Posts by tag: Cagiva

Derbi May 5, 2021 posted by

And Now For Something Completely Different: 2003 Derbi GPR

Many American riders might never have even heard of the Derbi brand, let alone ridden one. Thankfully the RSBFS faithful are not those riders, and can genuinely appreciate the rarity and fun this little 50cc bad motor scooter represents. Based in Barcelona, Spain, the Derbi inception goes way back to 1922. Like most smaller European makes of this era it all started with bicycles, leading to powered bicycles, which in turn led to fully fledged motorcycles. In fact the name Derbi is a nod to that history – Derivats de Bicycletas – meaning derivations in bicycling. While Debi is a brand name, the manufacturer is actually Nacional Motor S.A.U, which itself is now a Spanish subsidiary of Piaggio (as of the early 2000s). All clear?

2003 Derbi GPR 50 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Selling from my collection, yours to enjoy.
I sold these Derbi’s years ago, kept one of only 12 of this model imported into Canada in 2001.
Has never been registered to a buyer, original NIVIS form included.
I would think this is the only one like this in existence in private hands globally.
Youichi UI World Derbi Championship poster board included
Serious buyer only please.

Derbi has a long history of winning races and championships in the smaller classes. Outside of the Unites States, small bore racing is a real thing, and throughout the 1970s and 1980s Derbi was a dominant championship winner – until the demise of the class as a GP-sanctioned event. Therefore this little GPR has some real racing DNA under the skin. And the specs are there to prove it: A race-bred frame designed and built by Cagiva, housing a Derbi-built single cylinder, liquid cooled two stroke screamer (estimate approx 9 HP stock), a six-speed transmission, trick upside down forks, lightweight wheels and big brakes (for the displacement, anyway). Dry weight should be in the 230-ish range, with a top speed of about 70 MPH. We do not see these wonderful motorcycles often here on RSBFS, much less a never-been-registered example with a claimed NINE miles. Located in Canada, you can check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

And Now For Something Completely Different: 2003 Derbi GPR
Ducati December 27, 2020 posted by

Holiday Colors – 1986 Ducati 750 F1B

A touchstone to Supersport fans, the F1 was lightly built but had the innovative 750cc L-twin.  Offered by a classic specialist in Santa Monica, this F1B shows just over 8,000 miles in Km, but looks much better.

1986 Ducati 750 F1B for sale on eBay

The F1 packed a lot into its smallish envelope, chassis and swingarm were chromoly tubing, cradling the 75 hp engine from above.  Both cylinders exhaust toward the front, with a short intake tube allowing the forward Dell’Orto some cool air.  Forcella 40mm forks and a Marzocchi monoshock handled suspension duties, and 280mm disk brakes used just a single set of opposed pucks.  A 16-inch front wheel reduced gyroscopic mass, easing turn-in without an extreme geometric solution.  Aluminum fittings are billet-cut, but precede any Bimota-style brightwork.  The F1B was also available with a dual seat, but the monoposto offers a more authoritative spot to the rider.

At nearly 35 years of age, the longer history almost doesn’t matter, since this F1 was on display and recently tuned up for the next owner.  Blinkers are more modern but less obtrusive than the originals, otherwise its light preparation has an honest look.  From the eBay auction:

This F1B comes from a private collection of sport bikes and remains to its original specification apart from a change of indicators. From static display, the bike has had life breathed back in it with fantastic results. The recommissioning was minimal, and the bike now starts easily on the button and revs freely with a thunderous soundtrack. The bikes stops and goes around corners as well as the fabulous Tri-colore livery looks.

In very good condition, the bike shows minimal wear conducive with 8,000 miles and 33 years of enjoyment. A brilliant ‘80s ride and collectible piece of Ducati history.

The water cooled and four-valve 851 succeeded the F1 after a few years, arguably Ducati’s first superbike.  But bridging the air-cooled desmo through a change in ownership ( and thankfully not a name change ), gave the F1 an important place in the list of models.  The three circuit-named special editions gave testament to the TT heritage, and though they might be the most collectible, an unadorned F1B has its own, how do you say je ne sais quoi in Italian ?

