Posts by tag: GSX-R750

Suzuki October 20, 2018 posted by

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki’s GSX-R750 revolutionized the sportbike game by bringing racebike handling and technology to the masses. There were obviously plenty of other sportbikes available at the time, like Honda’s VF1000F and Kawasaki’s GPz900R, but none seemed to capture the style of the era quite as well the Suzuki, with its endurance-racing bodywork and striking blue-and-white graphics. It didn’t hurt that it had the performance to back up the race-bred style.

Interestingly for a cutting-edge sportbike, the original "oil-boiler" GSX-R's engine almost seems like it was a step backwards, as it was not water-cooled. Instead, the GSX-R’s designers took a page out of Colin Chapman’s book, and used an oil and air-cooling system to save both weight and complexity. Luckily, they left out Lotus’ factory-installed mechanical and electrical gremlins… Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” used a high-capacity oil pump and a large oil-cooler to do the same job as a radiator, and the package made 112hp in the second-generation version seen here.

The second-generation of the GSX-R was introduced in 1988 and affectionately known as the “Slingshot,” owing to the unusual design of the semi-flat slide Mikuni BST36SS carburetors. The Slingshot actually had one less cc than the original bike, because of a more oversquare bore and stroke that resulted in 748cc. The updated engine could rev higher and made more power, but naturally less torque, and increased weight meant some customers weren’t especially happy about the change: the extremely rare homologation GSX-R750RK actually switched back to the original bore and stroke dimensions to restore some of the lost torque at the request of race teams.

The new version kept the oil-cooling though, and the perimeter aluminum frame, along with revised styling, suspension, and 17” wheels that make it look and perform more like a modern motorcycle. I’m not generally a huge fan of Japanese sportbikes, but the second-generation GSX-R750 and 1100 are on my short list of favorite motorcycles. Okay, it’s technically a pretty long list, but this is still a really cool bike.

I don't especially like the heavy four-into-two exhaust system seen here, but it is original and should add to the value for collectors. "Showroom condition" is an overused term and  is often applied to bikes that are very nice, but far from the way they rolled off the dealer floor. It shouldn't be subjective: aftermarket turn signals, exhausts, and even period-correct performance-upgrades technically disqualify a bike. But as a non-expert on Gixxers, this one looks like it might fit the description, or at least come pretty close.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Rare opportunity to obtain an original 89 GSX-R750 in mint condition with original exhausts and components. 

8880 miles from new, runs perfectly and needs nothing

Originally Purchased from local Suzuki Service Manager and collector, maintained in a climate-controlled garage. 

 One small scratch on the rear left tailpiece otherwise in excellent condition throughout.  

Recent tires and battery

No oil or gas leaks whatsoever, no stains, engine is smooth

Buyer responsible for shipping arrangements and costs. 

Please do not bid if you do not intend to purchase.

The curse of the "everyman sportbike" was the very reliability and affordability that made them so ubiquitous: most owners didn't bother to cherish them as they would a more exotic, or maybe more fragile machine, and they were ridden, flogged mercilessly, and discarded when they were worn out or when a new generation was introduced, then "customized" horribly by their second or third owners as the obsolete version became more affordable. These days, clean examples of Suzuki's oil-cooled GSX-Rs are quickly snapped up by collectors. Just a few years ago, you could get one of these for a few grand, but prices are shooting up quickly, especially for nice, low-mileage bikes like this one. Don't scoff too loudly at the $9,500 Buy It Now price, since bidding is already up above $7,000 with plenty of time left on the auction.

-tad

Clean, Low-Mileage Slingshot: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Suzuki May 22, 2018 posted by

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

"Ram air" was a very 90s gimmick with dubious benefits, especially on the road, but they gave bikes of the 1990s like this Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD a distinctive style, with oversized fairing nostrils and large intake tubes that curved through the rider's view and into the top of the tank to pressurize the airbox. Well "ram air" implies airbox-pressurization at least, but the reality in this case was more form than function. But that minor point aside, the new model was a significant milestone in the history of the Gixxer, and there are very few remaining in this kind of clean, low-mileage condition.

