Posts by tag: TT1

Ducati July 10, 2018 posted by

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

The original listing for this 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica includes some good general information, but I'd love more specific details about the components. The seller mentions the frame was supplied by Roy Thersby, but did he build the frame, modify the frame, or just paint it? At a glance, it appears to be from a 90s SuperSport, which makes sense, considering the rest of the running gear. So it appears that what we're dealing with here is a fully-built 90s 750SS with brilliant retro-bodywork and paint. And headlamps. Those massive, retina-burning headlamps.

The original TT2 that inspired this build was a lightweight, Pantah-powered racebike displacing 597cc with a Verlicchi frame and Marzocchi suspension. Built between 1980 and 1984 the bike was very successful in competition and ultimately spawned the Ducati F1 road bike.

The engine in this replica is a 750, but it's looks to be the 90s version, since both carburetors live in the engine's vee: the 80s Pantah-engined bikes had both facing rearward, with the vertical cylinder's jutting out awkwardly towards the rider's knee. And the wheels are clearly 17" parts, in keeping with the 90s theme. Great for finding modern, sticky rubber, but not the most authentic-looking, if that's the goal, since the original used 18" hoops. And why choose non-adjustable front forks on this bike? Even set up properly, I'm surprised the builder didn't at least use the adjustable units available on certain 900SS models, since the upside-down forks give the game away anyway that this isn't really an 80s race bike.

Not doubting the craftsmanship, but there are some other choices I'm not big on, starting with the Koso instruments. I'm sure they're reliable and legible, but I don't really like them on recent Bimotas and I really don't like them on a retro-looking special. Something classic from MotoGadget would have given similar function with a much more appropriate look. The bar-end signals are a cool touch, but a bit too shiny for my taste and the grips and Union Jack tank pad are way too modern. And the M4 exhaust is perfectly fine on a GSX-R750 but a "classic" Ducati? But all that is relatively easy to change to suit the new owner's preferences anyway.

If it sounds like I don't like this bike, you'd be wrong: I'm really just picking nits and all of these minor issues are easily forgotten, looking at the red-and-yellow bodywork and those awesome endurance-racing headlamps. And although the listing doesn't go into too much detail regarding the engine, the Pantah engine can be tuned to make good power and, in a lightweight package, should make for a very entertaining bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale

For the Ducati connoisseur, this beauty will enhance any collection. Frame came from British Ducati legend Roy Thersby. The bike was built by vintage Ducati guru Scot Wilson as his personal ride. Scot is the owner of Italian Iron Classics in Tucson, AZ. I've had the pleasure of owning a couple of Scot Wilson's builds and they are very carefully planned and meticulously executed.

The 750 engine was built by Tom Hull of Phoenix to "Pro-Thunder" standards with Carrillo rods, dual spark, lightened internals and all the special bits you'd expect. The engine was moth-balled after a rule change, acquired for this build and has about 1,000 miles on it. 40mm Del Ortos, fork set by Computrack. GP shift but could be changed. The bike was just serviced, all fluids changed, fuel tank cleaned, carbs cleaned and carefully checked over. It's ready to go.

The bike is street legal, has a clear Massachusetts title and goes like crazy. Headlights are Hella style as used for endurance racing. Bar-end turn signals are installed so the bike will pass my state registration inspection. The paint is as good as it gets and looks as fresh as the day it came from the painter's shop. If you are looking at this bike I don't have to tell you about Ducati F1-R's or TT2's. I've had the opportunity to do a (very careful) track day at a Ducati event and the bikes gets lots of attention. If the track's not your thing you could proudly show it at any event and it would draw a crowd.

While undeniably cool, bikes like this are always tricky when it comes to determining value. They're not collectible in the conventional sense, in that they're not real race bikes or limited-production factory machines: they've been built using high-quality components, but they're basically really nice lash-ups, "bitsas" made from the very best bits. Of course, a real TT2 would likely sell for far more than the $22,500 the seller is asking, and considering the quality and names attached, I'm thinking this is a pretty damn good deal as long as the lack of originality doesn't bother you, and you're ready for the snobs to give you static when they ask you "is it real?" But honestly, if anyone gives you a problem, you should just blind them with those massive Hella lamps.

