Posts by tag: Sport Touring

BMW June 24, 2020 posted by

Bahnstorming: 2007 BMW R-Series R1200S

BMW’s R1200S is a “sportbike” in the same way Ducati’s 1000SS DS is a sportbike: it’s designed for folks who love the brand and want something fun to ride in the canyons, not the type that are going to be cross-shopping the latest literbikes or ripping the lights and mirrors off to do track days. Let’s be honest: that’s perfectly fine for most people, since both of the aforementioned bikes can certainly cut it on track, and probably show their taped-up taillights to much faster machines when handled by a skilled pilot.

This is the second-generation of what was BMW’s sportiest model, prior to the arrival of the S1000RR that turned the sportbiking world on its ear, and was introduced in 2006. Looks are similar to the earlier model, but a bit more angular and technical looking, a little more svelte. That’s no bad thing, as the original was a little bit porky by sportbike standards and the new version weighed in at a claimed 488 or so wet, down from the 505 of the preceding model. The new trellis frame that replaced the aluminum beam frame of the original certainly looks like it helped to save some of that weight.

So it was a little bit heavier than a Ducati Supersport, but it also made more power and torque. Displacement was up a little less than the 100cc’s advertised by the name, to 1170cc from 1085cc with twin plugs per cylinder. Power was up to 122hp from 98hp with a torque curve as flat as a tabletop. Power from the longitudinally-mounted flat twin is transferred to the rear wheel via a six-speed gearbox and the expected Paralever shaft drive system. Öhlins shocks were optional at the rear and at the front, since the bike retained BMW’s Telelever system that remains one of the few mass-produced alternative front-ends available in modern times. The R12000S handled well and, unlikely as it seems, you have to work very, very hard to deck out those cylinder heads that stick out awkwardly to the sides.

Given the shaft-drive models’ reputation for being able to rack up big miles with minimal trouble, this example is barely broken in by BMW standards: it’s covered just 2,250 miles so far. The bike includes a nice aftermarket Remus muffler that should make the bike sound a bit sportier, and the wider 6″ rear wheel should mean a wide choice of sporty rubber.

From the original eBay listing: 2007 BMW R1200S for Sale

BIKE IS IN LIKE NEW CONDITION. Oil and filter change done this past winter. 110 miles of riding have been added since. Bike was always stored indoors in a heated office. 
The owner died 2 months ago. He was a close friend of mine. I am selling this for his wife. I have ridden the bike about 15 miles to make sure of its condition. Starts and runs perfectly. He took it on a 60 mile ride the week before he died. I have owned dozens of BMW’s over my 69 years and this is as close to new as you will find. No marks, dings, or scratches on the bike. Always meticulously cared for.
Options include: 
Heated grips
Ohlins shocks front and rear
Full Remus exhaust system
6″ rear wheel
Gowing custom leather seat
ABS -(it was an option)

The bike comes with ABS. I have been told there are 2 versions. I will attempt to find which version is on the bike. 

I also am adding to this auction the large tank bag that is designed for this bike. Also included that is not listed above is a bunch of knick knacks BMW gave to the original owner upon purchase of an R1200S. Send me a message and I can send you pics of the knick knacks. I can’t ad pics to the add. All used up

The options on the bike include ABS so I am assuming it is the lightweight version that can be turned off for track days, tho the bike has  never been tracked. 

Apologize to all. The bike has 2810 miles on it, not 2250. Not sure how I made that mistake. 

Also – This bike has never been down in any way. The tire rubber and kickstand bottom are the only things that have ever touched ground…

I just received this note from a long time owner of a R1200S:

“Just so you know, there is only one ABS available on these bikes. Your bike with Ohlins, heated grips, ABS and probably the wider rear wheel is the Sport Option.
Standard model did not have Ohlins, ABS or heated grips. And yes, the ABS can be turned off.”

The seller also includes a video of the bike starting from cold and being ridden around some country roads, showing off the nice, mellow growl of the Remus aftermarket exhaust. At the time of writing, the listing is up to $7,900, with just 24 hours left on the auction and pretty active bidding. Maybe not the sexiest bike, but a pretty cool machine if you need one bike to do it all, with a bit of Germanic quirkiness thrown in for good measure.