After generations that saw Suzuki's range of sportbikes getting more refined, but ever heavier and slower, the 1996 GSX-R750 SRAD and the smaller 600cc version finally reversed that trend. Suzuki's new Ram Air Direct model was really a complete overhaul of the existing GSX-R: an entirely new aluminum beam frame with claimed ties to Suzuki's GP bike replaced the cradle design, the liquid-cooled engine was narrowed by moving the cam-chain to the end of the block, and basically everything was made smaller and lighter, more compact. It debuted with a bank of carburetors, but the 1998 version seen here added fuel injection.

The result? A bike that was, marketing hype aside, as light as a contemporary 600: 395lbs dry, almost 45lbs lighter than the previous version, with a screaming, 128hp rev-monster motor and a very slick six-speed box that you really needed to abuse if you wanted to make good progress up to the new Gixxer's near 170mph top speed. But that wasn't a problem because the new Gixxer liked abuse. Fully-adjustable upside-down forks helped the bike handle and the six-piston calipers up front may have fallen out of fashion, but certainly look pretty trick.

No one I know seems to be able to clarify for me: do you say "es ar ay de" or do you say "srad" when talking about these bikes? When I ask people keep looking at me like, "Hey, I thought you were supposed to be the expert." However you say it, the SRAD is a nearly classic sportbike with the handling, if not the outright power, to take the fight to modern machines. But throw on some fresh rubber, modern brake pads, and a set of steel-braided lines, and this could be one fun bike with the performance to go with all that nostalgic 90s style.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 fuel-injected with only 8,000 actual miles! 100% stock. Adult owned! Looks and drives like new! Never dropped! Always in a garage! Has a factory Suzuki bike cover, rear seat, tie-down strips, color-coded tank bra. This is a must see! Turns heads wherever it goes!

I've spared you the all-caps listing and deleted a whole bunch of extraneous exclamation points. You can thank me later. The seller's enthusiastic writing style aside, this is a very clean bike with a clean title and just 8,000 miles. It'd probably be even more desirable in classic Suzuki blue-and-white, but I'm sure the more subtle red-silver-black seen here has its fans.

-tad

 

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale
Suzuki May 15, 2018 posted by

Sharp Slabbie Survivor: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Suzuki's GSX-R750 brought endurance racer performance to the masses. It may not have been the first bike to use a full fairing wrapped around lightweight aluminum monoshock frame and a four-cylinder engine, but it was the first bike to make that formula accessible to ordinary mortals, and it popularized the format. Prior to the GSX-R's introduction in 1985, you needed to be looking at something from a boutique manufacturer like Bimota if you wanted that kind of package, and those were far out of financial reach of most enthusiasts.

In a step that seems retrograde at first, the GSX-R used oil cooling instead of water. But this actually meant for a lighter, simpler package that was also easier to work on, meaning the potential loss in maximum power was a good trade off. A high-capacity oil pump and a system of oil jets dubbed SACS or "Suzuki Advanced Cooling System" helped keep things cool and that, along with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder, helped the bike produce a genuine 100hp.

This 1986 example would have been from the first year the bike was actually imported to the USA. Slim, right-way-up forks [with anti-dive!], 18" wheels and very skinny tires clearly date the bike, but it otherwise appears pretty shockingly modern, considering it is 32 years old. It does have a few minor blemishes and small cracks in the fairing mounts, but is otherwise about as perfect as you're likely to find outside a museum.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

