Posts by tag: GSX-R750

Suzuki December 7, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K

When Suzuki introduced the GSX-R750 (G model) to US buyers in 1986, the racing world was set on fire. With four-stroke, race-bred technology - devoid of the corny race-replica shortcomings - the original GSX-R was a privateer's dream. This was as close to a race bike as one could buy in a showroom, and Suzuki capitalized on that fact with lucrative sponsorship opportunities in both professional and amateur racing series. This first generation of the GSX-R is often referred to as "slabbie" due to the flat, narrow bodywork along the sides and rear of the bike. Notable chassis features included an aluminum alloy frame, adjustable suspension and large, ventilated triple disk brakes. But the big story was the motor: to save weight the GSX-R was air-and-oil-cooled. This setup was pioneered on the XN85 Turbo project, and resulted in a much lighter package than the liquid cooled competitors. Bottom line: The GSX-R was a formidable track weapon.

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K for sale!

Fast forward only a few years, and already there were significant changes. While the unique air-oil cooling was retained, 1988 (J model) introduced a shorter stroke power plant that could rev higher than previous models. Gone were the flatslide carbs, replaced by new, larger Mikuni "slingshot" carbs with vacuum-actuated slides. The newer carbs worked better at lower RPMs and ultimately made more power than the first generation setup. The bodywork gained some fluidity through subtle curves, although the paint scheme remained familiar and relatively traditional. Chassis changes included a stronger frame, a bigger front fork and new wheels allowing for wider rubber. With the additional performance and handling capabilities came an increase in weight. The 1989 (K) model was the culmination of these changes, producing a meaner, faster GSX-R - and a neo collectable in its own right.

From the seller:
This gorgeous 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K "Slingshot" edition was brought to SUB moto service for a "make run" and ultimately a full restoration. Our service department took it apart, looked it over closely, any parts showing excessive wear and tear were repaired, refinished or replaced. This almost 30 year old GSX-R had held up well.

Its hard to believe that 31 years have passed since the US introduction of the original GSX-R. The model has held up well, and the J and K models have started to appreciate in value just like the slab-sided generations have done. The problem is finding a solid example of the breed. Three decades ago, these were mass-produced motorcycles of reasonable cost. Many found their way onto race tracks or (worse) into the hands of teenage squids who wanted to emulate Roberts, Lawson or Spencer. Today even a clean K model Gixxer is old and will likely need serious refurbishment. That is the appeal of this particular 1989 Suzuki GXR-R750 Slingshot - it presents well and has been thoroughly refurbished. This is a rider that you can collect. Or a collector that you can ride. Either way, you will be sitting pretty.

More from the seller:
It received a full service, new tires, all fluids were replaced and a complete carburetor rebuild including all rubber internal parts.. The original bodywork was sent out to be professionally inspected for any cracks or weak spots, Then repaired, gas tank cleaned out and everything repainted to exact factory specs even using an NOS Suzuki decal kit! All rubber pads and cushions mounting the tank and bodywork were also replaced. The original white wheels were sent out to be professionally powder coated, we cleaned and re-greased all the wheel bearings, reinstalled and then slipped on a fresh pair of Michelin Pilot Power 2CT's.

This GSX-R750K is not a concourse level restoration and really should be ridden and enjoyed, these are great bikes and a wonderful model series.

More from the seller:
Over $6500 spent in restoration! It will stand out in the crowd, Blue/White combo is always Suzuki's most popular and this one is a true classic. We just finished up some final details and it is ready to go!

If the beautiful pics are not enough to whet your appetite, check out the short video provided by the seller. Be sure and crank up the volume, as this Slingshot sounds fantastic! Take note of how clean everything looks. This is not just some used bike, but rather an example that really stands out from the crowd:

A few years from now (or a few years ago) you will be making comments like "I remember when the non-slabbie GSX-Rs were unloved and you could pick them up for nothing..." Those days are gone, as are many of the good examples of this breed. Good looks, great performance and a solid pedigree - what is there NOT to like of this generation GSX-R750? If there is a downside, I certainly can't find one. The K model does not have the distinction of being first generation, but other than that it is a superior motorcycle in every way to the earlier series of the line. With values on the rise, the time to get in is now. Check out this beautiful example courtesy of Seattle Used Bikes (a reputable shop in the Pacific Northwest) and be sure and tell 'em you saw it on RSBFS.