-tad

Bahnstorming: 2007 BMW R-Series R1200S
MZ June 5, 2020 posted by

German Exotica: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

Sadly overlooked now, the MZ 1000S is a seriously versatile bit of German exotica. The Motorrad und Zweiradwerk name may not be familiar to most, but the marque has plenty of racing history and pedigree. Unfortunately, most of it is in the distant past, and that fact likely hurt sales of the expensive motorcycle from a brand largely unknown by modern sportbike enthusiasts. Brief background lesson: MZ [then “MuZ”] two-stroke racebikes using pioneering expansion-chamber technology developed by Walter Kaaden dominated the smaller racing classes between 1955-1976, a streak that was really only broken when MuZ Ernst Denger defected and took the company’s racing secrets with him to Suzuki…

By the 1990s, the company was largely forgotten by modern riders, except as a producer of outdated, smoky machines really only suitable for sale in countries behind the Iron Curtain. A reborn company with a line of motorcycles built around a common platform and powered by Yamaha’s 660cc 5-valve single and 5-speed gearbox got good reviews and soldiered on for a few years, but the MZ 1000S was the company’s first real foray into big four-stroke motorcycles.

Conceived as a sport-touring machine, it looks far more exotic than most bikes that typically fit that job description. Chunky and very angular, the design doesn’t come across as overly busy or contrived. It just looks classy and confident, a little mature. It was well received by the motoring press, but the 1000S was expensive and maybe a bit too conservative for its price tag. Power came from a 998cc parallel twin that meant character and a meaty powerband, as well as compact dimensions. The expected vibration was quashed by modern balance shafts, and a six-speed cassette gearbox seems to have been included for bragging rights, since quick trackside gearing changes don’t otherwise seem to fit into the design brief.

The MZ 1000S, along with a pretty wild-looking naked version, were sold for just a few years before production ceased. Many have been well-maintained and are available for a fraction of what they cost new. This one has a shade under 2,400 miles and is fitted with some good quality if slightly gauche aftermarket exhausts, but includes the originals if these aren’t to your your taste.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

You are bidding on a 2005 MZ 1000S sportbike with extremely low miles, in great condition, and ready to ride. I have owned a couple of these in the past, and got this one back from a gentleman that owns 4 of them, whom I sold this one to about 4 years ago. The bike has only 2383 miles on her and is ready for the road. Here are the details.

As I mentioned, I sold this bike to a friend that has 4 others,and recently got it back from him. Unfortunately, I am trying to “thin the herd”, and need to concentrate on my other projects.

The bike has a new battery, all brake & clutch fluids were just changed, along with new synthetic motor oil & filter. Bike fires right up, and runs great though the 6-speed cassette transmission. These bikes are rated at 100HP, but really designed as a “sport tourer”, as opposed to a full on sport bike. Fully adjustable suspension both front & rear, as well as dual Nissin front disc brakes which makes for great handling & stopping. The previous owner installed the Jardine muffler set and they sound great! Have the original mufflers that will go with the bike.

Some minor nick ,and minor scratches in the paintwork here & there, but nothing major. Looks great all around. All lights,gauges work as they should.

There is a cult following for these worldwide, and a lot of the consumable parts are readily available (brake pads, oil filters, chains, etc.), and any model specific parts are available from Grahams Motorcycles in the UK. Over the years,anything I have needed to order for various other MZs, I have received from Grahams within 7-10 days. Fantastic German build quality, and craftsmanship for a reasonable price. There are a lot of Chinese bikes that cost more than this bike, and can’t hold a candle to it!

The bike has a clear title, original owner’s manual, and a copy of the factory workshop manual.

Overall, a really nice bike that needs to be ridden, as opposed to sitting in my garage while I work on other projects. Offered at a very fair “Buy It Now” price,or feel free to shoot me a serious offer.

Don’t be scared off by servicing or parts availability: these are supposed to be easy enough to work on, assuming you have a mechanic willing to deal with a bike they’ve never even heard of, and many components are still available from overseas. Look, you obviously won’t get a warranty with this bike, but miles are very low and At $4,350 you honestly should take a chance on this one if you’re a fan of practical sportbikes with rarity and tons of character.