For all those searching for an original, early GSX-R that wasn’t beat to hell or “modified” by some 18 yr old, here it is. All original everything in amazing condition. Miles are correct- no replaced speedo or set back to 0 after rebuild. Previous owner said the tires were original. Some scuffs, scratches and your typical stress cracks around the fairing bolts (as typical with these old Slabbies). Tank is beautiful, dent free and unlined. Exhaust/heat shield is perfect- (probably worth 2k in exhaust and tank alone if you can find them in this condition). A surface scratch approx 4-5” long on right side of tank (probably can be buffed out) and a few mm gouge on decal stripe on right tank side. Have a new tank decal kit if you’re going for museum quality restoration. Small (approx. 1/8”) plastic piece cracked on tail section cover, left side bottom shown in photo 17.  Some clear coat wearing off due to age near headlight cowling decals, photo 13. I tried to show everything, including flaws in the photos. In general, the paint is amazing. I took these photos in bright sunlight so some of the distortion you see is reflection. And I didn’t clean the bike and bathe it in armor-all for the photos. What you see is how it is after taking the cover off after several years. Never saw road salt or cinders- was previously a FL bike. 

I purchased this bike nearly 3 years ago, rode it approx 200 feet after it left the shipping truck, and parked it. Battery was removed and bike hasn’t been run since then. I just noticed some crusty brake fluid buildup that weeped from the front reservoir when taking these photos (4/23/18). Brakes should be bled, fluid replaced. I should have drained the carbs (but didn’t), so they may have to be cleaned.  

I bought a new GSX-R750 in '86, sold it when the military had me for 4 years, and purchased this one for more $ than what I paid new in 86’. If you want one of the nicest examples of the first true street -legal production race bike, and something that will hold its value, here’s your chance. More fun than a 401k too. I’m selling because after hitting the big Five-O mark, I’m more into dirt riding and the race replica style ergonomics don’t agree with my back and neck any more. Sold my Kawi triple, my GS1100, and Yamaha 2 strokes, and this is the last to go. PA antique title in my name. (Last owner was also older,  so bike was never abused).

Photos are part of the description ( **and no, the Shelby Cobra and KTM in the pictures aren’t included). I tried to include all the good and bad. If there’s any questions about things I may have missed, feel free to email and I’ll gladly answer. No outside CONUS shipping unless discussed prior to sale. I won’t crate and ship but I will work with your shipper. Bike located near Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, PA. Have your finances in order: if your bid wins, it’s yours. Non-refundable Pay Pal deposit due after auction. Bike and title won’t be released until all payments clear. Less than 10 positive transactions contact me first before bidding. In person examination can be arranged if desired. No low-ball offers please. Don’t waste my time or yours. I don’t need the cash, so if I can’t get what I’m asking, I’ll just keep it. If you can find one nicer and all original, go for it.  Thanks for looking.

Relisted because I ended it early due to not wanting to sell it the first time. My wife promptly changed my mind.

The asking price? $7,500 which is obviously on the high-side for a Slabbie right now, but not really out of line, considering the condition and originality. It wouldn't be all that hard to find a cheaper one, but minor blemishes aside, this one's in pretty exceptional shape.

-tad

Sharp Slabbie Survivor: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale April 11, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale

Update 7.3.2018: These bikes are sold and headed to their new owner. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Writing for this site, it's very rare I come across a bike that has me completely at a loss. I've got a great memory for weird motorcycles: Swallower-built Moto Guzzi with a girder front end and chain drive? Oh yeah, familiar with those. Wow, that's a Morbidelli V8? You mean with the original Pininfarina style, or the redesigned bodywork? Hey, look: a Dan Gurney Alligator in the flesh! I've only ever read about them... I'm generally at least passingly familiar with a pretty wide range of weirdo machines, even if I couldn't write a post about all of them without doing some research. But today's Featured Listing Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE? That's a new one on me.

Digging around the interwebs, there's not much out there about the bike that doesn't require Google Translate. No surprise, since just ten were supposedly made, and this listing includes two of them! The overall look of the Quattro 750 is "Japanese Bimota": the bodywork has a very late 80s YB7 vibe, and the hybrid trellis frame with machined aluminum side plates has hints of both the early SB and later YB models. No real surprise, since the bike was styled by Roberto Ugolini, who had a hand in several famous Bimota designs, including the Tesi 1D.

