Posts by Category: Kawasaki

Kawasaki January 31, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

Update 3.8.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

There is obviously no practical reason to own a 300hp, track-only motorcycle that isn’t eligible for any racing series of which I’m aware. Maybe something involving quarter miles and ETs? Reviewers of the Kawasaki H2R generally don’t even seem to regard the bike as a particularly good track-day weapon: it’s just too heavy, and that fat rear tire needed to keep the power on tap from going up in smoke slows steering significantly. So you can’t race it, it’s almost too fast for track-day antics, likely eats tires like they’re free donuts at a sales meeting, and you can’t ride it on the street… or can you? Apparently, you can, with a bit of DMV chicanery, since this Featured Listing Kawasaki H2R comes with a street title!

The original H2 from the 1970s seemingly has nothing in common with this iteration, other than the name: it was an unfaired, upright machine with handlebars and a long, Schwinn-style “banana” seat that was powered by a two-stroke triple, while the new bike has room for just one and is powered by a supercharged 998cc inline four. But the spirit is there in spades, since both bikes were about speed, speed, and more speed, and all other considerations be damned.

People often forget that there were two different versions of the H2 when the name was resurrected by Kawasaki: the regular road bike and the H2R seen here. The regular bike is a… regular bike: it has the usual turn signals, mirrors, and a really cool projector-beam headlamp in the center of the fairing that looks like it shoots some sort of death-ray. It also made a claimed 200hp, which is impressive, until you consider that Ducati’s V4 Panigale makes well north of that, and even several of the v-twin Panigales got shockingly close. BMW’s S1000RR, Aprilia’s RSV4, and most of the other liter bikes hover around 200hp as well.

And all that power is dulled a bit by the bike’s 475lb wet weight, which is significantly higher than those bikes. Of course, the Kawasaki still has a massive midrange hit of supercharged torque, but on paper, the literbike brigade makes the regular H2 look… a bit regular, although I’m reliably informed it’s anything but in practice. But it doesn’t matter anyway, because this isn’t the regular H2.

The H2R upped the game by saving weight by deleting the lighting and mirrors, replacing them with some extremely expensive carbon-fiber winglets to increase downforce, a set of slicks, and 35psi of boost. The increased positive pressure results in 300 claimed horses that announce their arrival through a stunningly gorgeous and deafeningly loud titanium exhaust that will require earplugs for your unborn descendants: the H2R is so loud that Performance Bikes Magazine wasn’t even able to test one in the UK, as it wouldn’t meet the dB limits at any track in the country.

It’s also worth noting this H2R benefits from the most recent electronic revisions from Kawasaki in 2017 including an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and autoblipper. Cosmetically it has updated upper wings and the “matte mirror” paint.

From the Seller: 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale

For sale is a 2018 Kawasaki Ninja H2R, complete with a clean street title in hand. The H2R only has 60 miles on the clock, and hasn’t been rode enough to register even one hour on the service interval tracker (it tracks based on time spent above 8000 rpm). Bike was broken in per Kawasaki’s specs on a dyno, at which point it was immediately serviced at the dealer. I took it out for a few minutes on the track and otherwise it has sat on front and rear stands plugged into a battery tender.

Includes all original accessories: front and rear OEM stands, Chicken Hawk tire warmers, and Dr. Beasley’s wax kit. Also includes one unused front tire and three rears (OEM-spec Bridgestone slicks), complete with spare rear wheel (you’ll need it for a track weekend!). The bodywork has been completely ceramic coated and the edges of the lower wings have a clear film on them for protection.

This is a tremendous bike and is virtually new, with the added benefit of a street title so you can easily turn around and take it on the street rather than wait for the next track day.

Regarding pricing, because H2Rs are so fantastically rare and streetable H2Rs even moreso, I find it difficult to put a price on it. I am not desperate to sell, but I’ve had a few opportunities come up, so I’d like to see if anyone is interested in one of the most incredible bikes out there that is only some tires and a mirror away from being street-legal.

For perspective on rarity, the VIN number on this bike ends in 10. I was told by a Kawasaki rep that Kawasaki skips VIN number 1, and this was the last 2018 H2R built worldwide. Unfortunately this is purely anecdotal but if you look for photos of H2Rs, there are so few images of them with the 2017+ revised wing design that it is not hard to believe.

Located in Indiana, USA but am happy to cooperate to find shipping within the US.