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750K
Suzuki November 15, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712

The 1980s were a watershed era for sport bikes. This was a period of constant escalation between the Big Four manufacturers out of Japan. Amidst the fighting came many new innovations and a quantum leap in performance. And none epitomized the arms race quite like the revolutionary GSX-R from Suzuki. A winner in the showroom and a clear favorite for amateur and professional racers alike, the air/oiled cooled GSX-R was a definitive game changer for riders everywhere. Fast forward 30+ years later, and while the 80's era GSX-R is still striking, performance has not kept up with modern machinery. That is where this owner stepped in, creating a vintage 80s hot rod with performance enhancements to bridge the gap. This is an amazing build that we know RSBFS readers can appreciate; this one-of-a-kind machine has the stance and the history to give it serious street creds, but with updates to back it up in the canyons.

So how do you build a GSX-R712? Start with a good 1986 example of a GSX-R750 - well regarded as the best chassis of the day. Remove the 750cc engine and replace it with a second generation GSF1200 Bandit motor. Purists will note that the 1200 Bandit was an evolution of the GSX-R1100 engine, which makes this a perfect fit from a lineage perspective. Once that epic change has been completed, you then turn your attention to, well, everything. Rebuild the front end with new and upgraded components. Work over the swing arm and rebuild everything connected to it. Replace and upgrade braking components. Anything still stock must be completely refurbished. With the mechanicals in perfect shape, you then turn your attention to cosmetics. This is where little changes can make a huge impression. Source new lightweight bodywork and make subtle alterations to clean up the classic lines. Dress up the wheels and powdercoat to suit. Apply paint and graphics that act as an homage to the original, but modernize as well. Then step back and behold the glory of what you have created: a GSX-R712.

From the seller:
1986 GSXR750 complete Moderation 396 lbs semi wet
• Probolt Titanium hardware throughout 97% moto
• GSRX1100 rear wheel & casting markings removed
• wheels powdercoated Vegas gold
• new sealed wheel bearings
• custom billit wheel spacers
• Avon Roadrider tires
• forks serviced with new seals & bushings, powdercoated text black
• steering head bearings serviced
• clip-ons powdercoated texture Black
• performance fork springs, ..90
• swing arm powdercoated texture Black, new bearings complete
• Fox Shox serviced by Cogent Suspension
• 500lb spring powdercoated Red
• all calipers powdercoated with new seals and boots, titanium bleeds
• custom HEL brake lines front, rear and clutch
• rebuilt clutch slave cylinder
• new Brembo master cylinders, Front brake & clutch
• new CRG adjustable levers & mirror and adapter
• rear brake rotor SV lightened
• Pit Bull 520 chain conversion, EK chain Blue
• new LTD replica chain guard
• new NRC engine covers
• gauges fully restored inside & out, Perfect
• new Shorai battery LFX14L5-BS12
• Gen 2 Suzuki GSF1200 motor
• new Suzuki fuel petcock
• new Suzuki headlamp relays
• Stage 3 Dynojet
• Uni pod filters
• Delkevic SS header
• Danmoto Carbon Fibre muffler
• Air Tech light weight body custom made, thanks Dutch
• Probolt Aluminun body fasteners
• RD decal set, installed by Adam Stevenson @ AccuGraphix
• Jarrell Paint works Paint & prep work
• Zero Gravity smoke windscreen
• gas cap cerikoted
• super light led tail light
• seat pan modified, lightened
• Mikes Upholstery recovered seat, Blue
• TrailTech switches
• abbreviated wiring harness

Price $10,250


For More Information:
Contact Edward Hessel at stathome@bellsouth.net
Text or call: 502.541.5253




Bikes like this amazing GSX-R Rod do not come along often. This is mainly because this is a very expensive, time-consuming process requiring patience and know-how. Most riders lack both the cash and the skill to create something this stunning, but would not hesitate to drool over it (and lust for one). A bike this good makes a personal statement that tells the world that you have great vintage taste and yet you also worship at the altar of performance. It is also likely a losing proposition for the seller; I could easily see $10k worth of parts in this rocket, not counting paintwork or specialized labor.