So who was Gallina Hayashi? Well the better question is, "Who were Gallina and Hayashi?" Roberto Gallina was a motorcycle racer who rode for several different Italian brands and went on to manage teams in Grand Prix and endurance racing, before moving into boutique road and race bike design. He was the brains of the project. The financial brawn came from Yoshiyuki Hayashi, a well-heeled and very passionate car and motorcycle enthusiast who wanted to fulfill every gearhead's ultimate dream: built their own vision of the perfect motorcycle.

The engine appears to be based on, or is at least inspired by, the Suzuki GSX-R750 as it uses a very similar cooling philosophy. The bike eschews water-cooling to save weight: the cylinders are air-cooled and the head is oil-cooled, although the fins on the Quattro appear to be more pronounced than on the GSX-R. Cases were magnesium to further reduce weight, and the Gallina Hayashi Quattro replaced the conventional timing chain with more precise gears to drive the camshafts. A dry clutch and six-speed gearbox from Suzuki put the claimed 130hp to the ground.

The initial production run of ten bikes proved to be the only production run, and all were hand-built, with slight variations between individual examples. Some were fitted with carburetors, although probably not the Keihin FCRs seen here. Other bikes were supposed to be equipped with fuel injection, but I'm not sure if any actually were actually built that way.

Honestly, there's more information in the customer's original post than I could find digging around the internet.

From the seller: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale

VIN#: A00007

Amongst all of Mike Canepa’s motorcycles, the most exotic and best storied bikes are the two Hayashi Gallina’s that he purchased from Rob Iannucci 20 years ago.

A brief back story of Roberto Gallina includes him as a team rider in the day for Benelli, Ducati and Laverda followed by team management in GP and Endurance Racing and onto design and production of numerous one off Superbikes and Race bikes out of his factory in La Spezia, Italy.

Yoshiyuki Hayashi was a Japanese well funded investor, owner of the Fuji Track, with deep support of different Japanese motorcycle and car teams and his own Grand Prix Motorcycle Collection. His dream became designing and producing his own motorcycle, turning to Gallina in Italy to express his vision. A quote of his was,

“Everyone is free to have a dream, however big it can be. How can a man without a dream be attractive? Once you, however, speak of it in the presence of others, you must make it come true with your efforts”

His is a fascinating story and for another time. This is about the ten motorcycles they created together, two of which sit in our shop for sale, the Hayashi Gallina Quattro 750 L.E. . Their mission, to create a motorcycle that ‘must be faster than the Japanese bikes and more fascinating than Italian motorcycles in old days’. Things were humming along very well when the Japanese economy collapsed in the “Great Recession” of 1990. Hayashi was deeply affected and was forced to withdraw his financial backing immediately, leaving only the ten motorcycles completed before the program imploded.

It is a pretty involved story about the creation the design and technical aspects of the bike and to be frank, I am not up to the task. There is a very well written article by Alan Cathcart in the November, 1990 issue of what I assume is Cycle that covers all of this in detail. We have a copy of the article that will go along with the bikes. To be frank, we are selling the bikes and in that context, history and details are too beyond my capacities to be correct or accurate. Buy the bikes, get the articles for free, become the expert!

So, the bikes ended up with Rob Iannucci of Team Obsolesce back in the early 1990’s. I have a bill of sale hand written on a scrap of paper showing frame number A00002 being sold for $60,000 in 1994. I do not know if that is when Mike got that bike and frame # A00007. It is not reflected anywhere in any of the paperwork that we have. What I was told by Mike was that he took A00007 to Carey Andrews in California and had Carey install the Gallina design dry clutch and flat slides. The odometer shows 18,064 kilometers. The A00002 bike shows 178 miles. There is no way to be certain either figure is accurate or actual.

