Posts by tag: fuel injection

Featured Listing March 23, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600

Spring has sprung and we are just starting to see the tendrils of growth that promise to make this another banner year. And right on queue comes this wonderful Triumph TT600 Featured Listing. While perhaps not as rare or expensive as some bikes in collecting circles, the Triumph is a wonderful and unique machine that certainly fits into the rare and unusual category here on RSBFS. We don’t see them all that often, and these 600s represent an inexpensive way to get into a quality sport bike riding the road less traveled.

Featured Listing – 2000 Triumph TT600

In 2000, Triumph was the only manufacturer outside of Japan to take on the Big Four at their own game: the 600cc hyper sport segment. To be successful in this ultra-competitive space, the Hinkley, UK-based constructor needed to bring some serious mojo to the design table. What they crafted was a powerful, fuel-injected inline four cylinder screamer housed in a twin-beam aluminum frame. Eager not to fall into the trap of “not invented here,” ancillary components were sourced from the best that the Japanese had to offer, putting the TT600 on the same footing as the competition. Brakes were excellent Nissin units (310mm front, 220 rear), and front and rear suspension pieces were provided by Kayaba. In an attempt at cutting edge, Triumph engineers fitted the TT600 with a Sagem digital fuel injection unit. This ensured that the bike was firmly rooted in the new century (producing power AND fewer emissions), but Triumph was to discover the this new technology was not without pitfalls.

From the seller:
2000 Triumph TT600 for sale in great condition. Has 13,000 miles on the unit. The unit is rated at 110 HP, I have replaced the stock exhaust with an aftermarket pipe. I do have the original pipe to go with the bike. I have purchased a rear fork jack for storage. The bike has Diablos for tires currently. The bike comes with a cover and also a tank and rear foot peg video or go pro attachment. I also have a TT600 jacket that is in red and silver color. New battery as 11/2020. The bike runs well, it will need service on oil and brake fluid before taking it out for a long ride. The bike has an excellent riding position for long rides or tearing up the corners. There are very few left in the market place.

Price: $4,000
Contact Peter: pfmolgaard10@gmail.com

Reviewers of the day lavished the bulbous Triumph with high praise, being extremely comfortable despite being a competitive crotch-rocket. The Kayaba suspension was set up a bit softer than the other middleweights, and the engine was a estimated 110 HP powerhouse that pulled hard in the upper revs – although suffered from some fuel injection stumbling at lower throttle settings. Handling was reported to be excellent as the alloy chassis was ultra stiff – even when compared to the Japanese competition. Overall build quality was up to a very high standard as well, making these motorcycles as exotic in the US as other European brands. Here is a video shot by the seller of this exact bike:

The TT600 model evolved in the 3 short years of its existence, paving the way for the Daytona series. Today these are relatively rare models, and difficult to find in decent condition. Today’s Featured Listing is a well-cared for rider that has the miles to prove the TT600 concepts works well, yet still looks as rare and unique as it did 20 years ago. In fact, given that most of the competition maintains a very angular design language, one might argue that the Triumph has aged far better that its peers; it certainly makes a distinctive statement in 2021. The exhaust upgrade helps with sound, performance and looks (win win win), and the overall package is listed for just $4,000. Interested parties should give Peter a shout. The Triumph TT600 is a great looking bike that owns a rightful place in history as a serious 600cc contender. Check out all of the pictures and video and then talk to the man.

MI

Featured Listing: 2000 Triumph TT600
Honda March 17, 2021 posted by

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo

During the early 1980s, the future was a bright and amazing place to be. The world was full of optimism that technology would solve all of our problems and provide us with transportation that eclipsed the cave man cars and bikes of just a few years ago. And during this time manufacturers pulled out all of the stops to try to deliver on the promised land, including the concept of 1 liter power in a package half the size. Enter the turbocharger; all of the Big Four dabbled in the concept of atmospherically-boosted intake for better power and smaller displacement. And while all the Big Four delivered turbocharged goods, the reality was not exactly the same as the promised vision.

