Posts by tag: SuperBike

Ducati December 12, 2019 posted by

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Ducati’s instantly recognizable 916 series of superbikes remain surprisingly affordable, considering their pedigree and perceived rarity. But the same basic design was in production from 1994 to 2004 and Ducati made a shedload of them. Sure, the SPS and R bikes are extremely rare, but regular production bikes like this 996 Biposto aren’t too hard to find in good shape, although most have accumulated way more mileage than seen here…

The 996 debuted in 1999 as an evolution of the 916. It might look virtually identical, but featured a host of subtle upgrades to the original bike, including changes to the frame, fuel injection and, most notably, the engine. The original 916 cases started to fail under racing conditions when punched out beyond 955cc, a disadvantage when World Superbike rules allowed twins up to 1000cc. The revised engine was first seen in the 916SPS and the 996 used the same cases, although the rest of the engine was in a lower state of tune, with milder cams and injection tuning to match.

It was followed by the 998 in 2002 that saw the introduction of the “Testastretta” or “narrow-head” engine that offered significantly improved power, making the 998 the fastest version of the bike, although a torque-rich 112 horses meant that the 996 was considered to be plenty fast. An Öhlins shock is matched to a set of quality Showa forks, and I much prefer these later five-spoke wheels to the original 916’s three-spoke design.

Right now, it seems like the 996 is the value proposition of the group. The 916 is the original and desirable for that reason, and the 998 the most powerful and well-developed. It’s not the fastest, or the rarest, but if you want a 916-style bike, this 996 Biposto offers a blend of handling and power, along with marginal passenger accommodations if your significant other is both petite and brave. And yellow bodywork

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Yes, this bike only has 1806 original miles! Collect it or ride it? You choose. Sharp looking yellow 996 that GP Motorcycles just changed all the fluids on and just replaced the timing belts. Bike still has original tires so you would want to change those if you are going to ride the bike but other than that, this thing is ready to go. Don’t miss out on this classic Ducati Superbike.

GP Motorcycles down in San Diego is offering this very clean, very low-mileage 996 for $6,999.00. Aside from the corroded paint on the brake fluid cap and the fogged headlight lenses, it’s very clean and comes with a set of Arrow slip-ons that were a popular choice when the bike was new. They aren’t my favorite in terms of exhaust note, but easy to change if you don’t like them. If you’re looking for a very sharp collectible and can’t spring for one of the more exotic Ducatis, this would be a pretty low-priced way to pick up a pretty pristine example of Tamburini’s iconic superbike. Assuming you’re okay with yellow, instead of classic Ducati red.

-tad

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale
Featured Listing December 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles !

Triumph entered the battle for sport riders’ hearts and minds in 1997 with their clean-sheet design T595.  The marketing blunder that left casual shoppers thinking it’s a 600 is far in the rear-view and just adds another point of interest for fans.  Seattle Used Bikes presents this slightly used and carefully updated Triumph T595.

1998 Triumph T595 with 2,518 miles!

Triumph built on their success with the T300 engine and produced another triple in the T5, a little torquier and with a scruffier sound than the usual inline four.  High compression (11.2:1) and electronic fuel injection conspired to deliver 130hp and 74 ft.-lbs. torque.  The twin double-tube chassis was all new and inspired confidence with adjustable suspension and excellent Nissin brakes.  The fairing design carved out its own character with dual headlights and Euro parking light, and hard covered pillion.

Seemingly set up for the long run, ten times the mileage would be expected on this T595.  But after Dymag carbon wheels, carbon muffler and ECU update, HeliBar risers, and bar-end mirrors were installed it was ridden only sparingly and looks better than excellent.  Seattle Used Bikes has added all new expendables ( fluids, battery, and tires ) for the next owner, and asks $7,999.  From their – website – :

This beautiful black 1998 Triumph Daytona T595 just arrived on our doorstep last month.  This is another one out of a friends private collection.  As you can see it just has a bit over 2,500 original miles, it was really set up properly when new by Scott Zollars at the Cycle Barn. Check out the carbon fiber Dymag wheels!!  It also has a hard to find, Triumph factory carbon slip on, a remapped ECU, raised HeliBars for added comfort, with CRG bar-end mirrors and upgraded rear suspension link from Attack performance.  We just gave it a fresh service, new fluids, new Dunlop Q3’s tires and battery.  If you are a fan of the early Daytona 955i’s this is probably the nicest one available for sale at this time. Can go back to stock wheels and save $1200.