This isn’t the first H2R we’ve seen with a street title, so it can’t be all that difficult to manage, assuming you don’t live in California or New York. I’m assuming it has a normal VIN to help things along, and this has been done in the past with the Ducati SPS, which apparently wasn’t road-legal either, but came with lights and signals and a VIN, making it more of a, “Of course you’re not going to ride this very fast, very loud exotic racing motorcycle on the road, even though it has headlights and turn signals and treaded tires…” [wink, wink] Obviously, do your homework if you intend to buy it and actually use it on the street, as your local DMV may have some problems with this one, depending on where you live. But other than that, I love the idea of an over-the-top track-day weapon you can use to commute to work on Fridays.

-tad

Featured Listing: Street-Titled 2018 Kawasaki H2R for Sale
Kawasaki January 20, 2019 posted by

Angry Ninja: 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1

It’s not that hard to come across clean Kawasaki ZX-7Rs these days, even after many of them were used and abused and thrown away. But this 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1 is a lot more special. It’s not quite an RR, but the M1 is an early homologation special of the ZX-7R, and it wears a plethora of very sexy race track-oriented bits. To wit: an aluminum gas tank, a rack of four 39mm flatslide carbs, adjustable suspension front and rear, an adjustable swingarm pivot and a close ratio gearbox. There’s also a solo seat cowl to really hammer home the idea that this ain’t your average street bike.

To take full advantage of the bike’s potential, you needed to spring for the race kit, which would get the thing ready for whatever series you wanted to throw it at. With 121 horsepower at the crank pushing around about 440 pounds, the M1 was no slouch. This one has been in the care of a Kawi tech for the last decade, and he says he purchased it from his friend who is the original owner. He claims it has never been raced, and all 21,000 of its miles were racked up on the roads around Burnaby, BC, where it lives. It got an extensive going over last year, with a catalog of new parts listed below.

The bike is in beautiful condition, with the exception of a very scarce few blemishes.

From the eBay listing:

Motorcycle is a Canadian M1 model.
Originally purchased new from my local Kawasaki dealership, Burnaby Kawasaki in BC Canada, est. 1975.
Previous owner is a friend and I have always wanted my first love, a 1993 ZX7R M1.
I purchased the bike June 2009.

Currently has 37,385 kilometers / 23230 miles

Wheels do have some minor light scratches where balance weights were removed when changing tires in past. Front fairing, above headlights, where Kawasaki silver lettering / black decal has, small Nick in decal. See pics.

Two things are missing:
Bike is missing fuel filter bracket, I’ve never had it, didn’t really bother me, but I ordered one last year, it never showed up. Bit disappointed. They are used ones out there.
The remote idle adjuster is bit shorter than the original. I do not know what happened to the original, I bought it like this, and again, never really bothered me. Its just short to reach the holder bracket.

All service work completed in 2018 by myself, factory Kawasaki trained tech.
All the fluids and oil filter have been changed.
Valve adjustment, shims changed as needed.
Carbs cleaned, adjusted as needed and synced. Bike runs great, see video of running operation, link below.
Brakes front and rear rebuilt, oem seals.
Fork seals replaced oem.
New sparkplugs.
New oem air filter.
New oem butt pad.
New brake pads and new oem brake rotors front and back.
Replaced the brake lines with spieglers, I do have the oem brake lines front and rear.
Zero Gravity tinted screen.
I do not have oem windscreen. These can be made to exact oem match by a company in Florida, www.bikescreen.com
New Michelin pilot tires with less than 300kms.
I do have the side fairing left and right side reflectors.
Two ignition keys plus the key code tag.
New chain and sprockets, went with blue chain, reminds me early 90’s. Stock oem gearing.
New battery, new thermostat. New brake reservoirs. All the lights, speedo lights etc work, nothing burnt out. Charging system checked, ok.
Bike starts up, idles, operates properly. I do have video https://youtu.be/M0ofJBc2JXI

Call me if you have any questions, Jason @ 1-604-816- 2915 Try to call between 9am-10pm PST
Much appreciated.

Buyer is responsible for shipping. Bike is located in Vancouver, BC, Canada,
1 hour north of USA border.

Motorcycle is listed for sale locally as well, so auction can end anytime.

Since the bike is in Canada, it will take a little bit of paperwork for U.S. buyers to get it on the road, but for a bike this cool and in condition this nice, it should be worth the hassle.

