Posts by tag: 1998

Ducati March 30, 2017 posted by

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

This is it. The end of the line. The last hurrah. The final countdown. The Ducati 900SS FE or “Final Edition.” Well, not really: 1999 saw the introduction of a brand new-ish, fuel-injected, Pierre Terblanche-styled SuperSport that carried over most of this bike’s strengths. But this is the very last of the old-school, carbureted SuperSports that carried Ducati through the Cagiva era and into the present: following a bit of a gap left after the Terblanche machine, Ducati is back with the introduction of a very Panigalesque SuperSport for for folks who want Ducati style and handling without the terrifying top-end power and chiropractor bills.

With slab-sided styling reminiscent of Ducati’s earlier 851/888, the SS FE evoked an era of less frantic performance: Ducati couldn’t hope to compete with the Japanese Big Four’s never-ending cycle of restyles and cryptic performance acronyms, so they didn’t bother. This is the sportbike distilled, with power accessible to mere mortals and superior handling. Built around Ducati’s famous trellis frame and powered by their two-valve, air-cooled L-twin engine, the Final Edition was basically a 900SS/SP with silver paint and a solo tail, along with some carbon-fiber and other lightweight bits. While most modern sportbikes discourage actual passengers by limiting accommodations to a tiny cushion and a set of pegs designed more as tie-down mounts, older sportbikes that might otherwise make decent bikes for ferrying significant others simply got rid of the seat entirely to convey Maximum Sportiness. The solo tail and deleted passenger pegs on the Final Edition also allowed the use of a high-mount exhaust that provided additional cornering clearance for spirited riding or track days.

Straight-line performance was never this bike’s strong suit: with a claimed 84hp pushing the bike’s 424lb wet weight, an SS would get positively murdered by any Japanese inline four of the period. But the Ducati had charisma to spare, handling, comfort, and that glorious v-twin sound that only gets better with a set of carbon-fiber exhausts. Or, if you’re on a budget, you can simply drill out the rivets on the standard exhaust, remove the stock guts, and presto: booming Ducati noise for the cost of a few screws! Luckily, this particular example comes with a quality set of carbon mufflers included so, unless you’re a Termignoni snob, there’s not much to add.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Ducati 900 Supersport Final Edition, this bike has covered 12366 miles, fresh service at AMS Ducati Dallas which included oil change Motul 300V, fuel filter, hydraulics flushed, etc. Bike is in excellent cond with a small crack under the Michellin Man decal on the right hand lower fairing. Bridgestone tires have 1000 miles on them, upgraded clutch slave cylinder from Yoyodyne, Ducati Performance carbon mufflers, carbon tank protector. The 900 FE is limited edition and this bike is #193 of 300 bikes imported to USA in 1998. The carbon fibre fenders and clutch cover are all standard 900 FE parts. This was the last Supersport to have Mikuni carbs which have been re-jetted and matched to a K&N air filter. Bike makes 76 rear wheel horsepower on the AMS dyno. Selling bike to reduce collection. Spare key and owner’s manual and toolkit included. Crating service available.

This bike’s dyno’d 76hp is pretty much bang-on for a carbureted two-valve Ducati at the rear wheel and, unless you want to splurge on a set of 944cc pistons and some Keihin flat-slide carburetors, you’re better off just enjoying the package, rather than chasing horsepower numbers that will still get creamed by anything remotely modern. The photos in the listing aren’t the greatest, considering that the bike’s silver color hides imperfections and dirt pretty well, although it’s pretty obvious that some of the carbon is a bit faded, but that’s nearly unavoidable at this point. The FE is a bit of a top-shelf parts-bin-special, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing and these are very rare motorcycles, if collectibility is your bag. I personally prefer the half-faired model in scar-your-retinas yellow, but this FE is undoubtedly the classy choice.

-tad

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale
Honda December 13, 2016 posted by

Lightweight Racer: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale

To the uninitiated, Honda’s alpha-numeric naming convention can get confusing, and it’d be easy to mistake this RS250R for something like a garden-variety NSR250R with a set of track-day fairings. But unlike the road-legal, race-replica NSR250R, the RS250R was a production race-bike, a Grand Prix machine in miniature. With the fairings removed, the elegant simplicity of this lightweight machine is clearly visible.

