Posts by Category: Kawasaki

Kawasaki July 12, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 “Goose” Tribute

Update 8.24.2018: The Goose has been SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Rather than the bloated KZ1000P CHiPs workhorse, Mad Max's not-so-distant future police bike was more of a café racer with lights.  And a siren.  This owner gave a down-on-its-luck Z1000 LTD a makeover right up Goose's alley.

1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 "Goose" Tribute

The LTD turns out to be a nice choice for the Main Force Patrol build, with its slightly smaller and more responsive Mikuni carburetors with accelerator pump.  The 1015 cc's on the stock machine made 86 hp and 61 ft.-lbs. torque, though the PMC exhaust fitted here may release a few extra ponies.  Most of the LTD's other attributes are cosmetic, except for the 16-inch rear wheel which has been corrected to an 18.  Elsewhere it's standard Z1000 - endless torque, three big stainless disk brakes, and just a hint of secondary vibration.

Owner / builder Dave kept an eye on usability during the work, though it is the spitting image of the movie machine.  Airtech's decision to manufacture the bodywork was a key motivator.  The chassis and drivetrain were gone over, and only altered in terms of the imported PMC exhaust.  Execution is sanitary and graphics are spot on.  Bespoke rearsets led to rear brake updates and handlebar controls were modernized.  Dave says  this about the work:

Many components have been upgraded in the process and in and effort to make the bike as close to the film version as possible.

First off the 16” LTD rear wheel was tossed in favor of the correct 18” variety. This was sourced from a 1984 GPz 750 and completely refurbished with new bearings, spacers, paint, polish and clear coat.

The existing rear brakes were worn out and not worth saving, so the rear caliper is now a 1985 KZ1000P,  connected to a rear master cylinder from a 1996 ZX600, as required by the custom, billet rear sets from PDM Fabrication.  

The exhaust is a very rare, PMC 4-2 crossover system from Japan, that is a flawless recreation of the system that was on the movie bike. It also sounds brilliant. The carbs have been completely gone through, cleaned thoroughly and jetted properly for the exhaust and airbox combo.

Front wheel is the correct 19” factory mag, completely refurbished as well and sporting new bearings and spacers.

As stated, all the body work came from Airtech and was painted locally by Anthony at Bridge City Cycles

The matching Airtech seat pan was covered by Shelby Schafer and is a perfect fit over the tail section.

All the handle bar controls are 1996 ZX600 parts.  This isn’t screen accurate, but the quality is so far ahead of the vintage stuff, it’s worth it to have a slight inaccuracy. Also with a nod towards modern technology, the front master cylinder is from a 06 Yamaha R6 and the clutch perch is from the same ZX600.

The "Max" movies launched a fan cult that continues almost forty years on, and there are kits of MFP bodywork to fit 1/12 scale models of the Z1000, as well as Jim "Goose" action figures.  But this one you can actually ride.  Restoration and upgrades have resulted in a much safer and better-running Z1000.  It's sure to be the hit of any show, though younger riders might have to google MFP.  Dave asks $12,000 for the Goose tribute.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 “Goose” Tribute
Kawasaki June 29, 2018 posted by

Outer Limits – 1974 Kawasaki H1F Mach III

Prehistorically speaking, Kawasaki came just behind the Honda CB750 in the nascent superbike sweepstakes, but just ahead in the 1/4 mile.  The lighter weight two stroke triple had a wheelie addiction, and a substantial power-to-weight advantage, if not being a dream to handle.  This H1 is an older restoration and comes to you with a few foibles but excellent cosmetics.

1974 Kawasaki H1F for sale on eBay

The H1 had a classic twin downtube frame but innovative two-stroke triple.  Three 28mm Mikunis fueled the engine and oil injection was automatic.  For a 500, a 12.5-second quarter was a revelation, but period single front disk and rear drum at least kept exuberance rational.  Improvements over the six years of production improved the Capacitive Discharge Ignition system and standardized the unusual N-1-2-3-4-5 shift pattern.

