CBX for Sale
Honda October 13, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!

Update 10.27.2017: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

In 1978 Honda stunned the motorcycling world with a technological tour de force. The six cylinder, 24 valve CBX was the most ambitious – and the most visceral – Honda project to date. Dominated by an air-cooled inline format mounted transversely, this Honda made a statement like no other. And while Benelli introduced the world’s first production six cylinder motorcycle, Honda completely owned it and made it their own. Seemingly an engineering exercise that got out of hand, the Honda CBX remains a remarkable piece of machinery. It is coveted by collectors as well, with prices following suit.

A bit portly at 600+ pounds wet, the CBX was considered a superbike at it’s 1978 introduction. Part of that reason is that the world had never seen anything like it. With more than 105 HP on tap, the big bike was as strong in performance as it was stunning to look at. While you might not know it by looking, the big six was actually an evolution of the 50cc and 125cc GP race bikes of the 1960s and early 1970s. Honda claimed this lineage not only aided in meeting the performance targets of the 1047cc, 24-valve DOHC inline six cylinder, but also dramatically shortened the gestation period since this was a route already well traveled by Honda engineers. As a promotional stunt Honda provided bikes to the Isle of Man TT, which were utilized by course marshals and made a statement as to the sporting intent of the flagship Honda. Capable at the dragstrip, decent on the road course (especially endurance events), and at home at any boulevard in the nation, the CBX delivered on Honda’s promise of engineering excellence.

From the seller:
1979 Honda CBX

This CBX bike comes from BAC, the famous automotive and motorcycle collection. In the early 2000s the owner of a famous automobile collection decided that post war 1970s and 1980s motorcycles were some of the most unappreciated classic bikes and set out to buy the best of the best of all the iconic bikes. The owner is nearing 80 years old and has decided to sell off his collection of Italian and Japanese classic bikes of the 1970s and 1980s.

More from the seller:

The CBX in this ad took him three years of traveling across the country to find the best CBX he could find. While the bike has just under 10,000 miles on it, the current owner is the second owner. The previous owner who purchased the bike new only drove it on sunny days and it has never seen a drop of rain or any major dust or dirt. Everything is original bike except for the bearings in the rear swing axle. The bike even has a matching color Honda period correct helmet. The owner says without a question; this has to be one of the finest CBXs in the nation. It runs perfectly and has never been taken apart and nothing sounds like a Honda CBX when it is winding up through the gears.

More from the seller:
The owner said in his opinion the most important part of any collector bike is the mufflers as they are almost in all cases impossible to reproduce. The mufflers on this CBX are immaculate.

This bike also comes with a matching helmet!

This 1979 Honda CBX is located in Chicago land: $14,500

From the pictures of the enormous engine, you might think you need to be a bow-legged cowboy to ride one. But thanks to intelligent design, that is not the case. Not only did Honda cant the cylinder bank forward some 30 degrees, the intake setup is arranged in a vee format to further narrow the bike’s midsection; despite engine dimensions, there is plenty of room for the rider. And with a jack-shaft arrangement that moves ancillary components from the ends of the crank to behind the motor, the CBX is not nearly as wide as you might otherwise imagine.

Built from 1978 through 1982, the CBX was but one of the incredible models that Honda created during this wild time; other examples include CX500 Turbo, CX650 Turbo and later the V45 Interceptor. Yet the more conventional CB900F was the real showroom performer, outselling the engineering oddities by a large margin. As a result, the CBX remains a relatively rare model. Yet it still presents an amazing sight, and continues to stun today. The 1979 Honda CBX shown here is a low mile example. More importantly, this is a a completely original example that was recently liberated from a larger collection. If you are in the market for a 1970s collectable Honda, you want to source the cleanest, best example you can find. This particular machine meets those specs easily. The asking price is $14,500.

