Posts by tag: Sport Touring

Laverda February 8, 2016 posted by

Gentleman’s Express: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale

1983 Laverda RGS1000 R Front

Laverda’s big-bruiser RGS1000 comes from an era when the European brands were struggling in the face of the Japanese Big Four’s onslaught. To keep pace required serious levels of financial and manufacturing muscle, and most of the European brands just could not compete.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Tank

Some, like BMW hung on to a niche market, with loyal sport-touring fans continuing to buy up their durable flat-twins, even as the company continued to innovate, building new triples and fours. But companies like Triumph struggled to update already obsolete machines and stave off their inevitable doom.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Clocks

Laverda, a tiny company compared even to Triumph, took a different path. They started with their powerful and chest-thumpingly manly 981cc three-cylinder engine and five-speed combination, then wrapped the package in modern, fully-faired bodywork, creating something new out of something old, a bike that wasn’t really trying to compete.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Engine

Although it was decidedly old-tech, the new sport-touring mission of the bike meant it wasn’t even trying to compete in the rapidly-escalating sportbike wars against the Japanese, and the bike, while not very light at 550lbs, offered Laverda’s famous stability, impressive midrange power, and reasonable comfort. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 L Front

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale

I bought this beautiful Laverda RGS 1000 about five years ago from a Laverda collector in California. He was selling it and other bikes after suffering serious injuries in an accident. He had owned it for a number of years when he decided that he wanted more “oomph” so he wisely sent it to Scott Potter, Laverda engine builder and restorer par excellence for some high-compression pistons. The bike was in good condition and did not need restoration, but since the engine was coming out anyway, why not take advantage?

And well, here is Scott’s work order:

RGS 2029 Disassemble the machine down to every last nut and bolt. Send out all chrome components to be replated . Strip frame, center stand and rear fork to bare metal. Fabricate gusset plates to strengthen headstock. Powdercoat frame and rear fork gloss black. Renew headstock bearings and rear fork bearings. Disassemble engine. Clean sand cast engine components. Bead blast as necessary. Follow with hot tank wash and clear out all passages with compressed air. Polish all alloy covers. Replace wearing components as necessary. Lighten clutch basket and pressure plate. Machine true and lighten clutch drum. Send out cyl head for 3 angle Serdi seat cut. Reassemble engine to factory tolerances. Check valve timing to published specs. Disassemble, clean and inspect starter clutch. Reassemble with new springs, plungers, and rollers. Refit to engine. Refit engine to chassis. Disassemble front forks and clean. Check fork tubes for straight and true. Polish fork tubes. Fabricate adapters for cartridge emulators. Modify damping rods for cartridge emulators Reassemble with new seals and oil. Refinish yokes and instrument mount. Refit forks to chassis. Renew rear damper assemblies with custom Works Performance units. Disassemble brake hydraulics. Clean and reassemble with new kits, pads and pistons. Remove rotor surface area of iron oxide. Mount rotors to hubs with new fasteners.Install new black sheathed stainless brake and clutch hoses. Bleed all hydraulics with fresh Castrol GT LMA DOT 4 fluid Fit new sprocket and renew sprocket locking tabs. Refit wheel assemblies to chassis. Fit new drive chain. Polish footrest plates. Clean adjustment discs and assemble with antiseize compound Install new bronze bushings in shift and brake levers and hone to fit. Install new type designation plate Fabricate new mounts to fit Mikuni RS36 carbs to utilize stock airbox connectors Fit carb assembly to engine. Install new push pull throttle quadrant. Clean and repair/modify wiring harness as necessary. Install Witt/DMC ignition unit and Mitsu coil assembly Refit wiring harness and switch gear to chassis.

As you can see it is a comprehensive rebuild, but not a complete restoration as the original durable Laverda paint was in great condition still. The owner was able to put only a few miles on the restored bike before his accident. Since I bought it from him, I have put about 1200 miles on it. I treated it as a new bike and carefully broke it in. I then changed the oil (Mobil 1), re-torqued the head and adjusted the steering bearings. I have changed to the shocks to Ikons from Wolfgang as the Works Performance shocks were a little soft. The only negatives that come to mind are the tire-changing marks on the rims and the older tires that have plenty of tread but should be replaced before any serious cornering takes place. It starts and runs well with plenty of power. The clutch action and shifting are great- better than any of the Lavs I have owned. It is an imposing bike in looks and sound and it makes a decent sport-tourer with the bags attached. I am including some pics of the rebuild and one of me riding it on the Dragon. I forgot to mention that this RGS has the dealer installed Executive package which consists of the hard bags, higher handlebar, and additional wind protection for the hands.

