Search Results for “db1”

Bimota August 16, 2019 posted by

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

The DB1 wasn’t Bimota’s first bike, but it perfectly embodies the company’s philosophy of taking a well-developed engine from an outside manufacturer and putting it into a package that was lighter, sleeker, and better-handling. That wasn’t really all that difficult to do when you’re looking at beasts like the Suzuki GSX1100: just take the good stuff and ditch the rest, then replace it with better, stronger, lighter components. But Ducati’s bikes were already a good bit lighter and more agile to begin with. They had to be, with smaller engines and fewer cylinders.

The DB1 was Bimota’s first Ducati-powered model, and used the two-valve, air and oil-cooled Pantah engine that included a pair of toothed rubber belts to drive the single overhead cams. The arrangement that was still pretty unusual at the time, since most bikes were still using traditional chains in 1985. A 352lb dry weight was claimed, which is pretty outrageously light for a sportbike of the era. Marzocchi suspension meant the light, compact machine would handle and 16″ wheels at both ends that exaggerated the already large front brakes to nearly pie-plate dimensions that were clamped by four-piston Brembo calipers.

Bimotas are famously hard to work on, with the frames so closely wrapped around the mechanicals to save weight, centralize mass, and improve aerodynamics: everything is optimized for performance. The SB3 actually had a frame that unbolted and separated into two sections to free the drivetrain for servicing! Jokes about Italian reliability aside, every single motorcycle will need regular servicing, and removing the fairings of a sportbike is often needlessly tedious. But they make up for that by at least being easy to strip clean of bodywork. Note that the entire tank cover and tail section is just one piece, held in place by just a few fasteners!

So was it really better than the Ducati F1 that donated its engine and five-speed transmission? Probably not, unless you were going racing. As with more modern Bimotas, it was much more expensive with minimal benefits for the average rider, compared to the donor bikes. But the DB1 was impossibly compact and futuristic, with the incredible detailing that Bimota has always been known for. I particularly love the brake and clutch reservoirs incorporated into the tops of the fork tubes.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1, 5 miles AS New, Very rare-one of 400

First Ducati powered Bimota.

This spectacular DB1 has 5 miles from new, these miles could be factory dyno or road test miles as the bike is new and in brand new condition. Everything is original and untouched, bike has always been in heated storage and shows almost no signs of aging.

This DB1 is nearly flawless, the only flaws I could find is a slight rub mark on the rear of the solo cowl near the tail light (see pic). Second flaw is a super small green paint dot on top of the solo cowl (see pic), this looks like a factory flaw. Other than that the bike is perfect and new.

I am the second owner.

For an indication or reference of value see last picture. That bike had mileage and has been slightly restored. 

This bike is number 203 of 400 produced.

There are no bids yet at the $25,000 opening bid, and there’s a long way to go before the $32,000 asking price. The original listing includes an ad from Bimota Spirit for a similar bike with price of $29,000 and it appears the seller is assuming or hoping that the much lower mileage of his bike will bring a higher price. Unfortunately, although bikes like the DB1 and the original Tesi are rare and desirable, Bimota values in general have remained pretty flat and it looks like the seller may be jumping the gun here slightly, given the overall lack of interest.

-tad

Thoroughly Italian: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Bimota April 3, 2016 posted by

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1 R Front

The DB1 was the quintessential Bimota, packaging a reliable Italian powerplant into a lightweight package with excellent handling… Wait, what? Actually, in spite of what you might expect, the belt-driven, SOHC Pantah engine is very reliable when properly maintained, and can be tuned to make good power. Sure, the 75 claimed horses don’t sound like much, but the twin is very flexible and the noise, oh the noise!

1986 Bimota DB1 L Rear2

Although Bimota made its name building lightweight, nimble bikes around reliable Japanese powerplants, it’s no surprise that, time and again, they’ve gone back to Ducati to supply engines for some of their best-selling and most popular machines. Ducati haven’t always made the most powerful engines, but they’re a great match for Bimota’s lightweight ethos and the bikes that result are beautiful.

1986 Bimota DB1 Dash

The seller indicates that this was originally a Japanese bike, but currently has a California title, which should allay fears of its legality, as California’s DMV is notoriously strict.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

Up for action is early 1986 Bimota DB1 This is a original clean motorcycle that I am selling my collection bike. The Bike is only 21000 KM (about 13000 mile). There is little scratch but never been drop or any accident.

