Posts by tag: paso

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Ducati November 15, 2021 posted by

Aging Gracefully: 1988 Ducati 750 Paso

From the archives of relatively recent history comes the curious story of the Ducati Paso. Utterly polarizing, the Paso was unlike anything that could be found on the roads at the time, and seemed to be either absolutely loved, or completely hated by the public; middle ground was not to be found. The fully-faired machine was a bit of a rarity at the time, as only Honda had a similarly enclosed model in the Hurricane of the same year. But the Honda was liquid cooled, while Ducati engineers managed to hide the mechanicals from prying eyes while still retaining the air-cooled Pantah motor. Other highlights included a square tubing steel frame, aluminum swing arm, 16″ wheels front AND back, and the use of a Weber 2-barrel automotive carburetor.

1988 Ducati 750 Paso for sale on eBay

From the seller:
1988 Ducati desmo 750 paso
Excellent condition
7000 miles
Clean title
Including 2 seats
Runs excellent

From a performance perspective, the Paso failed to take the fight to the Japanese. The unique styling did help it garner some acclaim which did help a bit with sales, but the Paso was not really a cut-and-thrust sport bike in the same vein as the Big Four middleweights of the day. Rather, the Paso gained favor with the sporting tour set, placing more emphasis on “sport” than tour, but capable of doing both with style and grace. Not back for a bike named after a racer (Renzo “Paso” Pasolini) and meant to save the flagging fortunes of a proud Italian brand recently taken over by Cagiva.

The financial reality of the Paso is that these tend not to be collector bikes…yet. That time may yet come when people look back fondly on where Italian style and unbridled enthusiasm produced a distinct period piece, but for now these represent a relatively frugal way to own Italian v-twin exotic that continues to turn heads. Today’s example has but 7,000 miles and looks as clean as you might expect. Check out all of the pictures, and consider the future of the striking silhouette that is the Paso. Do you dream of a Paso in your garage? Check out all of the details here, and then jump to the comments and let us know your thoughts. Good Luck!!

MI

Ducati March 11, 2021 posted by

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

Welcome to one of the most polarizing models in Ducati history. Perhaps second to only the 749/999 series, the Paso was a little bit like the un-Ducati. With full bodywork resembling more of a a monolithic, monochromatic sport tourer, the Paso took styling in an entirely new direction. Thankfully under the covers the DNA and performance of the F1 Pantah series remained, ensuring lots of lumpy, torquey goodness.

1988 Ducati Paso 750 for sale on eBay

Strip away the Paso’s fully enclosed bodywork (purported to vent away engine heat in a controlled manner) and you would essentially be looking at a Ducati 750 F1 mill with a reversed rear (upright) cylinder head to allow for both barrels to breathe through an automotive-styled carb between the vee. This also simplified the rear exhaust routing somewhat, although the collector is a work of art. The chassis is not quite what you would expect from a company that built round-tube trellis frames for decades, but all covered up in bodywork you would never know the Paso is based on a square tubing cantilever arrangement utilizing the engine as a stressed member. And speaking of bodywork, you may note similarities between the Paso and the Bimota DB1 – after all, they were both the brain child of designer Massimo Tamburini. All in all, the package worked well, yet was a significant departure from the classic lines of pervious Ducatis. The Paso was loved fervently by some, while hated by others.

From the seller:
Excellent example of the Ducati that is credited for saving the brand from disappearing, desinged by Massimo Tamburini, the legend behind Bimota, Ducati and MV Agusta. Paso 750 is powered by 748 cc Desmodue engine, the same Pantah motor from the Ducati 750 F1. Engine starts easy, runs great without overheating or smoking. Originally powered by a Weber carburator which was often the cause of high engine temps especially in traffic, this Paso has been upgraded to a Keihin 39mm flat slide. It currently retains OEM exhaust but an upgrade to an aftermarket system will allow for much better breathing motor.