Slab-sided Gixxers are HOT right now - we see both collectable as well as pretty rough examples on a semi-regular basis. And we see the occasional Limited Edition unicorn - with prices in the stratosphere. This particular example takes the basic slabbie form and uses it as the foundation for a real hot rod superbike. Think of it as a higher performance slabbie with the cache of an L.E., but without the price tag. There is no doubt that this is a special bike - something the entire RSBFS staff agrees upon. The conversion is super sano, the lines are amazingly clean, and yet the whole package retains the classic looks of the original GSX-R. Check out the large number of very high-res pictures. I dare you not to fall in love with this bike. Once you do, reach out to the seller (stathome@bellsouth.net). You cannot build this bike for the asking price, and you will never see another like it again. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R712
Suzuki October 12, 2017 posted by

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale

It's hard to imagine that, just a couple years before the introduction of the GSX-R750, Suzuki's top-performing repli-racer was the stylish, but very last-generation GS1000S, a bike with twin shocks, handlebars, a center-stand, and a bar-mounted bikini fairing. The original "Slabbie" GSX-R750 that came along in 1985 brought modern endurance-racing style to the masses and codified the formula laid out by much rarer and more exotic machines like the Bimota SB2. This particular GSX-R750 Limited Edition claws back some exotic cachet from the Italian brand, and is one of just 299 imported to the USA to meet AMA homologation requirements.

The heart of the GSX-R was an oil and air-cooled inline four with dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. It lacked liquid-cooling in a bid to save weight, reduce complexity, and improve reliability, but still had a few high-tech tricks up its sleeve: Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" featured a double-chambered oil pump was designed to more efficiently circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the bottom of the pistons. The aluminum frame used a mono-shock rear and four-piston brake calipers clamped triple discs. The Limited version added a very trick dry clutch, lightweight solo seat tail section, and the GSX-R1100's electronic anti-dive forks.

The Limited was differentiated by the striking red, white, and blue paint seen here on the distinctive, slab-sided bodywork, compared to the standard white-and-blue or red-and-black available on the regular GSX-R. When new, the bike was the most expensive Japanese sportbike, and was priced at $6,500, a shocking $2,000 more than the standard model. Performance advantages were very minimal but that wasn't really the point and this is, to my mind, the best-looking version of the early GSX-R.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

Race homologation special. It has 4545 miles. This bike is in as near perfect collectors condition for a 31 year old bike. Motorcycle was just fully serviced (ie carbs were serviced; all fluids changed; new tires added, as originals showed signs of cracking.)

These bikes have surged in price, exceeding $20K in most cases.

If you are looking at this bike, you know what it is, so NO LOW BALL OFFERS!!!!

The seller is correct that prices have surged, and his bike appears to be in excellent, very original condition that includes a stock exhaust that could be either "cool and retro" or "shockingly ugly" depending on your predilection for slotted heat shields. Certainly it's of value to collectors. Unfortunately, while his $20,000 asking price is fair, it actually seems just a bit on the high-side, at least looking at Limited Editions we've featured here on RSBFS in the past. I'm not sure just how far off his asking price an offer would have to be before it qualifies as "a low ball offer," but I have a feeling he may be disappointed. Will at least one buyer meet his asking price? It's very possible: those same recent bikes I mentioned didn't quite get to $20,000 but were very close.