This bike have been currently service and maintained (spend $900). All functions on the bike work properly. No oil leaks! Run perfect as new bike and It is stable at 240Km high speed. You will not be disappointed. 

The Bike was imported form Japan currently has California Title. It is a 1986 model but has been titled as a 1980 Bimota DB1. I purchased this bike in 2006 from a good friend who own Famous Bike shop in CA. The bike was stored at his bike shop and taken care of.

And this bike is for not a beginner, only for those who know the value of a Bimota and what it is capable of… I have a clear CA title in hand and I will be happy to answer any questions you have. The bike is sold “as is.”

1986 Bimota DB1 Front Wheel

Built between 1985 and 1990, the DB1 was one of the best-selling Bimotas, with almost 700 produced. There’s plenty of time left on the listing, and bidding is up to just $11,000 with the reserve not yet met. I’d expect this one has a long way to go before it finds a buyer.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1 R Side

 

Classic Italian Performance: 1986 Ducati Bimota DB1 for Sale
Bimota February 21, 2016 posted by

LoudBike Redux: 1985 Bimota DB1 SR for Sale

Update 2.21.2016: We last saw the LoudBike DB1 SR listed in October of last year. Back on the market with an opening bid of $16k. -dc

1985 Bimota DB1SR L Front2

We featured this bike a while back and my post generated a bit of, ahem… Controversy in the comments. Mainly because one of our readers felt I was possibly a bit too enthusiastic about this little gem of a Bimota DB1. Anyway, it’s for sale again and definitely worth a second look, with a bunch of beautiful photographs of the machine to drool over.

1985 Bimota DB1SR R Rear2

If you aren’t familiar with the history of Bimota, they were founded way back in 1966 by three men: Bianchi, Morri, and Tamburini, to make heating systems, of all things. But by the 1970’s they were busy stuffing reliable Japanese engines into state-of-the-art frames with top-shelf suspension at either end, then wrapping the results in quick-release bodywork. Bimota quite literally built race bikes for the road.

But this Ducati-powered Bimota DB1 no longer has any roadgoing pretensions…

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Bimota DB1 SR for Sale

92 honest-to-goodness rear wheel horsepower in a perfectly set-up package that weighs less than 300 pounds.  Arguably the fastest DB1 in North America and likely the only one set-up for serious track day work. 

Noted moto journalist, Chief Instructor at Yamaha Champions Riding School and Sport Riding Techniques author Nick Ienatsch rode the bike at Mosport last week and had this to say: “Buy it. My experience on Steve’s DB-1 at Mosport couldn’t have been more positive. He rolled it off the trailer Saturday morning, we rode the hell out of it all weekend, and he rode it back onto the trailer Sunday night. All Steve did was add gas. Bulletproof and extremely fun, surprisingly quick…probably the fourth-quickest lap time in the fast group at DOCC. The motor pulls strong, the bike sounds right and the chassis is sorted and composed at the limit. The problems?  All the new sport bikes in the way during lapping!!”

1985 Bimota DB1SR Dash2

The machine started out as a pretty tired and far removed from stock DB1 that was brought over from Europe by the previous owner and as such, it made an excellent candidate for a full-on hot-rod.  The bike was completely stripped-down and I started on the process of renewing all the rolling chassis components and rebuilding the motor over a period of 22 months.  The end result is an absolute riot on the race track – really sharp handling as would be expected with a platform as short as the DB1, but with excellent stability.  With 93hp and 63ftlbs of torque, the little bike goes like a scalded cat.  Given that the Montjuich cams are being used, I would have expected a more peaky delivery, but the Meyers Performance 790 kit beefed-up the bottom end significantly.  As you can see by the dyno chart in the pics, peak torque is at 6,500rpm and there’s usable stuff as low as 5,500.

I’ve ridden the bike at the Ducati Owners Club events at Mosport in 2013, 2014 and 2015 as well as at NHIS in October 2013 – and have been amazed at how well the whole package worked at speed.  The DB1 Is surprisingly comfortable and easy to ride fast – and absolutely gorgeous sounding.   My log shows 12 hours of riding time on the motor and I just completed a full post-season service.