The heads have been upgraded to M750 which increase the valve adjustment intervals while offering improved valve guides as the originals had a tendency to wear out rather quickly. The cam belts were replaced approximately 3 years ago and the valves were adjusted at the same time. There is around 2600 miles on the oil and filter. All lights and signals as well as the horn work perfect. Even the clock!

The front forks with anti-dive technology were very advanced for their time. Swing arm is lightweight alloy with concentric chain adjuster. This Paso rides on factory original Marvic aluminum wheels, tires have around 3500 miles but still have plenty of thread and perform fine in the canyons.

More from the seller:
Factory blue color is a rare find for a Paso, with some sources claiming only 50 or so were painted in this color. This Paso has been completely refinished by previous owner with correct decals applied and cleared over to prevent them from fading or pealing. Bike looks like new!

Keep in mind this is a 33 year old bike and it will have few quirks and needs. The fuel gauge works but it tends to bounce a bit, especially if the fuel level is at or below half mark. There is a very minor oil leak coming from what appears to be an oil pan gasket. Due to the conversion to Keihin flat slide, the choke has been disconnected.

Sold with a clean California title. Registration is expiring on 3/10/21 and was changed to non-operational to avoid any back fees. The Paso is sold “as is, where is”. In case of shipping, it will be responsibility of the buyer. I will work with the shipper to accomodate their time schedule. Please make arrangements and ask questions before buying.

The Paso offered here is a great combination of updated pricey mechanical components and cosmetic refresh. The motor is a very desireable Pantah mill that is gaining traction with the collectors. It is rare, it is cool and its very fun bike to ride. Overall this motorcycle is an inexpensive entry into vintage Ducati world!

The Paso lineup has yet to see the light of day when it comes to collectors and appreciating values. With 35 years gone since introduction, there are signs that some of that reticence is beginning to change. To find an exceptionally clean and original anything 33 years later makes it more rare than the day it rolled off the showroom floor. And sadly many of these models – after dropping in value – fell into the hands of those who could not (or would not) give them the care and maintenance they deserved.

To be clear, this particular Paso is not strictly a bone-stock example. The seller does a good job outlining the mods made, and the switch from the stock Weber carb is a popular one (Ducati eventually introduced fuel injection in later models), although pictures of the carb throat sans filter make me nervous. The rest of the bike looks used but clean, and readers should note that it has travelled nearly 24,000 miles. Mileage is not an issue with these models provided proper maintenance has been adhered to, but if you are seeking a zero mile bike look elsewhere. There are lots of good photos provided by the seller, so check out all of the details here. On which side of the Paso debate do you fall? Unloved, or unloveable? Let us know in the comments. Good Luck!!

MI

Bleautiful: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati January 23, 2020 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750

This Featured Listing is part of the The Edinger Ducati Collection. Thank you for supporting the site, David! -dc

That Ducati Paso 750s don’t get the pure adulation that they deserve from anyone outside dyed-in-the-wool Ducatisti is baffling. Sure, they’re looks might aptly be described as controversial and they never had world-beating power, but their place in motorcycling is as important as any mid-80’s Japanese rocket.

Most importantly, the bike saved Ducati from the scrapyard of history, pulling together the earliest versions of the brand’s modern hallmarks under new corporate ownership. Second, however controversial it might have been, their styling is uniquely Italian, uniquely 1980s and at the time was from outer space. The man who penned it, Massimo Tamburini, went on to give the world the Ducati 916 and the Ducati Monster.

So, it’s safe to say without the oddly charming Paso, with its belt-driven cam engine and fiberglass fetish, the Ducatis we drool over now might never have appeared. If we’ve piqued your interest, this 1988 Ducati Paso 750 is the pick of the litter.

With fewer than 1,500 miles on the dial since new, and wearing the rare-as-frog-hair blue bodywork, this Paso rightfully should end up in a museum. According to the seller, it’s one of just 55 sold in this color scheme worldwide.