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Honda CBX with Matching Helmet!
Honda February 13, 2017 posted by

X-Rated! 1979 Honda CBX

In the world of bike porn, there are many shapes and sizes. And while most lust-worthy machines are built from the ground up to become a whole – frame, suspension, motor, bodywork – the outrageous, plus sized Honda CBX seems to be a machine totally built around the motor. The first gen CBX made no bones about what made it special – it was a naked bike showing off its wares to the world. Born from the engineering might of Honda during a time of great experimentation, this inline six-cylinder with DOHC and four valves per cylinder pumped out an impressive 105 brake horsepower. And while the motor looks impossibly wide when viewed from the front, Honda spent considerable effort to reduce the flare at the bottom end, stacking ancillaries such as the alternator behind the block.

1979 Honda CBX for sale on eBay

The CBX debuted in the latter part of 1978 and were badged as 1979 models. The first generation bikes actually developed more outright HP than the follow on models, although the later years did have overall improvements in torque and general responsiveness. Sold alongside the CB900F, the CBX was a bigger, badder and far more expensive machine. And while CBX sales were far better than other “experimental” bikes of the time (think the CX-series Turbos), it was handily outsold by the cheaper 900F.

The seller’s text goes a long way to describing the CBX history, variances and qualities:

From the seller:
Introduced in 1978 as a 1979 model, the Honda CBX topped its competitors with a 6-cylinder dual overhead camshaft engine; however, it was not the first inline 6-cylinder from the Japanese-motorcycle titan. Honda developed a series of sophisticated multi-piston 4-stroke Grand Prix-racing entries culminating in the RC165 and RC166 250cc inline 6-cylinder machines. The engine was successful in 1966 and 1967, and was the precursor to the CBX. The fact the CBX engine has its roots in Grand Prix racing is not coincidental. Engineer Shoichiro Irimajiri developed the 6-cylinder Grand Prix engine and led the team behind the CBX powerplant. Six cylinders, 24 valves and chain-driven dual overhead camshafts help the 1,000cc Honda engine crank out 105 horsepower. Six Mikuni carburetors with an integral accelerator pump deliver the right combination of fuel and air into the cylinders. The CBX engine is integrated into the frame as a stressed member, and the absence of conventional downtubes makes for a clear display of all six cylinders and the exhaust. Honda pushed into the future with bold styling and innovative features on the Super Sport CBX. The sculpted tank blended into CBX-logo side covers and the kicked-up winged tail section looked fast at rest. Lightweight Comstar 5-spoke alloy wheels were equipped with dual front and single rear disc brakes to slow the CBX from velocity. In an effort to improve lagging sales Honda pushed the CBX away from pure sport into a sports touring direction in 1981-82. Full fairings and hard saddlebags position the earlier and more powerful CBX1000 Super Sport into a unique spot in collectible Honda history. This 1979 Honda CBX first and most powerful year of what was then the fastest production motorcycle in the world. This bike will thrill you with its smooth idle and fantastic power and the sound is unmistakable, go for a ride or just add to your collection.

While Honda did race six-cylinder machines in the 1960s, this was their first jump into sixes for the street. However they were not alone: Benelli had already come (and gone) with the Sei models, and Kawasaki was soon to follow with their excellent KZ1300 liquid cooled example. And while Kawasaki transitioned their naked bike into a full-blown touring bike, Honda elected to evolve the CBX into a sport tourer. They would re-enter the six-cylinder world with the dominating Gold Wing touring RV, but chose to drop the inline arrangement in favor of a boxer layout. Most recently BMW introduced the K1600, an inline six more narrow than some fours.

The CBX line has always been a visceral affair. These bikes have serious presence, amazing sound, and actually function as a terrific day-to-day rider. Being a Honda, they are well built and surprisingly reliable. Parts are still available for the model, making it an excellent collector choice. Prices have been on the rise with these machines – especially the earliest models – but nothing compared to an RC30, RG500 Gamma or D16RR. Interest in this particular bike is solid, with bidding up to $7,700 with reserve still in place. I, for one, will be watching this one. This bike is clean and looks very, very original. Check it out here, and then share your six-cylinder thoughts in our Comments section. Is a CBX on your bike porn bucket list? Good Luck!