It’s absolutely not a learner bike, or a practical track-day ride: it’s a pure GP racing motorcycle, and needs the attention you’d expect to keep it running properly. Powered by an ever-so-slightly undersquare 54×54.5mm two-stroke v-twin that could be tuned to snarl out over 90hp, the complete package weighed 223lbs dry, which should make loading it back into your van or pickup at the end of the day much easier than even your average 600cc sportbike.

Bikes up until 1993 used a 90° v-twin, but this later example uses a redesigned 75° unit, presumably because it is more compact, and the increased vibrations caused by the imperfect primary balance would be of limited concern for a racebike, especially considering the minimal mass of the tiny pistons and rods.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale

Honda RS250R NX5 98, Most of you know what your looking at, for those that don’t: this is a rare factory GP bike for racing use only, It is NOT street legal! Not recommended for the novice racer or trackday guys either, these 250 GP bikes reward talent and punish mistakes. Very sorted and capable machine with all standard equipment.

One sprint race in ’13 on full engine and chassis rebuild. Rebuilt and rechecked this fall 2016. We went through the bike and installed new Pirelli slicks (green) on freshly powder coated wheels, new OEM clutch, new silicone hose kit, rings, RK chain, refinished pipes and professionally painted bodywork with new wind screen. Needs nothing except a discerning owner. Some spares are available separately.
This was Brian Kcraget’s B bike, Brian last raced this machine and WON on it in 2013 (see podium pic). Has been stored properly since and not used.
So obviously, titling and registration issues are irrelevant here, since this a pure race bike. The $12,000 Buy It Now price for this example will seem steep if you’re expecting 250CBR or even NSR250R prices. But keep in mind that, while the displacement may be small, the level of performance and the quantity Honda race-spec parts will be high, although this example doesn’t include any spares, which is something to consider if you’re planning to use it regularly. It’s pretty bare-bones, but a very cool and functional tool for going fast and will likely still provide serious thrills for a skilled rider.
-tad
Lightweight Racer: 1998 Honda RS250R for Sale
Ducati December 1, 2016 posted by

Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale

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Much ink has been spilled waxing poetic about Massimo Tamburini’s masterpiece, the Ducati 916. The bike was such a common sight throughout the 90s as the two-wheeled incarnation of lust, it’s become a bit… familiar, and it’s easy to forget just how shockingly sexy this bike was when it was introduced: the incredibly slim waist, the single-sided swingarm, the undertail exhausts, and those huge side-panels, bare of graphics except for simple Ducati logos.

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Under the curvy new skin, the mechanicals were an evolution of Ducati’s 888: a liquid-cooled, four-valve 90° v-twin displacing 916cc and producing 114hp, backed by a six-speed gearbox and a traditional, rattly dry clutch. That powerplant was housed in a stiff, lightweight steel trellis frame that helped define Ducati superbikes until the nearly frameless Panigale came along.

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The 916 was impractical, uncomfortable, and expensive both to buy and to maintain. But it was also impossibly desirable and undeniably fast. If you’re looking for one now, prices have become very reasonable, at least in terms of the initial purchase: they’re still expensive to maintain and require regular attention. And that combination of “uncomfortable” and “expensive to buy and maintain” means that there are plenty running around in excellent condition and with very low miles. But ones with just a couple hundred miles on the odometer like this one are few and far between.

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From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 for Sale

Yes this beautiful Superbike has 245 miles on it.  It would have had less but I had to drive it to see Frankie Chili the Superbike star to sign the tank.  I bought from a guy who owned a huge plumbing company who bought it at Sotheby’s charity auction in 2002 brand new in Vegas after being signed by Ben Bostrom. Several other amazing guys signed tank but unfortunately while sitting in my office got cleaned by a cleaning person and ruined the signatures.   Bike is in my storage next to Jet Tunning, one of the Premier Motorcycle tuners in all of CA.  Bike has not been started since 2006.  Battery disconnected and fuel drained.  Bike is 100% original, never dropped or scratched. Clean Title as expected.  I bought this bike as art.  It was enjoyed by 1000s of folks who loved the fact that this was the body style that put Ducati back on the map in the 1990s.  Office building sold and now in warehouse covered.  Needs a good home where someone can hang it over a bar, or put in a collection, or maybe just rode hard for the first time in its life.  Thanks for looking.