Here are the specs on the build:

Motor:

  • 750 F1 (Montjuich) base with Meyers Performance 12:1 790cc kit
  • Lightened clutch basket, clutch housing, primaries, flywheel and clutch cover
  • JPrecision heads (Stage IV Pantah) with new valves, guides & seats
  • Montjuich (“P”) cams with Bucchi adjustable pulleys – timing set at 102.5 degrees at lobe centers)
  • Mikuni Pro-Series TM 41 Flat Slide (installed this season)  –  Malossi 41mm carbs available as an alternative
  • Modified Old Racing Spares cam end covers
  • Top-end lubrication via cam end cover feed
  • Exact Fit timing belts
  • New Kokusan pick-ups
  • Aluminum & Titanium fasteners throughout
  • Dyno tuned to 93hp and 63ftlbs of torque (I terminated the pulls at 8,500rpm, so there’s more on tap)

There’s much more over at the original listing, including a bunch of links to the build and this video of the bike being dynoed. Seriously, I want LoudBike to build my engine…

1985 Bimota DB1SR L Rear2

So pop on over and take a look quick: the clock is counting down on this one. Current bidding is up to $15,000 with the Reserve Not Met. It’s hard to put a really clear value on this one: it’s obviously not anywhere near original anymore, and I’m not sure if it’s eligible for any racing classes considering the modifications. And if it is, should you really risk something this nice rubbing fenders with a bunch of track rats?

Basically, this is a Bimota distilled, or a Ducati in its purest form, punching well above its weight. Although I’m still not sold on those spun-aluminum wheels…

-tad

1985 Bimota DB1SR Track2

LoudBike Redux: 1985 Bimota DB1 SR for Sale
Bimota August 29, 2015 posted by

Bimötaheads: 1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11

“Like any habit that becomes a vice, you think you can handle it.  Just the one.  That’s what you tell yourself.  As a man of fortitude and strong character, you can take it or leave it.  But before too long you’ve crossed a line.  You don’t even know where that line was and now you’re hooked, unsure of how you got here not sure you even want to go back.   No one ever stops at just one Bimota”. – Alan Seeley, Practical Sportbikes, August 2015

binota111

Call it common sense or logic or whatever you want, there is a legitimate argument that says pre-bankruptcy Bimotas aren’t worth the money, that modern day sportbikes are better at everything the Rimini factory produced back in the day, and that the company has more misses than hits.  It is true the Rimini firm’s pre-bankruptcy operations resulted in some goods bikes (YB4, S8R) and some not-so-great (Mantra, VDue, Tesi 1D) but Bimotas still seem to appeal to a lot of collectors.

For this post, we have a Bimota collector located in Norwalk, Connecticut with a large collection of Bimotas who has decided to let two go; a 1986 Bimota DB1 and a 1998 Bimota YB11.

Note:  The collector indicates that the rest of the collection will be up for sale shortly so I suggest you favorite the seller if a Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list – Marty/Dallaslavowner

db11

1986 Bimota DB1 for sale on ebay

The DB1 was notable as the first “all-Italian” Bimota as it was the first effort with a Ducati engine.  While the DB1 came with a 750 cc Ducati powerplant, it was the frame that was a big improvement over the Ducati it was based on. Made of special steel tubing and using a triangulated “Birdcage” design, the frame used the engine as a stressed member.  The DB1 also had trick parts such as a triple-tree/fork top, clip-ons, rear-sets made of aluminum.

Several DB1 models were produced, this one appears to be the standard version with 36 mm carburetors and the quieter exhaust.

Here is a summary of the bike:

  • One of only 400 DB1’s produced
  • 13,000 miles/19,000 kilometers
  • Custom two-in-one exhaust system
  • Belt service,and all fluids a few years ago
  • Special two piece custom wheels.
  • Few small stress cracks but nothing that would cause me to get the body refinished.
  • Bike will be sold with a bill of sale, but I believe it can be titled because its over 25 years oldv(never titled).

Opening Bid of $20,000 USD has already been met but reserve is not met.  Previous listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $35,000 for a used race bike to $45,000 USD for a new-in-the-crate edition.   This DB1 looks to be pristine, so expect the upper end of the range to be required to take this one home.

Now here is the second offering, a 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera.

yb11

1998 Bimota YB11 for sale on ebay

While the the YB 11 had the same engine as the Yahama YZF1000R, the Bimota was 33 pounds (15kg) lighter than the Yamaha, hence the name Superleggera/”Superlight”.  The reduced weight gave the YB11 neck cracking acceleration, with a flick of the throttle sending the YB11 ripping towards a top speed of 170mph.  The YB11 also came with a sophisticated Paioli rear shock and a new aluminium rear swingarm.  Overall, the Bimota was more race oriented than the YZR1000R it was based on, with a stretched-out riding position, flat seat and firmer suspension. Only 650 were reported to have been built.