1983 Honda CX650 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda offered not one but two techno sleds during this time: the original CX500 Turbo, followed by the radically remade CX650 Turbo only one year later. One year after that, the wastegate opened up and the boost party was completely over. But for those few years, Honda raised the stakes at the technological poker table to a level unmet by any other manufacturer. Utilizing the existing CX platform with a beefed up bottom end, Honda engineering computerized fuel injection and a raft of sensors to ensure that reliability was as prominent as horsepower. The Buck Rogers bodywork and paint was specific to the model, as were the multiple “Turbo” badges that festooned the final package (including the large “obruT” decal on the front of the fairing). The CX650T delivered power – and most importantly gobs of torque – just as the prophets had promised. But with that performance came complexity, weight (more than 600 lbs of it) and a high price tag. Turns out the buying public was more interested in an affordable future – and a significant number of bikes were left unsold.

From the seller:
Up for sale is a 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo. This bike was never sold by the Honda Motorcycle Company so there is NO TITLE. EBay does not have an option for “no title” so it was listed as “clean” but just to be clear there is NO TITLE for this machine. EBay does not allow a decimal point in the stated mileage category so it was listed with “2” miles, in actuality it has 2.6 miles and we show this in the photos. This bike is NEW OLD STOCK with 2.6 miles on the odometer, it has never had fuel inside the tank and has never been started.

This bike is one of 500 bikes that was donated by Honda to the Vocational trade school donation program and still has the decal showing this on the tank. It was never sold and was intended to be destroyed therefore Honda never issued a title for the bike. This bike is a true survivor in stunning condition. The only flaw I see is a small scratch in the paint on the right side tail piece by the grab bar. Total production numbers for the 1983 CX650 Turbo was 1777 worldwide. Out of the 1777 about 1025 of them were imported into the USA and only 500 were part of the vocational program through Honda.

More from the seller:
This is one of the 500, a super rare piece of Honda History. You may likely never get an opportunity to purchase a machine of this rarity or significance again in your lifetime. We obtained this bike from a museum where it was on display since 1992 after being donated to the museum by the vocational school. Before this the bike was in storage since the early ’80’s at the college, it was never used in their training program, it is an unmolested time capsule. We have the provenance documentation from the museum showing this chain of ownership and it will be conveyed to the new owner.

The sad fact is that the Honda CX650 Turbos are extremely rare today primarily because there was little interest from the buying public. Honda invested untold amounts of money to engineer a solution that did not really solve a problem that people were willing to spend money on – not when there were plenty of adequate motorcycles for less than half the cost. With little demand, Honda shut down production after only one year – and struggled to get rid of the remaining bikes. A large portion were simply donated to automotive/technical trade schools to be used as learning tools. Honda received some brand recognition, likely a significant tax deduction, AND got rid of expensive leftover inventory. These bikes were donated without title as if they had been destroyed, and were never intended to hit the road. Most of them by now have been parted out.

The valuation of Honda Turbos has definitely been on the rise, but the ascension has been gradual (to say the least). Low mile Turbos in good to excellent condition seem to have maxed out in the $10k range as of late, which is definitely an improvement to past financial performance of the model. Today’s bike, a school donated machine with fewer than 3 miles has spent its life in a museum, and looks the part (as in a never started, never ridden “new” motorcycle). In fact, it looks better than it should given its age. However in the past these “school bikes” have been the less desirable of the Honda models due to the fact that they were not intended to be titled. Perhaps being the most rare of the one-year only model will make them more popular with collectors, but we have not seen that in the past. If you have a take on this subject, please hit up the comments and share your thoughts. Regardless, the Buy It Now price is significant for a Turbo. You can check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Future Optimism: 1983 Honda CX650 Turbo
MV Agusta February 18, 2021 posted by

Different Name Same Game: 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750