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The $7,500 asking price is high for a bog-standard 916, or it would be, if it wasn’t virtually brand-new. As it is, that seems like a decent price for such a pristine machine, although I’d be tempted to just clean the badly-smudged signatures off the tank for a dead-stock look. It’s a shame, since they’d be a very cool addition for a display bike if they were in good condition… And honestly, “display” is probably what will happen to this bike: there are plenty of nice, well-maintained bikes around if you’re looking for one to ride, and this bike would probably need a comprehensive service if you wanted to actually ride it.

You’d also probably want to remove those “916” decals from the side panels: earlier 916s with the older graphics had the displacement displayed but, when Ducati switched to their new corporate logo, it was dropped until the introduction of the updated 996. Not a good aesthetic choice, but very easy to fix.

-tad

1998-ducati-916-tank

Nearly New: 1998 Ducati 916 With Just 245 Miles for Sale
Laverda November 17, 2016 posted by

Spooky Sportbike: 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike 668 for Sale

1998-laverda-ghost-strike-r-front

The Zane-era Laverda Ghost and Ghost Strike are extremely rare here in the USA. They were designed to fill the same niche as Ducati’s Monster and provide a profitable, parts-bin naked that would help put the struggling company into the black. The seller claims that the bike is “light, fast, loud, and powerful” and he’s probably mostly correct. At around 420lbs dry, it is relatively svelte and that exhaust is definitely not stock, so it’s likely pretty loud. The Ghost Strike generally came with a dual-exhaust, but this aftermarket two-into-one set up should save a bit of weight over the stock system in addition to increasing noise and power. Handling is excellent so the bike will definitely be quick down a twisted ribbon of asphalt, but “powerful” might be a bit of a stretch: the air-cooled 668 parallel-twin engine was a pretty ancient design and notably down on power compared to its competition from Bologna, with a claimed 70hp output.

1998-laverda-ghost-strike-r-rear

A quick look at the “gas tank” reveals something interesting: a lack of a filler cap. That’s because you’re really looking at the airbox and the tank filler is under a locking panel in the tail, which should be a conversation-starter anytime you’re gassing up. These bikes may look a bit like someone ripped the fairing off a CBR, but they’re very quirky machines that stress handling over power. The standard Ghost used a trellis frame similar to the Ducati, although this Ghost Strike features a beam frame that it uses identical geometry and is shared with the fully-faired 750S and Formula models.

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From the original eBay listing: 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike 668 for Sale

Real deal.  Made in Italy. Rare and unique Laverda Ghost Strike 668.   Aluminum frame, fuel-injected, air-cooled parallel twin.  Carbon exhaust, Brembo brakes, etc.  Top of the line components.  If you want to ride something no one else has, this is for you!   Runs, rides and shifts perfectly.

Beautiful bike in great condition.  Never dropped.  Very slight imperfections from normal use.  Just had starter and flywheel replaced with OEM parts.   

This bike is light, fast, loud and powerful! 

The bike is missing passenger accommodations and its stock mirrors, but it does look better with these simple bar-end bits anyway. There are just a few hours left on the auction, with bidding up to $4,000. Certainly, a Monster will give you more bang for your buck, with much greater straight-line performance and parts availability. But handling from that Nico Bakker frame is famously good and these are rare as hen’s teeth, especially in the USA. If bidding stays low, this could be a very cool buy for someone with a desire to be a bit different.