-tad

Slab-Sided Collectible: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited for Sale
Suzuki September 26, 2017 posted by

JDM Gixxer: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition

Honda's famed RC30 was basically designed from the ground up for competition, and seemingly only sold to the public to satisfy production-based racing requirements. That's one way to go about it, but if you don't have Honda's practically endless resources, how do you create a machine that will help your racers to compete at the top levels of production-based racing? You build something like this Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition. In recent years, "Limited Edition" has come to refer to things like luxury trim packages for Toyota Corollas, somewhat watering down the cachet of the term. But in this case, it was truth in advertising, with just a few hundred made to satisfy the regulations.

The regular GSX-R was already a pretty impressive machine and, considering that the Limited Edition was the most expensive Japanese sportbike of 1986, you'd be forgiven for thinking that the performance of this rare and exotic version is underwhelming. But the changes were designed to allow their inclusion on race machines, not make for a better roadbike. The LE was just six pounds lighter than the standard bike, most likely a result of the fiberglass solo-seat tail section. Power was very similar as well, since the engine internals were virtually identical to the stock GSX-R750, and flat-slide carburetors are great for producing maximum power, but they're not really suited to everyday use. Fortunately, the LE's lightweight vented dry clutch should produce enough rattle to drown out the supposedly noisy carburetor slides... Aside from those notable and very expensive upgrades, the bike also featured a revised swingarm for improved stability and the electronic, anti-dive forks from the GSX-R1100, although I wonder if many race teams actually used those. Photos of our recent GSX-R AMA Superbike suggest that at least some of them did...

So out of the box it didn't necessarily perform any better than a stock bike, and was hideously expensive. But honestly, most manufacturers of homologation specials probably weren't too concerned about selling them: I'm pretty sure the rules only required that they build the required machines, so if they sat in showrooms for a few years, manufacturers wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Collectors and enthusiasts with the money to buy them still did so, regardless of cost, but the main goal was to get the right parts legalized for the racers.

From the original Craigslist Post: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Edition for Sale

1986 GSXR-750 Limited Edition in Japanese Domestic Model Specification
Suzuki only produced 500 units world wide of the GSXR750 Limited Edition

The bike is imported from Japan.
Not registered yet in the U.S.
This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE)

Start engine! Runs well
Flat slide carburetors
Dry clutch
Original FRP rear seat cowl

24,374 km (15,145 miles)
Engine Number R705-125561

$13,800

The last Limited Edition GSX-R750 we featured on the site was also a Japanese import in similar colors that were intended to celebrate Suzuki's success at the 8 Hours of Suzuka, but this appears to be a different bike entirely. First-generation "Slabbie" Gixxers are already increasing in value, and nice Limited Editions are starting to command premium dollars. The lack of a title could prove to be a hassle, but many people considering a purchase will be looking to collect or display, not actually ride it, so that may not be all that much a problem. The $13,800 asking price seems in line with recent LE prices, but I wonder if the lack of title will have any impact on its value.

-tad

Suzuki August 28, 2017 posted by

Classic Racer in a Box: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Looking for a fun weekend project to keep you busy for a while? Well look no further than this ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 racebike. It's not exactly finished, but all of the really important parts appear to be there to get you started... Strangely enough, it seems like the AMA racebikes used many of the stock Suzuki components, even switching from the more exotic dry clutch to the standard wet unit, according to the seller. So that should help, right?

The introduction of the Suzuki GSX-R750 in 1985 was a seminal event in the history of motorcycling. It may not have been the first or only bike to use fully-enclosed, endurance-racer styling wrapped around a bulletproof, large-displacement inline four and monoshock aluminum frame, but it made that formula affordable and available to the masses, and led directly to the sportbikes we know and love. Later sportbikes would add liquid-cooling to the equation to help generate maximum power, but the Gixxer eschewed such frippery as too heavy for their pure speed machine: in spite of the visible cooling fins, it's oil that does most of the work. The oil-cooled powerplant utilized their SACS or "Suzuki Advanced Cooling System" that used a double-chambered pump and oil jets directed at the underside of the pistons to keep temperatures under control. Other than oil cooling, it followed modern designs and used dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder.