-tad

German Exotica: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale
BMW April 10, 2020 posted by

Ghost Gray Light* – 2007 BMW R1200S

More than ten years since the last one was made, the R1200S was only recently bumped off BMW’s air/oil-cooled throne by the R1250RS.  This stealthy example has been nicely updated by the East L.A. owner.

2007 BMW 1200S for sale on eBay

Beside the 100cc additional displacement on board the hex-head R1200S, the compression ratio was increased to 12.5-to-1.  Thanks to electronic knock sensors and the ECU’s control of ignition timing, premium gas will get you 122 hp.  The chassis was lightened and is more of a trellis affair than the R1100S, though the tele-lever and paralever suspension will be familiar to any BMW fan.  320mm brakes are complemented by factory braided lines, and the dual exhausts feed a common catalyst and underseat muffler.  There’s a big step up to the pillion, which is a nice backstop for the solo rider, but it’s hidden by a body-color cover.

Almost broken in at 22,430 miles, this R1200S presents nicely in its silver and black monochrome.  Though they were available as factory options, this one got the 5.5-inch rear wheel and Öhlins front and rear shock after the fact.  The R1200S had a lightweight ABS system available, not sure if this bike has it – though a front sensor ring is there.  The addition of a rear fender is very unusual, and ceramic coated exhaust looks great.  The comprehensive list of updates from the eBay auction:

Upgrades from stock are pretty minor and in my opinion, in very good taste and all take offs included:

– Remus headpipe and factory muffler both removed and ceramic coated so no blueing…ever. Looks amazing. Remus exhaust is no longer available FYI.
– EVAP canister removed
– Upgraded to wider OEM sport rear wheel
– Rear hugger added to keep tail section clean
– Helibars added, 1″ taller. Originals not included.
– Suspension upgraded to factory Ohlins, rebuilt and springs replaced (180 lbs rider) less than a year ago. Original front and rear suspension included
– Seat replaced with leather Corbin. Two originals included, both with cracked covers.
– Tank grippers added. Tech Spec if I remember correctly.
– Passenger pillion seat is MIA and didn’t come with the bike. Passenger pegs removed but included. Nobody wants to sit back there anyway.
– Puig double bubble clear windscreen. Original is included, but was painted black.
– Front fender pained black instead of factory silver. Looks much better and stays cleaner looking.
– Odyssey battery freshly installed
– Shorty Pazzo adjustable or like new stock levers, whichever you prefer
– Rear factory bags and racks added. I also keyed the lock cylinders to match the ignition. These are insanely expensive, but really make the bike more usable for long trips.

BMW put the R1200S on a diet, and was moderately successful with a wet weight under 470 lbs., and fans will tell you it feels more stable because so much of the engine weight is down low.  Can’t say the same for the factory hardbags, but they can be in the closet until they’re really necessary.  The R1200S is knocking on the door of a cult classic, a booming crescendo to the oil-cooled boxer -S variant that started way back in 1998.  This one does it almost at a whisper.

-donn

 

Ghost Gray Light* – 2007 BMW R1200S
Norton January 7, 2020 posted by

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

The history of rotary motorcycles is relatively short and includes a few technologically interesting, but largely unsuccessful motorcycles by Hercules, Suzuki, and Nortons. I’ll admit that I’m stretching the definition of “sport bike” much more than I usually do with this Norton Commando P52 police bike, but it’s such an oddball I had to post it. I mean, how could I not post a fully-faired Norton rotary-powered motorcycle? Hey, at least the P52 shared the same basic engine with the very rare and sporty Norton F1!

A rotary engine is elegant simplicity in concept, but problematic in execution: they have very few moving parts, and no need for camshafts, as the rotors themselves effectively open and close the fuel/air inlets. There are no poppet valves to bounce and play havoc when they try to share space with fast-moving pistons, and their rotational motion means they’re extremely smooth, compared to a reciprocal piston engine. One can understand an interest in avoiding engine vibration, as Norton’s previous parallel twins required the company to engineer the famous “Isolastic” mounting system to prevent the bikes from basically shaking themselves and their riders to pieces.