The name Ayrton Senna evokes some crazy raw F1 emotion. Arguably the greatest F1 driver of the modern era (uh, Schumacher and Hamilton excepted), Senna was in his day the highest paid driver and an international superstar. He parlayed some of that wealth and fame – not to mention his close personal relationship with motorcycle magnate Claudio Castiglioni known for the rebirth of Ducati and MV Agusta – to create a funding opportunity for his charity foundation looking after impoverished children in his native Brazil. Senna was a huge motorcycle enthusiast, and lent his name to Senna tribute models for both Ducati and MV Agusta. Today’s bike is a 2002 model MV Agusta Senna F4, based on the very successful re-launch of the MV Agusta brand.

2002 MV Agusta Senna 750 for sale on eBay

The F4 hit the press in 1998 as a 1999 model. Displacing 750cc (749.5cc to be exact) and sporting some novel engineering in the heads and intake runners (courtesy of Ferrari F1 involvement), the original engine developed 126 HP and was utilized in the Oro, the S, the 1+1 two-seater, and the Neiman Marcus Edition. It was not until 2002 that the EVO 2 spec engine was introduced – itself a product of a delayed SPR project – bumping power up to 137 HP, but at a lower redline. The Senna model was based on the EVO 2 spec, but was further blueprinted to allow for the full use of revs and then some: all the way to nearly 14,000 RPM. Festooned with the usual carbon fiber farkles, the black/gray/red Senna livery and unique number tag on the headstock, the Senna 750 was limited to 300 units worldwide.

From the seller:
2002 MV Agusta Senna in excellent condition. Number 218 of 300 made. Very rare. Clean NH title. Sold new by Fast -by- Ferrarci. Has Ferrarci risers, aftermarket LED tail light and rear fender eliminator, I have all parts removed as well as the accessories that came with the bike. (sport exhaust, sport chip, extra sprockets, factory cover) Runs and drives excellent, 3403 miles. I just have too much stuff!

In current markets Senna Editions are star-power bikes that come with exclusivity and some level of cachet. Originally conceived to be a funding vehicle for charity, today these are rare and collectible models worthy of note. We have seen several Senna models on these pages – both from Ducati and MV Agusta – and they always bring with them a stronger market than the base level bikes on which they were created. Such is the case with this model today.

Showing less than 3,500 miles and with some owner mods (original pieces reportedly come with the bike), this particular example looks clean from the photos provided. The red wheels highlight the single-sided swingarm stance, and the mods to the rear bodywork really show off the organ pipe shotgun exhaust. There are a number of watchers on this one, but nobody is piling onto the $7,000 USD opening ask. That is bargain money for a Senna Edition of any brand, however it remains to be seen where the reserve is set. There are a fair number of days remaining, so we may see some action on this one yet. Check out all of the details here. For those of you in more temperate climes, I believe that white stuff is known as snow/ice. Stay warm, stay safe, and Good Luck!!

MI

Different Name Same Game: 2002 MV Agusta Senna 750
Honda January 24, 2021 posted by

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)

With attribution (and apologies) to Charles Dickens, this was the best motorcycle, this was the worst motorcycle. This was an age where technology soared, yet this was an age where average triumphed. This was the time of lag, this was the time of boost. This was the Spring of hope, this was the Winter of despair. This was the early 1980s, and this was the Turbo era.

Forced induction has paved a long and storied road in the automotive world. For motorcycles, it represented more of a novelty cul-de-sac. And although started by Kawasaki farming out the Z1R TC model to a tuner and selling it in showroom without a warranty, the first fully-fledged, factory created and supported Turbo bike came from Honda: the 1982 CX500T. Utilizing the robust CX500 twin platform, Honda did some minor bottom end beef-up and some major electronics engineering on a computerized fuel injection and delivery control module to ensure engine longevity. The result is the space-ship resembling, very heavy, long turbo-lag inducing unicorn that you see here. Sadly, despite all of the technological innovations that Honda threw at the CX-T model, public interest in the beast never took off. And neither did values for these models, although that is definitely changing. Read on about these two bikes!