-tad

Racer Replica: 1995 Ducati TT2 Replica for Sale
Ducati March 13, 2017 posted by

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Until pretty recently, Ducati's 750 F1 was the redheaded stepchild of the Ducati family: it wasn't a bevel-drive and so wasn't really considered worthy of being considered a "classic" Ducati, didn't have the reliability [cough, cough] of the modern two-valve twin, or the performance credentials of the liquid-cooled four-valve superbikes. But values have been rising rapidly in recent years, and the F1 represents an important bridge between two eras of Ducati sportbikes.

The 750 F1 was built around their proven trellis frame and a 749cc version of the Pantah two-valve L-twin, tuned to produce 76hp and was wrapped in bodywork designed to resemble the successful TT1 racing machines. Wheels were the height of 80s fashion, with a tiny 16" hoop up front and 18" at the rear. This was the very last Ducati produced before Cagiva took over and it uses a pair of carburetors configured like the older bevel-drive bikes instead of the later machines that nestled both units in the engine's vee. Not the most efficient from a packaging standpoint, with those air cleaners jutting out bodywork.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale

Original surviving example with 3850 original miles. Runs very well indeed. Its tight and everything works. Toolkit and owners manual included. Will need tires if ridden aggressively. An uncompromising street legal Italian thoroughbred.

Bidding is up above $10,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction. These are the very last Ducatis before the modern era that was ushered in by Cagiva, and that gives them a special place in Ducati's history, and the uptick in values reflects that. This example looks very clean and is in excellent condition, with low miles and the seller even includes a short video of the bike roaring up the street!

-tad

Middle Child: 1986 Ducati 750 F1 for Sale
Ducati July 2, 2016 posted by

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 L Front

What looks good doesn’t always work well: some of the most beautiful cars ever built were created by eye, without the aid of modern aerodynamics. Sleek machines like the Jaguar E-Type and the Corvette Stingray may look impossibly fast, but often try to leave the road at elevated speeds… Racing machines on the other hand are often strange and awkward-looking, designed to perform ahead of all other considerations. The Ducati TT1 may not be the prettiest bike ever built by the company, but you can’t argue with its performance.

1984 Ducati TT1 L Engine
Although the earlier TT2 machine was more successful in terms of race results, the bigger-engine TT1 seen here still has some serious competition credentials and was successful in endurance racing as well. The bike was powered by a bigger 748cc version of the Desmo Pantah engine that used toothed belts to drive the overhead cams instead of the bevel-drive engine’s tower-shaft arrangement. A front-mounted oil-cooler behind the fairing kept temperatures under control, with holes drilled in front to allow sufficient airflow.

1984 Ducati TT1 Dash
This package eventually evolved into the air/oil-cooled L-twin Ducatisti still know and love today, although in this case it was still carbureted, with the rear head rotated 180° from more modern configurations: later bikes had intake for both in the center of the “V,” allowing Cagiva to fit the engine with an automotive-style carburetor in the Paso. The frame was an extremely lightweight, stiff, sculptural masterpiece by Verlicchi and a 16” and 18” wheel combo meant riders could exploit the bike’s extreme lightweight and agility.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

Unimpeachable provenance and beautiful patina

One of three ex-works 1984-season European endurance race bikes, then bought from the factory direct by American enthusiast Dale Newton for AMA BoTT racing in the USA

Frame no. 6 (on steering head), engine no. DM600L*702481*

Sold on a Bill of Sale. Five miles approx. since restoration.

This well documented TT1 is the rarest of the rare. Three chassis were taken from the production run of 50 600 TT2s and built as endurance racers for the 1984 European championship. Essentially two of the three - this is one of the two - were replicas of Tony Rutter’s factory team TT1. Based on the belt-drive, desmo Pantah, the TT1 had a 88mm bore and a 61.5mm stroke for a capacity of 748cc, with a factory quoted 80 horsepower. At under 300 pounds dry, they were built with Italy’s finest contemporary components such as Marzocchi magnesium forks, wider aluminum (extrusion) cantilever swing arm (with strengthening rub running along the bottom) – one of only two bikes known to have this feature - and Brembo brakes all round. The compact TT1 was both ground breaking fast and exquisitely handsome. It features a unique lower mounting point for the engine vapor catch tank on the right side. As a new bike it attended the Imola test day. The engine has the “Ascension” kit installed that upgraded the TT2 motor to full race 750. The bike retains its endurance racing quick-release rear wheel kit.

American Ducatisti patron Dale Newton (he owned the Phil Schilling/Cook Neilson “California HotRod” Daytona superbike, too) bought the bike from the factory at the ’84 season’s end (still with its headlamp sockets etc. intact; Dale removed the lights as the AMA rules did not require them) and proceeded to run the bike in the USA and was the last bike he restored before his untimely death. Dale’s goal was to beat east coaster Jimmy Adamo in BoTT.