Angry Ninja: 1993 Kawasaki ZX-7R M1
Kawasaki January 19, 2019 posted by

Warm Leatherette – 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R

This ZX7R has popped up from the middle of the 1996-2003 run, mostly stock and showing no particular damage.  The owner lists a recent major service, battery and new tires.  Not a ground-breaking design or super lightweight, the mid-size Ninja did nail down a few AMA Superbike titles, and is still a great looking ride.

2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R for sale on eBay

Kawasaki evolved the 748cc in-line four from the ZXR-750, and it puts out a very usable 112 hp.  The alloy twin-spar chassis was also a refinement from the previous model and offers a great-steering platform.  House adjustable USD forks and monoshock reviewed at the sporty end of the spectrum, rather stiff for road duty.  Six-piston Tokico brakes over 320mm rotors were up to the task.  Scoops next to the cat’s eye headlights send fresh air to the engine, and the biposto seat console offers a nice backstop for a solo rider.

With rather low mileage at 13K, this example looks great – but of course some close-ups would be nice, and we’ll have to look under that tank bra.  The color-matched pillion looks good, and the green Micron muffler will either delight or incite.  Surprising to see un-altered turn signals and tail feathers.  From the eBay auction:

Mint condition Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R. The only thing that is not original is the Micron can. I have the original black back seat for it. The bike only has 13,000 miles. It has never been laid down. There are a few minute scratches. It’ll be difficult to find one that’s this clean. The bike has new tires , battery and the front calipers rebuilt and all the fluids changed. The bike had a hung up float from sitting however that problem has been taken care of. Own a piece of history! The bike really needs someone that’s going to ride it. All it does is sit with me. It is maintained and started regularly. The bike runs and rides like a brand new machine.

Collectors will want a second -R, wanting an homologation special to keep up with their RC30 / OW01 buddies.  Not exactly plain vanilla but a perfect sport rider, carefully used, just a little young to be termed a classic…

-donn

Warm Leatherette – 2001 Kawasaki Ninja ZX7R
Kawasaki January 8, 2019 posted by

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Slathered in Kawasaki’s traditional lime green, the ZX-7RR was the homologation version of their 750cc superbike. It wasn’t quite as trick as Honda’s RC45, but its more pedestrian underpinnings make it a bit of an underdog, and the bike had surprising success and longevity for a machine that was updated in 1996, as you can see from this 2001 example. It was obviously pretty long in the tooth by then, but still provided a solid foundation for production-based racing.

The parts you’d expect are there: an adjustable steering head and swingarm pivot, and suspension provided an even broader range of adjustment, compared to the regular bike and, up front, Nissin six-piston calipers replaced the stock Tokico units. The bike had a close-ratio gearbox, and the cases were reinforced, and the engine used a heavier flywheel in an effort to improve traction off corners.

Interestingly, the bike was homologated with both 39mm and 41mm flat-slide carburetors, up from the 38mm CV units on the regular R. Kawasaki was covering their bases by offering that choice to racers, but conventional wisdom is that the 41s are just too much carburetor, especially on the street and even some racers went with the smaller 39mm units.

At 441lbs dry, the bike is a bit of a porker, but these Kawasakis were always more than the sum of their parts. Track down an old magazine article, or read a more recent review of these now “classic” sportbikes, and the writers will wax poetic about the bike’s “sublime front-end feel” and stability.

As you’d expect, it was pretty expensive for what was really pretty close to the standard model, but didn’t work as well on the street, or even on track for that matter, in the hands of ordinary riders. The RR was $11,999 compared to the R’s $8,999. $3,000 was a hefty chunk of change then and even now, but compared to the RC45’s $27,000, it was a screaming bargain, and one of my favorite Japanese superbikes.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Kawasaki ZX-7RR Ninja (750NNA – 2001 Registered)

Genuine motorcycle, which has traveled just over 5,200km from new. I purchased this example about 5 years ago on a trip to Tokyo, Japan and shipped it to New Zealand where it has been in my private collection. It is an exceptional example, all original, and appears not to have ever been ridden in the rain! The spare key still has its factory protection on it. The motorcycle was featured in a newspaper article on the model a couple of years ago.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/bikes/74403132/null

The original Japanese registration documents show it was first registered in Japan in 2001, and may well be one of the last of these RR versions manufactured. I have not complied and registered it in New Zealand, but have the paperwork and can arrange this if this buyer so desires.

I own a classic motorcycle restoration business and have shipped many motorcycles worldwide. It will be securely wrapped, packed and shipped in a steel crate, clad in plywood for safety. Feel free to contact me for a shipping quote, we use a broker and CFR Rinkens for shipments to the USA.