This late Mach III looks better than excellent with most metals looking almost new, and there's very little plastic aboard.  The Ohio owner divulges that the odometer is hopelessly optimistic, and colors are from an H2, but beside the K&N air filters it appears complete, stock, and un-muddled.  A steering damper is installed which appears stock but from an earlier year.  From the eBay auction:

Mostly stock bike with air intake pods, dual piston front brake caliper and aftermarket exhaust. Older restoration with paint and chrome in above average condition. Starts up on 2nd or 3rd kick and shifts through gears smoothly. No dents in tank, scratches or cracks in plastic. Tank has been lined. Oil injection system is complete. Gauges, lights and turn signals all in good working order. Seat and seat pan in excellent condition. Recently replaced drive chain. Mileage on speedo is not correct. Paint scheme is the H2 color, black/purple.

Reviews showed the chassis to be un-cooperative with mid-corner direction changes and rough roads in general, but once the inadequate brakes were planned for, the power slowed the passage of time.  In the better part of valor, a friend of mine in the late '70s sold his shortly after lifting the front wheel with his fiancé on the back.  Neither designed or built for longevity, few have survived in this condition, the restoration here done on a nicer example.  Bidders are off to find the reserve but the auction still has five days to run...

-donn

Outer Limits – 1974 Kawasaki H1F Mach III
Kawasaki May 25, 2018 posted by

Unloved Zed sled: 1995 Kawasaki ZX9R with 6,813 miles

Kawasaki's ZX-9R has always been a bit of mongrel bike; situated between the legendary ZX7 and ZX11 series, the 899cc bike was initially developed as a response to the Honda CBR900 but never achieved top status in the segment.  Although the configuration lasted for nearly 10 years, sales were never huge for Kawasaki and it isn't considered to be a historically or technologically significant bike by collectors. Still today's offering is an ultra clean model with less than 7000 miles in its over 23 years, is in the rare for the model candleberry-wine-red color scheme and appears to have all OEM bits available so it seemed worth of a post.

1995 Kawasaki ZX9R on ebay

The ZX9R was somewhat hastily developed by Kawasaki as a segment response to the CBR900 Fireblade.  The problem for Kawasaki was that as a smaller manufacturer they didn't have the resources to launch an all out assault against the class leading Honda (it would take a few more years until Yamaha's R1 did that).    Kawasaki instead tried to stake out a middle ground, offering a 900cc bike that wasn't an ultra-light-weight repli-racer fit only for the track but was also not a large capacity "sportbike" touring machine.  To do this Kawasaki essentially took their legendary but now outclassed ZX7/ZXR750 and incorporated a number of ZX11/ZZR-1100 design features.  Suspension was an upgrade over the 750 with fully adjustable 43 mm upside-down KYB front forks and a fully adjustable remote-reservoir KYB mono-shock while the brakes were Tokico front and rear.  The most obvious  change came in the engine but even there parts were shared with the majority of the engine pieces (crankcases, clutch and gearbox) coming from the 750cc while the cylinder head was from the ZX11/ZZR-11100 with different valve actuation.  The result was more grunt and a red line of 12,000 rpm (the Fireblade stopped at 10,500 rpm).  Put it all together and you got exactly what Kawasaki intended - a mid sized bike that existed between the ends of the segment.

While the ZX9R delivered on its intended purpose, it never really developed a strong following like the Fireblade, GSXR or the soon to follow Yamaha R1.  In retrospect is seems Kawasaki  misjudged the long term impact of the "less is more" movement begun by the Fireblade.  Also the first models of the ZX9R were heavier compared to the competition and had the typical-of-the-time Kawasaki build quality issues, especially with the paint.

