Posts by tag: 650

Cagiva October 15, 2020 posted by

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650

In the twisted family tree that is the Italian motorcycle community, there are many merges and branches. One interesting area is the history of Cagiva and their relationship with Ducati. While Cagiva owned Ducati in the mid-eighties, they were initially a customer as they purchased engines & transmissions to create their own bikes. Today’s Cagiva Alazzurra is such a beast, utilizing a sourced Pantah-based motor for power. In many ways these were seen as a poor man’s Ducati in North America – more exclusive than contemporary Japanese bikes, but with less cachet than other Italian exotics. Today the Cagiva Alazzurra is but a strange footnote for US buyers; once Cagiva took over Ducati they adopted the Ducati name as the stronger brand and the Alazzurra was discontinued.

1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650 for sale on eBay

The heart of the Alazzurra is very similar to the powerplant that drives the Pantah, such as this week’s 600 model. Ducati produced the Pantah in different displacements, including 500cc, 600cc and 650cc (there was also a 750cc unit built for racing). In many respects, the Alazzurra could be considered a later derivation of the Ducati Pantah, as the 650cc engine was the latest evolution of the unit, with a frame design that was extremely similar to the Ducati bike. With 55 HP pushing 424 lbs (dry) the Alazzurra offered respectable performance for the time, but was typically slower than similarly sized Japanese offerings.

From the seller:
Very good condition. Has collector plates so insurance in BC is 150 bucks per year.New cam belts, braided lines, seals, including crankshaft oil seal, valves checked, oil , filter and plugs replaced, new grips , l.e.d headlight

The legend of the Pantah design long outlived the Cagiva brand in North America. Today the Alazzurra is more an oddity than a true collector’s piece, although time has a tendency to create rarity all on its own. And with 35 years gone by, the pool of well-kept imported Cagivas is shrinking. But the big question is if that helps with appreciation of the model – or its value. This particular example is located in Canada, and is offered for approximately $3,424 USD. That is actually below the MSRP for the bike when it was new. But the Alazzurra does not have as strong a following as other Cagiva/Ducati models; it is seen by many as more of a novelty than an icon. Still for many riders this was a close to a Ducati as finances would permit during this time, creating a bit of nostalgia. Do any RSBFS readers fall into that category? There are not a lot of details available on this one, but you can check it out here. Let us know what you think about the Alazzurra, and good luck!!

MI

Alluring: 1985 Cagiva Alazzurra 650
Rickman December 28, 2019 posted by

Between Successes – 1974 Rickman Triumph 650 CR

Rickman-framed cafe racers have had a steady if not frequent presence on RSBFS, but mostly using Honda CB750 and Kawasaki Z-1 drivetrains.  Just before, they had produced but a few dozen Triumph powered CR’s.  This diamond in the rough has been in storage since just 3,000 miles, and is ready for a makeover.

1974 Rickman Triumph 650 CR for sale on eBay

Derek and Don Rickman made their name designing and fabricating beautiful and world-beating frames for the scramblers they loved, the lightweight and nickel-plated chromoly tubing being a usable showpiece.  They turned their attention toward the street starting in 1970, and provided the recently nationalized BSA-Triumph a market for their T120 twin of 46hp.  The twin carbs and factory 5-speed were good news, and Rickman added alloy rims and disk brakes, as well as large-diameter forks.  Careful fabrication was Rickman’s calling card, with lovely fiberglass work augmenting the frame.

Undeniably tired and ready for the next chapter, this CR appears substantially complete.  The pittance of miles will have to be swept away in a flurry of renovation, but the new owner will have a beautiful rarity when complete.  A thoughtful test rider or British specialist will be required with the right-side shifter, left foot brake.  Comments from the eBay auction:

RICKMAN CR TRIUMPH   1 0F 53 BUILT
BIKE HAS BEEN STORED FOR YEARS WITH LOW MILES
READY FOR RESTORATION
HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER MODEL
ENGINE TURNS WITH GOOD COMPRESSION
ORIGINAL ALLOY CHAINGUARD IS INCLUDED
MISSING THE FRONT BRAKE MASTER CYLINDER (SAME AS TRIUMPH T140 SO EASY TO FIND)
TITLED AS A 1979 SPECIAL WHEN THE ORIGINAL TITLE WAS LOST IN 79

Rickman won the Queen’s Award to Industry for their exports in 1974, but had to change horses when Norton-Villiers-Triumph could not resolve their labor troubles and were forced into liquidation.  Before that the Bonnies had been a big success so basic mechanical parts for this CR should be easy to source.  With its long lost history it’s a soup-to-nuts project, but a worthwhile endeavor in this complete and seemingly undamaged example.