-tad

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Spooky Sportbike: 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike 668 for Sale
Yamaha November 6, 2016 posted by

Everybody Loves a Winner: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

1998-yamaha-tz250-r-side

Just so we’re clear: this 1998 Yamaha TZ250 is not to be confused with the road-going but also very cool TZR250. The TZ250 was Yamaha’s over-the-counter GP machine, a pure race bike. As such, “originality” is a relative thing, and these things have typically evolved over their racing careers with the goal of winning at any cost. This particular TZ250 has obviously been thoroughly developed, as it was the AMA 250 GP Championship winner in 1999…

1998-yamaha-tz250-l-side-naked

Like the later versions of the TZR250, the TZ250 was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin, backed by a six-speed gearbox, with a classic “banana” swingarm out back. The bike was designed to appeal to entry-level racers and is relatively reliable for a pure racing machine, but it will obviously need regular rebuilds and much more maintenance than a roadbike.

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The 1998 TZ250 seen here featured revised plastics, including that tapered tail that looks a bit like the later Aprilia RS250. The new bodywork also featured a sealed airbox and a ram-air intake to feed the updated carburetors, along with a host of minor upgrades to the rest of the bike.

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From the original eBay listing: AMA Championship-Winning 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

You’ve heard of Barn Finds… Time Capsules…  Museum Liquidations….   well today, have I got one for you! This is THE 1999 AMA 250 GP Championship winning machine as piloted by Chuck Sorensen.  Exactly as it ran, with factory spares to boot!  It was, and possibly is still today- one of the fastest 250s in the country.

I purchased this in early 2003, directly from James Siddall- owner of World Sports Imports.  This was James’ trophy bike.  He mentioned that after it crossed the finish line, it went directly to his office to set behind his desk.  The only hands that have touched the motorcycle since purchase were those of Perry Melneciuc -who, if you know him- besides his being a Factory Mechanic for Ducati, Honda, Yamaha, AMA Race Teams- is considered the most correct, fastidious, compulsive Gran Prix mechanic alive.  All that, PLUS he was a World Sports’ team member/rider.  Perry went thru it from tip to tail and made certain everything was correct, fresh and set to their true running settings.  (Perry’s notes are included in the sale as to what World Sports ran and what it is set for now -including upper/lower, unleaded/leaded, head volume, deck height, squish, carb settings, transmission selections, etc.)
 
After Perry’s meticulous go-thru, fluids were drained and it went into storage/display.  Until now….
 
The motorcycle is completely outfitted with very rare and otherwise unobtainable parts.  Almost every single nut, bolt, axle and pivot is either titanium or aluminum.  Forks and shock are the state of the art (for the time) Ohlins.  Expansion chambers/pipes are factory “A” kit titanium.  Wheels, are five spoke Marvics.
 
The spares package is rich and thick:
 
*Complete set of later model Corbin  #1 body work (seat, two lowers, two uppers, tank (un-dented) (left over from the 2000 campaign)
*Extra set of Factory “A” kit steel expansion chambers
*Sprockets (front and rear) and carriers
*Clutch basket (inner, outer) rod, gear, bearings etc
*two cyclinders
*at least three sets of heads (8.1cc, 8.3cc w/ deto sensors, etc)
*2 Ohlins alternate shock springs
*alternate Ohlins fork springs
*throttle sleeve
*Stator/Rotor
*New side cover with new gasket in package
*TEN brand new matched pistons with rings, wristpins, etc.
*4DP-40 CDI (black box)
*one World Sports Imports Team Polo shirt!
*two (matched L/R set of brake rotors)
*19 spark plugs (11 in bag, used, 8 in holder used but entirely serviceable.
*foot pegs, clutch springs, etc
*electrical umbilical cord for exhaust valve setting
*spare battery, charger
*the SEVENTY-FIVE (not including the ones in the motorcycle) individual gears/alternate ratios that make up the UNOBTAINABLE FACTORY RACING TRANSMISSION KIT.
*tire warmers, f/r stands
*etc.
 
To further document things, the photos should take over from here.  I tried to photograph all the spares so you can paw thru them…  but one photo got missed -showing the two alternate rate Ohlins shock springs. The only thing that has happened to the bike in the years on display is the right aluminum clip-on split due fatigue/time under load.  (You can actually see it in photo #6, right clip on…  a small white line, about 3/4″).
 
