Search Results for “mc21”

Warning!

We have 15 years of archives. Please note that posts over a year old may have been updated to point to similar bikes available to bid on eBay.
Honda September 21, 2018 posted by

Kwaai – 1991 Honda NSR250SP in South Africa

What would it take for you to brave the scary monsters just over the horizon ?  Maybe a later NSR250SP (MC21) in excellent original condition ?  This one hails from faraway Cape Town, is in rare Pentax replica livery, and the owner promises shipping to CONUS that looks like a bargain.

1991 Honda NSR250SP / MC21 ( South Africa ) for sale on eBay

Honda had been making the NSR250R since 1987 with yearly updates passed down from race engineering.  Though power was limited by  statute to 45 hp, the 249cc L-twin was capable of nearly 60 hp with an HRC or updated card for the PGM-III programmed ignition system.  The alloy twin-spar chassis and 41mm air-adjustable forks, along with the Pro-Link rear monoshock could easily cope with more.  The MC21 brought the “gull arm” asymmetrical swingarm, which allowed the expansion chamber to wend its way offside and increased ground clearance.  The Sport Production edition was a rarity with racey bits like a dry clutch, cartridge gearbox, and magnesium wheels.

Showing just under 4,500 miles on its km odometer, this NSR looks unrestored and excellent.  From the condition, an occasional ride with an adult aboard would be my speculation.  Not enough use to require any major work, though some matching rubber would be nice before the next ride.  Unfortunately, no notes about de-restricting the engine.  From the eBay auction:

Extremely rare original Pentax Honda NSR250 MC21 SP.
Dry clutch, Magnesium wheels and adjustable suspension comes as standard on this SP model.
All original parts which even includes the original honda toolkit and passenger seat.
Worldwide shipping is available at affordable low cost.

Around Cape Town kwaai has two meanings: normally angry or bad-tempered, but urban slang takes it in a tough or cool direction.  The NSR250SP also has a split personality, loafing around below the powerband, but hang on once you get the tach pointed north.  Back when everyone had a camera that didn’t text or surf, Pentax sponsored Honda’s racing team, though the livery looks peculiar today.  There’s a fairly steady stream of grey small-sports but this one has lowish miles and no damage or corrosion.  Shipping and importation will be a project, and it might be worth enlisting an expert, but looks to be worth the effort…

-donn

Kwaai – 1991 Honda NSR250SP in South Africa
Kawasaki April 21, 2018 posted by

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

They’re relatively rare here in the US, even in states with lax registration requirements, but late 80s and early 90s quarter-liter two-strokes were pretty widely available elsewhere in the sportbiking world, considering their narrowly-focused role and limited audience. Kawasaki was largely absent from the intense class rivalry during that period, though. Their earlier KR250 was out of date compared to something like the original TZR and they didn’t have a real competitor ready until 1988 when the Kawasaki KR-1 and the sportier KR-1S were introduced.

The KR-1 was discontinued in 1992, without any significant updates and well before the others in the class. Just 10,000 were built, making it a pretty rare sight outside Japan these days: Honda constructed more than ten times as many NSR250Rs! But although Kawasaki as a company didn’t seem like they’d gone all-in on the idea of going head-to-head against Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha, it wasn’t as if the KR-1S itself didn’t measure up.

Like most of its rivals, the KR-1S was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel twin and backed by a six-speed gearbox to exploit the razor-thin powerband although, also like its rivals, the Kawasaki did feature power-valve technology, here dubbed “KIPS,” to boost the midrange. Modern bikes with their ever-larger engines and horsepower numbers are increasingly equipped with electronic up-and-down shifters and autoblippers, but they really don’t particularly need them on the road, considering the available power. A quickshifter/autoblipper would get plenty of use on one of these, had they been available: there’s only so much you can do with just 249cc and the bike’s government-mandated 45hp, so dancing on the gear lever is a required, not optional activity when riding a little two-stroke.

The frame was the typical aluminum beam unit of the class and the suspension was good but, compared to other bikes in the class, the KR-1 was a bit… raw. Handling was “lively” and the bike managed a best-in-class tested top speed of 139mph. An engine balance shaft driven by the 180° crankshaft seems like it was the only concession to civility, and even that was probably justified as preventing vibration damage to the minimalist frame, rather than as a means to refine the experience of riding the wee beastie.