MI

X-Rated!  1979 Honda CBX
Honda July 30, 2015 posted by

Six Appeal – 1979 Honda CBX1000

1979 Honda CBX-1000 on eBay

CBX_rightside

Honda produced the CBX-1000 from 1978-1982 and it was intended to be their flagship model… and how could it not be?  With that big beautiful inline six and the trademark six headers it was showing off without even trying.  The CBX made 102hp and with it’s surprisingly sharp handling, the big Honda was almost universally praised by anybody who rode it.  Unfortunately, it was a little more expensive than many wallets could handle and it didn’t sell as well as the lesser CB900 and disappeared after just four short years.  If you have been paying attention the collector’s market recently, you’re undoubtedly aware that CBX prices are skyrocketing right now.  Later CBX’s were detuned by anywhere from 5-20hp, depending on whom you believe, and the loss of HP did not go unnoticed.  As such, the early years have become the more desirable of the bunch.  This is certainly a fine example and the seller’s asking price reflects that.  It will be interesting to see if it actually sells for $15,000!

CBX_leftside

From the seller’s eBay auction found here: 1979 Honda CBX-1000 for sale

Super nice example of a 1979 Honda CBX100
i  got this from the original owner a few years back…..as you can see…..it is in exceptional condition …….it runs perfectly, has a new battery , fresh fluids   and the tires are like new…….what is exceptional on this bike is the Vin number ,,,,,it is 269….very early in the production, making it highly collectable
the exhaust is original, however it was show chromed a few years ago…….and they look great
the paint is in perfect shape!……bike runs mint, has a clear title  and is ready to go

CBX_tank

Six Appeal – 1979 Honda CBX1000
Egli September 14, 2014 posted by

Swiss Miss: 1983 Egli EH10-C Red Baron

EH10

For those of you that check in on Rare to learn something new, class is in session. Those with experience or knowledge of the brand, please share it in the comments section. What you are looking at is the Swiss interpretation of Bimota – only Elgi started many, many years ahead of the Rimini company. Founded by Swiss motorcycle racer Fritz Egli in the mid 1960s, the original goal of the company was to modify existing motorcycles for competition use. When Egli frames started winning hill climb events, people took notice. While he started out with a Vincent Black Shadow, Egli made frames to carry many different Japanese engines over multiple decades – which brings us to this CBX powered Red Baron machine, the EH10 (Egli-Honda number 10). Unfortunately there is almost NO detail available via the eBay auction, and only a single picture of the bike (above). One would expect a bit more when the opening bid is nearly $55,000 USD.

1983 Egli Honda EH10 Red Baron for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Egli Red Baron Superbike in perfect condition!!!! One of only 45 ever builds! Too many extras to list. Has a Swiss title. Additional setting for an Egli Target Design, only 6 build worldwide!

While the seller did not include many pictures, I found a similar EH10-C Red Baron for sale on multiple Swiss sites. The mileage and pricing leads me to believe that this is the same motorcycle, and as such I am sharing them here. Note that I am not certain this is the identical machine being listed on eBay. As always, interested parties should do their homework, talk to the seller and ask for more pictures and information.

Read into the title anything you’d like. It was intended to be a pun on the pre-packaged chocolate powder drink, but after some research and finding more pictures I am inclined to believe it should be interpreted more along the lines of a free throw air ball; the baseball equivalent of a whiff. Swing and a miss! Makes me wonder if Egli is pronounced “ugly” in another language. But here is the thing: Fritz Egli’s frame designs flat out WORK. Sure it doesn’t have the flair of a Bimota. It may look like something that escaped from a Mad Max / Road Warrior movie. But mechanically it is a work of art. And rare. The additional bodywork noted in the auction is for another CBX-based Egli machine – the Target – which is even more rare than the Red Baron model. Does a specialty frame maker ring all of the right chords with you? If so, check it out here!

MI

Swiss Miss:  1983 Egli EH10-C Red Baron