Outside of that- the motorcycles’ internals are fresh and as set by Perry.  With fluids, tires, battery and a proper set up for you- the bike is ready to ride.
1998-yamaha-tz250-expansion-chamber
There are no takers yet at the $17,500 starting bid. The listing includes a huge amount of spares as described by the seller, something that can make or break the deal on a bike like this, unless you’re just planning to simply display it. Two-strokes, especially highly-strung, tuned-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives racing two-strokes consume parts regularly. Folks racing on a budget are likely familiar with that and comfortable wrenching but, when you’re running a nearly twenty-year-old, limited-production motorcycle with parts you likely could never have simply picked up on the shelves of your local dealer, the chances of finding what you need are vanishingly small.
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And not only are maintenance parts included, but go-fast bits are in the mix. I can’t imagine there’s a track in the world you couldn’t configure those seventy-five gears to tackle, which is probably the whole point, and I have no idea what the trick front end and shock would be worth on the open market. $17,500+ is a lot of money, but considering the race-winning history and the fact that it’s basically a complete race-bike kit in a box (just add rider) that suddenly starts to seem pretty reasonable.
-tad
1998-yamaha-tz250-l-side
Everybody Loves a Winner: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale
Bimota October 27, 2016 posted by

Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

1998-bimota-yb11-l-front

1990s Bimotas currently represent an amazing value, and this 1998 YB11 Superleggera has superbike performance, Yamaha reliability, and is very rare, all for under $10,000. “Superleggera” or “super light” is a style of construction that stresses lightweight materials and construction: Ducati’s Superleggera is so super and leggera that it actually weighs less than the British Superbike Championship Panigale including ballast… So while 400lbs dry may not be considered the absolute lightest bike out there by today’s standards, it’s still in the hunt and was a solid 30lbs lighter than the YZF1000 that donated its engine and gearbox.

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Plenty of superbikes these days weigh the same and make far more than the YB11’s 145 peak horsepower, but without their electronics and sophisticated traction control systems, they’d likely be wrapped around a tree in short order. The five-valve Yamaha engine that powers the YB11 should be far less peaky than something like an MV Agusta F4 or even a BMW S1000RR, as evidenced by the 5-speed gearbox, which suggests a reduced need to chase narrow powerbands. It says much about the original bike that it’s nearly 20 years old and, with 170mph top speed, can at least keep modern superbikes in sight, especially on the road.

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The only catch with that “Yamaha reliability” thing could be actual access to the Yamaha parts on the YB11. That beam frame may be light and strong, but Bimota didn’t worry about things like “servicing” when they designed this beast, and other bikes they’ve built aren’t easy to service: for the similar, Suzuki GSX-R1100-powered SB6R, you actually need to drop the engine to change the front sprocket. The clutch slave? Drop the engine. And the alternator drive on the SB6R tends to fail due to overheating. Guess what you have to do to work on that?

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Those beefy 51mm Paioli forks provide excellent roadholding but could be difficult to source parts for. And when I say “could” I mean, “I know one that was sidelined for a couple years with leaky seals because the parts were unavailable.” Although I’m sure it’d be possible to swap in the front end from a modern superbike, if you’re friendly with someone who can knock up a set of custom triple-trees…

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

A Unique and Rare Super Bike On Display in the New England Motorcycle Museum!

Extremely rare! Only 650 made! Not many opportunities to buy unmolested, low mileage Bimotas present themselves! Act now!

Borderline savage power-to-weight ratio! There was nothing in its class that could touch it in sheer acceleration

This bike features an engine based off the Yamaha YZF1000 and featured a larger air box, reworked carburetors & a 4 into 1 pipe that turned the Yamaha engine into a rocket ship without comprising its superb reliability!

Immense handling capabilities! Extremely light weight makes for easy input and lean angle limits that are most likely well beyond the rider’s capabilities.

This hand crafted, Italian made motorcycle is gorgeous and the photos speak for themselves! Here’s your chance to own this Italian Stallion!

Ready for your exotic collection

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The seller does include a video of the bike with a walk-around, but doesn’t fire the bike up. It’s pretty clear from the photos that this bike is in superlative condition and has just 3,000 on it. I’m not sure if the YB11 has similar servicing issues as Bimota’s SB6, but I’d consult with a specialist shop or spend some time on the forums before assuming these will be cheap or easy to maintain. Plus, bodywork might prove a little difficult to replace if you take a tumble. That being said, I’d buy one in a heartbeat: with a Buy It Now price of just $9,500 it’s rare, fast, and Italian. It even has passenger accommodations, something of a rarity for Bimotas in general.