Brian Dietz purchased the bike from the Newton estate in September 1999 selling it on to Ralf Stechow in November 2008. It was acquired by the (private) seller shortly thereafter.

The Newton Ducatis were raced by legendary riders such as Tony Rutter, Kevin Schwantz and John Williams and were featured in Cycle magazine on several occasions. Next is a listing of the articles; January 1984 “Messenger in Red: Ducati TT2 600”; October 1984 “Ducati Pantah TT1”; April 1985 “Aboard Sunday’s Child: Ducati 750 TT1”; April 1985 “Desmo-Ships on a Time Belt: Ducati 750SS and TT1 750 F1”. "Dale Newton's ex-factory TT-F1 (this bike) is representative of Ducati 750 potential, and on the Axtell dyno it generated 83-86 horsepower." Kevin Cameron, February 1990.

This bike has also been featured in two of Ian Falloon’s books. “… the diminutive TT2 and TT1 were among the finest of all catalog Ducatis…they epitomized Taglioni’s philosophy of maximum performance through light weight and simplicity.”- Standard Catalog of Ducati Motorcycles, and Ducati Racers. And in Alan Cathcart’s Ducati, the Untold Story.

1984 Ducati TT1 R Engine

This TT1 is from a very limited run of competition-only Ducatis and has a well-documented owner history, the bike is in beautiful cosmetic condition for a race bike and is certainly very rare and valuable, although there’s been no real bidding activity so far and the auction is almost over. The more desirable TT2 might be worth six figures, but it’s pretty clear from the limited interest that the seller is aiming a bit high here.

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 R Side

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale
Ducati June 10, 2016 posted by

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front2

Although the mid-1980s 750 F1 may not have represented the very best from Ducati, the TT2 and later TT1 race bikes that inspired them certainly did. Lightweight, perfectly formed, and highly effective, they epitomize Ducati’s racing ethos of the period. The original TT2 displaced 587cc and used the belt-drive Pantah motor, with the later TT1 punched out to something closer to 750cc. Both bikes did well in competition, although the earlier 600 was far more successful.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side

The beautiful and very lightweight [at a claimed 16lbs] frame by Verlicchi and the bodywork with perforations to allow airflow to a front-mounted oil-cooler are distinctive characteristics of the TT, and those huge headlights speak to the bike’s obvious endurance-racing intent. The front three-quarter view also highlights the 16” front and 18” rear wheel/tire combo that contributed to the bike’s agility.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side Engine
Although this one may have racing provenance and should probably be on display somewhere in a collection or museum, but it’s battle-ready and scuffed appearance almost demand that it be put into track-ready condition and campaigned in vintage events.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

Ducati TT2/TT1 750, model year 1984, VIN 22

This is a GENUINE TT2 factory bike, VIN 22 upgraded to TT1 750cc specs to compete in that class in the Endurance series. Jean Moto Team was a small but very “aggressive” team competing in endurance racing and TT’s during the 1980's

A real piece of mid 80's Ducati history this bike finished 6th overall at the 1984 Bol d’Or, first of all Ducatis so in front of works Ducati machines! It's totally preserved as it finished the last race but the engine was completely overhauled by factory ex-mechanic Giorgio Grimandi.

Forget stocks and shares invest in a true piece of motorcycling history! It comes with documentation (original period magazine etc). Race, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Side

Bidding is up to around $6,500 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. That’s no surprise, considering that real TT race bike should be at least a $30,000 machine. I’m not sure why there hasn’t been more interest. Perhaps the bike’s mongrel TT1/TT2 history? That seems very much in keeping with a racebike’s mission, and only bikes that have spent their lives on display would be lacking period upgrades to keep them competitive…

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale
Ducati September 12, 2015 posted by

Raw Materials: 1987 Ducati F1 For Sale

1987 Ducati F1 L Front

Ducati's 750 F1 was intended to closely resemble their competitive TT1 racebike, and was the very last bike introduced before the company was taken over by Cagiva, when Ducati was on the ropes financially. It was the very last of the old-school Ducatis, and is finally starting to find its value because of that.

1987 Ducati F1 R Rear2

The F1 displaced 749cc's and produced a claimed 76hp with the typical 16" front and 18" rear combination for impressive agility. Unlike later Ducati's, the F1 still featured the older, less compact carburetor configuration, instead of the more familiar arrangement with both carburetors situated in the vee of the engine.