Bidding is up to $8,500 with the Reserve Not Met and a Buy It Now price of $14,500, which seems pretty on-the-money for a nice RGS. Although this uses the later, 120° crankshaft and was pitched towards a more “civilized” audience, these are still pretty raucous if you’re used to something like a modern Speed Triple.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Front Wheel

They’re very rare, with just 250 imported to the US and if you want a classic Laverda to ride and enjoy, these are stylish, durable and, with the fitted luggage included with this bike, make great sport-touring mounts. And, in case you’re wondering: yes, that little door in the front right fairing does in fact hide the fuel filler cap. Obviously you’d need to find a good mechanic, or be handy with a wrench, considering the age and rarity. But the Laverda community is close-knit, and many owners take great pride in wrenching on their own machines.

-tad

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Ride

Gentleman’s Express: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale
BMW January 12, 2016 posted by

Time-Capsule Space Ship: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

1993 BMW K1 L Side Front

A flawed motorcycle that nevertheless succeeded in its intended mission, BMW’s radical K1 was tasked with changing public perception of the slightly stodgy brand and, although it didn’t actually sell particularly well, it certainly managed to send the brand off in a new direction. A bit too futuristically-styled, and possibly a bit too ambitious in terms of technology, it certainly shook things up for BMW, and it also helped them prepare for stricter emissions requirements that were in the pipeline, something their airhead flat twin wouldn’t be capable of meeting. The K100’s liquid-cooled inline four and offshoot triple found in the K75 would make that much easier, and a sportier version for the four found its way into the K1.

1993 BMW K1 R Side

While a liquid-cooled inline four sounds pretty conventional, BMW of course had to do it their own way, and the long-stroke, Bosch-injected, longitudinally-mounted engine was laid-over on its side to keep the center of gravity low. This generally has the disadvantage of a pretty long wheelbase and the de rigueur telelever shaft drive is pretty heavy, but this was intended as a sport-touring machine, not a pure sportbike: with 516lbs to pull around, that torquey motor made for a bike that was reasonably fast, but certainly no road-burner.

1993 BMW K1 Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1993 BMW K1 for Sale

This bike came from the factory as pictured – special order Silk Blue with no K1 decals. This machine was professionally stored in a collectors climate controlled warehouse for over 20 years. I purchased the bike with 976 miles on it in January 2015. I have only put about 250 miles on the bike.

This machine is nearly perfect. One small V shape crack is shown on the pictures below. The ABS sensor also needs to be reset.

This is really a one of a kind motorcycle that is just about new in every sense.

1993 BMW K1 Rear Suspension

Unable to compete in the changing landscape of Japanese supersports in the early 90s, the bike was discontinued in ’93. It’s a bit of an odd duck today: it doesn’t offer much that appeals to traditional BMW enthusiasts with its inline four and very limited cargo capacity. The fairing panels are subject to cracking and the limited airflow means those bits of plastic can get very, very hot. And it’s not really very sporty compared to Japanese or Italian bikes of the period.

1993 BMW K1 Front Brakes

These certainly aren’t display pieces and, with prices relatively low, a nice K1 could make a pretty neat alternative for riders obsessed with quirky. However, with under 1,200 miles on the clock and a starting bid of over $10,000 this example is for collectors only. Most of the bikes were painted up in some pretty lurid red/yellow paint schemes, but this particular example is a very restrained, traditional blue that will probably help it appeal to BMW enthusiasts looking to complete their collections.

-tad

1993 BMW K1 L Side

Aprilia July 21, 2015 posted by

Sensible Sibling: 2001 Aprilia Falco SL1000 for Sale

2001 Aprilia Falco L Front

Mostly overlooked, even when new, Aprilia’s Falco is an ideal “mature” sportbike for someone who wants to stand out… subtly. Fast and comfortable, the bike featured a slightly detuned version of Aprilia’s 996cc v-twin that produced 118hp along with the usual “improved midrange and low-end power” that seems to feature on naked and sport-touring versions of these bikes. Still, the bike is good for a 160mph top speed, which really is plenty fast.

