Posts by tag: T595

Triumph December 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

I love seeing race and trackday bikes built out of unlikely candidates like this well-prepared, race-winning Triumph Daytona T595. After all, the whole point of the Daytona in the first place was that it wasn’t pretending to be just a numberplate away from placing at Brands Hatch. Instead, it was intended as a fast roadbike, with a focus on character, build-quality, and humane ergonomics. A gentleman’s sportbike. In this case, a bike for a very fast gentleman…

The original Daytona introduced in the early 1990s was available in three or four-cylinder flavors and it was a big, burly GT to rival bikes like the Kawasaki ZX11. The second generation seen here was codenamed the T595, although it was fairly quickly renamed the 955i to avoid confusion regarding its displacement. That’s the kind of thing that never bothered Bimota, and I wonder how many people ask SB6 owners if their bike is a 600… In any event, the bike displaced 955cc and was much lighter and more agile than the bike that preceded it.

That being said, the T595 really wasn’t intended for competition: the suspension was too soft, the motor biased towards a flexible midrange, as opposed to top-end power, and it was still just a tad too heavy. But this is a Triumph we’re talking about, and sportbikes are in their DNA. Fit some stiffer suspension, do a bit of headwork, swap in some custom-ground cams, and change out the stock wheels and bodywork for some lightweight parts. Voila: racebike! It’s obviously not quite that easy, but someone clearly put in the effort here: the description goes into great detail regarding the work and parts that went into building this successful racing machine.

From the Seller: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale

This is an off road only track bike, no street parts available. This bike dominated at the local track in the Formula Thunder class in early 2000’s. Once retired from active duty it was sold to its current owner in 2003. At that time it was taken to a well known local engine builder go through entire motor and chassis and make get it ready for its last race, a 4 hour endurance race. The motor was torn down and a full fresh build took place. Invoice provided for build. It was then broken in on the Dyno (see chart) and off to the races it went. Retired after the event, until it was brought in to us to find a new home. It had sat for a few years so we carefully went over it, good compression @185-200, changed oil, filter, flushed coolant, fresh fuel and bike came right to life!

Here is a quick list of the obvious and a note from professional Triumph engine builder Scott Zollars.

  • 885cc
  • Dymag magnesium wheels
  • Rare Yoshimura full exhaust
  • Attack Performance Triple clamps and rear suspension linkage
  • Pro Circuit Suspension re-valved front and rear suspension
  • Penske rear shock
  • Brembo Master cylinder and calipers
  • 320 mm rotors with custom caliper brackets for Brembo’s

“The cylinder head is a ported 885 from a speed triple. The cylinder liners are the aluminum with nickasil coating items from the earlier generation Super 3. In particular they are all number 2 cylinder liners as they had a tighter tolerance from the factory. The pistons were from the earlier Super 3 also as they were 12-1 hi compression pistons. The cylinder head was decked when it was ported. A final compression ratio of 13.0 sounds familiar. The cams are a custom grind from Web Cam. The valve springs are a custom set from Kibblewhite. The airbox is a crudely made custom item. However it proved to be very effective. The transmission gears were back cut. The shafts that the shift forks ride on were shortened to allow them to float in the case similar in fashion as to what was standard on R6’s etc. All rod and main bearings were the White bearings. Carillo connecting Rods. This is how I remember the bike being set up. Things may have changed since 2004 though” – Scott

From one of the local forums:

“05-15-2005, 12:47 AM – Scott Zollars was the man behind I-90 Motorsports race 885 Daytona. That bike dominated the Formula Thunder class at Pacific Raceway for four years.
Also he was involved with Jack Lilleys highly successful 595 Daytona. I think it was the first British bike to win a National in eighteen years? I know first hand that Scott is an expert with fuel injection, electronics, motors and fabrication”

Credits cards accepted, up to $150.00 documentation charge may be added.