Unfortunately, Norton traded one set of problems for another by switching to a rotary design and, aside from a few spectacularly cool racebikes that did well in competition and a few road going F1 replicas to match, the bike was a relative failure. Rotaries tend to run hot, so after an initial run of air-cooled motorcycles, Norton switched their twin-rotor design to liquid cooling, which helped control temperatures somewhat, but added weight and complexity. Overall, Norton managed to work out most of the bugs, aside from emissions, fuel economy, and problematic apex seals. Reliability improved, but the bike didn’t really offer much of a performance advantage, compared to conventional machines, and it never really found enough of an audience to justify itself or save Norton from insolvency.

Rotary-powered cars haven’t fared all that much better than rotary-powered motorcycles: enthusiasts may love them, but warranty claims for NSU’s R0 80 basically sank the company and Mazda’s rotary has been in and out of production for years, owing to their fairly horrible fuel consumption and issues with emissions, as well as rotor apex seal durability. Ultimately, they’re not the simplest, or most efficient way to motivate a motorcycle. Considering the hard miles law-enforcement machines rack up, I can only imagine the headaches experienced by officers using a Norton Commander P52 in the field…

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

This is a very rare Norton Rotary motorcycle and is in running condition.  It was sold to the Dubai (Middle East) Police Department as a demonstrator, probably with the hope of a large fleet sale.  I purchased this bike in the UK around 1995 and have finally been able to go thru it and get it 100% running and titled in the State of Arizona.

This bike has matching frame (VIN) and engine numbers.

This bike has a calibrated speedometer and has only 1150 original miles from new. Very little was done to bring the bike up to full running condition. As it sat for years (always indoors), I had to professionally rebuild the SU carbs with proper parts from the UK. As a safety measure the fuel lines were replaced due to age and hardness. (I have the old fuel lines for historical reasons). 31 years ago Iridium spark plugs were not yet either in wide use or even available. These plugs are well suited for an engine that burns oil  (as is the case in 2 stroke or rotary engines) so I installed NGK Iridium plugs in this bike to minimize fouling and promote easy starting and running. Again, I have the stock plugs. Norton also recommended Shell Rotella oil but once again I did some research and was advised by several people in the know that the Shell oil is perhaps not the best modern choice of rotary oil. Mazda, who perhaps has more success with the rotary engine in the world had commissioned Idemitsu  of Japan to develop a full synthetic oil for use tn their rotary engines. I decided that the Idemitsu oil was the best modern choice for the Norton Rotary and drained the oil tank and replaced the engine oil with Idemitsu full synthetic oil designed for the rotary engine.

The bike has all the equipment as shipped from the factory, including a 58/100 watt siren, front and rear blue flashing strobe lights and the STOP POLICE illuminated  rear sign. I have 2 new screen printed extras that were made by a friend of mine in the sign business. The siren can be heard for miles so I will include a 100 Watt audio L PAD that can be plugged in line with the siren driver to safely adjust the volume to a comfortable level. I Laser cut a “Norton” sign to replace the Police sign if so desired.

The machine uses 2 batteries and new sealed batteries were installed recently. ALL keys are included and except for the trunk key, duplicates were made for the rest.

The factory workshop manual only ever existed as a “work in progress” but I was able to secure a copy of the manual as a draft. All further work on the full published manual stopped when Norton shut down. I was also able to secure a full wiring drawing of the bike.

Several sales brochures  for the strobes and siren manufacture are part of the literature package included. A full parts list with images is part of the sale.

Norton designed in some unique features into this machine such as a 100% enclosed rear drive chain with an oil bath to promote long life. Built into the trunk is an on board battery charger with the typical UK plug and 240 volt AC input. I designed and built a 110 VAC to 240 VAC step up transformer, all mounted in a plastic box with a UK socket. This allows the built in battery charger to operate properly from US 110 VAC power.

The original owners manual, operators manual, and color sales brochure are part or the package along with letters from Norton to the Dubai authorities and letters in Arabic back to Norton.

The brake system had to be 100% rebuilt as the DOT 3 fluid had started to degrade. All calipers, and master cylinders were completely rebuilt and the fluid was replaced with DOT 5 silicone fluid to eliminate any future  concerns. Again, due to the age of the machine I did change the antifreeze coolant. The rubber hoses connecting the radiator to engine have hardened to the point of minor leaking… I have factory original  replacements that  have not been installed yet.