What I can see and know about the bikes is that the engine was based on an air cooled Suzuki 750 with chain driven camshafts. Gallina recast the cases, the cylinders and the head, converting the camshaft drive to gear drive instead. The Trellis frame is obvious but the low mount rear shock with rising rate spring has to be seen by looking under the motorcycle. Looking over the images you can see all of the billet, machined components on the frame and steering assembly. After all, these were hand made, one off motorcycles. The best way to know what the bike is about is to look over the images.

And now they are for sale. A brief history since Mike owned them. They were not carefully stored. Nothing Mike had was carefully stored. The body work is scared and chipped from being moved around his shops over the decades. We spent some time cleaning A00007 but did not touch A00002. A00002 is missing the throttle control and front master brake cylinder and the body work is in rougher shape then A00007. Also, the ECM is held to the rear sub frame by electrical tape. Neither bike has a battery nor have we made an effort to start them. The fuel tanks smell terrible and we have no idea of the oil’s condition. What also comes with the bikes is a spare set of cases, cylinders and head as can be seen in the images. Everything that is included with the bike is shown, nothing more is available that we are aware of.

Each bike has an Oregon title of ownership reflecting the VIN number stamped in the frame by Gallina. A00002 and A00007. We do not know the mechanical condition or if all of the parts that made up these motorcycles are here. What is being sold is what is being shown. Stated mileage is what is being read off of the gauges mounted to the bikes and we are not stating that to be actual or accurate. What we are stating for a fact is that we have two of the ten bikes built for sale. You be the judge of what is here. But what an opportunity, a once in a life time chance to own something this special, this rare and this beautiful. The task is not for everyone, only for the individual who knows what he is looking at, knows what has to be done and has the same dream as Hayashi-san to make it happen.

The selling price for both bikes and the spare parts is $30,0000. Oregon titles of ownership will be supplied. For other interesting bikes and collectible vehicles, visit our web site http://www.automaniagp.com 541-479- 8888 or come by and see us at 895 SE Gladiola Drive, Grants Pass, Oregon, 97526. Oregon Dealer DA1287.

So neither bike is perfect, and both will require a mechanical refresh before they'd be ready to ride. But aside from the bodywork, I'd expect the rest can be repaired or replicated, and $30,000 for the pair sounds like a pretty fair price, considering the rarity. Sure, neither have any sort of legitimate racing history or proud factory lineage. But the Quattro's creators certainly had credibility to spare and, if you ever had the nerve to actually use one in anger, I expect they would perform as well as any of the homologation specials that grace our pages.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1990 Gallina Hayashi Quattro 750 LE for Sale
Suzuki February 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712

Update 2.20.2018: SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Update 2.12.2018: The GSX-R712 has been kept warm all winter in the living room and is ready to ship and run at your house this spring. Price has been dropped to $9,750.


The 1980s were a watershed era for sport bikes. This was a period of constant escalation between the Big Four manufacturers out of Japan. Amidst the fighting came many new innovations and a quantum leap in performance. And none epitomized the arms race quite like the revolutionary GSX-R from Suzuki. A winner in the showroom and a clear favorite for amateur and professional racers alike, the air/oiled cooled GSX-R was a definitive game changer for riders everywhere. Fast forward 30+ years later, and while the 80's era GSX-R is still striking, performance has not kept up with modern machinery. That is where this owner stepped in, creating a vintage 80s hot rod with performance enhancements to bridge the gap. This is an amazing build that we know RSBFS readers can appreciate; this one-of-a-kind machine has the stance and the history to give it serious street creds, but with updates to back it up in the canyons.

So how do you build a GSX-R712? Start with a good 1986 example of a GSX-R750 - well regarded as the best chassis of the day. Remove the 750cc engine and replace it with a second generation GSF1200 Bandit motor. Purists will note that the 1200 Bandit was an evolution of the GSX-R1100 engine, which makes this a perfect fit from a lineage perspective. Once that epic change has been completed, you then turn your attention to, well, everything. Rebuild the front end with new and upgraded components. Work over the swing arm and rebuild everything connected to it. Replace and upgrade braking components. Anything still stock must be completely refurbished. With the mechanicals in perfect shape, you then turn your attention to cosmetics. This is where little changes can make a huge impression. Source new lightweight bodywork and make subtle alterations to clean up the classic lines. Dress up the wheels and powdercoat to suit. Apply paint and graphics that act as an homage to the original, but modernize as well. Then step back and behold the glory of what you have created: a GSX-R712.

From the seller:
1986 GSXR750 complete Moderation 396 lbs semi wet
• Probolt Titanium hardware throughout 97% moto
• GSRX1100 rear wheel & casting markings removed
• wheels powdercoated Vegas gold
• new sealed wheel bearings
• custom billit wheel spacers
• Avon Roadrider tires
• forks serviced with new seals & bushings, powdercoated text black
• steering head bearings serviced
• clip-ons powdercoated texture Black
• performance fork springs, ..90
• swing arm powdercoated texture Black, new bearings complete
• Fox Shox serviced by Cogent Suspension
• 500lb spring powdercoated Red
• all calipers powdercoated with new seals and boots, titanium bleeds
• custom HEL brake lines front, rear and clutch
• rebuilt clutch slave cylinder
• new Brembo master cylinders, Front brake & clutch
• new CRG adjustable levers & mirror and adapter
• rear brake rotor SV lightened
• Pit Bull 520 chain conversion, EK chain Blue
• new LTD replica chain guard
• new NRC engine covers
• gauges fully restored inside & out, Perfect
• new Shorai battery LFX14L5-BS12
• Gen 2 Suzuki GSF1200 motor
• new Suzuki fuel petcock
• new Suzuki headlamp relays
• Stage 3 Dynojet
• Uni pod filters
• Delkevic SS header
• Danmoto Carbon Fibre muffler
• Air Tech light weight body custom made, thanks Dutch
• Probolt Aluminun body fasteners
• RD decal set, installed by Adam Stevenson @ AccuGraphix
• Jarrell Paint works Paint & prep work
• Zero Gravity smoke windscreen
• gas cap cerikoted
• super light led tail light
• seat pan modified, lightened
• Mikes Upholstery recovered seat, Blue
• TrailTech switches
• abbreviated wiring harness

Price $10,250 $9,750


For More Information:
Contact Edward Hessel at stathome@bellsouth.net
Text or call: 502.541.5253




Bikes like this amazing GSX-R Rod do not come along often. This is mainly because this is a very expensive, time-consuming process requiring patience and know-how. Most riders lack both the cash and the skill to create something this stunning, but would not hesitate to drool over it (and lust for one). A bike this good makes a personal statement that tells the world that you have great vintage taste and yet you also worship at the altar of performance. It is also likely a losing proposition for the seller; I could easily see $10k worth of parts in this rocket, not counting paintwork or specialized labor.

Slab-sided Gixxers are HOT right now - we see both collectable as well as pretty rough examples on a semi-regular basis. And we see the occasional Limited Edition unicorn - with prices in the stratosphere. This particular example takes the basic slabbie form and uses it as the foundation for a real hot rod superbike. Think of it as a higher performance slabbie with the cache of an L.E., but without the price tag. There is no doubt that this is a special bike - something the entire RSBFS staff agrees upon. The conversion is super sano, the lines are amazingly clean, and yet the whole package retains the classic looks of the original GSX-R. Check out the large number of very high-res pictures. I dare you not to fall in love with this bike. Once you do, reach out to the seller (stathome@bellsouth.net). You cannot build this bike for the asking price, and you will never see another like it again. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712
Suzuki December 7, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K

When Suzuki introduced the GSX-R750 (G model) to US buyers in 1986, the racing world was set on fire. With four-stroke, race-bred technology - devoid of the corny race-replica shortcomings - the original GSX-R was a privateer's dream. This was as close to a race bike as one could buy in a showroom, and Suzuki capitalized on that fact with lucrative sponsorship opportunities in both professional and amateur racing series. This first generation of the GSX-R is often referred to as "slabbie" due to the flat, narrow bodywork along the sides and rear of the bike. Notable chassis features included an aluminum alloy frame, adjustable suspension and large, ventilated triple disk brakes. But the big story was the motor: to save weight the GSX-R was air-and-oil-cooled. This setup was pioneered on the XN85 Turbo project, and resulted in a much lighter package than the liquid cooled competitors. Bottom line: The GSX-R was a formidable track weapon.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K for sale!