This is a very rare opportunity to secure what I consider may well be amongst the best ZX-7RR examples in existence.

Excellent condition, has been part of a private collection for a number of years. Run up about every six months, but seldom ridden.

Well, this particular collectible Kawi looks to be in great shape, with low miles and a sharp Buy It Now price of $20,000, although bidding is only up to $15,000 with very little time left on the auction. The only downside? It’s in New Zealand, and that makes shipping a bit of a pain if you’re here in the US.

-tad

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale
Kawasaki December 11, 2018 posted by

P.C. (Preposterously Clean) – 1973 Kawasaki H1 500 Mach III

It would have been almost impossible to find an H1 in this condition in the mid-1970’s, Mach III’s generally obscured by dirt accumulated in the oily mist coating the bike.  This one has had a nice restoration and the auction still has a couple of days to run.

1973 Kawasaki H1 500 Mach III for sale on eBay

Back in the day, the only way to approach 100 hp per liter was with a two stroke, and while Honda had moved on, Suzuki still had a competing 500.  The basically square cylinders ( 60 x 58.8 mm ) resulted in 60 hp at 7,500 rpm.  The chassis was unfortunately not up to the task, put in a lot of over-exuberant situations.  Brakes were the usual, that is to say wholly inadequate, but this owner has added a second front disk.

A sparkling restoration and though the owner doesn’t divulge who did the work, the carefully detailed engine and wheels look great.  From the eBay auction:

The following services have been performed:
* Rebuilt Crankshaft, bearings, seals and gaskets 
* Pistons & rings (.50 over)
* Rebuilt Carburetors rejetted w/pods
* Fork tubes, seals & dust boots
* Stock rear shocks
* Triple tree bearings
* Controls, grips and mirrors
* Super bike bars
* New cables
* New signals & stems
* Polished: Engine covers, outer head fins, forks, rear hub
* Rebuilt calipers – Dual brake system with refinished rotors
* 5/8 master cylinder
* Stock brake lines
* original grab rail, brake pedal, shifter, front fender
* re-chromed fork ears, chain guard
* New Paint, decals
* Re-laced rims
* New tires & tubes
* Chain & sprockets 
* replacement clutch
* Original seat 
* Bill Wirges chambers

Reviews raved about the big triple, while things like mileage and changing spark plugs every other oil change were easily forgotten.  But no one’s proposing the H1 as a daily rider in this day and age, especially looking like this.  Wish the owner had attached a video with the sound of those triple expansion chambers…

-donn

P.C. (Preposterously Clean) – 1973 Kawasaki H1 500 Mach III
Kawasaki December 4, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R

The seller of this early-run 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R recently completed a fastidious restoration of the bike, down to changing the aged rubber charcoal canister strap for an OEM replacement. He also sourced new gaskets for the anti-dive system in the forks, which took some parts hunting, elbow grease and careful planning. The forks got a new coat of paint and fresh seals when the rebuild was done.

1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R for sale on eBay

The list goes on from there, including freshened carburetors and a couple invisible fairing repairs. The bike was evidently a solid rider before the current owner got ahold of it and made it into a running and riding museum piece. It has fewer than 7,000 miles on the odometer and was looked after properly over its life, so there shouldn’t be much cause to worry about engine internals.

These bikes were far ahead of their time when they were launched, and forecasted aggressive riding positions, handling-friendly 16-inch wheels, full fairings and weight savings. By the time the Honda Hurricane came along two years later, Kawasaki was already preparing to refresh the Ninja 600R. The early bikes, known as the GPZ600R in other markets, pushed out about 75 horsepower (some say 76), which was good for 135 mph. The engines responded to revs, and contemporary reviewers said the bikes felt a little flat until the party got going around 8,000 rpm. Keep the engine on the boil, though, and the 600R would sing, and was nimble, if not totally sure-footed, on the tiny 16-inch tires.