Here is what the seller has to say

  • Has just over 3,000 miles.
  • Totally stock, includes the single seat cowl and passenger seat.
  • Only flaw is a crack in the windshield which I repaired with a high strength epoxy.

The opening bid price of $10,000 USD for this YB11 has not been met.  Previous YB11 listings on RSBFS seem to show a price ranging between $8,000 and $10,000 USD so this one might be priced a bit high but the YB11 is certainly one of the best looking pre-bankruptcy Bimota models.  Also Bimotas tend to depreciate very slowly but I have to say I don’t think it will increase in value as a collectors item ala the VDue or Tesi editions.

yb112

One last note – while these two Bimotas will likely appeal more to someone already experience with Bimotas,  the seller indicates that the rest of his Bimota collection will be up for sale shortly,   If a pre-bankruptcy Bimtoa is something you have on your wish list, I suggest you favorite the eBay auction seller id.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Writers Notation/shameless plug for which I will receive no type of compensation: The title of this post and some of the content are based on an article in the latest edition of my favorite magazine, Practical Sportbikes which is published out of the UK.   If you don’t have a subscription and are a fan of late 1980’s/1990’s sportbikes, then you are missing out.   I urge you to get a subscription, you won’t regret it – Marty/Dallaslavowner

Bimötaheads:  1986 Bimota DB1 and 1998 Bimota YB11
Bimota January 12, 2015 posted by

Unobtanium Alert: 1987 Bimota DB1SR New in The Crate!

1.12.2015: Originally we first saw this DB1 SR available in October of last year. It failed to meet reserve reaching just over $31k. Now back on the market, just after the Vegas auctions, it is listed with a $45k buy-it-now. Thanks for all those who emailed with the heads up. Links updated.-dc


Here is some true unobtanium; a still in the crate 1987 Bimota DB1 SR.

db1merged

For motorcycle collectors, there are two main types of bikes; the survivor and the New Old Stock (NOS). Survivor bikes can be bikes that weren’t popular in their time but are now desired such as the Honda CX turbo editions . They can also be bikes that that were popular but are now hard to find in good condition such as a 1st generation GSX-R 750 slingshot.

New old stock/NOS bikes are quite a different matter; they seem to either be something a dealership had tucked away or something a collector bought and are usually in pristine condition with very low mileage. While NOS bikes ares rare, we do see them reasonably frequently here on RSBFS. But within the NOS segment there is an even rarer sub-group; bikes that are still in their original crates. There have been less than 10 NOS Crate bikes on RSBFS since this sites inception, so this Bimota DB1 SR is really something quite special.

db3

1987 Bimota DB1 SR new in crate for sale on ebay (Canada)

The Bimota DB1 was offered between 1985 and 1990 and was designed by Bimota’s Technical Director and ex-Ducati engineer, Dr. Frederico Martini. The DB1 stands for Ducati Bimota One which makes sense since it was the first Bimota powered by a Ducati engine.

The DB1SR is an even higher performance version of the “standard” DB1. The SR model came with 4-piston front calipers, 41 mm carburetors instead of the standard 36mm, freer 2-into-1 exhaust and more radical cam shafts. The SR model was only made between 1987 and 1989 and in performance it was frequently compared to Ducati’s Laguna Seca/Montjuich/Santa Monica models of the 750 F1s. Confusingly, many of the ealy DB1SRs are labeled “DB1RS” on the fairing. Later models were styled a bit differently with a rear red number plates and correctly labeled “DB1SR”. The DB1SR was successfully raced in Italy by Tiziano Bombardi, winning the 1987 Italian Sport Production Twins Championship, finishing on top of the podium in 8 of the 9 races, with one second place finish.

db4

Here is a portion of what the seller has to say:

This DB1SR is quite possibly one of only two still in their original shipping crates. When the current owner received this bike, he raised the crate top off the platform for only the second time since its departure from Rimini, Italy; the first time being at Canada Custom when it first arrived in our country.

It’s still mounted to the crate base and still shows some floor dust on the tires from the manufacturer wheeling it across the floor to be crated. The current owner simply couldn’t bear to have this beautiful Italian gem hidden in the crate, so he carefully removed the top and packaging so the bike could be displayed still strapped to the base. The crate top and packaging have been carefully stored.