Seattle Used Bikes
4905 Aurora Ave N.
Seattle, WA 98103
dave@seattleusedbikes.com
Closed Sun/Mon Find us on Facebook, Instagram and the Web

The seller also includes a short walkaround video of the bike running and the throttle being blipped. There are obviously more sensible track-day mounts, bikes that are simpler to get parts for and faster. But if I was in the market for a $7,000 track bike, I’d be very tempted by this Triumph. It’s obviously a highly-developed machine for that kind of money, and you couldn’t replicate it for anything like what the seller is asking: just the rare parts fitted would probably be worth the asking price, not to mention the hours spent building and tuning it. And if you’re looking to go racing in a vintage class, you could certainly do worse than starting with a competitive machine like this one!

-tad

Check out the other Triumph SUB has Featured on RSBFS: 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles ! Dave notes that a deal is possible on the pair! -dc

Featured Listing: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike for Sale
Triumph February 17, 2019 posted by

Mad About Saffron: 2000 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

This Triumph always makes me think of that classic Donovan song: “I’m just mad about Saffron, she’s just mad about me, they call me Mellow Yellow [quite rightly]” Honestly, it isn’t exactly mellow, but the Daytona 955i does look great in this pretty wild shade of yellow. It helps that the overall styling is simple and elegant, and there are no graphics to date the bike, but it’s still hard to believe this thing is nearly 20 years old now, and I think it’s one of the best-looking bikes of the period.

Designed as a road bike first and foremost, the 955i wasn’t intended to go head-to-head with sports multis from Japan. Which is a good thing, because in the rigorous instrumented testing that has always been popular for comparison tests when bikes are new, they blew the Triumph into the weeds. But while bench-racing and dyno comparisons may help sell the latest and greatest sportbikes and do offer an unbiased way to compare different machines, they don’t tell the whole story: then, as now, the Daytona is an excellent sportbike.

Back in the 90s Triumph made the calculated decision not to pitch their bike directly against the Japanese supertbike offerings. They knew they just didn’t have the resources to develop a bike that weighed less than, make more power than, or would turn laptimes within 1/10th of a second of them, so they went ahead and just made a pretty great all-around sportbike oriented towards the road. It’s a bit heavier, the riding position a bit more humane, the powerband more midrange-oriented, and the suspension just a little bit softer. All that meant the bike wasn’t the greatest at turning a hot lap, but a higher build-quality and timeless looks mean it’s a great bike for 95% of sportbike pilots, and those remaining 5% could ride the bike well enough

The original Daytona was available in three and four-cylinder versions, but only the triple got the nod for a redesign in 1997 seen here. It was redesigned in 2001 with a single, modern headlamp and a lighter, stiffer double-sided swingarm. That updated bike was much improved, but I prefer this earlier design, with the double headlight and the single-sided swingarm. This one appears to be in good condition, but miles aren’t especially low. The bike has the very cool undertail exhaust that several companies made for these when they were new, although I understand the official factory performance exhaust upgrade was the way to go for real improvements across the board.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Triumph 955i for Sale

This super bike is da BombDigity! It’s a real peach with only 21, 254 miles since birth. This machine is NOT for wimps or sissy-boys. When you grab the throttle on this 955cc, three cylinder throttle monster it’ll cause your ass to grab to seat OR… you just fall off. This monster comes with Triumph stock Brembo brakes on both tires. Speaking of tires these rubbers are brand new. Heck… wearing these rubbers just mike keep you safe in a Ron Jeremy movie starring Stormy Daniels. Remember what is was like to grab ahold of something and twist it and KNOW your day just got better? Well… This is the machine that will do that for you. This beast is fuel injected with an aftermarket Trident dual pipe under the seat. It already has the Battery Tender terminals attached to the batter so you can keep that battery fresh and ready to fire all year long. On a serious note though this example has never been track ridden and has only had two adult owners. This 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i is the bike that everyone wants to talk about and everyone loves to hear. 

This beast breathes through a larger, non-ram-air-equipped airbox with 46mm throttle bodies that feed a redesigned CNC-machined cylinder head featuring 1mm larger intake and 1mm smaller exhaust valves sitting at a narrow 23-degree included valve angle. New forged-aluminum pistons force a 12.0:1 compression ratio (over the previous 11.2:1 ratio), sitting atop stronger carburized connecting rods and a lighter crankshaft. This 955i pumps out somewhere in the neighborhood of 125 rear-wheel horsepower. On a dyno run that number bore with an impressive 128 hp at 10,500 rpm showing. The rear wheel is hung on a single-sided swing arm making for a killer look for sure.