As for this particular ZX9R, the bike looks to almost completely OEM but the pictures aren't the best...I mean seriously, how hard would it have been to move the truck?  The seller doesn't give any service info other than "newish tires" so I would expect there to be a need for fresh fluids with particular attention paid to the brake system (a known issue for Kawasaki bikes of this period if left standing for long periods).  On the plus side the bike looks clean with no evidence of indicator or rear tail modifications common of the era and even the exhaust looks OEM and pristine.  The only non-stock item appears to be the windscreen and the seller indicates the OEM unit will be included in the sale.

So let's jump to the question - is this low mileage and apparently almost completely OEM ZX9R worth the current Buy-It-Now price of of $3999 USD?  Well a quick search through sites like Cycletrader show that price to be a bit more than expected but not out of range given the mileage of this bike.   As for value, I don't think this one will appeal to collectors and will probably never appreciate significantly but it isn't something you are going to see at your local bike night and might also be a good fit for people who always liked the bigger ZX11/ZZR1100 in this color scheme but found that bike too big to handle easily.  Based on the pics and the mileage the current owner is not a major Kawasaki fan so they might be motivated to move off the asking price, especially if you can offer something Suzuki-related in trade?

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Unloved Zed sled:  1995 Kawasaki ZX9R with 6,813 miles
Kawasaki May 11, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R or 1990 Kawasaki KR-1R – buyer’s choice!

Update 5.11.2018: Based on his latest eBay listing, the 1989 is still available. Our original write up from November is shown below. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc


When RSBFS last listed this 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R on our pages, we considered it to be a bit of a world exclusive. That should tell you the rarity of what we are talking about. But how do you describe TWO KR-1Rs in the same collection? Unicorn doesn't quite cut it. You are looking at two examples of what has to be the rarest of the 250cc two stroke set, both in amazing condition. Utah collector Gary has certainly amassed himself a magnificent cadre of bikes - and RSBFS has been honored to help him list many of those bikes on these pages. But this particular event takes the cake: pony up $20,000 USD and take your pick of either one of the amazing R bikes listed here.

The KR lineup is a bit of a dark horse in the quarter liter sport bike world. Never as popular as the NSR/RG/TZR set, the Kawasaki offering provided a solid chassis and a very powerful parallel twin. In fact, a KR series bike held the 250cc land speed record at Bonneville thanks to that Kawasaki power. Outside of Japan, the KR is relatively unknown, although it was exported to the UK and AUS/NZ in limited numbers. Even the aficionados who are aware of the KR-1/KR-1S/KR-1R family have likely never seen one in person. And while some will be quick to point out that the KR-1R model is really just a 1S with slightly bigger carbs and more power, the value of the model has evolved well beyond the cost of the parts. These are rare, coveted machines and will remain at the sharp end of the collector scale for the foreseeable future.


1989 Kawasaki KR-1R D1 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
The bike came from a Kawasaki collector in Japan. Motor is all stock. Stock carbs,
stock airbox, stock heads, ect all confirmed OEM Kawasaki. Fairings 100% OEM.
Windshield appears to be OEM. Two Keys.

Previous collector has cosmetically customized this KR-1R with Kawasaki OEM green
front fender, Beet rear sets and Beet exhaust and mufflers. Some suspension
components have been polished.


1990 Kawasaki KR-1R D2 SOLD

From the seller:
This 1990 KR250-D2 is completely stock and has the black front fender. It has had the rear cowling and the lower cowling professionally re-sprayed. The upper and the tank and all other components are original. New tires, fork seals, braided front brake lines and chain complete the refresh. Comes with Utah title. Runs and idles like new. Bike has been tuned and has new engine fluids. 25,290km’s on the odometer. Bike came from a Kawasaki bike collector in Japan. It is very solid and runs surprisingly well for the mileage.