From the eBay listing:

Completely original 1985 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600A California.
This is the first year of the Ninja, this model is a first run #2460 made 12/84. It has just 6610 miles. It was purchased in California by the first owner (it has the CA vent box) . I am the second owner and have put no miles on the bike other than test rides.
This is a rare bike in original/collector condition. No resto-queen here, this is the real deal. You are not likely to find another in this condition, and if you do you’ll be faced with a great deal of work to get it into this ready to ride condition.
The bike starts and runs beautifully. I wouldn’t make it a daily rider, but if you’re a collector that likes to run your bikes – this is the one.
I found the bike in great condition, as the previous owner was an older rider who used the bike as a commuter and always stored it inside with proper storage habits.
The bike is in 99.9% original condition, with all original parts or updated OEM parts. It is the perfect survivor, the perfect collector (all original parts that were replaced are included).
This is my 4th nut-and-bolt restoration in the last 10 years (and likely my last). I’m moving to custom builds from here on out. In some ways it was the hardest restoration I’ve done, as I felt it was very important to keep the bike absolutely original and to be non-destructive instead of trying to reach “perfection”. I believe I’ve succeeded to the best of the situation – the following items have been addressed:
Fairing repair:
The previous owner dropped the bike in his garage, resulting in a the left turn signal hitting the wall, causing a silver dollar sized series of cracks around the mounting hole. The previous owner repaired the damage, but it was simply glued and the cracks were still visible.
I carefully grooved the cracks and seams, filled and repaired things properly with a professional plastic welding solution, I filled the area with vinyl body filler and sanded all things smooth.
It was professionally painted (only on the repaired spot) with perfectly matched paint and then clear coated to blend, and properly buffed. It is impossible to see the repair – except on the inside where you may see the weld seams when the fairing is off.
A similar process was followed on the nose cone, where a couple of scratches and rock dings necessitated proper attention. This repair is impossible to see as well.
Tank:
First, the tank has a very small, dime-sized impression on the back/top/left side (see photos) and the blue ring has age cracks (normal for an original bike of this age).
I have replaced the cap and repainted the outer cap ring (old parts included and in near perfect shape). I have also sourced and replaced an EOM fuel-level sending unit from England, as the old one failed due to corrosion.
The tank was fairly clean on the inside, but it was beginning to gather some rust on the surface. It was cleaned with muriatic acid and flushed, but still needed further cleaning – so I recently did a round with OTC rust remover. It’s very clean now.
New OEM petcock was installed as the original was beyond repair.
Forks:
If you are at all familiar with these bikes you know that they included a very complicated anti-dive system (known as ADVS) that used the front brake fluid pressure to dynamically control the compression dampening.
Great idea, but it was prone to leaking and corrosion over time – as there were many rubber parts inside. It is very common for the piston to corrode and leak out onto the fork – as was the case on the left fork of this bike.
As with the fairing, I carefully matched and repaired the paint on the fork, clear coated it, and completely overhauled the ADVS and fork seals with all new rubber (which is not easy to source BTW – OEM parts were found in England and Japan).
Everything was properly painted and overhauled – and all original fork stickers unaffected by the repairs. It is impossible to see the repair.
Brakes:
Just like all the other rubber on this bike, the brake calipers and levers were completely dried out and either seized or leaking.
I sourced all of the proper OEM seals for the calipers and primary/secondary cylinders and overhauled all, repainting a couple of items that showed corrosion.
The rotors were repainted and surfaces sanded and scuffed. Everything looks like new. New brake OEM brake pads have been installed on all three brakes as well (see photos).
Carbs:
The carbs were actually in perfect condition – but just like everything else, the rubber was dry. So, all new rubber gaskets were installed, and new fuel lines (I have placed a filter in-line as an insurance policy – not stock).
Misc:
Plugs, oil, filter, battery, chain, new charcoal box rubber strap (OEM), windscreen is original – outer face was sanded and polished, windscreen trim tabs replaced (OEM), etc. – no detail left out, all parts OEM.
Any small rust/dings were eraser sanded and airbrushed or spot brushed with the correct paint. These repairs are also impossible to see.
As you can see by the photos, everything on this bike is in great shape and very clean. It’s hard to believe a bike this old can still look this clean and perfect under the hood after all these years. It was a bit dusty, so I’ve cleaned literally every nook and cranny on the bike – including the entire motor (which was cleaned with bio-degreaser and toothbrush).
Please feel free to message me with any questions.

If the description doesn’t convince you, the pictures will. If you’re looking for a pristine version of the ancestor of modern sport bikes, look no further.

Featured Listing: 1985 Kawasaki Ninja 600R
Kawasaki November 24, 2018 posted by

Green Machine: 1991 Kawasaki ZX7R-K

Kawasaki built the ZX7 line for what seems like the last third of the last millennium, ending its run with a reputation for being smooth, comfortable and reliable, but behind its 750cc-class competitors as a track bike. The reputation gained by the later bikes belies the roots laid by the 1991 Kawasaki ZX-7RK. An out-of-the-box racer, the K bikes had 39mm Keihin flatslides, a single seat subframe and adjustable suspension and were a little more than 10 pounds lighter than the standard bikes.