In 1987 only 153 DB1SR motorcycles were made – and of these, most went to Japan. Although I’ve seen a pair of the later SR Serie Finale in North America, I’ve not seen one of these on our shores. This amazing piece of performance art was originally imported by the legendary Frank Romanelli – who indicated that this unit was destined for the market in France and should by all accounts, not have been directly exported to Canada.

db5

So of course now we come to the big question, what’s it gonna take to get it? Well the DB1 is pretty rare by itself. The few previous DB1’s that have appeared on RSBFS have all gone for between 30-40k USD and given the fact that this is a still-in-the-crate bike, I would expect the ebay reserve to be at the upper end of that range. It is certainly an amazing opportunity for a serious collector to acquire a rare bike and given the recent decline of the Canadian dollar, might even be available at a bit of a discount.

-Marty/dallaslavowner

Post Script: The same seller is also offering a nice 1986 Ducati BOTT Racer which can be seen here.

Unobtanium Alert:  1987 Bimota DB1SR New in The Crate!
Bimota June 9, 2014 posted by

Racing Bimota Redux: 1986 DB1R for Sale

Well this is interesting: two Bimota DB1s in as many days, each very unusual, but in different ways. This DB1R is one of only four made purely for racing, a seriously exotic piece of kit, offered up by the same seller as the Ducati Supermono we featured yesterday. I’ve been told he’s a collector with very good taste and given what we’ve seen so far, I’ve got no reason to disagree!

1986 Bimota DB1R for sale on eBay

1986 Bimota DB1R Front and Rear

Modern Bimota is famous for their super-exotic, carbon-origami confections and alternative front suspensions. Not to mention their eye-opening price tags. These days, it’s pretty hard to improve much upon the bikes being turned out by the major manufacturers, but Bimota got their start in an era when the handling of factory motorcycles often left more than a little bit to be desired and frame design was somewhat of a black art.

The name “Bimota” actually comes from the co-founders’ last names: Bianchi, Morri, Tamburini and the company was created in 1966 as a manufacturer of heating systems, of all things. But they branched out into motorcycles in the 70’s when they made their name cramming the refined and powerful engines of big-name Japanese manufacturers into aerodynamically-slippery machines that could go around corners without bending in the middle…

1986 Bimota DB1R Right Front Wheel

Aside from the disastrous but gorgeous two-stroke V-Due, all Bimotas have used engines from other manufacturers. Looking at a Bimota and wondering whose engine powers it? The clue is in the name: an SB is powered by Suzuki, an HB by Honda, and a DB by Ducati. The number represents how many bikes Bimota has built working with that manufacturer: so the DB1 was the first Ducati-engined Bimota.

The original eBay listings for these are always so spare. I’m guessing they just sort of assume “if you have to ask, you have no business buying…”

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1R for Sale

Bimota DB1R, 1 of 4 built, factory raced at Daytona by Malcolm Tunstall, new fluids, runs perfect

A couple years back, we featured one of these DB1R’s over on ClassicSportBikesforSale which looks to have been in more restored, less patina’d shape. That post is worth a look if you’re not familiar with the DB1, since that article has some good shots of the bike without the fairing: the frame is a serious work of art. And it probably doesn’t hurt that I have a bit of a fetish for big, white, Veglia tachometers with the smaller numbers conspicuously missing…

1986 Bimota DB1R Dash

Bidding’s very active, and has headed north of $35k with the reserve met. Not really a surprise considering how rare these are. A very different proposition than the recent DB1 track bike we featured. That one was one-of-one, but not especially original though perhaps more usable. This one is a piece of history.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1R R Rear

Racing Bimota Redux: 1986 DB1R for Sale
Bimota June 5, 2014 posted by

Track Animal: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale

1986 Bimota DB1 Track Bike L Front

Update 6.10.2014: While the auction is over, you can also see this bike on the Loudbike site. -dc

I’ve written about bikes from Loudbike before, over on our sister site Classic Sport Bikes for Sale, but the last one was patterned after a garden-variety 750 F1. Very classic, but not especially pretty…

I hate to gush, but you really can’t get much better than what is arguably the best-looking bike of the 1980’s, wrapped around a punched out Ducati Pantah twin, weighing in at a featherweight 300lbs. 90whp might not sound like all that much in this era of 200hp superbikes, but do some quick math: compared it with a 400lb bike, and it’s actually making the equivalent of like 120whp, so maybe 150 at the crank. And then think about that torque… Basically, you’re looking at BMW S1000RR levels of performance from an 80’s motorcycle.