Despite coming up on 100 years of Triumph cycles, John Bloor’s re-imagined company didn’t have a generation of superbike racing to lean on, and their 955cc family was never going to challenge those makers on the track.  But the T595 and renamed 955i caught quite a following, filling a European-designed niche in the sport market.  This example is practically unused and certainly better than new, and ready for next season.  Contact Seattle Used Bikes on (206) 535-6812 or by email – here -.

-donn

Check out the other Triumph SUB has Featured on RSBFS: 1998 Triumph Daytona Ex Formula Thunder Race Bike! Dave notes that a deal is possible on the pair! -dc

Featured Listing – 1998 Triumph T595 with just 2,518 miles !
Ducati November 20, 2019 posted by

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

It’s common for manufacturers to fudge things a bit when identifying their cars and motorcycles. Often, the name specifically referred to at least the approximate size of the engine, but liberties are often taken, especially when the displacement changes, but the name stays the same. The Mustang 5.0? Actually 302ci works out to 4948cc, which you should probably round down to 4.9 liters… But it’s pretty close at least, and sounds much cooler. Can you imagine Vanilla Ice crusin’ in his four-point-nine? Bike manufacturers are even worse about rounding things off to sound good. The Norton Commando 850 was packing 828cc, and the Ducati Pantah 600 had 583cc. Fortunately, Ducati redeemed themselves with the oddly-specific 888 SPO…

Until the introduction of the the also-accurately-named 851, Ducati made do with air/oil-cooled engines, and relied on their light weight and agility to compete against more poerful machines. Unfortunately, the handling of Japanese superbikes continued to improve by leaps and bounds, and the Italians knew the only way to stay competitive in production racing would be to evolve. Ducati’s 851 superbike was powered by an extensive redesign of their 90° v-twin that added liquid cooling and four valves per cylinder, with all eight actuated by the company’s famed Desmodromic system. The system basically eliminated valve float, although high mean piston speeds were a much bigger issue for a 10,000rpm v-twin. A more important advantage probably came from the ability to use more aggressive cam profiles to both open and close the valves.

The 888 that followed naturally used a slightly larger, more developed version of that engine. A six-speed gearbox backed by an exotic dry clutch gave racing credibility, along with that characteristic Ducati rattle that is often louder than the exhaust at idle, especially on a stock bike. Two versions of the bike were available in most markets: the 888 Strada and the higher-performance 888 SP5. The SP5 wasn’t road-legal here in the USA, so we got a bike that really slotted in between the two Euro versions called the SPO or “Sport Production Omologato” that was intended to homologate the bike for AMA racing. Unlike the Strada, the SPO had a solo-seat tail, upswept exhaust for more cornering clearance, and an Öhlins shock. A heavier steel subframe was used in place of the SP5’s aluminum unit, and the engine was basically in the same state of tune as the Strada, with around 100hp and a meaty torque band.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale

1993 Ducati 888 SPO with 4824 original miles and in excellent condition.  

Purchased new in the Seattle area and stayed a local bike all its life. Documented history throughout its 4824 miles, beginning from original purchase agreement in 1993 (pictured). Last full service (includes belts adjustment) done at 4600 miles in 2015. All major parts are original, including radiator (pictured) which shows matching usage/wear to the bike’s mileage. Pipes were upgraded to Ferraccis back when the bike was new, and coolant hoses were replaced during the last service in 2015. Also recently replaced the fairing fasteners to period correct OEM fasteners as the gold plating on the originals were faded due to age.

Title is free and clear, and comes with 2 original keys and owners manual. Stand is not included.

This bike has very low miles and includes the desirable, period-correct Fast by Ferracci exhaust is a nice option that should add a period-correct exhaust note. The seller is asking a very steep $16,500 for this one, but it’s very original, well-kept, and you’ll likely not find another in this kind of condition if you’re looking to grab an SPO for your collection.