From the original eBay listing: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

The KR1S model here in the USA is one of the most rare of the Japanese 250 racer replica two strokes. If one can be found, it will usually be the green, white, and yellow bike. Sometimes the black and green bike, but never a factory genuine JDM Zeus Blue bike. These bikes were very limited in production. The factory Zeus Blue bikes differed from the export models in a few ways: indicators, mirrors, calipers, rotor center color, wheel color, all ID by the frame number. California titled and plated to its original VIN# Rare. Call Tim @714-746-5087 for more details.

When I purchased the bike a few years ago, I went onto the forums and found only a handful of original Zeus Blue KR1S models all overseas: one in Australia, one in the Netherlands, and one in the UK. I would go so far as to say this is the only one in the USA, and I know it’s the only one with a California title. This is THE rocking horse unicorn bike. To whomever buys the bike, you would be INSANE to remove the California title from the bike. That makes this bike so desirable. These bikes were ONLY JDM models never for export which is what makes them so rare. I have owned many many 2Ts (TZR, SPR, MC21, Rothmans, MC28, VJ23, V Model, Lucky, etc). These parallel twins really are amazing bikes. Having owned the four big Japanese manufactured bikes, to me there is no question Kawasaki is the most fun to ride. They literally are mad scientists and I LOVE IT! The KR1S was the fastest of all the 2T racer replicas. And if you know Kawasaki, they just built it and let it rip. Yamaha, Honda have their rev limiters, credit card ignitions, etc. Not Kawi. This thing will go all the way if you were to wind it out all the way. The sound of the parallel twin motor is simply the best. The cackling of the pipes. This bike has only had Motul 710 in it, runs fantastic, starts first kick, and purrs at idle. 18k miles on the clocks, float, gaskets, float valves all done, carbs serviced and cleaned, has Uni foam filter, new plugs, steering damper, factory toolkit, original key, etc. Clear California title in hand and current registration ‘til Jan 2019. Bike is for sale locally so the auction can end at any time. Thanks. Enjoy the ride…

Personally, I prefer my wild-haired Kawasakis to be vibrant green, and not the more civilized, metallic green they’ve been using on their modern, more sophisticated offerings. No, I want that lurid, fluorescent green of old. But this color scheme is exceedingly rare here, and that does count for something. Not to mention that it does look pretty sharp! The 18,000 miles indicated may not be stored-in-your-livingroom low, but the bike does appear to be you-could-eat-off-it clean and is in immaculate condition, with the very desirable California registration. And yes, the seller is correct that re-titling it in another state is absolutely a bad move financially: legitimately-titled two-strokes of this era are difficult to come by here, and there are plenty of well-heeled enthusiasts willing to pay extra for something they can legally ride.

-tad

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale February 17, 2018 posted by

Get Your Bike Listed on RareSportBikesForSale.com with a Featured Listing!

Featured Listings are Just $59 for 3 Months!

With spring fever just around the corner, it’s time to prep your Rare Sportbike from winter storage and make it available for sale. You know the routine: Fresh fluids, tires, and a tune up. Finish with a full detail and a photo shoot after it’s maiden 2018 run. Then it’s time to contact us about a Featured Listing on RareSportBikesForSale.com!

Read the rest of this post.

Get Your Bike Listed on RareSportBikesForSale.com with a Featured Listing!
Sales Report January 31, 2018 posted by

Sales Summary – September 2017

Late Summer / early Fall is one of the best times to move a bike; you’ve had all summer to ride, yet the weather is still good enough to make buyers interested in purchasing an outdoor toy. Late Summer 2017 was as good as it gets – the supply of bikes was great and the general quality was quite high (with a few interesting exceptions). Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let’s take a look back at September 2017 and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


Aprilia RS250 from Speedwerks – SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


2009 Aprilia RS125 – SOLD for $3,401


1999 Bimota SB8R – SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1992 Ducati Superlight – SOLD for $10,199


1983 Honda CB 1100F – SOLD for $6,900


1988 Honda CBR250R Hurricane – SOLD for $4,000


1990 Honda NSR 50 – SOLD for $3,050


Ex-Jim Granger 1990 Honda RC30 – SOLD as a Featured Listing! (pricing data not available)