1986 Bimota DB1 Track Bike L Rear

Lots of good pics, a great clip of the bike on the dyno, and plenty of information on the build over at the original eBay listing: 1986 Bimota DB1 track bike for sale.

92 honest-to-goodness rear wheel horsepower in a perfectly set-up package that weighs less than 300 pounds.  Arguably the fastest DB1 in North America and likely the only one set-up for serious track day work. 

Noted moto journalist, Chief Instructor at Yamaha Champions Riding School and Sport Riding Techniques author Nick Ienatsch rode the bike at Mosport last week and had this to say: “Buy it. My experience on Steve’s DB-1 at Mosport couldn’t have been more positive. He rolled it off the trailer Saturday morning, we rode the hell out of it all weekend, and he rode it back onto the trailer Sunday night. All Steve did was add gas. Bulletproof and extremely fun, surprisingly quick…probably the fourth-quickest lap time in the fast group at DOCC. The motor pulls strong, the bike sounds right and the chassis is sorted and composed at the limit. The problems?  All the new sport bikes in the way during lapping!!”

1986 Bimota DB1 Track Bike Dash

The machine started out as a pretty tired and far removed from stock DB1 that was brought over from Europe by the previous owner and as such, it made an excellent candidate for a full-on hot-rod.  The bike was completely stripped-down and I started on the process of renewing all the rolling chassis components and rebuilding the motor over a period of 22 months.  The end result is an absolute riot on the race track – really sharp handling as would be expected with a platform as short as the DB1, but with excellent stability.  With 93hp and 63ftlbs of torque, the little bike goes like a scalded cat.  Given that the Montjuich cams are being used, I would have expected a more peaky delivery, but the Meyers Performance 790 kit beefed-up the bottom end significantly.  As you can see by the dyno chart in the pics, peak torque is at 6,500rpm and there’s usable stuff as low as 5,500.

1986 Bimota DB1 Track Bike Cockpit

These guys always have the very coolest bikes up for sale. I swear, if I ever have real money to throw at a bike, I’m going to ship them the motor from my 900 Monster to build… As per usual, they’ve included an amazing clip of the bike being run up on the dyno. If that sound doesn’t sell you…

The DB1 was, as the number indicates, Bimota’s first collaboration with Ducati. In an era when factory machines can far exceed the ability of even experienced riders, right out of the box, the need for companies like Bimota might seem to be disappearing. But back when this bike was new, Bimota’s gorgeous frames, components, and bodywork took the best engines of the day and put them into motorcycles that could stop, go, and turn better than anything the factories could seem to manage.

It goes without saying that any Bimota DB1 is a collectable motorcycle. But a perfect, museum-quality example wouldn’t be on my short list of bikes to own. But this one sure is: it’s one-of-one.

-tad

1986 Bimota DB1 Track Bike L Side

Track Animal: 1986 Bimota DB1 for Sale
Bimota April 5, 2014 posted by

Early Bimota – 1986 Bimota DB1

Listed originally in October 2011, this DB1 is back on eBay. Previous auctions have seen this one bid into the high teens but maybe this spring it will sell for the buy-it-now of $30k. Links updated. -dc

Here we have a lovely example of the first Ducati engined Bimota’s the DB1. This bike dates from 1986. The bike had a 750cc Desmo engine and 453 of these bikes were made in this standard model form. Just have alook at the pictures and you see high level components from the likes of Brembo and Marzzochi. The normal high quality craftmanship and gorgeous aluminium machinings are present. One unusal feature of this machine is the fully enclosing body work last seen in the 1950’s on the Vincent Black Knight.

The owner says the following:

Up for auction is a 1986 Bimota DB1. This is a very clean motorcycle that I am selling for my Dad who is selling his collection. This bike is is brand new with zero miles and has never been started.

The Vin# is DB100023. The condition of the bike is fantastic. There is no title or mso with this bike.

The auction on eBay is here.

The owner is looking for nearly $30,000 for this beauty. One cannot help but think $30k is too high for this bike and it might be a while before a seller turns up. Perhaps you should make an offer.

AS

Early Bimota – 1986 Bimota DB1

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