-donn

Holiday Colors – 1986 Ducati 750 F1B
Ducati November 2, 2020 posted by

Tacit Blue – 1988 Ducati Paso 750 with Just 1,538 Miles !

Rare though they are, the 1986-88 Paso 750’s have their loyal fans, and there have been a half-dozen blue examples profiled on RSBFS.  This one hasn’t but a half an oil change’s worth of miles, and has been beautifully stored and cared for since its return to duty.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Design legend Massimo Tamburini’s first Ducati was the Paso, where he proposed a square-tube chassis enveloped by the soap bar.  Other innovations on board included the belt-driven cams on the 748cc twin, with a single Weber carburetor servicing both cylinders from between them.  A rather forward weight bias steers easily on the 16-inch front radial tire, and the 42mm Marzocchi fork was robust at the time.  Mid-sized 280mm brakes, 5-speed transmission and long alloy swingarm complete the running gear.  Even with its opaque windscreen, the very full fairing provides a generous pocket for the rider.

The seller took a leap of faith several years ago, and went for a NOS twenty-five year old.  No word on how the re-commissioning went or what’s been needed since then.  The condition is hard to believe, in a good way.  Likely the cam belts are again due, but also factor the unobtanium exhaust and slick tail-light mod into the equation.  From the eBay auction:

When I bought the bike it had 154 miles on it and it was 25 years old. A brand new, unrestored antique made in limited numbers and even more rare, it’s blue.

Now the bike has 1,538 miles on it and it’s 32 years old, in like new condition.
 
I bought the new Conti slip-ons out of Australia. These are hard to find. The original exhaust to be included. I removed the old saggy rear blinkers and incorporated the signals into the tail light as was done on models sold in Europe. The only non-factory part is the ring on the tank that the fuel cap installs into. This was made by by hand at Ducati Austin as a replacement.

Before being assigned the Paso, Tamburini had already come and gone from Bimota, and joined Cagiva ( who had just acquired control of Ducati ).  Though it was great on a more open road and handled better than the 904cc models, even when tuned right the Weber was temperature sensitive and made the Paso 750 a finicky commuter.  Either way it never really caught on, and they’re rare without any special editions.  The buy-it-now seems realistic in light of the season and a downright bargain for an afficionado.

-donn

Tacit Blue – 1988 Ducati Paso 750 with Just 1,538 Miles !
Cagiva October 15, 2020 posted by

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650

In the twisted family tree that is the Italian motorcycle community, there are many merges and branches. One interesting area is the history of Cagiva and their relationship with Ducati. While Cagiva owned Ducati in the mid-eighties, they were initially a customer as they purchased engines & transmissions to create their own bikes. Today’s Cagiva Alazzurra is such a beast, utilizing a sourced Pantah-based motor for power. In many ways these were seen as a poor man’s Ducati in North America – more exclusive than contemporary Japanese bikes, but with less cachet than other Italian exotics. Today the Cagiva Alazzurra is but a strange footnote for US buyers; once Cagiva took over Ducati they adopted the Ducati name as the stronger brand and the Alazzurra was discontinued.

1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650 for sale on eBay

The heart of the Alazzurra is very similar to the powerplant that drives the Pantah, such as this week’s 600 model. Ducati produced the Pantah in different displacements, including 500cc, 600cc and 650cc (there was also a 750cc unit built for racing). In many respects, the Alazzurra could be considered a later derivation of the Ducati Pantah, as the 650cc engine was the latest evolution of the unit, with a frame design that was extremely similar to the Ducati bike. With 55 HP pushing 424 lbs (dry) the Alazzurra offered respectable performance for the time, but was typically slower than similarly sized Japanese offerings.

From the seller:
Very good condition. Has collector plates so insurance in BC is 150 bucks per year.New cam belts, braided lines, seals, including crankshaft oil seal, valves checked, oil , filter and plugs replaced, new grips , l.e.d headlight

The legend of the Pantah design long outlived the Cagiva brand in North America. Today the Alazzurra is more an oddity than a true collector’s piece, although time has a tendency to create rarity all on its own. And with 35 years gone by, the pool of well-kept imported Cagivas is shrinking. But the big question is if that helps with appreciation of the model – or its value. This particular example is located in Canada, and is offered for approximately $3,424 USD. That is actually below the MSRP for the bike when it was new. But the Alazzurra does not have as strong a following as other Cagiva/Ducati models; it is seen by many as more of a novelty than an icon. Still for many riders this was a close to a Ducati as finances would permit during this time, creating a bit of nostalgia. Do any RSBFS readers fall into that category? There are not a lot of details available on this one, but you can check it out here. Let us know what you think about the Alazzurra, and good luck!!

MI

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650
Ducati August 3, 2020 posted by

Nice Surprise – 1988 Ducati Paso 750

Arguably the first modern Ducati, the Paso used an innovative design, and new belt-driven cams for its desmodue engine.  This Pennsylvania example has been beautifully restored, using at least a gallon of arrest-me red.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Underneath Tamburini’s ground-breaking package was a familiar Pantah 748cc twin, this time with a single Weber carburetor and 73 hp.  A 5-speed was all the torque curve required, and Marzocchi suspension and 16-inch tires are found at both ends.  Triple Brembo disk brakes are nearly the same size all around, 280mm fronts and 270mm rear.  The soap-bar bodywork freed the designers to build the square tube frame strong and economical, and Tamburini honed the geometry and balance to make the Paso a sweet handling package.

The owner has a short eBay history but picked a lower-mileage Paso as a project, and made a beauty out of it.  Right down to the exhausts, it’s hard to find a modification to the factory’s ideal.  Alloy re-finishing came out better than new.  Pictures without the fairing might require some enhancement to really see the details.  From the eBay auction:

Purchased this classic Paso to perform a full restoration, but when we removed the body work, the chassis and componentry were in such excellent condition, we opted to focus on a cosmetic overhaul. The engine and chassis have been gone through and everything is in order. Valve adjustment and belts replaced within the last 1,500 miles. New tires, new battery, new oil pressure sending unit, new leather seat cover. All bodywork (fiberglass and ABS) was repaired prior to very high quality lacquer repaint. There is a blemish on the left side panel where the mounting point caused a crack after reinstallation (picture shown). Decals replaced and cleared over. Original Oscam wheels were stripped of the delaminated clearcoat and machine polished. There is likely not a Paso this clean outside of the Ducati museum.

The Paso’s styling wasn’t enough of a sure thing to generate more than a couple of thousand sales each year, though Honda came up with a very similar package for the late -80’s CBR600F.  The Weber struggled with heat in traffic, and an upgrade to fuel injection came with the last-of-the-line 907 i.e.  Paso’s do have their fan base though, who appreciate their moderately sporty riding position and protective aero.  Hopefully a RSBFS reader will meet the reserve on this cherry and let us know how it goes.

-donn

Nice Surprise – 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati August 1, 2020 posted by

Lighter Makes Righter – 1987 Ducati 750 F1B

Ducati found its Taglioni-engined twins a good match for the fledgling Formula TT series, and produced road and track versions.  This California example has apparently never seen the road, and not much of the track as evidenced by the unfettered condition.

1987 Ducati 750 F1B ( Racebike ) for sale on eBay

The F1 refers to its Tourist Trophy class, the 600-750cc segment of the race series which got its start when FIM decided the Isle of Man was too dangerous a venue.   As presented for the street, the F1 claimed 63 hp, with two valves per cylinder and 36mm Dell’Orto carbs.  The artfully crafted chrom-moly chassis and swingarm had Marzocchi dampers front and rear.  Brembo brakes are not oversized at 280mm, and the six-spoke alloy wheel sizes were staggered at 16 inch front, 18 rear.  The sub-400 lbs. weight came through judicious use of lightweight materials and drilling everything else.

Hard to expect a full ownership and maintenance history for a find like this though the seller does posit an odometer issue.  Can’t tell all from the pictures provided, but the finishes look excellent and lack the patina that not much actual use would provide.  Carburettors have been upgraded to 38mm Mikunis, and fuel plumbing had to be changed to accommodate.  From the eBay auction:

1987 Ducati F1B that was never titled for the road. The speedometer has 4 miles. I don’t believe it to be original miles. The 750 F1 was a factory prepped track bike that saw very little use. The paint is in beautiful condition and as you can see in the photos. Bike is fitted with a harness for track, with out a left side headlight switch. The bike starts and runs flawlessly. Carbs are Mikuni race 38 mm flatslides. The bike would need little work to return it to a road bike but at the end it is a original factory 750 F1. The frame paint shows no use and is in beautiful condition without any damage or scratches. The bodywork has some small spider cracks on the mono seat, fairing is in beautiful condition. The plastic windscreen shows a small crack visible in the photos.

Ducati started out in Formula TT with their 600 F2 under Tony Rutter, who laid down 4 consecutive championships.  The 750 F1 wasn’t quite so lucky, but has become an iconic model.  Special F1 editions commemorating wins at Montjuich, Laguna Seca, and Santamonica may have put Ducati on the path to continuing limited editions.  This F1B is a classic piece of exotica and has the ask to match – but looks worth a daydream or two.

-donn

Lighter Makes Righter – 1987 Ducati 750 F1B
MV Agusta May 25, 2019 posted by

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750

There are fast motorcycles, there are unique motorcycles, there are iconic motorcycles and there are truly beautiful motorcycles. The re-introduction of the fabled MV Agusta brand in 1999 seemingly achieved all those goals thanks to the vision of Massimo Tamburini and the might and wealth of the Cagiva Research Center.

2000 MV Agusta F4 750 for sale on eBay

Following the well-trodden path to sport bike glory, the MV Agusta F4 utilizes an in-line four cylinder engine with four-valve heads, fuel injection, and novel variable length intake runners to help control engine power across the rev range. Dubbed Torque Shift System (or TSS for short), that intake wizardry is one of two Formula 1 technologies utilized by the F4. The second is the oft-hyped hemispherical head chamber with 4-valves per cylinder. And while the hemi head and radially splayed four valves definitely maximize the airflow and flame front during combustion, neither are particularly new in terms of technology. All told the 750cc power plant was good for a stout 126 HP.

From the seller:
This motorcycle looks like is brand new…..it’s a model year 2000. 750 cc engine. sounds fantastic… bought it from the original owner who use to keep it in his own room…..always garaged and covered. it only has 3,900 original miles on it, it has good tires and all the fluids have been exchange recently. runs beautifully. it has quite a few carbon fiber pieces and the previous owner did some polishing on the engine cover, chain cover and foot pegs along with the rims… . too many things to list here. Look at the pictures and give me your thoughts about it. This one of a kind has to go to a good home. If you are looking for a unique, head-turner, clean bike, blast to ride, this is it….check what is available in the market!

In addition to the F1 technology, the F4 borrowed heavily from the fertile past of designer Tamburini. Both the single sided swing arm and the under seat exhaust are derivations of the Ducati 916 (which Tamburini also designed). The exhaust pokes out of the underside of the seat in a not-so-subtle fan out of four separate pipes, and sounds glorious. The rest of the bike relies upon yards of aluminum for the frame, beefy front forks (Showa), and a fair bit of carbon fiber flair.

The introduction of the F4 was a massive investment into technology, and the resultant bikes were as beautiful as they were fast. Limited production and high prices kept them to the exclusive territory of well-heeled riders or even better heeled collectors. Today they are available on the used bike market at more realistic prices – but still not cheap. This particular example is an early model with few miles (<4,000) and what appears to be a great deal of care bestowed upon it. With a Buy It Now price of $7,500, this bike is asking strong, but not outrageous money. The seller is open to offers, so there may be an opportunity to pull this down somewhat. With bikes of this caliber, prospective buyers would do well to find the cleanest, best example possible. I could do with less of the polished bits, but this 2000 MV Agusta F4 750 looks to be better than most we have seen in some time and is worth checking out. The full details are here. Good luck!!

MI

Beautiful Boy: 2000 MV Agusta F4 750
Cagiva November 16, 2018 posted by

9/16ths Scale: 1998 Cagiva Mito

Legendary motorcycle designer Massimo Tamburini had a long and storied career. From co-founding iconic motorcycle manufacturer Bimota, to penning some of the most striking designs in motorcycling history for the likes of Cagiva, Ducati and MV Agusta, Tamburini has been responsible for many a rider’s dream machine. You might have seen some of his design genius in bikes such as the Bimota KB2, the Tesi 1D and the DB1. For Ducati he was involved with the 851/888 and the Paso and had a hand in the Supermono works. But his greatest contribution to motorcycling – his most admired design theme – was around the Ducati 916. Everything that came after it was simply a small step along this theme – including the 748/996/998 and the entirety of the MV Agusta F4 lineup. So strong was this theme that the design language translated to smaller machines as well, which is where we pick up the story on today’s fantastic Cagiva Mito.

1998 Cagiva Mito 125 for sale on eBay

Powered by a single cylinder, liquid cooled two stroke, the 125cc Mito was considered as an entry level sport bike for Europe’s small-bore crazed culture. Popular in areas where larger capacity motorcycles are prohibitively expensive due to taxes or license requirements the smaller scoots are immensely popular and technologically advanced. In the case of the Mito, that technology includes design elements straight off of the legendary 916, including twin headlights and the tail section. Nifty hardware includes the twin-beam aluminum frame, asymmetrical rear swing arm with preload-adjustable rear shock, Brembo binders (that’s a single 320mm unit up front), 40mm Marzocchi front forks (including steering damper), 7-speed transmission and an estimated 34 HP (stock) at 12,000 RPM. Tipping the scales some 15 under 300 lbs, this is a race track replica rocket provided you are of suitable stature with the skills to keep the revs on the pipe.

From the seller:
This machine is virtually new as it only was ridden 399 km since its conversion from a stock 70mph (110 km) bike to one that will show 112 mph(180km) on the speedo.Its collectibility is enhanced by its 7 speed gearbox and of course the styling, which was done in the spirit of the Ducati 916.Being a 2 stroke machine,many states allow small displacement bikes plates for highway use or find a track site to enjoy this super handling lightweight. The mods we performed were not optimized for competition, but were done to keep the reliability and add to the enjoyment of the bike.Recently upgraded, cleaned fuel system,and new battery was fitted.

The seller claims this particular Mito has been hot-rodded, but not much info is included as to what was actually done. Generally this is done via boring out the displacement and porting the cylinder. Expansion chambers and silencers are other popular mods to help two strokes breathe better and make more power. Other than the unknown mods, this is a low mileage example that appears clean in the few, blurry photos. This has all of the hallmarks of an Evo I machine, with both the 7-speed gearbox and the tri-spoke wheels. Later Evo II models went to a more robust 6-speed gearbox and a different set of wheels. Any Mito is potentially collectible – after all we do not see them every day here in the US – but there is not enough data to determine if the 7 cog bikes are any more valuable than the 6 speeders. Either way you are in good company; even the vaunted Barber Motorsports Museum proudly highlights the Mito in their extensive collection.

This is not an auction, but rather a straight-up buy it now listing. Pricing is a fair $6,500 (especially for the low miles!), although the states in which you can register this bike might not be one in which you reside. Even if not used on this street, this little Mito will eat larger bikes alive on a tight and twisty track. Smart buyers are encouraged to check first, ask lots of questions, and do your homework. So who *doesn’t* want to have a mini-916 in their quiver? It’s great for show, and from the mods sounds like it is ready for some GO. Check it out here, and let your inner child racer run free. Good luck!

MI

9/16ths Scale:  1998 Cagiva Mito