1994 Honda CBR900RR – SOLD for $4,990 after relisting


1996 Honda NSR250R SE – SOLD for $8,550


1990 Honda CBR250RR from Deftone Cycles – SOLD as a Sponsored Listing! (pricing data not available)


1990 Honda CBR1000F – SOLD for a bargain $2,247


1990 Honda NSR250 MC21 – SOLD as a Featured Listing for $6,350!


1975 Kawasaki Z1 with Blake turbocharger – SOLD for $4,150


1977 Kawasaki KZ1000 – SOLD for $1,526


1992 Kawasaki ZX-11 – SOLD for $3,000!


1995 MZ Skorpion Replica – SOLD for $5,500


1990 Suzuki RGV250SP – SOLD for $9,655!


2000 Daytona 955i – SOLD for $3,202


1993 Yamaha FZR250R – listed as SOLD for $2,181


2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 – SOLD for $5,000

Unsold Bikes


1984 Bimota SB4S – No sale with bids up to $14,600


2007 BMW R1200S – No sale and zero bids at $3,000


1991 BMW K1 – No sale and zero bids at $5,500


2012 EBR 1190RS Carbon Edition – No sale at $26,500


1980 Ducati Super Sport – No sale at $35,500


1992 Ducati 750SS – No sale at $3,000


2004 Ducati 998 Matrix Reloaded Edition – No sale at $11,000


2005 Ducati 999R – No sale at $24,000


2007 Ducati SportClassic 1000SE – No sale at $17,500 with listing ending early


2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR – No sale; listing cancelled


2008 Ducati Monster S4RS Tricolore – No sale at $13,995


2008 Ducati 1098R – No sale at $19,995


1986 Honda GB400 – No sale and zero bids at $1,999 opening ask


1990 Honda CBR250RR – No sale at $4,850


1991 Honda VFR400R – No sale at $4,399


1993 Honda NSR250R SE – Listing ended early with a $11,500 ask


2007 Honda CBR1000RR Repsol – No sale at $10,500


2014 KTM RC8R – No sale at $8,300 and 9 bids


1993 Moto Guzzi Daytona – No sale at $10,000


2004 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 – No sale with listing ended by the seller and bids up to $20,000


1999 MV Agusta F4 Serie Oro – No sale with bids up to $17,000


2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna 1000R – No sale and zero bids with a $14,000 opening ask


2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910R – No sale at $6,499


1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo – No sale at $7,000


VIN #1, Engine #1 1985 Suzuki GSXR 1100 – No sale (listing cancelled) at £150,000


1986 Suzuki GSXR-750 Limited Edition – No sale at $20,000


1995 Suzuki GSX-R750 – No sale and zero bids at $3,000


1992 Yamaha TZR250 3XV – No sale at $8,500

Sales Report January 6, 2018 posted by

Sales Summary – June 2017

Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let’s take a look back at June 2017 and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


2009 Aprilia RS125 – SOLD for $4,200


1992 Ducati 400SS – SOLD for $5,050


1993 Ducati 888 SPO – SOLD for $10,100


2001 Ducati 996 SPS – SOLD as a Featured Listing (pricing data not available)


2006 Ducati Paul Smart 1000LE – SOLD as a Featured Listing (pricing data not available)


1990 Honda NSR250R SE – SOLD for $4,200


1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 – SOLD as a Featured Listing (no pricing data available)