-donn

Between Successes – 1974 Rickman Triumph 650 CR
Ducati December 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah

Update 12.2.2019: This bike is now on eBay. -dc

This is the first of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Rare to the point where this might be the first 650SL to grace RSBFS, this 1984 model has been restored to museum condition and is ready for spotlights and close-up viewing.

1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah for sale

In an interesting turn of the rulebook, Ducati produced the 650SL to homologate the 61.5mm stroke for the planned 750cc race machine.  The extra torque provided by the lengthened stroke was a welcome addition to the originally 500cc engine, and claimed 63 hp at 8,500 rpm.  Still considered part of the first generation of Ducati belt-driven cam engines, the twin used dual 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors.  The model’s smaller-displacement origins are divulged by the 35mm Marzocchi forks and 260mm dual front disks.  The trellis frame with engine as a stressed member helped keep dry weight under 400 lbs., remarkable for the day.  The very trim monoposto fairing was retained from the 600SL, and finished in Ducati’s yellow over red race livery.

In private hands of Stuart Parr Collection, this 650SL was treated to a comprehensive restoration, and updated with a two-into-one Staintune exhaust.  Comments from the curator:

The 650 Pantah was built specifically to homologate Ducati’s TT1 750 engine which used a 61.5 mm stroke. Instead of producing a production 750 road bike, the 650SL was created with an 82mm bore and the required 61.5mm stroke, thus complying to the governing bodies homologation requirements. The 650’s bodywork is virtually identical to the 600, but it was painted in the now famous TT2 color scheme of red and yellow. Other minor differences were a different instrument layout and some other cosmetic minor changes, but it had far more torque, and that was a big improvement.

Only 288 650SL’s were ever produced; enthusiasts and collectors alike have doubled the 650’s value over the past half a decade alone, actions that have cemented this model’s security as being a sound investment for the future. This example has been restored to stunning condition with gorgeous paintwork and finishes throughout. A Staintune 2=1 exhaust system and corresponding jetting was utilized, otherwise a stock bike. Fresh tires and zero post-restoration mileage.

The 650SL can also be viewed on the collection’s website – here -.

The new two-valve desmo engine sparked the interest of the Castiglioni family, which took an ownership role at Ducati and likely saved the company.  Desmoquattro engines were just around the corner and a string of Superbike World Championships just over the horizon.  Significance and rarity off the scales, the 650SL is the Pantah for a knowledgeable fan.  The collection is selling to make way for new acquisitions.  Inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah
Yamaha November 18, 2019 posted by

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo

The Turbo years were the wild west for technology mavens in the motorcycling world. For only a few short years did this persist, but while it did the space race was on! Every one of the Big Four came up with at least one turbocharged model, and each had its unique position in the market. Each had its own unique strength. And all had a common weakness. The 1982 Yamaha Seca Turbo was no different. Not the first of the factory turbo bikes – and definitely not the last – the Seca Turbo was the typical middle child. In many ways Yamaha jumped onto the turbo bandwagon with a #MeToo bike, but their interpretation of the breed did produce an interesting motorcycle. As far as factory turbos go, the Yamaha Seca 650 Turbo was a low-tech, low-buck affair. The whole Yamaha approach was a check-box effort, allowing them to play in this important space while presenting the least amount of risk. As such, the Yamaha Turbo is perhaps the least collected of the Big Four factory bikes. But that does not mean it is not worth a look.

1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

While Honda flexed their technological muscles (and deep cash reserves) in the creation of the liquid-cooled, computer-controlled CX500 Turbo, Yamaha warmed over the existing Seca with relatively little fanfare. Air cooling was the order of the day, as was the brace of carburetors. The turbo itself – a teeny-tiny 39mm unit from Mitsubishi – produced a meager 7-ish pounds of boost and was arranged in a “blow through” scheme to avoid the cost and complexity of fuel injection. The heads were new to provide for better airflow, although the bottom end was a modified version of the existing 650. Internals were strengthened, additional oil galleys were added for lubrication and cooling, and forged pistons were utilized. All told, the Seca was rated for approximately 90 horsepower (good for a quarter mile in the mid to high 12s).