Fast forward only a few years, and already there were significant changes. While the unique air-oil cooling was retained, 1988 (J model) introduced a shorter stroke power plant that could rev higher than previous models. Gone were the flatslide carbs, replaced by new, larger Mikuni "slingshot" carbs with vacuum-actuated slides. The newer carbs worked better at lower RPMs and ultimately made more power than the first generation setup. The bodywork gained some fluidity through subtle curves, although the paint scheme remained familiar and relatively traditional. Chassis changes included a stronger frame, a bigger front fork and new wheels allowing for wider rubber. With the additional performance and handling capabilities came an increase in weight. The 1989 (K) model was the culmination of these changes, producing a meaner, faster GSX-R - and a neo collectable in its own right.

From the seller:
This gorgeous 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K "Slingshot" edition was brought to SUB moto service for a "make run" and ultimately a full restoration. Our service department took it apart, looked it over closely, any parts showing excessive wear and tear were repaired, refinished or replaced. This almost 30 year old GSX-R had held up well.

Its hard to believe that 31 years have passed since the US introduction of the original GSX-R. The model has held up well, and the J and K models have started to appreciate in value just like the slab-sided generations have done. The problem is finding a solid example of the breed. Three decades ago, these were mass-produced motorcycles of reasonable cost. Many found their way onto race tracks or (worse) into the hands of teenage squids who wanted to emulate Roberts, Lawson or Spencer. Today even a clean K model Gixxer is old and will likely need serious refurbishment. That is the appeal of this particular 1989 Suzuki GXR-R750 Slingshot - it presents well and has been thoroughly refurbished. This is a rider that you can collect. Or a collector that you can ride. Either way, you will be sitting pretty.

More from the seller:
It received a full service, new tires, all fluids were replaced and a complete carburetor rebuild including all rubber internal parts.. The original bodywork was sent out to be professionally inspected for any cracks or weak spots, Then repaired, gas tank cleaned out and everything repainted to exact factory specs even using an NOS Suzuki decal kit! All rubber pads and cushions mounting the tank and bodywork were also replaced. The original white wheels were sent out to be professionally powder coated, we cleaned and re-greased all the wheel bearings, reinstalled and then slipped on a fresh pair of Michelin Pilot Power 2CT's.

This GSX-R750K is not a concourse level restoration and really should be ridden and enjoyed, these are great bikes and a wonderful model series.

More from the seller:
Over $6500 spent in restoration! It will stand out in the crowd, Blue/White combo is always Suzuki's most popular and this one is a true classic. We just finished up some final details and it is ready to go!

If the beautiful pics are not enough to whet your appetite, check out the short video provided by the seller. Be sure and crank up the volume, as this Slingshot sounds fantastic! Take note of how clean everything looks. This is not just some used bike, but rather an example that really stands out from the crowd:

A few years from now (or a few years ago) you will be making comments like "I remember when the non-slabbie GSX-Rs were unloved and you could pick them up for nothing..." Those days are gone, as are many of the good examples of this breed. Good looks, great performance and a solid pedigree - what is there NOT to like of this generation GSX-R750? If there is a downside, I certainly can't find one. The K model does not have the distinction of being first generation, but other than that it is a superior motorcycle in every way to the earlier series of the line. With values on the rise, the time to get in is now. Check out this beautiful example courtesy of Seattle Used Bikes (a reputable shop in the Pacific Northwest) and be sure and tell 'em you saw it on RSBFS.

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K




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