2001 Aprilia Falco R Front

The unusual 60° v-twin configuration was chosen as a balance between smoothness and packaging. Ducati’s 90° twin is smooth, but notoriously difficult to package effectively: with that horizontal front cylinder, it’s a very long engine. Suzuki tried to make it work by fitting a rotary damper in place of a normal shock to save space, and that didn’t work out so well. Today, even Ducati has been forced to come up with interesting solutions at the rear to allow for an ideal swingarm length that works with their L-twin.

2001 Aprilia Falco Dash

It’s maybe not the sexiest machine ever designed, the Falco still looks sleek, with interesting details like that frame, funky three-lobed headlight, and angular bodywork. It’s a bit like an MZ 1000S, but with better parts availability: the Falco and RSV share all their important spin-y and reciprocate-y bits, so it should be easy to keep one running, and the RSV is known to be durable and reliable, so problems shouldn’t crop up very often.

2001 Aprilia Falco L Rear

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Aprilia Falco SL1000 for Sale

Great bike for the value.  I hate to part with it but I could use the cash for my business.  The suggested retail value (kbb.com) is $3210.00. Could use some new back rubber but other than that the bike is in excellent condition as you can see by the pictures.  No damage never laid down.

2001 Aprilia Falco R Fairing

Sales were disappointing during the bike’s run between 1999 and 2003, making used Falcos correspondingly rare, although the ones I’ve seen do appear to have been well taken care of. At under 14,000, mileage isn’t collector-bike-low, but seems very reasonable, considering the bike’s original sport-touring mission.

2001 Aprilia Falco R Rear Exhaust

The only thing that concerns me is the complete lack of badging. The seller maintains that the bike was never crashed, but was it repainted? Did he simply have any decals removed? Regardless, the paint does look nice in the photos, and you can certainly add the original decals if you like. In contrast to the sometimes garish RSV graphics, the Falco had pretty discreet badges and logos.

With a starting bid of $2,800 and no takers as yet, riders on a limited budget looking for something classy, reliable, and fun should take note.

-tad

2001 Aprilia Falco R Side

Sensible Sibling: 2001 Aprilia Falco SL1000 for Sale
MZ February 16, 2015 posted by

V-Twin Alternative: 2005 MZ 1000 Sport for Sale

2006 MZ1000 Sport L Side

If you’re in the market for a practical exotic that will turn heads and won’t break the bank to buy or to run, this virtually new MZ 1000S deserves a closer look. As much as we’d all probably love a garage full of weird exotica, for budgetary and space reasons, many riders are forced to buy a do-it-all machine.

2006 MZ1000 Sport Dash

So what do you buy if you want a bike that’s sporty and practical for daily use, but one that’s also good for riding to the twisties and not just in the twisties, something with a bit of “get out of town-iness”. And what if you want something a bit out of the ordinary? Well, the Ducati ST2, 3, and 4 represent a pretty great bang for your buck, but were introduced before Ducati adopted much longer service intervals, and the four-valve L-twin can be pricey to maintain. The BMW R1100S and the Triumph Sprint are also pretty good choices, but not really all that exotic…

2006 MZ1000 Sport Front

Introduced in 2005 and powered by a big parallel twin that provided packaging advantages and midrange punch at the expense of top-end performance, the 1000S engine was an ideal powerplant for the road. Unfortunately, the lack of a truly prestigious brand name worked against the 1000S and was at odds with MZ’s quirky, grassroots image and the bike was discontinued after just three years. These are extremely rare in the US, although the ones that do come up for sale tend to be in excellent condition, and this one has just 16 miles on the odometer from new.

2006 MZ1000 Sport R Side Fairing Detail

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

The MZ 1000 Sport Touring bike is a museum quality motorcycle. Owned and sold by a former MZ Motorcycle dealer, this bike is one of a kind. It has only been ridden around the dealership to park it. It has been kept in a climate controlled environment on display in the owner’s various stores, from Michigan to Tennessee. This is truly a wonderful bike for the European motorcycle collector or for someone who is just looking to buy a piece of German history. 

Everything on it is original, everything is perfect like it would have been 20 years ago. Never titled, never tagged.