-tad

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Super and Leggera: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Yamaha June 15, 2016 posted by

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 R Front

I wouldn’t normally post something so relatively common on a bike about “rare” sportbikes, but this particular 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1 is strikingly clean and low mileage, the kind of bike speculators or collectors might soon be snapping up. Japanese sportbikes offer performance, reliability, and ubiquity in equal portions. That’s kind of the point: you can get your bike serviced anywhere, parts are plentiful and cheap, and the bikes are fast and good-looking. Which is great, but they can hardly be considered rare or exotic in most cases. But the R1 is certainly an iconic machine and a defining bike of the modern era, so it’s significant and collectible. And in this kind of condition with miles this low, I think it counts as being pretty rare as well.

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 Tail

Big-engined sportbikes were at one time also cursed with bloat: the ZX-11 and GSX-R1100 were certainly fast, but they were more GT and less sportbike. The CBR900RR showed the advantages of big-bike power combined with a light, agile platform, but that 900cc displacement left it without a class or real competitors, a bit like the situation the GSX-R750 has found itself in for most of the past decade.

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 R Fairing

While the previous YZF1000 was a fast and sporty mile-muncher like the ZX-11, complete with anachronistic five-speed gearbox, Yamaha basically threw that bike completely out the window and started with a virtually clean-sheet design. Angular styling that’s far more svelte than what you’d normally find on a big-bore superbike and innovative features designed to maximize power-to-weight and help to keep that performance under control. The new bike was designed with a stacked gearbox. This allowed the most compact powertrain possible and maximized swingarm length within the wheelbase for improved traction. The bike was a revelation for period testers, who had to dig deep for hyperbole to describe a bike with a very real 150hp motivating just 450lbs wet.

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

I could go on and on about this bike, but my guess is that you know what you’re looking at, and want to hear more about this particular one. As you should already know, these bikes are very hard to find… Ok let me reframe that, these are hard to find that are original, low miles, and in good working and cosmetic condition. There are lots of used R1’s that come up for sale now and again with lots of miles and wear but to me, these are not collector bikes, just used bikes.

This bike, in my opinion, is a “good” example of a collector bike. I say good, as it isn’t in the wrapper or perfect, and had more than one owner and not a lot of paperwork. It showed some wear and use, and took a little work to get it cleaned up back to stock after I purchased it. When I found this bike it was still being ridden very sparingly by its second owner who was looking to free up some money for his new family in Michigan. It had the usual used bike stuff done to it, fender cut, blinkers changed, aftermarket windscreen and grips, aftermarket sprocket (everybody thought changing the sprocket was a big deal back then), and braided front brake lines, most of which he still had the original parts to go with the bike (which is always a good thing).

From the viewpoint of a collector, I really liked this bike because of its originality, it was the first year and had a low VIN (…000047), so this was 47th off the production line. The condition and the mileage as well as the color pulled me in – very few red and white ones seem to come up that often. It was in great shape, all the plastics were original as far as I could tell and not all scratched up. No pitting on the headlights, and rims were in nice shape — no excessive marks which would be indicative of multiple tire changes.  It does have low miles and the bike should tell that story — and it did. The tank was clean, no rust or paintwork had been done and it started right up and ran and idled very well… we agreed on a number and I brought the bike home. Once home the bike was stripped down to frame and motor (as seen in the pictures below), cleaned, and everything non-stock or should I say non-OEM was replaced other than front braided brake line and rear sprocket (I think I have the OEM rear sprocket and forgot to replace it with the original).

The bike was in great shape – detailed, oil and filter changed, fuel and air filters changed, tank and carbs drained, battery removed and discarded then put into climate controlled storage (so you will need to buy a new battery). I have all the receipts of parts that were ordered and installed. I have the bill of sale from the original owner to the second owner back in 2000 (nice touch). All put into a binder for the new owner. This bike would make a nice addition to an existing collection and or start a new one. This bike is surely going to appreciate over time. Please take the time to look over the pictures in great detail and decide if this bike is the right fit for you, ask questions if needed. Good luck and have fun!