More details:

Price: $20,000 gives you the choice of one bike

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com


In case you have not noticed, it is not 1989/1990 anymore. The KR-1R - already rare when it was first introduced - has become a very exclusive tile in the two stroke collector mosaic. These were built by Kawasaki as sports production racers, and as such many (most?) were thrashed and cast aside. Those that survived often fell victim to sea air and corrosion common to the Japanese home market. In short, a clean and loved KR-1R is a rare survivor of a rare species. Here at RSBFS we always recommend that if you are in the market you should seek out the best example of a collector model that you can find - but how often can you find more than one example to compare? Today you can find TWO of these remarkable KR-1R models in pristine condition in one place - all you need to do is pick the one you want. Kawasaki isn't building any more of these, and the world's supply is low and getting lower. Resto mods and parts bikes may be available sporadically in the future, but you are not going to find bikes in this condition often. If a KR-1R is on your bucket list, you might want to act before these jewels appreciate even more. Contact Gary at rmurangemasters@aol.com to seal the deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R or 1990 Kawasaki KR-1R – buyer’s choice!
Kawasaki April 27, 2018 posted by

Explosive [Acceleration] Device: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo for Sale

UPDATE: This bike sold before I could post it, but I'd thought I'd share it with you all anyway, since it is so darn nice. -Tad

The dream of the 1980s was to turbo all the things. Cars, hairdryers, sneakers... If you could buy it, someone was trying to slap a TURBO badge on it during the 1980s to help move units. Actual turbochargers started showing up on commonly-available vehicles during the 80s to inspire that trend, but people were experimenting with turbocharged passenger cars as far back as the Oldsmobile Jetfire, Chevy Corvair Corsa, and Saab 99 Turbo. It took a bit longer for turbocharging to find its way into the production motorcycling world, due to a few challenges associated with the relatively primitive turbo technology of the time. Of course, the term "production" might be stretching things a bit when you're talking about the Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo.

By 1978, the Kawasaki Z1R KZ1000 was decidedly old-fashioned, with honking big air-cooled four cylinder engine, a twin-shock rear suspension, spindly forks up front, and a frame that was less than cutting-edge. The package was generally competent and well-regarded, just a bit long-in-the-tooth. With the development of the much more modern GPz underway, Kawasaki needed to move some remaining stock and generate a bit of excitement for the brand. The TC Turbo, which took the already reasonably quick Z1R and added a RaJay turbo package that increased power by 50%, may have generated a little too much excitement.

TURBO was a word associated with power and speed and modern and cool, even if most people really didn't know what it meant, or exactly how a turbocharger added power to an engine. A high school buddy of mine drove his mom's Mitsubishi Tredia L equipped with some sort of POWER button on the automatic shifter, and he was convinced that it activated "turbo boost," since he'd watched lots of Knight Rider and thought that's how things worked... What it probably did was lock out overdrive in the transmission, but you couldn't convince him it didn't actually release additional power. And likely a great many enthusiasts' understanding of the technology didn't extend much beyond that.

Turbos can make big power, but with that great power comes great responsibility and it was laughably easy to adjust the wastegate on the Z1R TC to allow boost far beyond what the stock internals could handle, leading to a sudden, explosive reversal of the normal interior/exterior engine component relationship. Sure, you could always opt to have your new Kawasaki's engine fully built to withstand the additional pressures, something that was actually recommended by the company, but how many people do you think bothered to do that?

Turbochargers originally came into widespread use during World War II, and the advantages of forced-induction were exploited to allow combat aircraft to perform more efficiently at high altitudes, where reduced oxygen density significantly reduced power. The move towards turbocharging in automobiles was also driven by necessity in the 80s, when the manufacturers were hit by significantly increased fuel-economy and emissions standards. A turbocharger allowed smaller, more efficient engines to perform like larger engines on demand.

Unfortunately, while that Jekyl/Hyde personality of early turbocharged cars generally made them entertaining, it made motorcycles, especially ones already pushing the limits of frame and suspension technology, pretty terrifying: the Z1R probably would have killed more people than Cholera, but luckily very few were actually built. Even fewer still survive today, and most of those aren't in the hands of their original owners, who likely died horrible, firey deaths...

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R Turbo for Sale

Created through an arrangement between Kawasaki and Turbo Cycle Corporation (which was founded by ex-Kawasaki Marketing Director, Alan Masek) brand new Z1R's were sent to TCC, who then modified them with a RaJay turbo and badging. These modified bikes were then sold through select Kawasaki dealers- without a warranty. THERE WERE ONLY 500 BUILT. 