The bike listed for $11,000 in 2005.There were only 40 of these bikes imported into the USA. This bike is like new. Owned by the original dealer and sold by the original dealer. Fantastic bike.

Who ever is fortunate enough to become the new owner of this bike will become the proud owner of the last brand new MZ 1000 in the world.

It truly should be in a museum. 

2006 MZ1000 Sport Cockpit

In spite of the racy looks, the 1000S was really never intended as a pure sportbike, with handling biased towards the “comfort” end of the spectrum. But don’t let that fool you into thinking this bike can’t get a wiggle on when asked. It will function as a sporty, stylish everyday motorcycle that can munch miles and looks far less dated than many other bikes from the “straight edge” school of design.

2006 MZ1000 Sport Tank

If you really want a classy, competent machine that will leave onlookers scratching their heads or or nodding in sagely respect, something like the MZ 1000 Sport should do the job nicely, assuming you’re willing to take a bit of a chance on servicing and parts. These are reportedly very reliable, and easy to get serviced by non-MZ mechanics, but it’s still a bit of a leap of faith, buying an out-of-production sportbike that was never made in great numbers.

-tad

2006 MZ1000 Sport R Side Fairing

V-Twin Alternative: 2005 MZ 1000 Sport for Sale
MZ August 16, 2014 posted by

Rare and Practical: 2005 MZ1000S

Most attempts to resurrect a defunct or struggling brand start with high-performance, limited-edition hypersports machines that inevitably get compared to the GSX-R1000, and generally not in a good way. So it was interesting when a revitalized MZ chose not to compete directly with hypersports bikes from Ducati and Aprilia, instead creating a classy gentleman’s express that they hoped would be judged on its own merits.

Produced between 2004 and 2007, the MZ 1000S represented a new era for formerly East German MZ. Known in classic circles as pioneers in the two-stroke revolution, their later range of bikes was powered almost exclusively by the 660cc Yamaha single. Great, practical everyman transportation, but MZ needed something to compete with more refined machinery.

2005 MZ 1000S L Side

Unfortunately, one of the reasons people create hypersports bikes in the first place is that folks with more money than skill or sense buy them as dangerous fashion accessories, and the MZ1000S disappeared with barely a ripple… In fact, this is the first one I can ever remember seeing for sale.

But don’t let that discourage you: reviews may not have been glowing in terms of track prowess, but then it wasn’t that sort of bike. It worked as intended, as a rideable, practical exotic that stands out in a crowd. And stand out it surely does.

2005 MZ 1000S R Side Garage

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale 

Gloss Black/Silver graphics Color scheme with Remus Slip on Exhausts made specifically for this bike – engine is bone stock – fuels beautifully – complete paper work from first owner and myself – factory tool kit – Digital service and owners manual in ENGLISH – parts readily available from Grahams In the UK – Pazzo Clutch and Brake levers (I do have OEM levers and they are in mint condition) Sprockets are Yamaha parts and oil filter is standard K&N item. Slight light scratches in clear coat on tail section, only noticeable up close and in full sun from first owner running soft luggage while sport touring. I do NOT have the stock exhausts.

Bike is an incredible sport bike, while she’s big sitting at rest and tall in the saddle (If you have a short inseam – this might not be the bike for you – I’m 6’0″ and I’m solidly on the balls of my feet at a stop.) But get it going and the size melts away – it is capable of staying with modern 600’s easily in really twisty tight mountain roads and the torque is simply addicting – come out of a corner and just roll it on – you are pulling away while everyone else is downshifting like crazy to match your drive out of the corner – and like a BMW K1200/1300 or Moto Guzzi sport bike – incredibly confidence inspiring and OMG easy to ride fast!

The MZ 1000S was powered by their in-house parallel-twin, bucking the v-twin sportbike trend that saw every niche market motorcycle powered by Ducati, Honda, or Suzuki v-twin engines. This choice certainly came with built-in limitations: parallel-twin engines are very compact and less expensive to produce, but vibrate like the dickens, especially in larger-displacement applications.

Just ask Norton and Triumph.

2005 MZ 1000S L Side Garage

And they really aren’t generally rev-happy engines, happier to punch out useable torque. Even with a balance shaft or two, you’re never going to get screaming revs out of 1000cc parallel twin. Also, there’s a certain bias against the configuration: the very advantages that speak to efficiency in manufacturing suggest a certain… pragmatism that is at odds with an exotic image.