The tool pouch was missing the basic tools except for the important real wheel axle spanner wrench.

As the bike in NOT restored, various scratches and blemishes exist. I went so far as to NOT polish the bike in any way. To the best of my knowledge the bike is as described.

The Norton F1 is the bike we’d normally want to feature here on RSBFS, being a full-on race-replica with pretty solid performance credentials. The sport-touring Commander seen here used a variation of the liquid-cooled two-rotor powerplant, with fully-faired bodywork that included integral panniers, although later machines used detachable luggage instead. The starting bid is set at $15,000 which seems… honestly, I’d have no idea how to value this bike, but hopefully some collector with a taste in interesting machinery will give it a good home!

-tad

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale
Ducati July 11, 2019 posted by

White Elefant – 1988 Ducati Paso Limited

New Cagiva managers enlisted Massimo Tamburini to design the next Ducati, and installed the desmodue 750 in the Paso.  Unfortunately it didn’t lead to a sales boom and a limited edition was issued to bump showroom interest.  This Virginia example is very stock and very, very clean.

1988 Ducati Paso Limited for sale on eBay

Ducati got their design dollar’s worth and the Paso looks like no other Ducati, with a square-section dual downtube frame, hidden under the all-encompassing soap bar.  The innovative 44mm Weber carburetor fed both cylinders and the engine bragged 73 hp with a wide torque band which made the 5-speed trans workable.  The Limited benefits from premium Marzocchi M1R forks and Öhlins monoshock.  Brakes are shared from the non-limited, but fine Brembo 280mm dual disks.  Nicer suspension and 16-inch rubber masked the 430 lbs. dry weight, which still cost performance versus the competition.

This owner has helped preserve his Paso Limited, even keeping the black chrome muffler and having a Corbin seat done which is almost indistinguishable from the factory sofa.  Comments from the eBay auction:

I have owned this Bike since 2005
Total original miles is Just under 5,900 miles
Only Fifty Paso Limited made
I just completed installing
New timing belts
New under tank gas filter
Plugs
Oil change
Brake fluid
Bike is totally stock with the exception of euro turn signals and polished grabrail
This bike actually has a Weber carb which is factory
I had a Corbin seat recovered to look exactly like stock seat, original seat included

The Weber carb doesn’t suffer neglect gladly but can be tuned to relative perfection.  Without much adjustment, the Paso’s riding position is relaxed enough for sport-touring and even some commuting.  Subsequent 900cc models addressed charging issues with a bigger alternator, stop-and-go cooling with water-cooled heads, and replaced finicky carburetion with fuel injection.  Styling continued to be a bugbear though, and the model struggled to break 1,000 sales each year.  For fans of the enclosed solution or just the transition to more modern engines, every Paso is a Limited Edition.

-donn

White Elefant – 1988 Ducati Paso Limited
Triumph April 17, 2019 posted by

Big British Bruiser: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale

After years of “close, but no banana” attempts to out-inline-four the Japanese with their 600cc TT600 and Daytona, Triumph finally hit one out of the park with their slim, agile, and characterful Daytona 675, a bike capable of holding its own against the world’s best, while offering a unique blend of flexible power, torque, and a soundtrack to differentiate it from the typical inline four and v-twin sportbikes. This Triumph Daytona 1200SE represents the path not taken: with no analogue in their current lineup, Triumph’s four-cylinder Daytona was ultimately a dead-end for the company, as the smaller three-cylinder proved more popular and led the way forward for the company. But if you’re in search of something cool, classy, affordable, and fast, this one might just tick the boxes for you.

When Triumph was reborn in the 1990s, modular design allowed them great flexibility to refine their offerings and minimize the risks associated with new or niche models. Individual bikes were slightly compromised by frames and engines designed with versatility and not maximum performance in mind, but this kept the company light on its feet and and able to quickly respond to industry trends. The Daytona 1200 slotted their biggest, most powerful engine into the spine frame, added the best suspension in their arsenal and fitted some very effective brakes. It was Triumph’s big stick of their lineup and, even though it was discontinued after just a few years, that doesn’t mean the four-cylinder Daytona 1200 isn’t a great motorcycle.