The gas tank side covers, header panels, and tail section have been repainted and color matched to an original Z1R TC. It has all new decals from reproductiondecals.com. So much work has been done to this bike. There are approximately 40 miles on the top half of the rebuilt engine. the cylinder was removed, sand blasted, honed, and painted. New piston rings have been installed. I purchased a like new cylinder head that has all new component parts. The original head had two hairline cracks. The forks were removed, cleaned, and polished with new dust covers. It has a new battery. It has a rebuilt,older style Keihn carburetor. I have the original Bendix carburetor, but as most people know, it runs smoother with the Keihn carborator.

The Rajay turbo 370 F 40 was rebuilt by Mr. Turbo.  The seat has no rips or cuts. The seat pan was removed, sanded, primed, and painted with stock stickers installed from reproductiondecals.com. The bike starts, sounds, and runs great. I have all of the receipts from the mechanical work. Only if i feel you are very serious, I will provide you with the name of the motorcycle service center who performed the work on my bike and send you copies of the sales and receipts. Before the engine was rebuilt, I replaced the tires which are Pirelli Sport Demon. The sprockets and the brake pads were replaced. Those items have about 200 miles on them. The only item i know of that is not an original item is the Pingel fuel valve. Passed down from the original owner are the owners manual, turbo supplement manual, and black vinyl Kawasaki pouch, which was provided for Z1R TC conversions. Both manuals have all the pages intact, and are not oily or greasy. By the way, I know on Ebay, there are reproduction turbo supplement manuals, but this one is original. You can tell by the yellowing pages and semi brittle paper. All three items are 40 years old. 

This actual bike, and not one just like it, is pictured in a hard cover book written by Tony Sculpher title, "Kawasaki (K) Z1000 Z1-R." I have the book. I bought the bike from a collector of Z1R TCs. I wont divulge the info of the collector on ebay, due to privacy and legalities. I made a copy of the title while it was in his name, before I sent it to be transferred to my name. His name is in the book with a picture of my actual motorcycle above the description. All of the instrumentation works. The bike starts, sounds, and runs great. 

This bike's VIN is listed in the official Kawasaki registration for TCC bikes. I am posting a few photos, however, if you want more, please state the area of the bike that you want more detailed photos of. The frame VIN is KZT00D006472. The engine number is from the state police of California as it looks like there must have been an engine case issue which required a factory replacement. Replacement cases from Kawasaki do not carry an engine number and come blank. 

I will assist with your shipping, but will not be responsible for the shipping.

If you're in the market for a Z1R TC [and who isn't?] this looks like a good one. Unfortunately, as mentioned at the start, the listing has been pulled, so I'm assuming it "sold locally." It's clearly been owned by a knowledgeable enthusiast and, although it isn't sporting original paint, it appears to have been painstakingly restored. This is about as nice a machine as you're likely to find, with history, appropriate mechanical updates, and even a very comprehensive video with lots of commentary.

-tad

Explosive [Acceleration] Device: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC Turbo for Sale
Kawasaki April 21, 2018 posted by

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

They're relatively rare here in the US, even in states with lax registration requirements, but late 80s and early 90s quarter-liter two-strokes were pretty widely available elsewhere in the sportbiking world, considering their narrowly-focused role and limited audience. Kawasaki was largely absent from the intense class rivalry during that period, though. Their earlier KR250 was out of date compared to something like the original TZR and they didn't have a real competitor ready until 1988 when the Kawasaki KR-1 and the sportier KR-1S were introduced.

The KR-1 was discontinued in 1992, without any significant updates and well before the others in the class. Just 10,000 were built, making it a pretty rare sight outside Japan these days: Honda constructed more than ten times as many NSR250Rs! But although Kawasaki as a company didn't seem like they'd gone all-in on the idea of going head-to-head against Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha, it wasn't as if the KR-1S itself didn't measure up.