From the seller:
Hi I’m selling my 1982 XJ650LJ Seca Turbo. Its in great shape. Replaced left front linker Lens with New OEM. The windshield has a small crack but does not affect function. Rebuilt Turbo, been sitting to long. Low miles.
Complete Service done. Oil Change, Spark Plugs, Carbs Rebuilt ETC ETC.

The real effort on the Seca Turbo was expended on the styling aspect. This bike practically screamed “futuristic missle,” even if the performance didn’t quite back it up. It did look the part, at least in 1982. Today it appears a bit dated, much like a Seca with a funky fairing on it. The underlying chassis was straight from the normally aspirated 650 Seca, although the Turbo did benefit from air assist forks up front, and an air shock in the back. That was relatively high tech for the times. At over 500 pounds dry, nobody would mistake the Seca for a sport bike, but testers in the day indicated that the Yamaha had minimal turbo lag and managed the twisty bits as well as its contemporary peers.

If all this sounds like I’m panning the Seca Turbo, let me set you straight: While the bike did not live up to the performance of the latter factory turbos such as the XN85, the CX650T or the mighty GPz750 Turbo, the Seca is still a good motorcycle and a great example of the experimentation that took place during this phase of motorcycle development. These are unique and fun motorcycles to ride, and certainly something you won’t see very often at your local bike night. The Seca Turbo – like all turbos – are relatively rare due to the fact that they were not big sellers. Time passed them over quickly, and by 1984-85 that party was over. This particular Seca Turbo looks to be in extremely decent condition for a rider, sports relatively low miles, and has been under the care of a turbo fan. The price is downright C.H.E.A.P. for such a unique bike, with a Buy It Now price of only $3,750. Check it out here, and get your boost on. Good Luck!!

MI

Buck Rogers: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo
Yamaha May 11, 2019 posted by

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo

Someone bought-it-now Friday afternoon – a reader ?   -donn

It was a short bandwagon but early 1980’s was the time for early turbo systems, and Yamaha developed the XJ-650 Turbo but resisted the urge to break the bank.  This Phoenix example is quite clean with just a couple of foibles and barely 10,000 miles.

1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

Using a relatively low-tech two valve four as a base, the blown 650 used carburetors instead of injection and was rated for 90 hp and 60 ft-lbs. torque.  The YICS intake control system capitalized on the speed of the charge air to improve combustion.  Air cooling limited boost to 7.7 lbs., adding a gentler push than some of the competition.  Exhaust is simplified with one muffler dedicated to the wastegate, emissions kept quieter in the other single muffler.  Despite the higher speeds and weight of the turbo bike, brakes weren’t upgraded from the normally aspirated model.  Styling was one area where the Seca Turbo excelled, with and integrated fairing with a sport touring windscreen and locking glove boxes.

Averaging nearly 20 years for each of its two owners, this XJ650 Turbo has been only occasionally ridden, and looks very good.  The undamaged fairings, pipes, and cases far outweigh the worn stitching and tired trim shown in the owner’s video – here –.  Comments from the eBay auction:

I’m selling my 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo.  Low Miles, 10,100  Miles.  Excellent Condition.  2nd owner.  This is the same type used in the James Bond Movie never say never.  Recently serviced.  Runs great!  I also created a video of it running and  a walk around.

James Bond’s stunt double shredded a Turbo in a chase scene early in 1983’s – Never Say Never Again – but the real Seca had a less sporty rep.  The turbo era fizzled shortly afterward, along with a drop in fuel prices.  But each solution had their good points – Yamaha’s showed how 25% more power could be achieved with relative simplicity.  As presented, it’s a lot of bike for the fan, and for the buy-it-now.