-tad

Truth in Advertising: 1993 Ducati 888 SPO for Sale
Yamaha November 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

Update 11.27.2019: SOLD in less than three weeks! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Say you’re a Yamaha fan and you want to collect something significant. Where do you start? Well, rare homologation machines are always a great place to look. Think you want an OW-01? You might find that mighty machine to be very, very expensive, and not as rare as you think. If you really want to buy the right bike at the right time, the homologation machine to check out is the 1980s FZR750R variants. Built to go AMA Superbike racing, the FZR750R line was fast and trick, and continues to be an affordable collector option today. Take for example today’s Featured Listing: a 1987 Yamaha FZR750R “T” model.

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT

To build the FZR750R, Yamaha invested in new technology. To build the DeltaBox frame, for instance, Yamaha adopted robotic procedures for folding and welding the thin aluminum components. This stiff but light frame housed the all-important, 106 horsepower “Genesis” engine. Sporting a unique valve train consisting of 5 valves per cylinder (3 intake, 2 exhaust), the Genesis engine family also maximized weight bias by canting the cylinder bank forward to place more weight lower and closer to the front tire. Between the high RPM capability offered by the airflow through the head (and straight-shot downdraft carbs) and the handling afforded by the chassis and ideal weight distribution, the FZR750R was a potent competitor on the racetrack.

From the seller:
Original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT, #2** of 500 Homologation specials for 1987 , this is a Canadian market bike with 26290kms

This bike is a unrestored survivor in excellent overall condition and does not appear to have been raced (no drilled brake caliper bolts, axles etc etc) the exhaust has never been painted from new. There are some scratches to the protruding air intakes on both sides of the fairing as shown, the fairing is not cracked or split in any way in these areas.

This bike is in very original condition, with all the original reflectors, grips, handlebar ends leavers footrests, windshield and trim. The bike has been fully serviced: valve clearances done, carbs serviced and balanced, it has brand new Bridgestone Battleax tires front and rear, everything works as the should.

Comes with the original owners manual in English / French as it is a Canadian.

Asking Price: $5,950 USD

The anecdotal stories suggest that Yamaha dealers were discouraged to offering these homologation machines to buyers intent on utilizing them on the street; after all, Yamaha built these bikes to go racing. And while many FZR750Rs were raced, we have (thankfully) seen a number of these bikes show up on the street. Some have been reconverted from the race bike status. This particular example appears to have been saved the hard life of the race track, and has instead lived its life as a pampered street bike. That is a plus for collectors. That is not to say that this bike has not been used – with 16,000 miles on the all-metric clocks this is not a garage queen, but looks to be in complete and original form.

Yamaha produced but 200 of these particular bikes for the US market, and only 500 world wide. Those are some pretty low numbers by “Limited Edition” standards, and you are looking at the #2 bike in the production series. But before you think “that will cost me an arm and a leg,” the seller is only asking $5,950. That is right in the sweet spot of where these amazing machines are today, and an amazing deal when you consider that this was destined for AMA Superbike competition. The bike is located in Osaka, Japan, and the owner is willing to talk about crating, domestic shipping or (I hear vacation!) local pick up. Check out the picks and then drop Trev a line. Homologation bikes are hot, and the FZR750R has been the underappreciated step child of the genre. These are bound to go up, so we recommend picking up a great example before the market discovers them. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT
Bimota October 16, 2019 posted by

A Good Fit – 1987 Bimota YB5

Even Bimota was not immune to the siren call of Yamaha’s 130 hp FJ1200, producing one of their only biposto models.  This example has been carefully preserved in South Africa.

1987 Bimota YB5 ( South Africa ) for sale on eBay

Yamaha had recently given their air/oil-cooled four a big displacement bump and tuned it for a torque band that made shifting almost unnecessary.  The massive lump was narrower than usual since the alternator was placed behind the cylinders rather than at the end of the crank.  At the front of the interesting cradle and spar chassis, Marzocchi supplied 42mm forks, and Bimota fabricated their own swingarm.  Wheels were eighteens front and rear, more of a GT solution, along with 280mm Brembo brakes.  The body-color pillion cover is easily removable should a volunteer turn up.