Like most of its rivals, the KR-1S was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel twin and backed by a six-speed gearbox to exploit the razor-thin powerband although, also like its rivals, the Kawasaki did feature power-valve technology, here dubbed "KIPS," to boost the midrange. Modern bikes with their ever-larger engines and horsepower numbers are increasingly equipped with electronic up-and-down shifters and autoblippers, but they really don't particularly need them on the road, considering the available power. A quickshifter/autoblipper would get plenty of use on one of these, had they been available: there's only so much you can do with just 249cc and the bike's government-mandated 45hp, so dancing on the gear lever is a required, not optional activity when riding a little two-stroke.

The frame was the typical aluminum beam unit of the class and the suspension was good but, compared to other bikes in the class, the KR-1 was a bit... raw. Handling was "lively" and the bike managed a best-in-class tested top speed of 139mph. An engine balance shaft driven by the 180° crankshaft seems like it was the only concession to civility, and even that was probably justified as preventing vibration damage to the minimalist frame, rather than as a means to refine the experience of riding the wee beastie.

From the original eBay listing: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale

The KR1S model here in the USA is one of the most rare of the Japanese 250 racer replica two strokes. If one can be found, it will usually be the green, white, and yellow bike. Sometimes the black and green bike, but never a factory genuine JDM Zeus Blue bike. These bikes were very limited in production. The factory Zeus Blue bikes differed from the export models in a few ways: indicators, mirrors, calipers, rotor center color, wheel color, all ID by the frame number. California titled and plated to its original VIN# Rare. Call Tim @714-746-5087 for more details.

When I purchased the bike a few years ago, I went onto the forums and found only a handful of original Zeus Blue KR1S models all overseas: one in Australia, one in the Netherlands, and one in the UK. I would go so far as to say this is the only one in the USA, and I know it’s the only one with a California title. This is THE rocking horse unicorn bike. To whomever buys the bike, you would be INSANE to remove the California title from the bike. That makes this bike so desirable. These bikes were ONLY JDM models never for export which is what makes them so rare. I have owned many many 2Ts (TZR, SPR, MC21, Rothmans, MC28, VJ23, V Model, Lucky, etc). These parallel twins really are amazing bikes. Having owned the four big Japanese manufactured bikes, to me there is no question Kawasaki is the most fun to ride. They literally are mad scientists and I LOVE IT! The KR1S was the fastest of all the 2T racer replicas. And if you know Kawasaki, they just built it and let it rip. Yamaha, Honda have their rev limiters, credit card ignitions, etc. Not Kawi. This thing will go all the way if you were to wind it out all the way. The sound of the parallel twin motor is simply the best. The cackling of the pipes. This bike has only had Motul 710 in it, runs fantastic, starts first kick, and purrs at idle. 18k miles on the clocks, float, gaskets, float valves all done, carbs serviced and cleaned, has Uni foam filter, new plugs, steering damper, factory toolkit, original key, etc. Clear California title in hand and current registration ‘til Jan 2019. Bike is for sale locally so the auction can end at any time. Thanks. Enjoy the ride…

Personally, I prefer my wild-haired Kawasakis to be vibrant green, and not the more civilized, metallic green they've been using on their modern, more sophisticated offerings. No, I want that lurid, fluorescent green of old. But this color scheme is exceedingly rare here, and that does count for something. Not to mention that it does look pretty sharp! The 18,000 miles indicated may not be stored-in-your-livingroom low, but the bike does appear to be you-could-eat-off-it clean and is in immaculate condition, with the very desirable California registration. And yes, the seller is correct that re-titling it in another state is absolutely a bad move financially: legitimately-titled two-strokes of this era are difficult to come by here, and there are plenty of well-heeled enthusiasts willing to pay extra for something they can legally ride.

-tad

Rare Colors: Cali-Titled 1989 Kawasaki KR-1S in Zeus Blue for Sale