When new, it was considered a bit of an also-ran, since it was compared directly to Japanese rivals like the Suzuki GSX-R1100 and Kawasaki ZX-11 in that all-important top-speed metric while costing a good bit more. With 147hp from the 1180cc engine to haul 550lbs of wet weight around, power-to-weight compares favorably with the last generation of Suzuki’s GSX-R1100, while offering an extra cog to make even better use of the flexible engine. That may seem unimpressive by today’s ludicrous power levels, but the 85lb-ft of torque is paired with real-world gearing that emphasized performance street riders could actually use, instead of hypothetical top speeds they couldn’t. With stock gearing, a 1200 Daytona could easily embarrass a ZX-11 from 40-100mph, before running out of puff at a mere 160mph.

And like the ZX-11 and the later GSX-R1100, the Daytona wasn’t a sport-touring bike, it was a big GT, a sportbike with comfortable ergonomics suited to mature riders who wanted to occasionally do very immature things on their motorcycles. A GSX-R with wild graphics and neon colors would blast to triple-digit speeds, strafe canyons, but had very boy-racer pretensions, for better or worse. But if you’d aged out of that, but still wanted to scare the bejesus out of yourself without needing to pretend you were hitting LeMans the following weekend, the Daytona was available in elegant black, classic British Racing Green, or a rich yellow. The styling was simple and unadorned by crass graphics, and the bike exudes class from nose to tail.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Triumph Daytona 12oo for Sale

Helping a family friend clear out an estate. Two Owner bike, Was adult owned its whole life, most recently by an avid motorcycle enthusiast in his 60’s for the last 15 years. Clean and Clear title ready to go and two sets of keys.

Limited edition 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200 in very nice condition. This is a rare bike they do not come up for sale often. limited production Only 250 made, this is bike #175.

She has been sitting in storage for the last 2-3 years or so, fuel was drained before storage. Pulled it out, new battery, gave it a wash, put fresh gas in, fresh oil change, and she fired right up and sounds amazing. Tires have good tread left, the bike brakes and handles amazing, its very fast! This bike has been very well taken care of and well maintained by owners. No leaks of any kind.

Paint is nice, always garaged. there are a few blemishes that I noticed, some scratches on the right side fairing isolated to about 2″x2″, and a hairline crack and some nicks up by the left mirror(see pics)

Modifications that I noticed: 

Micron carbon fiber slip on exhaust

Hella headlights, very bright, turn signals

Nology profire coils

Windscreen?

Very clean for being 20 years old, a few things I have noticed that I want to mention for full disclosure: 

  • Bike hesitated a little  before it took off when I drove it, I would recommend a fuel additive to clean out the carbs and fuel system for the first few tanks of gas since it has been sitting
  • Temp gauge was working intermittently

Don’t let this rare opportunity pass you by!!

With a Buy It Now price of just $5,500 this is a ton of bike for the money, and it looks clean and relatively unmolested, with just 15,000 miles on the odometer and a set of Micron carbon cans to liberate a bit more growl, as you can hear in the included video. It’s unfortunate the seller doesn’t know more about the history, but is pretty thorough in presenting what is there. It’s not quite perfect, with some scratches, flush front signals, and the frankly awful rear turn signals, but looks complete and all Triumphs of the era still represent a seriously fast chunk of classic sportbike for a pretty minimal outlay of cash.

-tad

Big British Bruiser: 1999 Triumph Daytona 1200SE for Sale
MZ August 31, 2018 posted by

Have Your Cake: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

Clean, low-mileage examples of the MZ 1000S pop up for sale from time to time and, since most were silver, I always have to dig back through our archives to see if it’s one we’ve featured recently. Also, I get the feeling they’re hard to shift and the same listings seem to pop up again and again for sale, which is a shame considering how competent a motorcycle it is.

After a moderately successful attempt at a comeback in the 90s with a range of practical, accessibly sporty motorcycles based around Yamaha’s five-valve 660 single, MZ decided that, if you’re going to go low-volume, you should probably go upmarket. The striking MZ 1000S was the result, but the only exotic vibes were the ones produced by the unusually large parallel-twin engine, and performance wasn’t really backed up by the bike’s angular looks. Neither the 1000S nor its half-faired stablemate the 1000SF “Streetfighter” sold very well.