But you will get character and packaging advantages galore, and a torquey powerplant ideal for the sports touring bike MZ had in mind.

Parts availability is a big question mark, although the seller mentions that servicing has never been a problem. This is the epitome of a “mature” sport bike and should be comfortable on both long rides and fast canyon runs on Sunday morning. This could be a really cool buy for someone looking for a bike that will really stand out from the crowd.

-tad

2005 MZ 1000S L Side Rear

Rare and Practical: 2005 MZ1000S
Yamaha June 26, 2014 posted by

Exotic Suspension for the Masses: 1994 Yamaha GTS1000

Only sold for two years in the US, the Yamaha GTS1000 was available from 1993-94. Styling is conservative 90’s Japanese, but without the garish graphics that often distinguish sportbikes of the era and the look is handsome, but so relatively unremarkable that it’s easy to miss the bike’s true standout feature: the forkless front end.

Almost missed that, didn’t you?

1994 Yamaga GTS1000 R Side Front

Conventional telescopic forks have well-known limitations: under braking, they compress and throw a motorcycle’s weight forward, upsetting weight-distribution, and this shift disturbs suspension geometry as well. In addition, the forces being channeled through and being amplified by the tubes means that triple-trees and  headstocks need to be very beefy, increasing weight.

1994 Yamaga GTS1000 L Front End

Plenty of alternatives have been tried since the dawn of motorcycle suspensions, but most have fallen by the wayside: they may improve in some areas, but usually at the cost of increased complexity or reduced steering feel, exactly the kind of things engineers were looking to avoid. They exchanging simple for complicated with no real upside, except as an exotic calling-card for owners of bikes like the Vyrus or Bimota Tesi who don’t mind the additional maintenance expense.

Interestingly, the suspension on this machine provides the best of both worlds: suspension compliance and braking stability as well as relative simplicity and reliability.

1994 Yamaga GTS1000 Dash

Yamaha’s “Omega-Framed” GTS1000 was an innovative, ambitious attempt to bring exotic swingarm front suspension technology to the masses. Alternative suspension maverick James Parker, who is still hard at work developing this concept today, licensed his technology to Yamaha and the engine was from Yamaha’s FZR1000, a 1000cc five-valve four cylinder that was detuned for touring duty, although that’s likely easily changed to something approaching the donor bike’s 145hp without too much trouble. The bike also included a great deal of exotic technology like electronic fuel injection, anti-lock brakes, and a catalytic converter.

1994 Yamaga GTS1000 Frame

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Yamaha GTS1000 for Sale

Two words. RARE, Collector! This GTS1000 is in fantastic condition and yes, it’s a pretty difficult find. The GTS was only available in the states from 1993 to 1994. It was still available in Europe until 1999. The previous owner took exceptional care of this. If you’re a collector or an enthusiast, this would be a great bike. Not to mention, it’s still a great bike to ride. For those of you who looked at this listing earlier, I did get the bags and the brakes. Please see pics. The only thing that is any concern is that the ABS is disconnected. I do have a box of all the parts for the ABS (see pics). The previous owner disconnected them as he didn’t like ABS. Overall, this bike is in great condition and would be a wonderful motorcycle to have in any collection.

Reviews at the time suggest that the suspension performed as advertised. Unfortunately, while the bike was innovative, it was very expensive and the de-fanged powerplant combined with a surprisingly limited range to muddy the waters: exactly what was this bike for? The main advantages of this design were really wasted on a heavy sport-touring bike like this, and it seems odd to combine relatively primitive ABS with a suspension designed to provide increased braking ability at the limit.

Poor sales killed the bike after just two years, although it sold until 1999 in other markets. I’m not sure these are really any sort of huge investment opportunity, but they have a strong cult following and parts for the engine should be readily available, although bodywork and suspension bits could be a problem. As an affordable sport-touring mount, it’d be hard to beat, so if you’re looking for a weird bike with reliability and subtlety, this interestingly technical machine could represent an opportunity you never knew existed.

-tad

1994 Yamaga GTS1000 L Side

 

Exotic Suspension for the Masses: 1994 Yamaha GTS1000
Ducati May 5, 2011 posted by

Guest Post: 1992 Ducati 907ie

I used to own a 1992 907ie, and really miss it. I have a standing search on eBay for this model, and this is one of the best I have seen in 2011. The listing is supplied by the original owner, and the bike has under 1,100 miles. He states he puts about 100 miles per year on it. Tires and battery are less than two years old.

