Posts by tag: OW-01

Yamaha June 12, 2017 posted by

80% of an OW01?: 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R

1996 Yamaha YZF-750R on ebay

Back in the mid-1990’s the main way most sporbike fans learned about the latest and greatest developments was through a subscription to a motorcycling magazine.   For me, the magazine was Cycle and I can clearly remember reading discussions about the different development philosophies of each major Japanese manufacturer.   These philosophies are reprinted below (or at least as best I can remember them) and I think most people who are fans of sportbikes from this period will agree these are still accurate for the Japanese mid -1990’s machines.

  • The Honda Philosophy–  Strong in engineering and build quality but would sometimes over-engineer or develop something without a proven market.  The model line was refreshed in a phased approach over time instead of all at once.  Styling could be bland/conservative.
  • The Kawasaki Philosophy–  Great engines but suspect braking.  Not really an innovator but decent build quality.  Not as extensive a model line as Honda or Suzuki.  As for styling…well I hope you like green.
  • The Suzuki Philosophy–   Seemed to have a “try-everything-and-see-what-works” mentality resulting in a confusing model lineup.  The lower part of the lineup would sometimes have bikes with lower component quality in order to meet a price point.  Styling varied widely based on the model.
  • The Yamaha Philosophy–  Similar to Honda with great engineers but build quality not quite as strong.   Timeframe for innovation was longer than Honda and seemed more along the lines of trying to improve on a proven/existing concept rather than being a true innovator.  Model lineups were mid-sized but fortunately major components were common across the model line.  Styling choices were hit-or-miss and could sometimes be eye bending (cough-Vance-and-Hines-edition-cough-Marty).

 

The philosophy review above is relevant to today’s post, a 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R. While the YZF-750R was the base version of Yamaha’s YZF 750 lineup and wasn’t as exotic as it’s lineup siblings, it still had the same basic design. Yamaha tuned the R to be good for both street riding and canyon carving and the R actually won the 1996 Sport Rider magazine bike of the year.. While it didn’t sell in the same numbers as the Suzuki or Kawasaki 750cc machines, he R version still has a very active fan base as evidenced by the EXUP Worldwide forum.

Here is what the seller has to say about this particular 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R.

  • 12,202 miles
  • all original plastics & graphics
  • spotless stainless exhaust with functioning EXUP valve
  • original windshield, blinkers,rear plastic fender
  • No aluminum ever polished or chromed
  • Some new parts  include battery, rear rotor, all brake pads, chain & sprockets, oil & filter.
  • few tiny paint chips on bottom edge of tank & one crack in top of right mid fairing 


In case you are wondering what the YZF would be like to live with today, there’s some good buying advice available on VisorDown here.  I also found a previous post on the RSBFS archives which a nice video of a test of a few older bikes with the Yamaha being one of them (embedded below)

So now we come to the question of the value of this mid-90’s middleweight.  Well a close inspection of the pics show some wear and tear and the spelling errors in the ebay listing are a bit of a concern.  Also given its level of components and condition, its not really a bike that will be likely to appreciate over time.  

That being said, the current bid price is below $1600 which seems stupid low (although reserve has not been met). And even though the 1996 Yamaha YZF-750R is the lowest spec model of the 1996 Yamaha 750cc sportbike line, the Yamaha philosophy means that this is probably an opportunity to experience 75-80% of the performance of the legendary OW01 at a fraction of the cost. Perhaps this one is best suited for our more senior RSBFS readers to experience or relive a bit of the 1990’s 750cc sportbike experience, someone who wants to finally experience a EXUP machine without a huge outlay of monies. And I would be willing to bet you won’t see another one anytime soon at your next bike night.

Marty/Dallaslavowner

80% of an OW01?:  1996 Yamaha YZF-750R
Yamaha April 17, 2017 posted by

Collector Alert: 1989 Yamaha FZR750RR/OW-01 with 741 miles

1989 Yamaha FZR-750RR/OW-01 for sale on ebay

Most collectors of homologation bikes place the Yamaha FZR750RR/OW-01 near the top of their lists, along with the Honda RC30 and Kawasaki ZX7RR and…whats that you say, you don’t understand all the fuss about homologation bikes?   Well I don’t see any big blue police boxes or dogs named Peabody around so I guess I will just have to do my best to go explain the historical significance of these machines.

In the late 1980’s race series organizers and major manufacturers agreed that it was in both of their interests if race bikes were more closely based on bikes that people could actually buy.  The thinking was this would keep fan interest, cut down on development costs and weed out money losing engineer flights of fancy (i’m looking at you, Norton rotary).  The adage of the day was “a win on Sunday equals sales on Monday”.  But the major manufacturers engineer departments were still charged with winning and made the legitimate point that race bikes had very different performance needs from standard street machines.  In the end a compromise was reached; racebikes would still have to be based on a bike available for sale to the general public but the base bike could be a limited edition series that was equipped with the same components as the bikes that would be used on the racetrack, including racetrack level frames, engines and suspensions.  The limited edition bikes had to be able to be able to pass emissions and run legally on the street but could otherwise essentially be race bikes with lights and a license plate.  This agreement became known as the homologation rule and bikes from the era are referred to as homolgation bikes.


Okay, so they had some track-oriented tech, but you still don’t see what’s the big deal?  Consider this – a factory racetrack-level motorcycle has components that are hellishly expensive to develop and produce, the prices for one of these limited edition/homolgation bike was usually significantly higher than a standard street version.  The OW-01 had a list price of about $16,000 USD, which back in 1989 was equal to about a year of private college tuition.  And even with their high prices the street legal homologation machines were often unprofitable for the manufacturers so to cut down on losses the production run was typically a very small number of bikes.  For the FZR750RR/OW-01, production was 500 units over two years. But while Yamaha’s 750cc powered machine was pricey and parts would always be a challenge, anyone who bought one did actually get something quite special: titanium rods, twin-ring pistons, an aluminum tank with a track ready fuel filler were all wrapped up in a beautiful hand welded frame. This was then combined with Ohlins suspension, magnesium brake calipers and quick detach sub-frame and axle release clamps.

And best of all, these track-oriented goodies weren’t just for show. While not quite as successful as its main rival the Honda RC30, the FZR-750RR was used as the basis of multiple World Superbike wins, a British Sport Bike (BSB) title, set an Isle of Man TT lap record and was ridden to victory in the 1993 Daytona 200.

So in summary, homologation bikes were an opportunity for mere mortals to experience what a true race bike was like. They were also quite rare from a price and production number perspective and many were bought by privateer racers and then actually used on the track. This means that finding one today in pristine condition is quite a challenge and given that the primary rare sport bike criteria are condition, number produced, historical significance and technology, its only natural that the OW-01 always causes a fuss/is a big deal to collectors.

As for this FZR750RR/OW-01, a  quick look at the pictures in this auction show that the seller is a big fan on the late 1980’s/early 1990’s homolgation bikes.   The seller indicates a recent freshening of items which together with the low mileage means this one is a good option for someone building a collection.

Here is an overview of what the seller has to say

  • New battery,new fork seals and fork oil, new spark plugs
  • Fresh fluids including engine oil, new coolant flush, new brake fluid, and original air filter was serviced.
  • Carburetor jets and needles are original and still comes with the factory jetting set from the factory.  Runs a little rich at my elevation (Utah) but will need nothing if your going to run it at sea level. If your in a high elevation state it will need jets and fine tuning.
  • Still has the original factory tires, however there are age cracks in the sidewalls.
  • Still has its original chain & sprockets with factory safety wire, original brake pads and all original fairings and factory components.
  • Air breather hose was replaced since the original was hard and cracked.
  • Slight ripple in the muffler that does not show up in photos, you would never know it if I didn’t mention it to you but its there.  Muffler was chromed and re-finished to repair the tiny ding in it that you cannot see now.
  • There is patina here and there as you would expect from a 28 year old motorcycle.  Also there was a scratch protection pad on the tank at one time, since been removed but has left a clear residue behind from adhesion.
  • The original fuel tank cap was replaced with a NOS OEM Yamaha fuel cap due to a rough edge from being dropped on the ground in the past we believe. Original fuel cap is included with sale.

?  

So, now for the price question- what is this bit of homologation era history going to cost?  While the listing has an excellent level of detail and some services have been done, the condition is not perfect (note the cracks in the dash foam) and there is a need for fresh tires.  Recent examples of FZR750RR/OW-01 on RSBFS  show a price range of between $16,000 -$25,000 USD so the sellers Buy-It-Now price of $27,500 seems to be a bit optimistic.

My person opinion is that the value of this one is right about $23,000 USD,  Current bid is at about $12,600 USD with about 5 days on the auction left.  Unless the seller has a significantly lower reserve than the Buy-It-Now price I don’t think one will sell on the auction but any interested parties might want to follow the listing on Ebay and reach out to the seller after it ends.  Then again, Ebay can be a funny thing and part of being a smart collector is knowing when to pull the trigger so if this one is on your list, it might be time to move.

 

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Collector Alert:  1989 Yamaha FZR750RR/OW-01 with 741 miles
Ducati July 22, 2012 posted by

Best of Mailbag Edition (RC45, OW-01, Bayliss 998S, Slingshot, NSR150SP, 850GT T3)

Hey guys,

First let me say our readers are the best! Our inbox is overflowing with suggestions on bikes to put on the site and we appreciate all the help. Due to the volume we’re getting these days we’re not able to reply to everyone and will be picking the best selections, but please keep the submissions coming.

Thanks again and enjoy your weekend!

dc

Lets get things started with this 94 Honda RC45 for sale in Australia. $49k AUD. Thanks for the forward Jamie!

Next how about your choice of Yamaha FZR750R OW-01’s? Pick one for $15k. Thanks for the forward Michael!


Jeremy loves his Honda’s but this time he sent us this 88 GSX-R for $2900 in Orange County. It’s not perfect and missing the lowers, but for $2900 I’ve seen alot worse.

How about a street registered Honda NSR150SP? $4500 and less than 3k km’s. Thanks for the forward Garrett!

How about this Bayliss 998S for sale in Miami for just under $13k. Note the sign in the background 😉 Thanks Scott!

Several people emailed us this 1977 Moto Guzzi 850 T-3 “Sport” for just $6500.

Sport Bikes For Sale June 3, 2012 posted by

Real Race Replica – Yamaha FZR750R 0W1 (Holland)

When it comes to race replica’s (code name RR) the Yamaha FZR 750 R also known as 0W-1 is one of the most significant models. First in series of the 0W (the Yamaha YZF R7 being the 0W-2), this bike was in many ways more exclusive than Honda’s RC 30. Only 500 models were produced and they didn’t come cheap, about 25.000 $ at the time + 5000$ if you wanted it fitted with the race ready Yamaha kit.

The 0w-1 wasn’t as successful on worldwide race tracks and roads (TT trophy) as the Honda and this is probably the reason why second hand models are now available at a more down to earth prices.

The model below is exposed at a dealership in Holland and is on sale for roughly 12.400$ (click on link at bottom of article).

With just below 21.000km the bike isn’t new but in fair conditions from what can be judged form the pictures. With 120BHP this carburereted race spec motor won’t disappoint in terms of speed even in comparison to modern bikes but expect a peaky delivery of power (fun starts at 9000rpm). The best way to sum up what this bike really represents is to listen to MCN’s editor Micheal Neeves who happened to be an 0w-1 enthusiast:

Convinced ?

I am…

 

In comparison with the standard FZR the 0w-1 featured a different aluminum quality frame, fine Ohlins rear suspension, a very different motor with magnesium and titanium bits, close ratio 6 speed gearbox, single seat unit, endurance style fuel cap and a very racy (read not  good for long range cruising) riding position. The sample below is almost in original conditions despite the turn lights and red painted wheels.

1995 Yamaha FZR 750 R 0w-1 in Holland

 

Claudio