From the seller:

This blue model Paso is very limited in numbers with only 55 sold worldwide and only has 1,486 miles which allows you to have a brand new antique. The Ducati Paso 750 was the first road going product to come out of the Cagiva-Ducati relationship, launched in 1985 when Cagiva purchased Ducati from the Italian government. Cagiva rushed to get it ready for the 1985 Milan motorcycle show. The bike has a set of Conti slip ons however the stock exhausts come with the sale of the motorcycle. This is a very comfortable bike for both the rider and the passenger.

Between 1986 and 1988, Ducati only sold 4,863 Paso 750s. It’s important because it was the first Ducati product designed by Massimo Tamburini, co-founder of Bimota, and the man who would go on to design the Ducati 916, and the MV Agusta F4, both considered to be two of the world’s most beautiful modern motorcycles.

For the Paso 750, Tamburini cloaked the entire motorcycle behind fiberglass and plastic panels, hiding all the mechanical parts. For the time, the Paso was packed with state-of-the-art features: square chromoly steel tube perimeter chassis, an aluminum rear swing arm, and aluminum Marvic 16-inch wheels wrapped in radial tires.

The Paso 750’s calling card was in the parts department. The 42mm anti-dive front forks were pretty huge for the era, and there was a stout fork brace built right into the front fender. At the rear, the rising-rate “Pro-Link”-style Ohlins monoshock was adjustable for preload, compression and rebound damping.

It is equipped with the belt-drive Pantah motor which was a strong and capable engine, and known to deliver in the Ducati 750 F1.

The bike’s instruments were nestled in a binnacle that on normal machines would be covered by a tinted plexiglass windscreen, but on the Paso was an extension of the bodywork. They were made up of equal-sized speedometer and tachometer, along with a fuel gauge.

The Paso was lauded as “the best-equipped Eurobike ever to take on the Japanese in the hotly contested 750 sports market.” Owning a Paso today is something of a labor of love. They’re also mechanically reliable. The carburetor–an automotive Weber two-barrel pressed into duty running both cylinders.

The Paso is a fun, unique, and totally ’80s ride for not a lot of cash. Riding one never fails to elicit a thumbs up, and an appreciative glance from the crowd at your local European bike night.

Top Speed is 131 MPH with 72 HP@7,000 RPM and with a dry weight of 429 pounds with a 5 speed transmission, 5.8 gallon fuel capacity and a 30.6 inch height seat

Contact: David Edinger
Edinger.david@gmail.com
+1-317-908-2573

For all that beauty and rarity, our buddy David is asking for just $5,500. That’s half what you’d pay for a grey market Japanese two stroke, and this one is twice as clean as most smokers you’ll come across.

Featured Listing: 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati December 3, 2018 posted by

The description is worth it: 1988 Ducati Paso 750ie

The seller of this 1988 Ducati Paso 750ie takes honesty in advertising in a slightly strange direction, choosing to focus less on the attributes of the bike and more on the potential impact the bike will have on your social engagements. He gives us scant details beyond how long he’s owned it, how far he has ridden it in that time and the fact that it is a “great bike.”

1988 Ducati Paso 750ie for sale on eBay

That’s when the real fun starts. It’s PG-13 at least, so proceed with caution if you have young gas monkeys around. From the eBay listing:

1988 Ducati Paso 750 ie Limited Only 3098 miles – great condition !

I’ll be adding more photos tomorrow – including odometer.
It’s a great bike.
I have owned it for 13yrs and rode it 10 miles on my own property the day I picked it up – stored in museum since then.

Start your collection now – good bikes have outpaced many other investments over the last decade since the recession –
and you cannot invite your friends to come drool over stocks & bonds or ride them to Sunday morning coffee….

Plus no one ever got laid because of their bond portfolio unbless it had a billion dollars in it and then they still got laid because of their 300′ yacht not the bonds.

no yacht ?

Buy this bike.

Have more money , or not the most dashing gent ? Buy the Paul Smart I have for sale 🙂
WANT TO APPEAR REALLY YOUTHFUL & VIRILE ? Buy the insane aprilia factory supermoto racer I have for sale lol

The Paso isn’t anywhere close to a yacht, but its acres of white bodywork are vaguely reminiscent of a luxo-barge you’d see moored in Monaco. If you squint real hard and let your imagination go. What this bike certainly represents is a decent and pretty much unmolested example of a very-1980s Ducati, built just on the cusp of the brand’s return to building the wild sportbikes it’s known for today.

The description is worth it: 1988 Ducati Paso 750ie
Honda March 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1988 Honda CBR600F Hurricane for Sale

Update 3.17.2018: The seller has notified us that the transaction is now complete for this Hurricane and in fact sold quickly after being posted for just 4 hours. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

If Suzuki’s GSX-R codified the sportbike formula for the masses, the Honda CBR600F Hurricane represented the next evolution. Introduced in 1987, and known in the UK as the “Jelly Mould” due to the smooth, aerodynamic bodywork, the bike featured a steel frame that persisted up until the introduction of the CBR600RR, but that was somehow never much of a handicap. Sure, it meant that later iterations of the bike were at a technical disadvantage when compared to aluminum-framed rivals, but the CBR always had that user-friendly quality for which Hondas are justifiably famous. And at around 440lbs full of fluids, the original Hurricane was still a good bit lighter than its contemporaries and it handled beautifully, rivaling the Yamaha FZ600 but with a far more refined engine.

Mechanically, the Hurricane signaled a shift for Honda away from the V4 engine configuration. It still made sense for more focused racing machinery but, for a mass-produced motorcycle like the CBR, an inline four was easier to package and less complicated to manufacture. That inline engine displaced 598.5cc and was much more oversquare than generally seen at the time, with a bore and stroke of 63mm x 48mm, something that was allowed by the bike’s liquid cooling. It produced 85hp with the help of a 4-into-1 exhaust and could push the slippery machine to over 140mph, with triple disc brakes that could pull the bike down quickly and safely from those speeds.

The impressive top speed was made possible by the bike’s sleek styling: after Ducati pointed the way towards the future with their fully-enclosed Paso, Honda took the ball and ran with it, taking advantage of the aerodynamic and manufacturing advantages, since the bike’s mechanical parts could also be conveniently hidden out of sight without concern for tucking wires and hoses out of the way or a need to “beautify” the mechanical parts. And, while Ducatisti resisted the Paso’s modernity, Honda fans embraced the future and the new Hurricane sold in droves.

Today’s Featured Listing is a low-mileage survivor with just 12,000 miles on the odometer and an asking price of $3,750. It appears to be in very nice, original, unmolested condition, excepting a Yoshimura exhaust the seller claims has been on the bike since new, so it may not be OEM, but is at the very least period-correct.

From the Seller’s original Craigslist post: 1988 Honda CBR600F Hurricane for Sale

Up for sale is my 1988 Honda Hurricane! She runs and rides fantastic.

If you are looking at this ad, you know how rare these are to find in this condition and this color scheme with low mileage.

It has an original Yoshimura complete exhaust system that was installed when new. She is ready to go with a new battery, fork seals, new OEM chain, fresh oil change, re-built master cylinder and re-built carbs. She is mostly original except I did replace the brake lines with braided ones when the brakes were rebuilt. She has a couple minor blemishes in the decals and tank but it has never been dropped or laid down.

The title is clean and in hand. I do not need any help selling the bike and ask that only serious buyers reach out to me. I am not in a hurry to sell her so no low ball offers and no joy rides. I am happy to send additional pictures and or video upon request.

Thank you for looking!

Certainly, Honda sold plenty of their seemingly simple, but still revolutionary Hurricane when they were new. But, like so many older Japanese motorcycles, they were used and abused, raced and thrashed and ridden hard, then put away wet. At some point, as values decreased and they were sold on down the line, they needed some sort of maintenance the owner couldn’t afford or justify, and they were left to rot. But a few are still around and have been restored or cherished by their original owners, and they may still be affordable, but that can’t possibly last.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1988 Honda CBR600F Hurricane for Sale
Ducati July 1, 2016 posted by

Blue By You – 1988 Ducati Paso 750

The Paso was more revolutionary than evolutionary, with square-tubing frame, full bodywork, and two-barrel Weber carburetor.  Despite reviewing well, the Webers had some rideability issues, and the love-it-or-hate-it styling as well as the import price stranded the bikes in the showroom.  With sales under a thousand per year, the bikes are now a rarity and significant, as they mark the Cagiva era and began Ducati’s sport-touring segment.  This example is a distinctive blue, well kept and has had fuel delivery and charging system updates.

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso right

1988 Ducati 750 Paso for sale on eBay

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso left

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso right front

Very similar to the 750 F1 desmodue, the Paso’s 748 cc’s are good for 73 hp, routed through a 5-speed transmission.  Because of the single Weber, the vertical cylinder has the intake at the front, and the 2-into-1 exhaust has a collector under the engine.  42 mm Marzocchi forks split compression and rebound duties in an early anti-dive method.  An Öhlins damper is hidden under the Tamburini-sculpted body, which also provides conformal turn signals and mirrors.  Brembo brakes are 280mm fronts with 270mm rear, all single-puck.  16-inch wheels and tires are wide – 130/60 front and 180/60 rear.

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso left rear

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso front  20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso rear

All bikes with nearly 30 years and 21,000 miles have a past and this one includes a repaint of the right side, but it looks good.  From the background we see that the owner knows his way around a carburetted engine, and has this to say in the eBay auction:

This is a very nice example of a rare blue 1988 Ducati Paso 750. It was previously owned by an ex Automotive and Aerospace Engineer who was meticulous and put in a lot of time to Engineer and fix the original fuel, air and electronic problems that were inherent on this bike. He upgraded the starter, fuel system, rebuilt the carbs, fixed wiring, redesigned fuel pump and air flow needed to fix these issues. She starts great, runs great and is a real head turner. She has a new battery included in sale.  The blue color is very rare and less than 50 were made Worldwide and shipped to the U.S.  A lot of  time and effort was expended to make her run better than original.

In an age where just about everyone has loud pipes, the original black-chrome mufflers should be at least friendly.  Non-working tacho should be an easy fix.  Overall build quality after the Cagiva investment was better than ever.

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso left front wheel

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso right rear wheel

Updates eventually came to the Paso, including a water-cooled 907 cc engine, six-speed and electronic fuel injection, but the styling never caught fire and the line shut down in 1992.  Often shunned because of the 16-inch tire size, choices are better now than they were in the 1990’s, when the now-classic was simply used.  If you like the aerodynamic styling, it’s a great looking bike, and tested as a nice handler.  This example looks original but has had some attention under the bodywork, and should be a great rider.

-donn

20160701 1988 ducati 750 paso left grip

Blue By You – 1988 Ducati Paso 750
Ducati January 25, 2016 posted by

Rare Duc – 1988 Ducati 750 Paso Limited

Shortly after Cagiva’s agreement to use Ducati engines, they bought controlling interest in the company in 1985, and breathed some design and engineering funding into the company.  Responding to competition from the east, the Castiglionis hired Bimota founder Massimo Tamburini to design the new 750 cc model.  The result was the Paso, with full fairing concealing the 750F1 engine and 5-speed, named for Ducati racer Renzo Pasolini, who died in an accident at Monza in 1973.

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited left

1988 Ducati 750 Paso Limited for sale on eBay

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited right

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited left front

Cam drive now by timing belt instead of bevel gears, the air-cooled 748 cc desmodue developed 73 hp.  Use of a two-barrel Weber carburetor required the  rear cylinder to be reversed.  Doubly odd for a Ducati, a square-tube frame, none of it visible, hidden beneath the curves of the all-encompassing tupperware.  Marzocchi air adjustable forks are 42mm, and at the back is an Öhlins monoshock.  Three similar-sized brake disks, dual 280mm fronts with 270mm rear.

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited right front

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited left unfaired

Not quite sure what makes this particular Paso a Limited, exhaust system, livery perhaps ?  There were only 50 Limiteds, but any Paso constitutes a limited edition as sales never took off and production over the five years was just a few thousand.  A ground-breaking design, very well resolved, and this one in super nice shape, collector quality.  The owner shows off the lovingly detailed mechanicals without the bodywork.  From the eBay auction:

Rare Duc!  Excellent Condition.  In storage since 2006 (ridden occasionally) when it was completely serviced by dealer and any and all updates and repairs were done.  Runs strong, despite original Weber carb’s reputation. Barnett Clutch Pack. New battery. New Michelin tires. Comes with Corbin Seat and original seat. Standard U.S. exhaust in black chrome (never used), (has Euro exhaust on since new). Euro tail light. RKA Tank Bag. Ducati Red powder coated wheels to match belly of fairings.  All original parts plus Ducati and Clymer Repair Manuals. Some spares. Certified by Ducati Museum to be 1 of only 50 produced. Owner is former dealer.

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited right unfaired

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited left seat unfaired

Not without its faults, the 750 Pasos suffered rideability issues with a flat spot in the torque curve, and while 16-inch wheels helped turn-in, tire selection has been lacking and occasionally impossible.  Still it reviewed as a  supple handler, hiding its weight well and cradling the rider.  Tests from the day poke fun at Cagiva for using the fairing to save money by not having to design and finish the drivetrain for display, just what Tamburini would have had you believe as he was pulling the plastic over your eyes…

-donn

20160125 1988 ducati paso limited rear

Rare Duc – 1988 Ducati 750 Paso Limited
Ducati October 21, 2015 posted by

Red Revival – 1990 Ducati Paso 906

On display for the past few years, this Ducati Paso 906 might be ready for revival.  With just about 5,000 miles, some rubber, belts, and maybe a seal or two should be all that’s required for some nice riding.

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 right

1990 Ducati Paso 906 for sale on eBay

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 left

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 right rear

Penned by Massimo Tamburini for the 1985 show season, the Paso model was introduced as a 750, and a major upgrade came in 1989 with 906 engine ( peculiarly displacing 904 cc ), water cooling and 6-speed transmission.  A strong square-tube frame is beneath the bodywork which conceals all the mysteries.  Marocchi forks and Ohlins rear monoshock are accompanied by Brembo brakes.  In the GP fashion of the time, 16-inch Oscam wheels are fitted.

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 left above

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 cockpit

Looking excellent in the many good pictures, this Paso has only a couple of mods, a Corbin seat and Ferracci mufflers.  Pretty sure these came with a center stand but I’m not seeing it.  The tank is signed, but the auction doesn’t divulge by whom.  Loving those faired round mirrors.  From the eBay auction:

There is good chance that my Paso 906 may be the best one you’ll ever find in its original condition on eBay.  Only 100 Paso 906s were imported to the US back in the difficult days of Ducati.  This one has served me only for its good looks in my office as a Massimo Tamburini art-piece and later in our TV room along my other Tamburini Ducatis as a show-bike.  I have not driven it in 3.5 years.  I had it completely serviced before I put it up for display.  It needs a battery.  The tires are all original from 1989 when it left the Ducati factory. Drive it or show it.  No damage whatsoever.

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 seat

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 right rear wheel

While time in the gallery is not deducted from a bike’s life span, a comprehensive service would be required to return this Paso to the road.  It would be worth doing, though early Paso’s suffered rideability squawks due to their single carburetor, these were ironed out with the 906.  Underneath the bodywork are Ducati’s excellent frame design and handling, and top quality components.  If the soap-bar styling of the Paso speaks to you, this would be a great bike to bring home from the museum shop…

20151020 1990 ducati paso 906 rear

-donn

Red Revival – 1990 Ducati Paso 906