Ducati 907ie For Sale

Unlike most Ducatis of the time, this is a square-tube framed bike. The frame is quite ugly, but the body work makes up for it. The motor is the familiar L-twin with belt-driven cams and the desmodromic action. The unit on the 907 is two-valves per cylinder, and it is fuel-injected and liquid cooled.

I can tell you from experience these things are super sweet to ride. They have about 75 HP at the rear wheel, and rev to about 9,000 RPM before hitting the limiter. Even though they’re 20 years old, the suspension is very sporty, providing plenty of ground clearance (though I would never take one to a track). It is a bit heavy at about 500+ pounds, but you don’t much notice it, and the brakes are excellent. The stock seat gets tiresome after 150 miles, but Corbin still markets a replacement.

The pictures are really only adequate. The owner has good feedback on eBay, so I trust that the bike is in excellent condition. The description says box stock except for tires and battery. I can see, however, that this bike has the European-option tail light on it, which is a highly-desirable feature that combines stop light and turn signals in to one cohesive unit. The stock pipes on this are really ugly, but Ferracci might still have a set laying around. Note a swap of slip-ons will require a new chip for the EFI.

The stock gearing on all older Ducatis is too high. The simplest fix is to drop one tooth from the front sprocket, which should allow the existing chain to be used without modification. A better solution is to add two teeth to the rear sprocket, but that would require a new chain.

This model bike needs valve adjustments every 6,000 miles, and belt changes every 12,000 miles. A typical Ducati owner accepts those costs as the price of admission. If I were to buy this bike, I would get the belts changed immediately, add two teeth to the rear sprocket, find some decent slip-ons and chip, then happily put perhaps 1,000 miles per year on it.

Two problems with this bike are fairly common. There is a clock in the dash that usually dies. Also, the regulator is prone to failure, but recent Ducati regulators can be swapped in. The mirrors rarely survive a tip-over, and they are very difficult to find. But the bike has 17″ wheels and can be fitted with current technology sport bike tires. The K&N oil filter is still common among some current Ducatis and Aprilias.

This model is the first Ducati I ever laid eyes on back in the late 80’s, and I was amazed back then by the sound. It was a privilege to own one for several years. I now have an ST-3, which is a better bike in most ways than the 907ie, but definitely not as handsome.

Only 2,300 total of the Paso (750) and 907’s were ever built; I don’t know the import numbers for 1992. The current bid is just over $2,500 with a reserve not yet met. At the end of 2010 I saw a ’92 907 on eBay go for about $7,500. That bike was also a one-owner, mostly stock, with less than 2,000 miles on it. So, a BIN of $5,000 is one heck of a bargain. If I were not in the midst of starting a new company, I would snap this one up at the BIN.

This was a guest post from Philip. As you can tell, his email to me was so complete that I asked if we could turn it into a guest post. Thanks for the heads up and the detailed analysis Philip! -dc

Honda January 11, 2011 posted by

1991 Honda VFR750F-M With 3,950 Original Miles Just Outside Of Seattle, Washington

A low mileage ’91 VFR750F in Washington state!

Bike:  1991 Honda VFR750F-M (RC36)

Location:  Bothell, Washington

Mileage:  3,950mi

Price:  $3,395USD

Honda marketing labeled the VFR as a “sportbike for all seasons” and “an entire garage full in one bike”.  These VFR’s were designed to be just as usable as a canyon carver, sport-tourer, and daily rider.  The bike retained race derived components such as the 16-valve V-4, Pro-Arm single sided swing-arm, twin piston brakes and a dual spar aluminum perimeter frame.

I find these earlier VFR’s–third and fourth generation–to be the best looking of the standard production VFR line.  The seller doesn’t state much other than that this bike is all original.  From the minuscule Craigslist photos, it looks to be in very good condition as I would expect for a bike of this mileage.  This bike does look to have bronze wheels.  While I’ve only seen these red examples with white wheels, this could be from the factory–anyone care to comment?  The price is higher than most for a second-gen’ VFR but considering mileage and condition, it isn’t too out of line.

See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG