Posts by tag: fuel injection

KTM June 8, 2019 posted by

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190

In the world of different strokes, there are Japanese sport bikes and Italian sport bikes. And for a short while, there was a rational choice out of left field – Austria – with the KTM RC8R. With a unique blend of high-quality components and features not often found on bikes in the range, the RC8R was powerful, potent, very competent and largely ignored. Not even the impressive results of factory racer Chris Filmore in AMA Superbike competition could make the RC8R a commercial success. Ultimately KTM pulled the plug on the RC8 line – in part thanks to the CEO suggesting they should not build machines that could not be used sensibly on the street.

2014 KTM RC8R 1190 for sale on eBay

Powered by a 1190cc v-twin set at 75 degrees, the RC8R offered up a very healthy 175+ HP. With Keihin fuel injection via 52 mm throttle bodies feeding directly into the twin spark, four valve heads, power was instantaneous – if not a bit abrupt. Coupled with a 6-speed tranny and nestled in a unique trestle frame, the RC8R takes convention to a new level. Adjustments abound: the RC8R provided for a vast array of adjustments similar to what you would expect on a race bike. From levers to pegs, suspension and sub-frame height, the RC8R was an open book for a rider who knew what they wanted. Even the swing arm pivot angle is adjustable. And with WP suspension front an rear, the rider is availed to a dizzying array of potential changes that can be made in order to maximize the handling of the bike. When it comes time to stop, radial mount Brembos are up to the task. The seller is the original purchaser of this one-owner bike, and has quite a bit to share. Read on:

From the seller:
I am the original owner of this 2014 KTM RC8R 1190. I purchased the bike in March of 2014 from Thousand Oaks. The bike runs perfect and looks beautiful. I have taken excellent care of the bike keeping up on regular maintenance and always in my garage. Its always clean and waxed and has never seen rain. Never downed, raced, or abused, in like new condition and babied.

The fluids were changed last year including the oil, coolant, and brake fluids and have about a 1000 miles on them. I have only used Motorex Power Synt 4T oil in this bike per KTM’s recommendations. It has never been raced and most of the miles are highway from road trips with my buddies.

More from the seller:
I want to sell the bike with the accessories, but if somebody doesn’t want them I would let it go for less money as stock. Here are a list of the mods:

-Akrapovic EVO 4 Full Titanium Exhaust ($4600 and over 20lbs weight savings)
-K&N Air Filter
-KTM Factory EVO 4 Tune
-CJ Designs Block Off Plates
-KTM PowerParts Reservoir Covers
-KTM PowerParts Tinted Wind Screen
-KTM PowerParts Rear Seat Plugs
-KTM PowerParts Supersprox Rear Sproket
-KTM PowerParts Swingarm Protector
-KTM PowerParts Tank Pad
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Tank Guards
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Chain Guard
-Bestem Carbon Fiber Rear Fender
-Evotech Fender Eliminator
-Brand new Dunlop Q3+ Tires
-Clear Wrap on Front and Rear Tail Panels
-Fuel Tank Anti-Scratch Protector
-HID Headlamp
-DB Silencer for Akra Exhaust
-KTM RC8 Indoor Cover

More from the seller:
Factory Wise, the bike is set up very well. It has many adjustments with seat height, foot peg location and height, and handlebar height. WP suspension is stock and very good, Marschesini Wheels, Brembo Brakes, and hydraulic slipper clutch. This bike is a blast to ride, has so much torque and power I can only explain it as violent. This truly is a riders bike as there aren’t any rider aids and its all up to you. I am 6’1″ and 200lbs and this bike was comfortable for me on long road trips because of its adjustability and room to move around.

Only issue with the bike is a small burn mark I put into the lower right fairing when I installed the EVO 4 exhaust. The exhaust was missing a bracket, I was excited to ride the bike and the fairing was touching the header. But its fixed and only cosmetic. I was planning on replacing the fairing with the KTM race pan. The EVO 4 Headers also developed a crack at the intersection which was not uncommon. The crack was welded and is only cosmetic and doesn’t affect performance. I have all of the stock parts to go with the bike too.

Otherwise, bike really is 10/10 and still looks and rides perfect. Any questions please feel free to ask.

By then numbers, RC8 machines are relatively rare. Only a few hundred units were purportedly imported each model year, with the 2015 – and final – example being the rarest. But the RC8 is plagued by the worst of all collector bike syndromes; ambivalence. You see, these are great motorcycles swimming in a sea of lots of great motorcycles. The fact that the RC8 and RC8R failed to make a splash has more to do with economics and dealer reach than anything performance or quality related. No, the RC8R did not win an AMA Superbike race. Nor did one top the championship standings. But Chris Filmore was there and was close, and such speaks to the potential of this platform. As an out of the box offering from the Austrian manufacturer – their first big-bore sport bike – the RC8 was a refreshing alternative to the rest of the known crowd. And while the party ended too soon, there are plenty of good examples around. This particular RC8R looks to be well cared for, has some tasty updates, and fewer than 7,000 miles. The ask on it is a very strong $13k, but the seller indicates he is willing to entertain offers. The last few R bikes we have seen have been up in the $10k range – with exception units topping at $12k – but the dollars sunk into all of the KTM upgrades may bolster that price somewhat. It was a pity that the KTM street bike party ended too soon – it would have been fun to see what could happen at the WSBK level. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Different Perspectives: 2014 KTM RC8R 1190
BMW May 28, 2019 posted by

Portion Control – 2004 BMW R1100S

Showing less than 1,000 miles per year, this rather stock R1100S looks excellent in the option paint, and appears to have ABS and new tires.  Might be a sensible entreé to the sporting side.

2004 BMW R1100S for sale on eBay

BMW’s R1100S was their re-introduction of the -S model, not seen since the R100S.  Ever the flat twin, the R1100S used oil-cooled heads and four valves to percolate 98 hp and 71 ft.-lbs. torque.  Suspension is of course BMW-centric, with the anti-dive Telelever front and Paralever shaft drive rear.  320mm front disks do their best with the 505 lb. dry weight.  The painted cover hides a generous pillion, and bag racks are not installed but of course available.

BMW’s are born for farkling with great aftermarket support, but this owner has hardly been tempted.  The overall factory look shows off the carbon mudguards and pebble-grain seat, and a stray bracket and smudge on the handlebar betrays a gadget or two.  From the eBay auction:

Pristine bike. Less than 12k miles. Brand new Michelin (2ct Two Compound Tech) Aftermarket Seat, Ceramic coated exhaust, performance chip.

 

Try as BMW might, the R1100S didn’t fall very far from the sport-touring tree.  Often seen with a jillion miles, this one looks fresh and the condition reflects the Beemer demographic of multiple bike ownership and shall we say, an experienced rider.  The option paint and late year makes this one interesting, and unless your looking for something very sporty, the robust mechanicals and top craftsmanship should make it a nice value.

-donn

Portion Control – 2004 BMW R1100S
Suzuki February 15, 2019 posted by

Early Adopter – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Though each of the big four produced an -80’s turbocharged middleweight, Suzuki’s was focused on sport and is still the rarest.  This example has been on display in Sweden since 1987 and is ready for a marquis spot.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo ( Sweden ) for sale on eBay

Each of the turbos were a technology showcase and showroom failure, but as ever, Suzuki jammed a helping of sportbike technique into their design.  In spite of the excess heat brought by a turbo system, Suzuki stuck with air-oil cooling and used an early version of their SACS piston squirters to keep temps under control.  The 673cc four used 12 pounds of boost to make 85 hp, helped by electronic fuel injection which was tuneable and didn’t require carburetor float bowls next to a hot turbocharger.

The chassis got a healthy dose of attention, with the first road application of a smaller 16″ front wheel and anti-dive forks.  The Full Floater alloy monoshock made for a sweet handling powerhouse.  Fans will see references to the 1981 Katana in the supersport fairing which flows right to the tailcone.  Brakes are big for the time at 290mm, an acknowledgement of the 550 lbs. wet weight.

I was thinking this Suzuki might be related to the Christensson MC Collection we saw at the Mecum auction in January, but it must be another collector from that mad hotbed of sportbikes, Sweden.  Though not perfect, the condition is close to museum quality, with just 2,300 miles.  There are nick here and there, and some peculiar almost-scratches on the right engine case.  Unlikely though it is, a quick look and lubrication of any rotating part would be in order before a ride.  From the eBay auction:

SUPER RARE ONLY MADE 1 YEAR (1983)
Bike has only 3697 km / 2297 miles on it and has been parked away since 1987.
Minor scratches as per documentation.
Bike is located in central Sweden (Västerås)

With just rudimentary electronics, this Suzuki turbo could be diverted from the collection back to rideability with just some seals and oils.  More likely it will get a thorough buffing and resume its spot in a collection, but RSBFS readers and writers would love to hear if anyone inspects or bids on this XN85 !

-donn

Early Adopter – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Suzuki January 12, 2019 posted by

Use Your Boost to Get Through – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo

Vying for additional power without displacement, the 1980’s saw major cycle makers attempt to tailor the excess heat and complexity of turbocharging to sport bikes.  Suzuki’s entry is the rarest and this one has ultra-low mileage, and just one tangle with the mischievous elves that tip stuff onto parked motorcycles.

1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo for sale on eBay

Suzuki based their turbo on a 673cc inline four, and used electronic fuel injection to tailor the fuel delivery through the variable throttle / boost map.  85 hp are claimed, leading to the model designation.  An early adopter of innovations like Full-Floater rear suspension, air-oil cooling system ( with piston squirters ), and 16-inch front wheel, the XN85 was a bit of a tech showcase.  Kayaba provided the suspension, with anti-dive forks.  Triple disks are big but not oversize considering the 550 lb. ready-to-ride weight.  Angular fairing and sculpted tank owe royalties to the then-recent Katana.

Detailed photos should be part of an auction with a high falutin’ buy-it-now, which this eBay bike parts dealer probably knows.  Nothing a pre-purchase inspection can’t remedy, however.  Some history and service record(s) would be a help, even for a bike with so many years and so few miles.  Short and sweet from the eBay listing:

483 miles – all original except petcock, last ran in December 2018. Also, have Service Manual, and original title.
Right rear tail section has scratches that can be fixed.

Suzuki’s turbo was the sportiest of the big four’s litter, though even at that it’s more of a GT.  None were real showroom success stories, but maybe their role was more of leading edge glitterati for the dealer.  Under just the right conditions, the XN85 could woosh through the traps first, or just look great on the sidestand.  Either way the XN85 can provide liter-size performance from a boosted mid-size, and maybe the make offer button will let us know whether this is a survivor or museum piece.

-donn

 

Use Your Boost to Get Through – 1983 Suzuki XN85 Turbo
Ducati September 19, 2018 posted by

Walks like a Duck: 1991 Ducati 851 Strada

Ducati is responsible for some of the most iconic motorcycles in the world. They are also purveyors of more marketing ploys than any other manufacturer, as evidenced by the endless parade of Limited Edition models. Therefore, words like “special” and “rare” are used so often as to appear meaningless. But limited numbers aside, Ducati has made some revolutionary leaps along its long history, cementing their place in motorcycling history with truly milestone machines. Not content to simply evolve one step at a time, at certain points in history Ducati doubled down on a new idea, catapulting forward along the performance curve. The introduction of the 851 was just such a moment. Today’s bike, a 1991 851 Strada, is a good example of that revolution.

1991 Ducati 851 Strada for sale on eBay

If you think about the major technological jumps prior to the late 1980s, Ducati went from being a small bore, single cylinder manufacturer to producing twins. The L-twin configuration evolved over time, but was invariably a small step forward along the same route. The introduction of the Pantah could be seen as a leap, but in reality that move was more towards efficient production than outright performance. The Pantah was essentially the same air-cooled, two valve desmo twin as the bevel drive that came before, with only mild steps in go-power. With the 851, however, Ducati turned their own ideas of performance on its head. Simultaneously introducing liquid cooling, fuel injection AND a four valve, desmo actuated head, the 851 was a massive step forward from a technology perspective and performance. Did it work? Raymond Roche, participating in World SBK, took 3rd overall in 1989, was champion in 1990 and came in second in the two years to follow.

From the seller:
Ducati 1991 851 Strada, mostly original condition 14,600 miles.

Stored in Las Vegas Nevada for 8-12 years by the 2nd owner. Condition was not damaged or crashed.

Work that’s been done since Nov 2017:
Major service including valve and shim adjust, new cam belts installed, degree the cams and clean and adjust throttle bodies by a qualified Ducati service tech.

New parts include:
fuel pump
fuel filter (Mahle)
Air Filter (BCM)
all fuel lines, inside the tank and out, plus clamps
cam belts (Exactfit)
radiator hoses and water pump hoses (Samco)
clutch master cylinder (Brembo)
front brake master cylinder (Brembo)
stainless steel clutch line (Galfer) and slave cylinder
chain (DID)
sprockets
Dunlop Q3+ tires
oil (15/50) full synthetic and Ducati filter,
tinted windscreen (Zero Gravity)
lithium battery (Shorai LFX18A1-BS12)
new voltage regulator

Plus, brakes have been flushed and radiator has been flushed. Left and right fairings have been painted.

Also I chose the very rare, period correct carbon Termignoni high mount exhaust and they sound beautiful. There is also a header modification, see pics. Other special parts included are rear Ohlins shock with remote adjuster. Ohlins steering damper.
Included with the bike are the original mufflers, passenger footpegs, owner’s manual, one key and original windscreen.

Like many Ducatis, the 851 was released in a few different flavors. What you see here – the Strada or street edition – was the base model. This is not a homologation bike, although the basic platform is the same to the SP series. The Strada was the most streetable, complete with a passenger pillion hiding under the color coded tail cover, and nifty passenger grab handles that pivot out from beneath the seat. 1991 and 1992 were the last years of the 851 – the 1992 SP versions of this model actually contained a 888 motor, although the Strada remained an 851. But this speaks to the robustness and longevity of the basic mill, as even the 888 eventually became a 916 while still being badged as an 888. This is a milestone bike for Ducati, and the platform that won SBK victories and birthed the 888 and legendary 916.

Today’s 851 Strada example looks to be in great shape – with wonderful photos. Mileage is reasonable considering you are looking at a 27 year old performance bike. There are a few added farkles in the manner of tinted windscreen and carbon bits, and the high-mount carbon Termis which look great. They interfere with the passenger pegs, however, so those have been removed (but are available with the sale). The Ohlins upgrades are choice, to be sure. The add ons and upgrades do not cause concern. The seller notes that both sides of the fairing have been painted – with no comment as to why. It may have been simply cosmetic, as there is no real evidence of the bike being down. Either way, it looks great in the pictures, appears to be very clean and cared for, and with those Termi cans I’m sure it sounds incredible. A big plus is that all services have been recently completed.

Well-preserved 851 examples have held up in value reasonably well. This was a watershed bike for Ducati, and it continues to be a sought-after model. This particular bike sits below $6k at time of writing, with reserve not met. No telling how high the reserve is set, but I would estimate somewhere around $7-8k would be in the money. We have definitely seen these cross the auction block for less, but the market can be a funny thing. Just check out some of the comments on the more rare examples of Ducati exotica featured in the pages of RSBFS to read comments such as “I remember when you could pick up one of those for just $xxx…” Check out the auction here, as this bike is currently a bargain. Will it close that way? What is the current market temperature for a beloved Ducati model (albeit non-homologation base model)? Watch on, and good luck!!

MI

Walks like a Duck:  1991 Ducati 851 Strada
Moto Guzzi June 4, 2018 posted by

Some Assembly Required – 1998 Moto Guzzi V10 Centauro Sport

Moto Guzzi cross-pollinated their 1990’s unfaired sport model with the newly developed 992cc four-valve V-twin, the result being the V10 Centauro.  Calendar-girl bodywork surrounds the air and oil-cooled beast within, tuned down from the Daytona 1000’s peak but still happy to rev to the 8,400 rpm limit and crank out 95 hp.  This one has been rendered a little more naked than usual, but the auction includes all the stock parts and some neat touring accessories.

1998 Moto Guzzi V1 Centauro for sale on eBay

This era of Guzzi combines their recent overhead cam engine with premium components and styling by the late Luciano Marabese.  The powerplant is the star of the show, Weber fuel injection helping push 78 ft.-lbs. through the 5-speed and out to the natural shaft drive.  Top-of-the-line suspension from WP, Bitubo steering damper, brakes from Brembo, and wheels by Marchesini set the scene for a undeniably European experience.  Old enemy gross weight is present but held low in the picture and handling is helped by a rigid chrome-moly backbone chassis.

Evidently in between plans, this Centauro has had the bikini and engine fairings removed, and except for the oil cooler hanging out there, looks just as well for it.  Possibly making ready for a tour, as a couple of different seats are included as well as a set of Hepco-Becker bags, which from my BMW days are without equal.  Not mentioned but it might be an aftermarket exhaust or cat bypass.  Pictures aren’t high resolution, but the owner does offer these comments in the eBay auction:

One owner, excellent original condition with 8,620 miles. Always garaged. Only in the rain three times and has zero damage.
Comes with all its original parts including the following three which were removed when it was brand new: Headlight/dash cover with clear air foil, Oil cooler bezel and catalytic convertor.
Also comes with following new parts: Luggage rack with mounts, Hepco Becker Junior 40 liter Hard bags with mounts, Hepco Becker Junior 40 liter rubber liner set, one pair original grips.
In addition, comes with following used parts: Original tires,  Factory seat, Factory seat with extra passenger padding. All original hardware, computer chip, Original owners manual, Shop manual, Parts manual.

Looks like the new owner will have all the options – a new-looking machine with choice of seats, and factory fairings or not.  Luggage, well, if you must.  Reviewed as eager to run and needing firm direction, the modern twin can propel the Centaur to more than enough speed to make the auction winner consider replacing the windshield fairing.  Stock or updated, local or long distance – which direction to take this rare and quintessential Guzzi…

-donn

Some Assembly Required – 1998 Moto Guzzi V10 Centauro Sport
Suzuki May 22, 2018 posted by

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

“Ram air” was a very 90s gimmick with dubious benefits, especially on the road, but they gave bikes of the 1990s like this Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD a distinctive style, with oversized fairing nostrils and large intake tubes that curved through the rider’s view and into the top of the tank to pressurize the airbox. Well “ram air” implies airbox-pressurization at least, but the reality in this case was more form than function. But that minor point aside, the new model was a significant milestone in the history of the Gixxer, and there are very few remaining in this kind of clean, low-mileage condition.

After generations that saw Suzuki’s range of sportbikes getting more refined, but ever heavier and slower, the 1996 GSX-R750 SRAD and the smaller 600cc version finally reversed that trend. Suzuki’s new Ram Air Direct model was really a complete overhaul of the existing GSX-R: an entirely new aluminum beam frame with claimed ties to Suzuki’s GP bike replaced the cradle design, the liquid-cooled engine was narrowed by moving the cam-chain to the end of the block, and basically everything was made smaller and lighter, more compact. It debuted with a bank of carburetors, but the 1998 version seen here added fuel injection.

The result? A bike that was, marketing hype aside, as light as a contemporary 600: 395lbs dry, almost 45lbs lighter than the previous version, with a screaming, 128hp rev-monster motor and a very slick six-speed box that you really needed to abuse if you wanted to make good progress up to the new Gixxer’s near 170mph top speed. But that wasn’t a problem because the new Gixxer liked abuse. Fully-adjustable upside-down forks helped the bike handle and the six-piston calipers up front may have fallen out of fashion, but certainly look pretty trick.

No one I know seems to be able to clarify for me: do you say “es ar ay de” or do you say “srad” when talking about these bikes? When I ask people keep looking at me like, “Hey, I thought you were supposed to be the expert.” However you say it, the SRAD is a nearly classic sportbike with the handling, if not the outright power, to take the fight to modern machines. But throw on some fresh rubber, modern brake pads, and a set of steel-braided lines, and this could be one fun bike with the performance to go with all that nostalgic 90s style.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 fuel-injected with only 8,000 actual miles! 100% stock. Adult owned! Looks and drives like new! Never dropped! Always in a garage! Has a factory Suzuki bike cover, rear seat, tie-down strips, color-coded tank bra. This is a must see! Turns heads wherever it goes!

I’ve spared you the all-caps listing and deleted a whole bunch of extraneous exclamation points. You can thank me later. The seller’s enthusiastic writing style aside, this is a very clean bike with a clean title and just 8,000 miles. It’d probably be even more desirable in classic Suzuki blue-and-white, but I’m sure the more subtle red-silver-black seen here has its fans.

-tad

 

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale
Kawasaki January 28, 2018 posted by

Boosted Optimism: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo

You are looking at what Cycle magazine dubbed the fastest motorcycle of 1985. Ripping off a quarter mile faster than liter bikes of the day, the Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo took the latest fad and turned it into a very sharp weapon indeed. Easily the most potent of the Turbo set, the GPZ750 Turbo pushed the boosted boundaries further than any of the Big Four. Yet despite the performance possible, Kawasaki failed to achieve success with their Turbo offering – much like the rest of the Big Four. Turbos screamed with graphics, torque and power, but generated few sales.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo for sale on eBay

Kawasaki bolted a Hitachi HT-10B turbocharger in front of the engine, positioned as close to the headers as possible to reduce lag. Utilizing digital fuel injection, the air-cooled, transverse four-stroke in-line four was otherwise comparatively simple in design. Kawasaki engineers raided the parts bin, adding some strengthening to the normally-aspirated GPz750 block handle the Turbo pressure. The top end came from the more conservative KZ650, lowering the compression ratio to a range more compatible with a turbo and pump gas. Expect approximately 95 unfettered horses from this combination.

From the seller:
YOU ARE LOOKING AT A 1985 KAWASAKI GPZ 750 TURBO THAT I HAVE OWNED SINCE NEW. THIS BIKE LIVED ALL OF ITS LIFE IN A CLIMATE CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT. THE BIKE HAS NEVER HAD FUEL IN ITS TANK, NEVER BEEN STARTED OR HAS HAD ANY ELECTROLYTE PUT INTO THE ORIGINAL BATTERY. MOTORCYCLE WAS PICKLED WHEN NEW AND MAINTAINED THAT WAY THROUGH OUT ITS LIFE. I DON’T KNOW HOW MANY ARE STILL OUT THERE IN THIS CONDITION, I’M THINKING VERY FEW IF ANY. BIKE IS STILL ON MSO, NEVER REGISTERED. I HAVE ORIGINAL OWNERS MANUAL AND BROCHURE. THIS IS A CHANCE TO OWN A BRAND NEW PIECE OF MOTORCYCLE HISTORY. I HAVE MORE PHOTOS IF NEEDED. TIRES ARE STARTING TO SHOW THEIR AGE WITH A LITTLE CRACKING ON THE SIDES, REMEMBER THEY ARE 33 YEARS OLD. PAINT IS FLAWLESS AS IS THE REST OF THE BIKE. PUT IT IN YOUR OFFICE OR MUSEUM , IT IS CURRENTLY IN ONE OF MY LIVING ROOMS.

The Turbo era has remained a relatively underperforming element of the collecting world. Sure, Turbo bikes are rare and unique – and slowly (glacially) gaining in value over the years. However they have failed to ignite the collector world just as they failed to ignite showroom fires back in the 1980s, and just as they failed to deliver on “literbike performance” from a smaller package. One might be willing to call the entire Turbo era a wholesale failure according to nearly every standard by which we compare motorcycles. Those might be harsh words, but the unfortunate reality of this particular segment of our two-wheeled universe. These words, by the way, come from an owner…

This particular Turbo GPz is perhaps the last “new” bike of its type in the world. Zero miles, never filled with fuel and original battery and tires make this a unique find for the right collector. And it would need to be a collector, as after sitting this many years unused, considerable care would need to be taken to turn this back into a rider. But riding it would destroy the value of this zero mile example, making this a museum piece at best. And what price does a brand new 1985 model go for? Would you believe six figures? Me neither. Props to the seller for asking a huge sum, but not riding the fastest quarter miler back in ’85 does not necessarily escalate the value tenfold. Yes, it can only be new once – but few bikes make it to the $100k milestone (and those are far more coveted models). Still, it is a cool time capsule worth looking at. Check it out here, and then jump to the comments and share your thoughts and experiences with Turbo bikes. Good luck!!

MI

Boosted Optimism: 1985 Kawasaki GPz750 Turbo
Honda April 11, 2017 posted by

Hot Air: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo

Imagine the scene in Honda dealerships back in 1982: Buck Rogers – your bike is ready. One can only imagine what the buying public thought of a futuristic, turbocharged rocket ship that offered liter-bike power in a 500cc format. Unfortunately, the reaction from the general public was not to immediately rip open their wallets and buy one. Complicated, heavy, expensive and more compromising than riders (and buyers) wanted, the Honda CX Turbo lineup survived only a few, short years before being closed down completely. Produced in very low numbers, these Turbos have half of the “supply/demand” equation on their side. Unfortunately, even fewer buyers seem to want these bikes today, making them an interesting investment conundrum. Relative scarcity does not automatically equate to “desired” – or valuable.

1982 Honda CX500 Turbo for sale on eBay

Public opinion be damned. These bikes are some of the finest produced by Honda during this era. These are cutting-edge bikes – including turbocharging, liquid cooling, computerized fuel injection – all during an era where the archaic, air-cooled GPz still hunted in the canyons. This was the promise of the future, delivered on a neon orange & pearlescent canvas, plenty of gold accents, yards of ABS plastic bodywork, and enough “TURBO” badges to make people think you went nuts with a J.C. Whitney catalog. It is different – very different. And that is both the glory as well as the failing of the Honda Turbo lineup. People want the same, only better. Honda delivered a sport touring bike (likely because it was impossible to package all of the tech in a sport bike sized machine) that was neither really sporty, nor really touring. It was an in-between bike that screamed loudly, but never really said anything that people wanted to hear. It was a monumental advancement, and an utter flop. And you will have to pry mine (a 650 model) out of my cold, dead hands.

From the seller:
Beautiful 8000 mile example of this cool turbocharged touring bike. I got his from the original owners estate sitting in the back of the garage. It had been sitting for years. I resurrected it and drove it several hundred miles and love it! but i’m a harley and triumph guy and although I like all bikes it really is not my type of bike. But more about the bike, it runs great and drives great has the original owners manual with the tire gauge and the only thing I did to get it going was replace the fuel pump and rebuild the petcock and it runs beautifully. All the gauges work great. It has a few scratches here and there but nothing too noticeable. Original paint!!

Today, everything said about the CX500 Turbo back in 1982 applies. It is big, heavy, complex and different. It’s still expensive, although time has not been supportive of the overall value. Prices on these models appeared to peak around 2010. It’s hard to believe that they will not still appreciate due to novelty and rarity, but one will likely need to another round of 1980s nostalgia to return before that happens.

This pretty (in the eyes of this beholder, at least) CX500 Turbo one is listed for $5,000 in a Buy It Now classified, with the seller open to offers. That is fair money for a 8,000 mile example of a rare bike, and far below the top dollar we have seen asked in the past. There is some damage noted to the hard to replace bodywork, so make sure you do your homework first. Check it out here, and then share your thoughts. Investment opportunity or just something different to own and ride around? Good Luck!!

MI

Hot Air: 1982 Honda CX500 Turbo