1991 Kawasaki ZX7-RK for sale on eBay

This example looks very well kept, and the odometer shows fewer than 6,000 miles. The pictures leave some detail to be desired, but the fairings appear to be blemish free and the running gear is used, but not filthy. It has an aftermarket Muzzy pipe, but the ad doesn’t mention whether the stock piece is available.

From the eBay listing:

1992 zx7r-k model for sale. Very low miles, very nice condition!! Have not seen another one in as nice of condition ever! No scratches, no seat wear, never dropped, abused or raced since owned by me. Bought bike in 06 with 3,500 miles and been in heated garage ever since. Just had carbs rebuilt and tuned…..bike runs amazing! Will not disappoint! $500.00 non-refundable deposit.

The buy-it-now is set at $9,000, steep for a used sportbike, but the K bikes are rare as hen’s teeth, and a cool alternative to the more numerous GSXRs and CBRs.

Green Machine: 1991 Kawasaki ZX7R-K
Kawasaki October 18, 2018 posted by

The Namesake – 1972 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV

Like Chevy’s Z28 Camaro, the H2 is a model that creeps back into Kawasaki’s line-up occasionally, but here we have the pre-historic beast that made the name.  The fire-breathing two stroke triple lasted only a few years before being regulated out of existence, but memorable enough that H2 is only applied to the most extreme green offerings.  The Florida example has somehow escaped the overcooked wheelies and tank slappers that claimed so many of its siblings.

1972 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV for sale on eBay

 

Coming hot on the heels of the 500cc H1, the Mach IV used the same successful formula – acceleration above all.  The 74 hp available were jammed into the upper reaches of the powerband, and weight was kept to a minimum at just 450 lbs. topped off.  Period single front disk and rear drum were adequate, as was the double cradle chassis, unless they were hopelessly out-gunned by the right wrist.  With a 19-inch front and 18-inch rear wheel, straight line stability was favored in the handling compromise.

 

This H2 is returning to the road at a ripe old age, and looks very good for its 30K miles.  Though not mentioned, the paint might be a little too nice and spell an older restoration.  The owner has gone over it carefully maintenance-wise, and provides this list in the eBay auction:

installed air filter box with a new (genuine) 3 way rubber manifold,
and a new (unknown manufacturer) upper snorkel.
needs internal filter element as I have none left.
drained and put new brake fluid in front cylinder, shoes and pads look good and all cleaned.
reset timing, cleaned and re-gapped pickups.
pistons are very recently installed (you can still see the cylinder honing marks) virtually no carbon build up.
cylinders are still at factory standard bore of 71mm – great compression.
complete new carb internals and set to factory standard.
crank seals and gearbox were inspected, all sweet.
3 x new NGK B9HS Japanese plugs.
new battery.
gas tank cleaned and new complete fuel tap seal kit installed.
no center stand installed but I can (if interested) supply one with bike that needs minor work,
a clean and a return spring.
clutch stripped/inspected and rebuilt, working great with no slippage.
as new bridgestone spitfire tires fitted and rims balanced.
all new fuel/vacuum lines installed.
the seat cover is perfect, the pan has no rust but the original foam will soon start making the dust particles.
exhaust is totally solid with very minor scuffs/dents but the chrome is starting to get tiny blistering on the lower middle pipe and would need to be re chromed to be show quality but is great as a daily driver.
new cylinder exhaust gaskets were fitted, center seals were checked and good,
all baffles are present and the only place you see two stroke fumes are coming out of the back end 🙂
I left the engine casings with the original patina on them as I know some people think polishing reduces value, so I have left that choice to the new owner.

 

Kawasaki had their eyes on the new Formula 750 race series and went racing in 1973 with the likes of Yvon DuHamel and Gary Nixon, but had more success rubbing Honda’s nose in it on the road.  The quickness and low price of the H2 glossed over a lot of irrational rider exuberance, and though subsequent model years smoothed out the power delivery and handling a bit, the early models are legend.    The 900cc Z1 was introduced in 1972 and though the two models existed side by side for a couple of years, time marched on and showed the H2 the exit…

-donn

The Namesake – 1972 Kawasaki H2 750 Mach IV