Obviously, as a race-spec machine for the street, the GSX-R750 spent plenty of time competing in various classes both abroad and here in the US. This particular bike was used in AMA racing and was ridden by Doug Polen. Polen was a world-class rider who got his start in AMA racing but left to compete in the World Superbike Championship, where he won the title on the trot in 1991 and 1992. He continued to compete in both international and American roadracing with success, netted a win at the Suzuka 8 Hour endurance race, and even dabbled in MotoGP.

There's additional information about the bike, its history, and the included photos over on eBay, so head over and take a look.

From the original eBay listing: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 AMA Superbike for Sale

I have researched the photo archives of Cycle World and Cycle magazines and obtained a number of unpublished photos from their records.  I've also bought photographs from freelance photographers that covered AMA racing in that year.  Special thanks to Larry Lawrence, of The Rider Files website.  I will provide these photos to the buyer with the proviso that they remain unpublished.

Each rider had two chassis.  The chassis and motors evolved constantly through the season and Doug probably got the good parts first, as he did better than Otter in the results, starting with the first race.  Their A bikes had all of the good parts at each race and the B bikes had more stock components.  You can clearly see in the photographs the progression of modifications during the season for all of the bikes and the lower spec of the B bikes.

The chassis is un-braced, with modified stock forks, Kosman Triple clamps, Kosman brake discs, AP calipers, a Fox shock and Marvic magnesium wheels.  The swingarm has been slotted, to allow for more variation in wheelbase.  Jim Lindemann worked with them on the shock valving, although he passed away a few years ago.  I have spoken to an ex-Fox engineer and he'd be happy to restore the shock but the records they had of those years were destroyed a few years ago.  Sandy Kosman now lives in Portland Oregon and the last time I talked to him, he was willing to get the discs reground on a Blanchard grinder, if desired.   One of the previous owners began the restoration years ago and the chassis, as pictured, is where he was when he sold the bike to the next owner.

The bodywork used was stock Suzuki plastic.  Early in the season it was raced in 1986 blue/white Suzuki colors; later in the season some of it was sporting the 1987 blue/white Suzuki stock colors.  A perforated metal filler panel was incorporated into the lower fairing V and the lower fairing panels had holes cut in them to allow for more ground clearance.

The motors were modified during the season and varied quite a bit.  They had Yoshimura (either kit Suzuki or Cosworth) pistons, different crank bearings, heads ported by Ron Scrima, Megacycle cams with Yosh retainers, a Tsubaki cam chain tensioner, and various carbs and exhausts.  At one point they obtained dry clutches and close ratio transmission gears but went back to running wet clutches and stock transmission ratios.  They may have run an ECU with a higher rev limit.  Ron Scrima passed away in 2011 but his company (Racing Engine Service) is still in business in Texas and the current owner was with Ron for about 25 years, so they might be my first choice for an engine refresh.  Another option would be Kelly Roberts, also in Texas.  I have never disassembled the motor, so I do not know what internal components are present.

I am interested in selling this project to someone that has the necessary resources and desire to restore it to an as-raced condition and to preserve it for the future.  It is a significant bike, as it was one of the highest placed privateer AMA superbike efforts of that era and was ridden by the rider that probably had more success in the USA racing the first generation Suzuki GSX-R than any other rider.  I would be willing to discuss this bike in more detail, via telephone, with any serious prospective buyers.  I am also willing to provide additional photos, a more complete listing of what components will come with the bike, and an approximate idea of what additional components will be needed to complete the restoration.

I have listed the mileage as 99999, as eBay requires that the mileage be listed for any vehicle sale.  The true mileage is unknown, as it was never recorded, which is not unusual for a race bike.

It also looks like the bike went through several iterations, giving you a bit of flexibility in terms of the color scheme you choose. If it were complete and in as-raced condition, this would probably be a very valuable motorcycle. As it stands, it's a valuable... basket case. How valuable? Well the But It Now price for this bit of American roadracing history is $4,950. This is going to need a lot of love, time, and money to finish, but I think this GSX-R deserves to be restored to its former functional glory.