The 955cc triple has no problem pulling the tall lower gears due to its stupendous amount of low and midrange torque. Big power starts at 4000 rpm (any lower than that requires a smooth throttle hand), launching the Daytona forward through the rev band like a locomotive on crystal meth; revs climb even quicker once the tach hits 7500 rpm, spinning up far faster than the old T595 ever could. The power continues to build up top, with the Triumph’s distinct exhaust timbre accompanying the blurring scenery.

The Triumph Daytona 955i can make time with the best of Japanese track weapons through the curves; it just generates its acceleration in a slightly less frantic manner. Despite the claims of a lighter crankshaft, the 955i still has a lot of flywheel effect. This can be a boon for riders less accustomed to the precise throttle control and gearbox manipulation necessary with a typical four-cylinder. Throttle application isn’t as critical, and sweeping turns where momentum is key allow you to showcase the Triumph’s stomping midrange. 

The best part of this bike is its near V-twin torque and low/midrange grunt with a four-cylinder’s screaming top end. The 955i is very deceptive in how it generates its speed. The gearing, especially in the lower cogs, is tall enough that the motor’s relatively loping gait fools you into thinking you aren’t really traveling that fast… until the next corner comes up. That tall gearing, however, when combined with the heavy flywheel effect, means care must be taken with downshifts during corner entries in the tighter stuff to avoid rear wheel hop.

If you’d like to come by and test ride this bike you must have in your possession a non-expired license with a motorcycle endorsement, you must have the full asking price of $5500USD in cash and you must let me hold the cash, your license and the keys to the vehicle you arrive in while you do the test ride.

Does anyone actually say “da BombDigity” anymore? Questionable taste in slang aside, this is a pretty great description of the bike, although the front brakes are Triumph-branded and not Brembo units. The seller does include the picture above showing damage to the tank with no explanation, and the scratch is gone in the other pictures, so it’s worth a message to the seller before bidding, considering he’s asking premium money for this one: the asking price is on the high side for a Daytona of this vintage at $6,500. Daytonas are especially appealing on the used market and offer pretty great value: they look great, have plenty of performance for all but the most hardcore road-racers, are reasonably reliable, and have been dirt-cheap for years now, although that’s bound to change sooner or later.

-tad

Triumph April 5, 2018 posted by

Low Mileage Future Classic: 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

The first generation of Triumph’s new line of motorcycles that followed their resurrection by John Bloor seemed calculated to avoid direct comparison with products from the Japanese manufacturers. They’d obviously learned from their past mistakes trying to match the high performance and low cost of their Big Four rivals, and the new lineup filled in the gaps in more conventional thinking: a sportbike that wouldn’t be legal in any major racing class, with comfortable ergonomics and a big, flexible engine. Or two engines? Check. A funky retro-roadster with classic looks and a three-cylinder engine? Check. And it worked: build quality was high and the bikes sold well enough to support a second generation of the machines that included the now-iconic bug-eyed Speed Triple, the versatile Tiger, and an updated Daytona like today’s sleek silver example.

The second generation of the Daytona introduced in 1997 still didn’t try to go head-to-head with bikes like the GSX-R750 or the GSX-R1100. In fact, with the four-cylinder version gone, it fell pretty much between those two in terms of character and performance: it was more powerful and more comfortable than the 750 and more agile than the 1100. The GSX-R1000 that came along later pretty much murdered the Daytona in terms of outright performance, but Hinkley’s big triple sportbike was one of the best roadbikes of the era, and the looks have aged very well.

Originally designated the T595, the revised, fuel-injected 955cc triple put out 128hp at the wheel and a healthy midrange. It was quickly renamed the 955i to avoid any misunderstandings regarding the big triple’s displacement. The single-sided swingarm is obviously for looks, since no one that I know of was racing them, and the simple, monochromatic paint suggests confidence in the design: I’ve always felt that wild graphics take away from a bike’s design and distract you from its actual silhouette, like you’re looking at some World War II combat ship with bold shapes painted on the hull to make it harder to hit with a torpedo… Anyway, I like these in Triumph’s vivid “burnt mustard” color, but this silver example looks very elegant and mature.