-donn

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo
Laverda July 1, 2015 posted by

1st time on RSBFS: Laverda Black Strike 668 in the UK

blackstrike2

Here is one we haven’t had on RSBFS previously, a Zane-era Laverda 668 Black Strike.   The Black Strike model incorporated all the top shelf goodness of the Laverda marque at the time; a Nico Baker designed frame, 3 sets of brembro brake calipers, Marchesini wheels and a letterbox gas tank that reduces the center of gravity (which is still pretty advanced after 14 years). And the fact that you can still get a Zane-era Laverda for reasonable money whereas a lot of Breganze-era bikes have begun to appreciate beyond the reach of us mere mortals is another plus.

Note:  For anyone not familiar with the Zane-era vs Breganze-era Laverda models, click here for a brief overview.

blackstrike3

Laverda 668 Black Strike in the uk

The black strike edition was a kind of a one-off within the Zane-era lineup; the air-cooled 668 engine and Nicco Baker designed frame were from the 668 sport model, while the seating and gauge clusters where from the the 668 ghost. The 668 black strike was also the first model with the lighter plastic gas tank, straight exhausts without the restricted collector box and also offered a few bits of optional carbon fiber such as exhausts and optional front fender/mudguard.

This particular Zane-era Laverda 668 black strike looks to be in excellent but not pristine condition.  I can see some minor bits of weathering included some fading in the small side cover panel above the id plate, what looks like some dried polish or flaked off paint on the riders right engine cover and some evidence of brake fluid removing paint on the Marchesini rear wheel.

On the plus side, the pillion cover is in place and looks to be in good condition and the seller indicates both the standard and carbon fiber versions are included for both the front fender/mudguard and exhaust. This is important since all 3 items are pretty much unobtainable nowadays. Also while the “rabbit-ear” standard mirrors are missing from the pics, the seller indicates these are included and the often missing rear plastic hugger/mudguard is in place.  Lastly the seat condition, lack of bubbling in the dash light decals and lack of rust on the dash nuts/bolts all seem to indicate proper storage away from both the hot sun and damp during non-riding time.

blackstrike6

Here is what the seller has to say:

  • Has done 17,235km,
  • Currently has the front carbon mudguard on but I have the original in great nick that comes with it,
  • Also have the original exhaust pipes but currently have the carbon exhausts on.
  • There is a carbon windshield that is with it that I thinks off a ghost legend.
  • Side mirrors are with it but I preferred it without.
  • Battery currently not with bike but will be added before sale.
  • Had a new speedo cable 100km ago, new oil just put in.
  • Rear tire has done 200km (maybe just less, looks like new), front had good tread also.

Note:  The seller lists this as a 2001 but the black strike model was produced from 1997-1998.   Email messages with the seller indicates that the 1st registration was 2001 hence the date.  I would guess this bike is actually stamped a 97 or 98 on the manufacturers id plate which is mounted on the riders right side but was probably in a showroom for a few years (Three Cross or Slater Bros dealerships perhaps?) and was only sold after Laverda was absorbed by Aprilia/Piaggio.

blackstrike5

Is this Zane-era Laverda 668 black strike worth the 3,400GBP asking price?  Well only 50 668 Laverda Black Strikes were produced and since Laverda is now a mothballed marque within Aprilia/Piaggio this is definitely a rare bike.  But the 668cc air cooled engine produced about 70 bhp so its not going to blow the doors off any other bike and some zane-era bikes have had reliability issues with electrics and cranks so the status of these items which would need to be factored in to the price.

To be honest, I think the the current asking price is a bit high but not outragously so.  While the Zane-era laverdas seem to be starting to appreciate, I think the value for this right now is probably closer to 2400-2850GBP.   I do think these will appreciate in value going forward so the bike may be of interest for a UK-based collector looking to add a bit of Zane-era exotica to their collection.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Addendum:  I feel it only fair to let readers know that I have a restored 668 Black Strike in my personal collection.

1st time on RSBFS:  Laverda Black Strike 668 in the UK
Cagiva January 11, 2015 posted by

Mellow Yellow: 1986 Cagiva Alazzurra 650/GT

Alazzurra_650_GT_3

Cagiva Alazzurra models have long since been considered bargain Ducatis. Much as Nissan is to Datsun (hopefully I haven’t lost our younger readers), Cagiva was the parent brand to Ducati following bankruptcy of the Bologna manufacturer back in 1985. But even before then, Cagiva purchased engines directly from Ducati for some models of their line-up. By the late 1980s, Cagiva decided that the Ducati brand was stronger outside of Italy, and the US distribution of Cagiva models dried up. While Cagiva shared Ducati componentry, the bikes themselves were manufactured in separate facilities. Thus the Cagiva/Ducati tie-ins can be confusing. Since Cagiva owned Ducati, used many of the same components and were built under the same parent company, perhaps Fiat – Ferrari would be the better comparison. Regardless, the pedigree is there and these are indeed unique Italian machines generally at a price point below that of a commensurate Ducati model.

1986 Cagiva Alazzurra 650 GT for sale on eBay

Alazzurra_650_GT_1

From the seller:
1986 Cagiva Alazzurra 650/GT

Very well maintained and restored piece of Ducati History for the price of a run of the mil Japanese sport bike. Only around 200 of these were imported into the United States. This is a 650 cc, proven L twin Ducati motor in a Cagiva Alazzurra frame. Equipped with Marzochi forks and shocks. Brembo disk brakes front and rear and great sounding buds exhaust. This bike need nothing and is ready to ride.

Alazzurra_650_GT_2

This late model Alazzurra looks great in full bodywork. The seller has included only a few, artsy pictures. I must admit the black/white/yellow pics look sharp, but I want to see more! This striking bike is located in Oregon, and has the BIN set at $4,500. The auction is currently sitting at less than half of that, with reserve still in place. Check it out here and be sure and let us know what you think!

MI

Mellow Yellow: 1986 Cagiva Alazzurra 650/GT
Yamaha August 18, 2013 posted by

Rare Bird: 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo

Seca_Turbo_1

If Rodney Dangerfield comes back to us reincarnated as a motorcycle, this would be his gig. All the right pieces, no respect. Built in the early 1980s and riding the fad wave of boosted power, the Seca Turbo simply never had a serious mission. Based off of the namesake Secas of the Yamaha lineup, these bikes were the poster children of the UJM. Whereas Honda followed the sport tourer route, Suzuki went for the sportbike and Kawasaki sought to own the strip with performance, Yamaha went the bland route and built the Seca. With the lowest boost and least performance of all the factory Turbo bikes, the Seca was a bit unloved.

1982 Yamaha XJ650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Seca_Turbo_17

None of the factory Turbo bikes sold well in the showroom. Expensive and complicated, heavy and lacking performance, the Turbo hype could not match reality. Yamaha stayed in the game longer than any other manufacturer, and as such produced more bikes than the others. Unfortunately, finding a clean Seca Turbo is rare; these are all too often trashed and discarded as oddities. That makes this 1,250 mile example pretty special. Because once the hype of the Turbo era was over, the reality was that the Seca made for a reasonable mount. If you don’t expect Hyabusa power or Panigale handling, the Seca will offer a unique experience in its own right.

Seca_Turbo_5

From the seller:
This is one of the nicest all original extremely low mileage Yamaha Seca Turbo motorcycles you may ever come across in excellent overall condition 9 of 10. Everything works as it should mechanically & electrically functioning 100% & is cosmetically as nice as I’ve seen outside the showroom in the 80’s. It has always been stored in a climate controlled environment. I am an avid car & motorcycle collector. This is the nicest riding of all the Turbo era bikes I have (all but the Suzuki XN85). It has never been down or damaged. The previous owner replaced the fork seals & tires due to age. Oil & filter recently changed and a battery tender plug-in has been added for ease of keeping on the tender in my building as I do all my bikes & cars. It has been tuned with new plugs, valve adjustment, needles & seals. The only issue I am aware of whatsoever is that if I don’t ride it on occasion, the check valve may stick which forces oil into the turbo and gets dumped out the wastegate left-hand side exhaust slight drips. Bike is always stored on the center stand with gas petcock turned off as recommended by the Yamaha Turbo Forums.

Seca_Turbo_18

This bike is available via auction with a starting price of $3,495. Seca Turbos have not significantly risen in value over the years, and we have seen clean examples change hands in the $5-6k region. This particular bike looks to be in great shape, and the low miles and collector storage has certainly helped to preserve this example. Click the link to jump over to the auction and check it out. While you’re there, take a gander at some of the other cool stuff this seller has in his stable!

MI