-tad

Suzuki March 28, 2017 posted by

Rare Slabbie: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale

Update 3.28.2017: Previously seen in October 2016, this GSX-R Limited is back on eBay with a starting bid of $13,500. Links updated. Good luck to buyers and seller, -dc.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-r-front

It’s interesting how some bikes seem to come up for sale in waves, like owners who've had their bikes for years see similar bikes up for sale and think, “Hey, I’d better get in on that before demand is all gone!” Or maybe it has to do with the ages of the bikes and the related ages of the owners… Regardless, we’ve seen a number of Suzuki GSX-R750 Limited Editions come up for sale recently, in a range of conditions, but this example appears to be very clean and original.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-l-front

The original GSX-R750 was a pretty significant bike when it was introduced in 1985, and it became an icon for good reason: the fully-faired styling, aluminum-frame, and monoshock suspension helped to define the modern sportbike, and was adopted by millions of hooligans and squids as their bike of choice. Plus, they do look pretty sharp in Suzuki’s traditional blue-and-white paint.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-cockpit

The GSX-R750 was powered by an oil and air-cooled inline four to save weight and reduce complexity compared to water-cooling, although it did use dual overhead cams and featured four valves per cylinder. The temperatures generated were kept in check by Suzuki’s Advanced Cooling System or "SACS" that featured a double-chambered oil pump to more effectively circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons. In spite of the obvious cooling fins cast into the engine, it’s actually oil that does most of the cooling in the Gixxer.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-engine-detail

Based on the regular GSX-R that was introduced in 1985, the Limited Edition was intended to homologate specific parts for superbike and endurance racing, Suzuki’s equivalent of the Yamaha OW01. Parts exclusive to the LE were the vented dry clutch [clearly visible in the above picture] and electronic anti-dive forks that contrasted with Honda’s mechanically-operated forks. The seat unit offered no passenger accommodations, as befitted the bike’s race-bred styling.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-headlamps

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale

The bike is an amazing piece of history, absolutely gorgeous and has been in my collection for some time. However I am feeling my mortality and so it is time to pass it on to a new owner. I have rode this bike sparingly over the past years but have maintained it both mechanically and cosmetically in a temperature controlled environment. Cosmetically, the bike is in excellent condition for a 30 year old bike, with the exception of a very, very small soft dimple in the right hand upper rear corner of the tank that a good PDR tank man could take care of but in my neck of the woods there are none. (had to place light to see it) All original equipment to best of my knowledge, but will let you be the judge. I understand in terms of a collector bike originality is important. I noticed the exhaust pipe was not right after purchase, the heat shield louvres were horizontal rather vertical as they should be ...and spent a tidy sum to make it right.

Mechanically the bike is “spot on” (just tuned) but you may want to do some fine tuning as well as set the bike up to accommodate you personally, or simple admire for what it is, and will be in the future. One fork seal starting to slightly weep, and if you planning on riding I would suggest new tires as these are getting on in years.

I am not going into the history or the desirability of this particular model. It is generally well known by any student of the early superbikes that maybe interested in this bike. And if not there is considerable available on-line or from knowledgeable resources. Also for some, what it is, and is not as far as originality will be a subject of debate, I personally do not regard myself as a expert so I have attempted to display the bike in the best way I can by removing the plastics. Someone willing to pay what I am asking at least deserves to have the opportunity to evaluate the bike in the proper manner. All in all, I personally feel it a very nice example in comparison to the limited number eBay sales I have monitored in the past.

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-front-wheel

Just 299 examples were imported in 1986, making this one rare Suzuki. This example has a few minor nicks and chips, but looks very clean and complete, with bidding up north of $11,000 and the reserve not met. There are several days left on the auction and active interest, which should come as no surprise, considering a recent, very non-original example sold for over $19,000!

-tad

1986-suzuki-gsx-r750r-le-r-side

Rare Slabbie: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R 750R Limited Edition for Sale