This owner has a couple of other very collectible bikes at auction, all looking excellent though a long boat or plane ride away.  Close-up photos show the finishes to be unblemished, with just under 10,000 miles the paint almost looks wet.  From the eBay auction:

Number 18 out of 208 units ever produced. 
Bimota YB5’s do not come up for sale often, so this is the perfect opportunity to add a prime example of one to your collection. 
She handles surprisingly well considering a dry weight of 210 Kg.
Apart from the turn signals, mirrors and windscreen everything else is still original. Even the factory paintwork has been preserved.
The YB5 has been part of my private collection for the past five years in which time the vehicle only accumulated less than 500 Km.
The tires were replaced about two years ago and a full service, including replacing the brake pads and the battery was completed three weeks ago.

Bimota couldn’t do much about the mass of that gorgeous drivetrain, though they reduced the dry weight to just under 500 lbs., and balanced the package to neutralize handling.  The YB5’s rake and trail numbers are substantially less than the donor FJ, lightening the handling and stipulating a steering damper.  Low profile tires were specified for the bike, which reduced the gyroscopic effect of the larger wheels.  The “skinny” 1200 slips into the sleek fairing and can take two for a wicked sporty ride.

-donn

A Good Fit – 1987 Bimota YB5
Suzuki October 8, 2019 posted by

Spring has Sprung – 1982 Suzuki GSX-1100SXZ Katana

– At least in the seller’s Cape Town home.  This low-mile Katana is an excellent original and unusual -SXZ variant that was only offered south of the equator.

1982 Suzuki GSX-1100SXZ ( South Africa ) for sale on eBay

As 1980 approached, Suzuki was having its way on the track and in the showroom, and the SXZ was specified by the New Zealand importer to homologate the model for racing down that way.  Beside the radical look of the Hans Muth design, these Katanas came with spoked wheels ( 18-inch rear ), bigger brakes, carburettors and exhaust, and performance camshafts.  Actual tech for the time meant air cooling, right-side-up forks, and twin shocks.  Even with power bumped up from the usual -S’s 111 hp, the 500-plus pound dry weight was undeniable.  But it made for a great endurance racer and GT.

This owner has had some knowledge of the SXZ’s special lineage, and preserved it beautifully.  Some close-up details would be nice, but metals and finishes look close to faultless in what’s shown here.  Most bikes closing in on their 40th birthday have had some degree of customization, but this Katana is very original.

I am the second owner of this very special Katana for the past twenty-six years.
The mileage is low for the age of the vehicle.
In total, she has done just over 17,000 Km (10,493 miles) of which I have done about 7,500 Km (4,630 miles) during my 26 years of ownership.
She is in mint condition, well maintained and recently serviced.

The factory’s change to an 18-inch rear wheel is puzzling, maybe it was deemed the easiest way to increase ground clearance and decrease the rake angle, lending more quickness to the steering head.  The up-and-coming GSX-R put the kibosh on the Katana’s racing career, but the model has had a lasting impact on Suzuki’s stable, being revived this year as a 2020 model.  For a fan with the time and resources for an international purchase, this looks like a special opportunity.

-donn

Spring has Sprung – 1982 Suzuki GSX-1100SXZ Katana
Kawasaki September 28, 2019 posted by

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

It came up recently in the comments section, but I got into motorcycles relatively late in life. I mean, I always thought they were cool, but they just seemed so dangerous, and I knew I’d never hear the end of it from my family and friends. They’re also of limited practical value in the northeastern US as primary transportation, unless you’re a masochist or have Yeti DNA. When I finally got one here in California, I used economics to justify it: just $500 got me a runner. And that still holds true: if you’re into motorsports and have a limited budget, just what kind of worthwhile car can you get for five to ten grand? And if you live in Southern California, where would you keep a fun hobby car anyway? But you can fit a small collection of bikes into a single parking spot. And a nice, classic superbike like this 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 can be had for that kind of money.

The late 1980s and 1990s were a golden period of superbike development. The basic formula was set, and the Japanese manufacturers were hard at work perfecting their creations. Only Ducati really went their own way with a v-twin: Suzuki, Kawasaki, Yamaha, and Honda all stuck with inline fours for their mass production machines, with the very limited-production RC30 and RC45 homologation machines from Honda being notable exceptions. Kawasaki’s ZX-7, known in other markets as the ZXR750, used a 748cc four that squeaked in under the 750cc limit for four-cylinder superbikes, a move that allowed the machine to be used in production-based racing series.

That engine was hung in a stiff aluminum frame, and backed by a six-speed gearbox. Power was rated at 105hp and the bike wasn’t especially lightweight at 450lbs dry, but there was the potential for more in the hands of skilled tuners, and the ZX-7 was famously terrific under braking and had excellent mid-corner stability. It might not have been the best bike on paper, but the Kawasaki found plenty of success in a variety of racing here in the US and abroad. This example isn’t perfect, or even stock, but looks like a sharp rider or a rolling restoration project. It’s not flawless, but has low miles and appears to have been sympathetically maintained.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

1994 ZX-7 (ZX750L) with 9,812 original miles.

Original plastics – All VIN tags in place.

Engine/Frame/etc. all very clean.  No leaks.

New tires, fresh oil change (Mobil 1), new sprockets all this year.

Runs and Rides great (see video).

Light damage on left side from falling off lift while stationary.

Muzzy full system with correct jetting.

Original turn signals etc. will be included.

CLEAN NC TITLE IN HAND.

The seller has also helpfully included a nice, high-res video of the bike. So what’s to like here? The low miles, the likely reasonable final price, compared to a more exotic ZX-7RR, the period Muzzy pipe, and classic superbike looks. What’s not to like? The fact that it’s just a standard ZX-7 and the minor damage the seller mentions. The front and rear turn signals are also missing, along with the rear fender, although those shouldn’t be too hard to source if you want to switch things closer to stock. I doubt these will ever be worth crazy money, but it’s certainly a bike that should go up in value and you’ll be able to ride it in the meantime without worrying too much about either damaging an ultra-rare exotic or devaluing it by adding too many miles.

-tad

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale
Featured Listing September 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Low mileage 2000 Yamaha R1

As we spill countless pixels on aging, air-cooled weapons of yesteryear, bikes that ride on weird anti-dive forks and odd-size tires, it’s easy to forget that machines like the first-generation Yamaha R1 are quickly approaching classic status but can still hang with modern stuff. As traction control and other rider aids become the norm, that is less and less true, but to the average guy, the difference is still miniscule.

That’s why bikes like today’s 2000 Yamaha R1 are so appealing. For starters, it’s an example of a bike that carries the weight of every superlative and cliched modifier you can stack on it. Game changer? Yep. Fastest of its time? Yep. Racebike with taillights? Yep. In 1998 when this first R1 bowed, there simply was no equal in any dealership. More refined rides existed, but as would-be road racers soon found out, this thing would see the big end of 140 before the end of the street (if you had a straight, deserted road you might hit upper 160’s) and make long sweepers into tight esses.

This 2000 Yamaha R1 has been very well looked after, with less than 5,000 miles on the dial and just a few small blems to show for its 19 years. It has brand-new tires, and a recent carb clean, oil change and tank flush. A D&D exhaust is the only deviation from stock.

From the seller:

I am the second owner of this absolutely stunning 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 with only 4874 miles (may go up slightly for short ride). A true game changers and a definite appreciating classic. Aside from the D&D slip on exhaust this R1 is completely stock. Brand new tires (Michelin Pilot Power). Just had a carb clean, oil/filter change and tank flush performed. The bike runs fantastic – as good as it looks. No leaks. Transmission works great as does all lights/blinkers/horn. This bike is turn key ready to ride needs nothing!

There are a few small paint imperfections that I have pointed out in pics. Nothing serious but I know how nerve wracking it can be buying a bike sight unseen. Please check the pics and video. Any questions just ask.

Location: Houston, Texas
$4750 Negotiable.
Russr33@gmail.com

You can see a start up/running video of the bike here:

Make no mistake, at $4,750 OBO, this thing will move quickly, and it won’t be long before that price is absolutely unheard of for an unmolested early R1. Get at our boy Russ at russr33@gmail.com to make the deal.

Featured Listing: Low mileage 2000 Yamaha R1