The bike comes with:

2 keys

Binder with all paperwork that I have

Service manual

Owner’s manual

Original tool kit

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 R Fairing

Certainly, as the seller points out, there are plenty of well-used R1s out there for folks in search of decent cheap speed. There are connoisseurs out there who will battle it out in the forums over which generation R1 is the best. But whichever you prefer, it’s hard to argue that the original will likely be the most collectible and, if you’ve been considering adding one of these to your stable, you’re very unlikely to find one this clean and original outside of an unregistered bike sitting in a crate somewhere.

-tad

1998 Yamaha YZF R1 L Front

Low-Mileage Future Classic: 1998 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale
Ducati April 22, 2016 posted by

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

1998 Ducati 900SS FE L Side

The 90s iteration of Ducati’s famous SuperSport wasn’t exactly a fast bike, even by standards of the day. And by the time the Ducati 900SS “Final Edition” rolled around, it likely appealed mostly to die-hard Ducati fans and collectors. Which is a shame because, although the 900SS didn’t offer cutting-edge performance, it did offer plenty of charisma, great handling, and accessible real-world performance.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE R Side Fairing

The chase for abstract performance numbers has always obsessed the world of motorcycles and cars. But the truth is that peak horsepower numbers are often pointless. Since these machines are only fully exploited by .01% of riders, and what works in ad copy isn’t always all that useful on the road, it’s not always the most powerful bikes that make the most rewarding bikes to ride, especially on the road. Look at the endless praise heaped on the K5 GSX-R1000 by modern reviewers and see how this year’s Brutale 800 actually produces less horsepower than the previous version to make it a better roadbike, and it becomes easier to see why this Ducati might win your heart, even if it won’t win any bench-racing sessions…

1998 Ducati 900SS FE L Side Fairing

Powered by Ducati’s long-lived two-valve Pantah engine, the FE featured a solo-seat tail that allowed upswept pipes for increased cornering clearance and some carbon-fiber parts ostensibly because of their light weight, although the savings on a front fender are probably negligible… With a claimed 80hp on tap and a big fat midrange these are very rewarding to ride stock and a huge range of aftermarket support means you can modify the bike to suit if that’s more your thing.

1998 Ducati 900SS FE Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale

Here we have a 1998 Ducati 900ss FE.  #246 of 300 imported to North America.  The FE stands for ‘Final Edition’,  Based on the 900SS SP, the FE comes dressed in elegant silver bodywork and black wheels, with carbon fiber rear fender, dashboard cover, and countershaft drive cover. A solo (monoposto) seat completes the stunning visual impression.

But there’s more than just skin deep beauty in the FE.

To back up the race-bred look, a few additional changes were made as well. The exhaust pipes have been raised to provide improved cornering clearances. New cast iron floating brake rotors have been fitted with remote reservoirs and adjustable levers. New cylinders, alternator, and voltage regulator have been added. The resulting combination will assure that the thrill of the ride matches the beauty of the machine. Limited to just 300 bikes in North America, the 900SS FE is the last of the 2nd generation SuperSports to be produced by the Bologna factory. To further secure it’s place in the DUCATI legacy, the top triple clamp of each FE is fitted with a consecutively numbered commemorative plaque. There is no doubt as to the special position the FE will assume in the heritage of the most sought after sport motorcycles in the world.

 

1998 Ducati 900SS FE Plaque

The 900SS was certainly dated when new, a nearly retro-performance machine before that was really even a thing. Certainly, it was intended to appeal to collectors and designed to shift the moribund hardware while a replacement was being prepared, but the package can provide plenty of smiles if you’re more of a back-road rider than a track-day warrior. The seller is asking $8,999.00 for this sub-10,000 mile example which, although premium money for a 90s 900SS, seems pretty much on-par for an FE these days.

-tad

1998 Ducati 900SS FE R Side

Silver Bullet: 1998 Ducati 900SS FE for Sale