1993 Honda NSR250R SP MC21 – SOLD for $6,500


1998 Honda VTR1000F – SOLD for $3,401


2002 Honda NSR150SP – SOLD for $3,900


2002 Moto Guzzi V11 Le Mans – SOLD for $7,732


1996 Suzuki RGV250V Lucky Strike – SOLD as a Featured Listing (no pricing data available)


1988 Yamaha FZR750RU – SOLD as a Featured Listing


1996 Yamaha YZF-750R – SOLD for $4,025


2006 Yamaha YZF-R1 LE – SOLD for $12,967

Unsold Bikes


1982 BMW-Krauser MKM 1000 #130 – No sale with a $28,000 opening ask


1999 Ducati M900 Cromo – No sale with bids up to $7,995


2003 Ducati 999S – SOLD for $8,900


2008 Ducati-NCR Mike Hailwood TT – No sale with bids up to $74,600


1982 Hesketh V1000 – No sale with bids up to $14,900


1983 Honda CX650 Turbo – eBay Listing removed early


1984 Honda Nighthawk S – No sale at $4,999


1990 Honda CB-1 – SOLD for $2,475


1986 Kawasaki GPZ900R – No sale at $6,750


2013 KTM 1190 RC8R – No sale with bids up to $12,995


2006 Moto Guzzi MGS-01 – No sale with bids up to $22,300


2006 MV Agusta F4CC – No sale with a $50,000 ask.


1986 Suzuki RG500Γ – No sale with a $30,000 ask


1988 Suzuki RGV250 VJ21A – No sale and zero bids with a $3,500 opening ask


1996 Suzuki RGV250SP VJ23A – No sale at $9,400


2001 Suzuki TL1000R – No sale at $7,500


1984 Yamaha RZ500 – No sale with a $9,999 opening ask


1990 Yamaha FZR600 – No sale with a $4,000 opening ask


1991 Yamaha TZR250 – No sale with bids up to $5,501

MI

Sales Report October 30, 2017 posted by

Sales Summary – March 2017

Whether you are a collector or simply interested in values, let’s take a look back and see what sold and for how much. Links to the original post on RSBFS included.


SOLD Bikes


1976 Honda EGLI frame kit – SOLD for $8,400



1978 Kawasaki Z1-R – SOLD for $9,500



1982 Ducati Pantah 600TL – SOLD for $9,500



1983 Benelli SEI 900 – SOLD for $10,785.75



1984 Kawasaki GPz750 – SOLD for $4,310



1984 Yamaha RZ500 – SOLD for $11,200



1990 Ducati 750 Sport – SOLD for $4,500



1990 Honda CB-1 – SOLD for $3,100


1990 Honda CBR250RR MC22 – SOLD for $7,075



1990 Honda NSR250R MC21 – Featured Listing that SOLD in just two days!



1991 Bimota YB9 Bellaria – Listed as SOLD for $4,050



1991 Ducati 851 – SOLD for $9,050



1994 Honda CB1000 – SOLD for $2,800



1998 Yamaha R1 – SOLD for $6,995



Featured Listing – 2000 Kawasaki ZX-12R – SOLD!


2004 Aprilia RS250 L Rear
2004 Aprilia RS250 Challenge – SOLD for $12,400


Unsold Bikes


1977 MV Agusta 800 Super America – No Sale – bid up to $45,655


1982 Benelli Sei 900 – No Sale – bid up to $18,000


1982 Laverda Jota 1000 – No Sale – bid up to $14,609


1983 Bimota KB3 – No Sale with a $18,000 opening ask


1986 Ducati 750 F1 – No Sale with bids up to $10,905

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-r-front
1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition – Listing ended with a $13,500 opening ask


1986 Yamaha TZR250 – No Sale with a $3,800 ask


1988 Ducati 851 Tricolore – No Sale with a $31,900 ask


1988 Suzuki GSX-R750 – No Sale with bids up to $4,850


1988 Yamaha FZR400 – No Sale with a $7,500 ask


1990 Buell RS1200 Westwind – No Sale with a $7,500 opening ask


1994 Honda RC45/RVF750R – Listing ended early


1996 Moto Guzzi Sport 1100 – No Sale with bids up to $5,000


1998 Ducati 900SS FE – No Sale – bid up to $5,300


1998 Ducati 900 SS/CR – No Sale with a $3,500 opening ask


1999 Ducati 748RS – No Sale with zero bids and an opening ask of $13,499


2000 MV Agusta F4 750 – No Sale with an $8,800 opening ask


2001 Yamaha FZ-1 – No Sale with zero bids and an opening ask of $3,400


2002 Ducati MH900E – No Sale – bid up to $20,300


2003 Kawasaki ZRX1200 Custom – NO Sale with zero bids with a $9,500 ask


2004 BMW R1100S – No Sale with $6,995 opening ask


2007 Honda CBR1000RR Nicky Hayden Edition – No Sale with bids up to $5,599

Honda October 10, 2017 posted by

The Last and the Best? 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

Sometimes, the very final version of a car or motorcycle is a pale shadow of the original, as the years inevitably add pounds and dilute the purity of what made the original example so desirable. But the Honda NSR250R went out with a bang instead of a whimper, at the top of its game, and is considered by many to be the best of the series. The MC28 might have put on a couple pounds compared to the previous MC21, owing largely to that very cool ELF-designed Pro-Arm single-sided swingarm that was heavier than the double-sided aluminum units that preceded it, but the bike was packed with cutting-edge technology.

There were three versions of the MC28, the standard R version, the SE that came with a dry clutch, and the SP that included the dry clutch and a set of lightweight Magtek wheels. This example is the regular R, but all MC28s are pretty special and come standard with that Pro-Arm swingarm, a 90° liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin and a six-speed cassette gearbox for easy, track-side gearing changes.

The two small combustion chambers were still filled by carburetors, but the charge was ignited by what was probably the most sophisticated electronic control system available on a motorcycle at that time. The fourth iteration of Honda’s electronic ignition was called, naturally, “PGM-IV.” The system took in sensor input from the throttle position, gear-selection, and rpm to create three-dimensional ignition maps for each cylinder and adjust Honda’s RC “Revolutionary Controlled” Valve for maximum power and response.

The biggest concern if you’re looking at a NSR250 is whether or not it has been de-restricted: power for the Japanese-market 250s was limited to just 45hp, and it can be very difficult to unleash the bike’s full potential without the HRC version of the ignition card that functions as the MC28’s key. The seller doesn’t mention whether or not this bike has already been de-restricted, but it’s worth a quick email to the seller as this will affect the value and desirability, especially for anyone interested in riding this little machine in anger.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale

This is a 94 Honda NSR250 MC28 v-twin 2-stroke sportbike with credit card ignition and only 6000 kilometers (3600 miles). 

Clean North Carolina title with the correct 11 digit VIN. These are quite rare to find in the US as they were originally only sold in Japan, and this is the lowest mileage example I have ever seen here in the US. It is completely stock and all the controls are tight and smooth as you would expect on a low mileage bike. I bought this bike in 2011 after it had been removed from storage, fluids changed/replenished, new tires mounted, and new chain installed. I start it up several times a year and ride it occasionally but I doubt I have put over 200 miles on it since I have owned it. I recently put a new battery in it and disassembled the carbs to clean the bowls and jets out.  It starts and runs as it should.  I don’t need to sell this bike but I have a lot of other toys and feel it is time to turn it over for someone else to enjoy if that person is out there. Tool kit is in place and I also have the passenger seat pad.  Rear stand and indoor cover is included.  Has one scuff on the right side of the tail section that has been touched up, and the rear of the right lower is discolored.  Other than that, very minor blemishes only.  Not really interested in any trades. 

Winning bidder must pick up bike in person in Charlotte, NC and pay in cash.  Title will be signed over at that time.  Willing to discuss shipping if you make all arrangements to have your carrier pick bike up at my house after all funds have cleared.

The Buy It Now price for this NSR250 is $10,000 which is reasonable for a nice, clean NSR250 with a US title. The MC28 included some of the most advanced technology ever available in the two-stroke 250cc class, and is thought of by many as being the best-looking of the breed, with the cool single-sided swingarm providing the visual flourish that seals the deal. Unfortunately, residents of states like California might be out of luck, as titling can prove impossible for a bikes less than 25 years old. Of course, if you “know a guy,” or “know a guy that knows a guy” then you can probably make that happen but, if you’re in a state where registering this might prove possible, it’s a huge help that this bike comes with a clean US title. Otherwise, maybe just buy it and display it for a couple years before you try to register it. Certainly, the last of the Honda two-strokes will only going go up in value.

-tad

The Last and the Best? 1994 Honda NSR250R MC28 for Sale
Honda September 16, 2017 posted by

Rothmans Replica: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale in Cali!

The gearhead culture in Southern California never ceases to amaze me. Sure, all kinds of weird and wonderful cars and bikes and the folks that love them can be found all over the country, and all over the world. But the intensity of it here is something else: you almost get blasé about it, since any weekend drive in the Los Angeles area will expose you to a veritable parade of exotic cars, vintage bikes, rat-rods, and all manner of weird, is-that-even-legal-here machinery. Oh look, was that Jay Leno driving a pre-war, aero-engined race car? Yes, yes it was… The irony is that the CA DMV is among the most draconian in the country, largely a result of a famously bad smog problem caused by vehicle emissions during the 60s, 70s, and early 80s. Which is why something like this Honda NSR250R SP Rothmans Replica with a clean California title is something of a unicorn!

The NSR250R was the definitive quarter-liter sportbike of the period, and featured Honda’s 90° liquid-cooled 249cc v-twin with a six-speed cassette gearbox that allowed gearsets to be quickly and easily swapped to suit different race tracks. Fuel was delivered via carburetors, but the ignition system was Honda’s sophisticated PGM-III that controlled the bike’s ignition based on throttle-position, revs, and gear selection. Note that the seller refers to this as an “SE” but the fairing proclaims it an “SP.” I’m assuming it’s the former, and the SP is there to match the Rothmans livery. The SE generally didn’t come with the Magtek wheels, but this one has them, bringing it up to SP spec, since both the SE and SP had the dry clutch, versus the regular NSR250R’s wet clutch.

I have seen a few late 80s and early 90s grey market two-strokes running around the Malibu canyons on the weekend, but still an MC21 done up in Rothmans livery is something to celebrate, especially in such sharp condition. From the description, it looks like the bike has undergone a cosmetic restoration, and looking at some of the photos, that restoration appears to have been more than just skin-deep. Appropriate maintenance has been taken care of for the new owner as well, and the bike appears to be ready to roll.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE Rothmans Replica for Sale

This is a beautifully restored 1993 Honda NSR250 SE Rothmans Replica MC21. This bike has the factory dry-clutch and adjustable suspension along with the Magtek wheels. This low 4490 mile (7226 Klm’s) NSR has just undergone a cosmetic restoration, as in: new bodywork, new wave-rotors, brake pads. 

Add-on’s include, a Tyga, GP style rear brake caliper hanger and a Brembo billet rear brake caliper, along with clear turn-indicators and tail light (adds a nice modern touch along w/the wave-rotors).

Also, freshly powder-coated Magtek wheels, with new Pirelli Diablo SuperCorsa tires. All hardware  has been re-zinc or re-chromed. Other items refinished include, the mufflers, fork bottoms, top triple clamp, etc..

Forks rebuilt with new oil and seals. All other fluids changed or flushed. Recent tune-up with new plugs, air-cleaner. De-restricted ECU. (Full power). Small scratch and chip on gas tank, (no dents). Comes with clean transferable (in your name) California title and street registered. (lic. plate off now for photos) Can help with shipping, but up to buyer to make all arrangements. 
There’s plenty of time left on the listing, but all my two-stroke LA peeps should pounce on this before it gets away! $11,500 seems a very fair price, considering the California title and the exceptional cosmetic and mechanical condition: many of the two strokes that populate the US eBay listings these days are recent arrivals from Japan where they’ve been affordable, thrashable, and often left out in the salty sea air for years, so surface corrosion and wear-and-tear are common, even on low-mileage examples. Obviously, the turn signals and tail light lenses seen here aren’t actually the original bits, but those shouldn’t be too hard to source if you’re after something completely stock. Whatever shenanigans are normally required to register an NSR in California should be largely mitigated here, and this bike should quickly be ready to draw stares and thrash canyons for the new owner!
-tad
Rothmans Replica: 1993 Honda NSR250R SE for Sale in Cali!

Subscribe by Email

Get every post delivered by email! Your information will never be sold or spammed.

FB Like Box

Support Our Sponsors!



  • 1987 Audi 5000CS quattro Avant
    Recently I looked at a 1987 Audi 5000CS quattro Avant project that I hoped someone would save. It ended up trading hands just under $2,000…
  • 1993 Mercedes-Benz 300E 2.8
    One of my favorite Mercedes-Benz nerd “fun facts” has to do with the 1993 Mercedes-Benz 300E. This chassis is quite possibly the most basic model…
  • 1995 Mercedes-Benz 350GD
    Once again the internet teaches me something new when I think I’ve seen it all. This is a 1995 Mercedes-Benz 350GD which is fixed with…
  • 1996 BMW 320i Touring
    Until the current model year, BMW’s “what if?” pantheon was generally reduced to a few paths. What if BMW had given us the full M…

Archives