The smaller Daytona that was introduced in 2006 carried on Triumph’s tradition of oddball displacements, and that bike’s famously flexible 675cc triple ended up allowing Triumph to finally compete on nearly equal footing with the more traditional 600cc inline fours. Triumph fans have long clamored for a sportbike built around the bigger, 1050 engine from the Speed Triple, but a new bike based around the 765cc version might be a great alternative to Ducati’s “supermid” 959 Panigale and MV Agusta’s F3 800…

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale

Frankly, there is not too much to say about a 2001 Triumph 955i that has accumulated just over 3,600 California miles since it was delivered in 2001! We will take this opportunity to clarify a few important points, and provide a history of the bike that many believe represents one of the best high performance sports bikes ever produced by Triumph. Specifically:

  • From a cosmetic and mechanical perspective, the bike remains in excellent condition in every respect… no surprises, no excuses.
  • Within a few months the bike was fully inspected and serviced by the local Triumph dealer. The bike has always received “expense no object” care and has been ridden occasionally to ensure full operation at all times. Of course, it has never seen rain.
  • The 955i has always been licensed and carries a clear California title
  • No surprises, accidents, replaced components, aftermarket parts… 100% stock
  • No modifications
  • Stand shown not included
  • Owner’s manual included

Note: This is a serious super bike and we recommend that only experienced riders consider the purchase of a bike that is capable of speeds over 165 mph with ¼ mile speeds reaching 130+ mph when piloted by a capable rider.

In any event, if you have a hankering for an absolutely pristine example of Triumph’s comeback kid, you’re in the right place. There is very little time left on the auction and bidding is up over $4,500 with very active bidding. This is more than you typically see for an early Daytona like this one, but mileage is outrageously low, and appears to be one of the very last built before a significant redesign in 2001 that resulted in a much improved, but less attractive motorcycle.

-tad

Low Mileage Future Classic: 2001 Triumph Daytona 955i for Sale
Triumph May 2, 2015 posted by

1st of the 2nd: 1st gen Triumph T595 Daytona in yellow

t5953

1997 Triumph T595 (955cc) Daytona for sale on ebay

Here is a personal favorite of yours truly, a 1st generation Triumph Daytona T595.  Although these bikes carried a model designation of “T595”, the 1st generation of the reborn Daytona actually featured a 955 cc displacement three-cylinder engine designed in part by Lotus.   Along with the other triple-cylinder Triumphs, the Daytona helped to establish the newly reborn Triumph as a real alternative motorcycle manufacturer.

The big Daytona was the first serious big sportbike for the reborn Triumph but it couldn’t compete with the best the Japanese had to offer (especially when Yamaha brought out the R1 in 1998).  While the big Daytona wasn’t able to match the hardcore sportbikes from Japan, it was big, fast, smooth, comfy, able to do medium level touring while still looking great.  The big triple was often referred to as a British version of the Honda VFR and even though the bike couldn’t compete with the hyperbikes appearing out of Japan, reviewers were generally positive.

Here is an excerpt from Viserdown.com:

Judge the bike by its lap times and you’d have to agree; the T595 never matches the Japanese competition but the big Triumph does have two real aces. The first is personality which counts for an awful lot, much more to most of us than shaving fractions of seconds off lap times. In the Daytona’s case much of it comes from the Triumph three cylinder engine’s rough charm. The second ace is it’s a bike which works better on real roads than it does on a racetrack. It’s more stable and easy to use than the Japanese competition.

t5954

This 1997 Daytona T595 looks amazingly clean with only 9263 miles.  There are a few nicks in the paint but certainly nothing major and no evidence of the bike being down.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • 100% original ’97 Triumph Daytona T595 (955cc)
  • New TORS carbon low exhaust + updated to corresponding tune
  • Service done in the last 50 miles includes
  • Valve adjustment
    Entire intake tract cleaned. Spotless down to the valves.
    Injectors pro cleaned + flow benched
    New fuel pump, pressure regulator, fuel filter, hoses, + dry break fittings
    Coolant flush + fill w/ engine ice
    Flushed brakes
    New plugs, air filter, hoses, gaskets, o-rings, grommets, etc.

  • New AGM battery 1 year ago on float
  • Only non-triumph parts are the fuel pump + pressure regulator<
  • Only cosmetic flaws are ichip in the rear lens + few small paint chips on fender and tank.
  • Bike has been in the family since 1999. Tires should be replaced soon, lot of tread but old

t5956

Is this big Daytona worth the $3,800 asking price?  Well while the 1998 version in silver (when it was marked as the 955i) is the most popular among collectors, this is still a hell of a lot of bike for not much money. Overall I think this one is being offered at pretty close to the right price and may be a good opportunity for a “more experienced” rider who still wants a sportbike to have something that can do everything they need.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

1st of the 2nd:  1st gen Triumph T595 Daytona in yellow
Triumph August 28, 2014 posted by

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595

Fast, classy, and just a bit different, this Triumph Daytona T595 represented a huge change in thinking for the recently resurrected company. Early on in Triumph’s John Bloor era, cost-cutting measures that didn’t compromise reliability or quality were in full-effect, and basically all of their bikes were based around a common frame and two engines, which gave plenty of versatility to create new models by simply swapping parts around. So a 900cc triple or a 1200cc four could be slotted in, with different bodywork and suspension fitted to create a range of motorcycles that eventually included a dual-sport, a sport bike, a sport touring bike, and a naked roadster.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Front

The resulting motorcycles were never be able to compete directly with more pure and focused designs: multi-purpose engines and frames were always going to be too heavy, and not optimized for specific tasks. But the designs were modern and significantly improved on the reliability and usability of the older Triumphs, helping pave the way for the Triumphs of today.

And even though the bikes were generally not focused enough to really compete against dedicated sportbikes from Japan, they had far more character, good looks, were sized for larger riders, and were uncommon enough for folks looking for something different than the usual shrieking fours. The original Daytona came in both four and triple flavors, although the added weight of the larger four cylinder moved it even further towards the sport-touring end of the spectrum.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Rear

The second generation of the Daytona was a big leap forward in terms of both style and performance. While the unfortunately-designated T595 sounds like it should be packing a 600cc motor, it’s got a big, meaty 955cc triple that pumps out 130hp. Like the earlier Daytona, the T595 was a bit too heavy for serious track duty, but as a road-weapon it was hard to beat, with a comfortable seating position, excellent brakes, and plenty of torque. Very much a GT, the perfect bike for folks who wanted to buy British but also wanted a completely modern machine.

Some minor low-production-volume quirks aside, the Daytona delivered.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Triumph Daytona for Sale

Check out this super cool and hard to find bike!! 1997 Triumph Daytona T595 in Strontium Yellow. A real classic sport bike. Lots of performance and great styling to boot. The 955cc in line three cylinder engine with 130 horses and 74 foot pounds of torque makes this baby boogie. With almost a five gallon fuel tank, a six speed transmission, and a low weight of only 435 pounds you can great range and travel on this bike.  This bike has super low miles for the year with only 11,280 clicks on the odometer the Daytona has only averaged about 660 miles a year. Very clean bike and freshly serviced. Priced right and ready to roll today.

These aren’t especially rare, but they’re pretty hard to find in such nice original condition. I loved the styling at the time, especially in silver, and I think it’s aged pretty well. Too curvy by far to look modern, the proportions are very nice and a lack of outrageous graphics favored by Japanese manufacturers keeps things simple and elegant. This is one of those bikes that, like the GSX-R 1100, I’d love an excuse to buy: a long highway commute, or as a weekend getaway machine.

1997 Triumph Daytona L Rear

It’s unfortunate that Triumph doesn’t make a big-bore Daytona today: just take a Speed Triple and fit a fairing. It wouldn’t be competitive in  any eligible race classes, but neither was the old one. In today’s market, where “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” seems to be less and less of a concern and bikes with oddball-displacements like Kawi’s 636 and Ducati’s 899 offer additional choice and high performance in a very sporty package, it seems a no-brainer, especially considering the success and popularity of Triumph’s 675 Daytona.

-tad

1997 Triumph Daytona L Side

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595