1987 Ducati F1 Dash

There's plenty of potential in these motorcycles and handling was exceptional, but that's kind of the problem: it's almost like Ducati assumed that they were selling roadbikes to race teams, who planned to tweak and tune and set them up to suit, instead of to normal, everyday consumers. It's like they thought they were just supplying the raw materials out of which you could build a very nice sportbike.

1987 Ducati F1 L Fairing

This one looks to be in very nice condition, although as a display piece, you'd obviously have to put some work in before riding it.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Ducati F1B for Sale

A complete frame up restoration. This bike retains all original equipment including mirrors, original brakes, turn signals, air box, two into one exhaust (stock exhaust available). Engine dismantled and serviced as required. New battery, tires, brake cylinder kits and more. Only displayed since being renovated. A show quality motorcycle. Lying in Ft Lauderdale inspections welcome. One of the last true Ducati custom designs.

I'm really not sure what "one of the last true Ducati custom designs" is supposed to mean: this is neither custom, nor the last of anything. And period tests were not especially kind to the F1, nor were they especially popular.

1987 Ducati F1 Controls

Sure, go find some nice, period suspension upgrades and have Loudbike tune your 750 for 100hp and you'll have yourself a nice, vintage firebreather: air/oil-cooled Ducatis are fundamentally tough, race-bred motorcycles. But as stock, the F1 was a raw material than finished product. In spite of that, these early Pantah sportbikes have rocketed in value recently, so this might be a good investment or the perfect bike to complete your collection.

-tad

1987 Ducati F1 R Side

Raw Materials: 1987 Ducati F1 For Sale
Ducati September 11, 2015 posted by

RELIST: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 Racer in the UK

Update 9.11.2015: Previously listed in March of this year, this 750 TT1 is back on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller. -dc

pron1

Here is a true legend, a Ducati TT1 race bike available for sale in the UK.  The Ducati TT1 was a 748cc race bike based on the hugely successful Ducati TT2.  While the TT2 was only 600cc it won the world championship multiple times. The TT1 didn't produced quite the same success as it’s smaller brother and Ducati only built 60 TT1's before focusing its efforts on its street legal version, the 750 F1.

Sadly the early edition 750 F1's werent that good on the street and were described  as "uncomfortable, extremely unreliable, and slow".  But the TT1 was none of those things and is still one of the most desirable and collectible Ducati's ever made, largely due to their rarity and face-melting performance capabilities.

pron2

1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for sale on eBay

According to the seller, this TT1 is an original Pablo Real race bike run by Team Leoni in the 1984 season.  For those of you too young to know about Real and Leoni, Reno Leoni was a former test rider for the Ducati factory who moved to America in 1965 and stayed for the next 35 years.  Leoni first made a name for himself with Moto Guzzis and then most famously with Ducatis and was instrumental in establishing the early Superbike series and then the emerging Battle of the Twins division.  Meanwhile Pablo Real was the AMA's 1991 Pro Twins GP1 national champion and always ran well on the high banks at Daytona.

pron3

According to the seller, this bike is basically un-restored and looks just as it did when it was last raced (with the exception of a depressurized rear shock).  Apparently the shock went down as the bike has spent the last several years as one of the centerpieces of the Silverman Museum Racing collection.

Here is some of the other info the seller provides:

  • A fantastic period built privateeer TT1
  • 750Cc engine tuned by Lenci of Rome
  • 41mm Malossi carbs, ported heads, race cams
  • M1R forks, floating Brembo discs with Gold line P08 calipers, Campagnolo magnesium wheels
  • Verlicchi frame, Verlicchi lightweight aluminium swinging arm t
  • his bike’s loaded with all the best bits so much of which is of course unobtainable today

pron6

Of course now we come to the question of what it will take to put your hands on this lovely piece of Italian exotica?  Well hang on tight folks because when this bike was offered for sale by Bonhams last year the auction expected bid range was between $16,500 and $18,500 USD.   I think that makes it the most expensive bike we have ever posted here on RSBFS, although a few of the Ducati SuperMonos we have posted have been close.

Even with the recent movements in the dollar vs euro, the asking price for this bike is still likely to be equal to a decent 1st house or a full tuition at a US private university.   But if you are by some chance a RSBFS reader who can afford something like this and you bring it over here to the states, all I can say is....can I have a go?

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

RELIST: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 Racer in the UK




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