For an exotic sportbike, the 999cc parallel-twin that powers the 1000S is an odd choice, as is the relatively pointless cassette-style gearbox. The chief benefit of a cassette gearbox is quick gearset changes to suit different tracks, and I really don’t think many people were racing these… Although maybe MZ figured it’d be easy to service higher-mileage examples? Considering the bike’s more practical mission, that does make sense.

It’s almost like MZ was undone by their pragmatic roots: the parallel-twin engine was easy to package and offered up the chunky midrange required for a good road bike, and the 1000S was very comfortable for such an otherwise sporty machine. But people buying exotic sportbikes are generally looking for an experience, not a practical form of transportation. Especially here in the US, they usually have several other bikes for that job, and there’s no real glamour or cachet surrounding the MZ name, either. Unless you’re a big fan of classic motorcycle racing.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale

I am the original owner of this 2004/2005 MZ1000s. It has 7,320 miles on it. It comes with the owners manual, warranty book, most of the on-board tool kit, Sebring exhaust, lever upgrades, passenger seat eliminator (AKA hocker), Mototeknic frame sliders, power commander, O2 eliminator, Vortex stand. It comes with the original parts and an additional front fairing.

Starts right up!

Truly an awesome bike I will miss forever. Cervical radiculopathy has kept me from riding. It’s time to part with it.

I purchased all the parts in Germany on a NATO training mission. I found the receipt. That’s $1200+ in additional parts. Any questions please ask.

I love me some brutally uncomfortable sportbikes, even with my aging joints. You have to suffer for art, after all… But if you can have your cake and eat it too, why not? I do understand why the 1000S wasn’t a big success. Or any success really: production was discontinued after just three years. But although they were considered to be too pricey when new, they seem to be pretty good used value. Although this one might be a bit too pricey, with no takers yet at the $6,800 Starting Bid. Still, the 1000S has distinctive looks, good performance, and even solid reliability: put concerns about servicing the bike aside, since parts supposedly aren’t difficult to source and the bike is easy to work on, even for mechanics not particularly familiar with the brand.

-tad

Have Your Cake: 2005 MZ 1000S for Sale
Laverda May 16, 2018 posted by

Semi-Finalist – 1983 Laverda RGS1000

Laverda was already reeling from overseas competition in the early 1980’s, but had the gumption for one more design project.  The RGS was based on their recent 1000cc air-cooled triple and rode more like a Beemer than a finicky Italian exotic.  This one has been enjoyed, but is quite original and well maintained.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 ( Canada ) for sale on eBay

For the RGS, Laverda civilized the 981 cc engine with rubber mounts and quieter exhaust, but the 83 hp didn’t suffer.  Marzocchi  suspension is found front and rear, but triple 280mm Brembo brakes are a little undersized for a 135 mph streamliner.  Designer details like the Veglia dash, removable pillion fairing and the tank filler in the front ( out of the way of a tank bag ) are sweet period items.

Over the age of EPA, this Laverda should be an easy import from British Columbia.  Seems cared-for despite the mileage – though my back-of-the-napkin ( ok, google ) conversion shows 57,000 miles from 92,000 KM.  Making it sound like a recent acquisition, the owner isn’t a slave to details, but says this in the eBay auction:

Hello, have my beautiful almost all orig RGS to sell.  Wolfgang recently went thru her before my purchase with full tuneup, fluids, tires, rejet, etc.  He has most history on it, has had top end done plus small items.  Most normal upgrades done with ignition, etc.  Runs very strong, and smooth.

After the Laverda family abandoned ship in 1985, the company was fits and starts until industrialist Francesco Tognon was nearly successful with a couple of new models in the 1990’s, making the RGS almost the last design from an icon dating back to 1873.  Fast, quiet, and smooth, the Laverda was unfortunately slower, heavier, and more expensive than its Japanese rivals.  But if you’re after a continental 1980’s experience, the RGS is one of a very few…

-donn

Semi-Finalist – 1983 Laverda RGS1000