1982 Honda CX500T #1

From the seller:
CX500 Turbo Has Been On Display For 17 Years In My Climate Control Museum.
It’s Been Pulled Off The Display Floor And, Over Last Month, As Time Permitted I Have Had The Following Service Items Performed By My Master Mechanic –
-Storage Fuel removed and replaced with Non-Ethanol Premium Fuel.
-New AGM Battery Installed
-New Oil & Filter Change
-Both Front And Rear Brake Calipers Serviced – Disassembled Cleaned & Brake Fluids Flushed From The Long Time sitting Idle While On Display
-New front brake pads on both sides. The OEM ones were hard squeaked some and we have everything apart already.
-Both fuel Injectors Professionally cleaned by Mechanic
-Air filter check and was OK
-New OEM spark plugs installed

This bike looks absolutely awesome, and has been bid up to nearly $10k as of time of writing with the reserve still in place. There are a lot of bidders, and even more watchers. The activity is certainly pushing the envelope in terms of price point for these rare bikes (which should represent a *very* welcome trend for Turbo collectors), and this one may end up a new high-water mark for the model.


1982 Honda CX500T #2

From the seller:
1982 Honda. Condition is “Used”.
I’m Selling my CX500Turbo because I have to many bikes and someone needs to enjoy this one.
Bike is in immaculate condition for a 39 year old machine.
Only 3100 miles
All original paint
Original tires
Runs and drives perfect
Recent work completed includes all master cylinders and calipers rebuilt, injectors sent out and cleaned, new fuel pump, oil and filter changed.
I can take more photos if needed. Also have a video I can text of bike running with a walk around.
Chance to own a very rare motorcycle that has been climbing in value.

This particular example has very few miles for the age, and looks to be in good shape overall. There appears to be some paint cracking on the front fairing, and the original tires would make me nervous as a rider. This one has a bit longer to go at auction, with no reserve and the latest bid at over $7k at time of writing. Again, this is elevated territory for these techno-wonder machines, and we might see this one climb even higher before the auction ends.


Dickens closed out his famed novel (A Tale of Two Cities) with: “It is a far, far better thing I do than I have ever done…” Looking back at the monumental moment when Honda rolled out this amazing motorcycle, you can forgive the Engineers if they thought along the same lines. This was truly a remarkable undertaking, and endures as the most complex and technological effort of the Turbo era. To see not one but two great examples available at the same time – and being bid up to the current prices – bodes very well for these machines in the future. Check out the pics and videos for 1982 Honda CX500T example #1 here, and jump to 1982 Honda CX500T example #2 here. Enjoy, and Good Luck!


1982 Honda CX500T example #1 gallery

1982 Honda CX500T example #2 gallery

MI

A Tale of Two Turbos: 1982 Honda CX500T (x2!)
Aprilia December 20, 2020 posted by

Futurama: 2001 Aprilia RST Futura

One of the most underrated platforms of the sport touring set is the Aprilia RST Futura. Built only across the years 2001-2004, the Futura should really be considered a serious sport bike with hard bags – and a bargain. Today’s example is a mere $3,995 or best offer. That is a very short stack of cash for something motivated by essentially the same powerplant as the RSV Mille (with DNA from Troy Corser’s WSBK entry), and includes all you would expect of a sport bike plus comfort amenities you might not have known you needed. Poor sales and overall softening of the Aprilia business led to it’s (early) demise.

2001 Aprilia RST Futura for sale on eBay

To build a Futura you start with the same 60-degree, fuel injected, liquid cooled Rotax v-twin displacing a nominal 1000cc. Different throttle bodies provide a flatter torque curve for the touring side of the sport tourer, but with 113 reported ponies on tap, little has been given away on the top end. The high-mounted, under seat exhaust both makes the bag mounting easier as much as highlighting the sporting intent. A stout Showa upside down fork takes care of the nose, while rear single-sided suspension – like with nearly all the Aprilia models – is provided by Sachs. This is bolted to an aluminum twin-spar frame, and halted by excellent Brembo 320mm disks up front (255mm in the rear). Wrap it all up in bodywork that mimics the future Tesla Cyber Truck, and you pretty much have the complete package.

From the seller:
Stock #:U000100
Exterior Color:GREY
Interior Color:GREY
Mileage:17,541
Title Condition:Clear

Dry weight on this beast is a relatively svelte 465-ish pounds. That made it competitive with the Honda, BMW and Triumph peers of the day – and none of them looked like this! The Futura design can be very polarizing (much like the Ducati 999), which likely did not help with sales. Today this bike continues to stand out, and it is difficult to imagine that this bike is 19 years old already!

The seller (a dealer located in Las Vegas, NV) provides very little information about this particular example, but does provide a number of decent pictures. I think that this bike look awesome in silver, and from the photos it looks reasonably unscathed. With only 17k on the clock there are a lot of miles remaining in this future-retro beast, so if you are looking for something different that also has a bit more protection from the elements, you might what to check this out. View all of the details here, stay safe and good luck!!

MI

Futurama: 2001 Aprilia RST Futura
Suzuki December 18, 2020 posted by

! obruT – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Suzuki’s entrant to the turbo sweepstakes was sportier than the green or red models, still more of a GT all in all.  This Oregon example has been ridden some, displayed some, and made ready for the next rider.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo for sale on eBay

Suzuki designed a special engine for the turbo, only 673cc and 7.4-to-1 compression, but nicely oversquare with a 10,000 rpm redline.  Full injection ensures smooth running across the range and the advanced oil cooling system used squirters to cool the pistons.  The forward leaning chassis used twin downtubes, anti-dive forks with a 16-inch front wheel and Full Floater monoshock rear.  A little Katana-style goodness made for a distinctive fairing with sportier clip-on handlebars and footpeg location.

Any curator would be happy if their XN85 was in this kind of shape, undamaged and shiny pretty much everywhere.  The owner states he’s only the second, and it’s been in “his” museum for the last twelve years.  That might be worth looking into if you’re local to Portland.  Links to a few comprehensive videos are in – the eBay auction – interspersed with the owner’s comments:

The XN85 Has Been On Display For 11-12 Years In My Museum.

It’s Been Pulled Off The Display Floor And, Over Last 3+ Months As Time Permitted I Have Had The Following Service Items Performed By My Mechanic –

-New AGM Battery Installed

-New Oil & Filter Change

-Both Front And Rear Calipers Serviced – Cleaned & Brake Fluids Flushed From The Long Time sitting Idle While On Display

Recently un-mothballed in a loving fashion by my master mechanic.  The fuel system flushed with non-ethanol premium fuel.  Installed a new battery along with a new battery tender hook-up.  It started up in less then 2 seconds and runs great!  There are no fuel leaks. It idles perfectly.  It’s fuel injected. It Revs & Restarts fine.  It is ready to go and needs nothing  to go riding.  And/or it’s ready to go straight into another Museum.

Though a great engineering exercise, the fuel crisis passed, insurance companies got wind of the power vs. displacement issue, and none of the models survived to see 1986.  The XN85 was relieved for the ’84 model year in the U.S., but was sold abroad for a couple of more years.  Time has confirmed that Suzuki’s ideas about handling and de-tuning the turbo were correct, as the model has consistently reviewed well in the fun-to-ride and reliability departments.  Evidently the victim of a failed BAT auction, this particular XN85 would’ve been a bargain at that strike price, but likely this and XN85 owners everywhere are hoping for better.

-donn

 

! obruT – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Ducati December 14, 2020 posted by

Multinational: 1990 Ducati 851 SP2 in Germany

Before the flames start, let me warn you: This bike has little info and few pictures. So why bother to post it here on RSBFS? Simply because the Ducati 851 SP2 is a noteworthy collector machine. Having achieved success in WSBK with the original 851, Ducati punched out the older mill to 888cc, made a few other tweaks, and continued to rack up victories and championships. The homologation machine for the initial 888cc variant was the 851 SP2, which ran the larger power plant under the 851 covers, ahead of the official release of the new 888. All clear? Like all “R” spec bikes, the SP2 is uniquely identified via a numbered plaque attached to the upper triple trees. This Italian wunderkind is currently located in Deutschland.

1990 Ducati 851 SP2 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Used Ducati 851/888 SP2 the number 250 from 381 piece.
22000 km By 1990
Good condition not crash 1 owner
OEM only new Fuel pump and Ohlins Fork tube new and battery.

Pictures are few and decided low resolution, but do show the important bits. The white frame and white wheels are correct, as is the solo tail section. From the right side in the dark at a distance the bodywork looks to be complete and the paintwork intact. The second picture shows the numbered series plate, the adjustable front suspension and an odometer that reads just over 22,000 KM (13,500-ish in miles). Unfortunately, that is it – except for the $45,000 USD ask. That’s right: fork over forty five really big bills and this can be yours. Interested parties are welcome to make an offer below that, but the seller has set the expectation high indeed. The 851 series was a watershed moment for Ducati, and the start of the 851/888/916/996/999 dominance on the track. Check out the few details here, and good luck!! (comments welcome but please keep them civil and to the model in question)

MI

Multinational: 1990 Ducati 851 SP2 in Germany
Honda November 11, 2020 posted by

Dig Out Your Legwarmers: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

Michael Jackson’s Thriller. Personal home computers. Digital displays. The Space Shuttle. Princess Diana. The Falklands. Epcot Center. The early 1980s were a time of excess, and of Turbos. For this was the era of the factory turbocharged motorcycles, and leading the charge was the 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo. For certain the concept of boosting intake manifold pressure was not a new invention – both driven superchargers and exhaust gas turbochargers had been around since relatively early days of motor design. But use in a street-bound motorcycle, as built from the factory, was a brand new thing. Purists will point out the Kawasaki Z1R TC, but that was an aftermarket mod. The CX500T was the real deal, soup to nuts. And what a deal it was!

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

Honda already had the beefy CX (think liquid cooled Guzzi) design laying around, and thought it would be a great platform to accept forced induction. There was some work to allow the bottom end to accept larger bearings, but with liquid cooling and robust components the CX platform was nearly turbo ready. What it was missing was a suitable fueling mechanism. For that problem, Honda assembled a brain trust to develop a computerized fuel injection system that would provide power and control while allowing for a safely margin under load.

From the seller:
1982 Honda CX500 turbo. Extremely low miles. Excellent condition. Runs and drives as it should
Photos tell it all. Any questions welcome.

To compliment the cutting edge technology that went into the CX500T, Honda designers went overboard with a Buck Rogers theme and color palate. The bike screams TURBO! from no less than eight locations, including the backwards “OBRUT” badge on the front of the fairing (to make it obvious in a driver’s rear view mirror). At 570-ish pounds the Turbo was not a sport bike, but alongside the big six-cylinder CBX the CX500T looked positively svelte. Decent wind protection made for a torquey and fun sport tourer, and roll-on power was never really a problem.

Although cutting edge in design and tech, the Honda CX500T was a failure in the showroom. It was too complicated, too heavy, too expensive and too different to appeal to the mass buyer. Rideability was also noted as an issue, with low-to-no power off boost and a knife edge when all the power became available. It was an important milestone and a major technology credit to Honda, but it was not what the buying public lusted after. Today’s machine does have low miles for the year, and looks to be complete. Sadly it has suffered from at least one tip-over if not two (remember, these are heavy!), and replacement parts and plastics are not readily available. Check out all of the details here, and then decide whether boost is for you. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

Dig Out Your Legwarmers: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo