Posts by tag: RGS1000

Laverda November 20, 2021 posted by

1984 Laverda RGS1000 with 5,400 miles

Here’s a very sharp and low mileage RGS1000 available in the Chicagoland area. Sounds like the seller is assisting a collector in thinning out their collection.

1984 Laverda RGS1000 for sale on eBay

from the seller:

Frame Number: ZLVMVDHA0E0000009
Engine Number: LAV.1000RGS2682
Build Date: 2/1984

The Laverda RGS was among the last all-new designs produced by Moto Laverda in Breganze, Italy. Francesco Laverda built his first motorcycle in 1947-1948, and began serial production of a 75cc single, the Turismo, in 1950.

The cosmetic condition of this machine is just as good as it looks in the photos. Every finish on the machine is original. No part of the bike has been re-finished. The running condition of the machine is flawless, starting immediately. This bike has been part of the owner’s collection for a while and is ridden on a regular basis. It runs and rides with absolutely no issues.

Again, everything on this motorcycle is original, with the exception of the exhaust system, which was removed and replaced with the ultra-rare race exhaust. The seat is also in original condition and is beautiful. The original and complete Laverda tool kit is also included.

As you can also see from the photos, the machine has had absolutely no restoration performed to any part of it. The condition is exactly what it looks like in the photos. Owner has been a fan of Laverda for some time, and has two of these RGS machines at the moment.

The paint on the tank, side covers, and cowl is, as far as he can tell, original, and has never had any type of paintwork or touchup. The bike has never been in any type of accident or been dropped at any time.

The machine has 5,400 original miles on it, and is in perfect running condition with a compression test having being recently performed. The cosmetic condition of the engine finishes, apart from some minor age freckling, is very nice, with the aluminum and cast parts being particularly beautiful for their age.

The seat is original and in perfect condition, and the rear cowl is easily removable, allowing for two up riding. The wheels are original to the machine, stamped Laverda, and are also in very nice original condition.

Please note that the owner has the original spec smoked windscreen, which will be included with the sale of the motorcycle. He preferred riding with the clear windscreen, but the new owner can decide between the two.

The RGS1000 runs and rides the way you expect a machine with this type of mileage to run. All of the mechanical components have been checked over to ensure they work properly including the clutch and brakes, which were recently serviced and adjusted. The carbs were completely gone through this season and function perfectly, and there is a new battery installed.

The tires currently installed have comparatively few miles on them, and have plenty of service life left, but if you plan to ride it hard, tires should be replaced. There is absolutely nothing else you will have to do to this motorcycle to ride and enjoy it this season.

Note the seller borrowed a portion of our copy from this post by Mike in 2018. While always flattering, it’s polite to note your sources 🙂

Hat tip to Jack P. for the forward!

dc

1984 Laverda RGS1000 with 5,400 miles
Laverda February 14, 2017 posted by

Love, Italian Style: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

Considering I can comb eBay for months on end and not see a single Laverda for sale, it’s crazy that we’ve seen not just one but three worthy examples representing a couple different eras recently. From the 1990s Formula that might be more familiar to our readers, to the more vintage 1984 Jota and today’s Laverda SFC1000, fans of the Breganze Bruisers have been spoiled for choice of late. The RGS1000 SFC was a bit of a last gasp for the original Laverdas before their death and subsequent resurrection during the Zane-era, a technological dinosaur that had been continually updated since the early 1970s to keep up with the ever increasing pace of sportbike development. Laverda knew they were falling behind the curve, as were all of the European brands, and they recast themselves as purveyors of elegant sportbike alternatives for distinguished gentlemen to help justify high prices, outdated technology, and “classic” styling. And even though the RGS wasn’t a sportbike in the high-revving, light-weight idiom, it was still a blood-and-thunder brute with high-quality suspension, stability, and very real road-going performance.

Certainly, the “SFC” name of this very exclusive RGS variant was a bit of a cheat: produced in very limited quantities, the original SFC was based around Laverda’s parallel-twin and was a barely-disguised racebike with lights stuck onto it to make it “street-legal” in the loosest sense of the phrase. Obviously, laws regarding that kind of thing were much simpler back then… SFC was an acronym for “Super Freni Competizione” which translates to “super braking competition”  and referred to the huge aluminum drum brake found on the original bikes. Later machines used a pair of discs as seen here, which provided less sexy but more reliable stopping power.

The engine was Laverda’s long-serving and very charismatic three-cylinder 981cc engine, here with a 120° crankshaft that made for smoother running, along with high-performance cams and other assorted go-fast bits to raise the power from 85 to 95hp. Early examples of the Jota, Laverda’s original, hairy-chested three-cylinder sportbike, used a 180° crankshaft that basically ran like a four-cylinder with a miss. It was good for power, but vibrated excessively and was eventually replaced with a smoother-running 120° crank. Even though the revised crank is considered a bit of an abomination by some Laverda purists, condemned of the sin of being “too civilized,” if you’ve ever heard one of the 120° bikes, “civilized” isn’t the first thing that springs to mind… It’s raw and very Italian, and sounds like a Stradivarius violin crossed with a chainsaw being used to cut down a tree made of silk, dark chocolate, and truffles, or some other equally ludicrous simile. Basically, if you’re expecting the soft whir and refined yowl of a modern Triumph triple, you’ll be sexually aroused, pleasantly surprised, or horrified, depending on your feelings about earplugs.

So even though this was intended as a high-performance motorcycle, it was a bit behind the times when it was new. But if calling this an “SFC” is technically a bit of a stretch and merely a calculated dip into past glories to paint a moribund package a brighter shade of orange, this is still a very special motorcycle, as can be seen from the description below.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale

This unique SFC 1000 – one of a tiny number made – is in great original shape. It is a perfect runner receiving all it needs in the past four years to operate as new. The serial number shown is correct…0001.  Here’s the story behind it:

This bike was built for Alexander Claren, a Cologne architect who designed Ewe Witt’s dealership (the German importer of Laverdas).  Claren saw the prototype bike at the Cologne motorcycle show and had to have one. He persuaded Witt to order one – requesting number 0001 – from the factory for immediate delivery and thus it was built ahead of the production line. The first production bike was number 1001, following Laverda’s usual numbering protocol. There are a series of letters from Piero Laverda in the file that accompanies the bike confirming the numbering.

SFC 1000 production ran alongside the RGS, RGS Corsa and various RGAs from 1985 through 1989 but few were made. SFC 1000 specifications changed only in detail as tiny batches of bikes were constructed. The most important visual differences were the color – red or black – and the wheels – three-spoke Oscam cast wheels or Akront wire spoke rims. The engine in all SFC’s starting with this bike was to Corsa specification – that is 95bhp at 8000rpm – 5-speed, Marzocchi forks and rear shocks, Brembo Gold Line brakes, and either Smiths or Veglia instruments. All top quality components.

Two additional sets of factory exhausts and silencers come with the bike.  These are: a set of three into two in chrome (some SFC’s had black, some had chrome) and a rare set of three into one.  The ignition currently on the bike is a modern Sachse electronic with selectable advance curves, but the factory original unit also comes with the bike. Note:  mileage shown is in km.

These bikes are rare. Don’t miss an opportunity to own this one.

They were making these things, or titling them anyway, as late as 1988 by which point this machine would have been horribly outclassed by the latest generation of four-cylinder sportbikes from Japan. But while that might have mattered when the bike was new, it’s pretty irrelevant now: it has classic looks you’d never confuse with a GSX-R or ZX or FZR or even FJ that would have mopped the floor with the RGS. And the bike’s lardy 500lb dry weight was motivated by a stout 95hp so it’s not exactly slow, even now.

So what’s it worth? Well not much, unless you’re an aficionado, so the $14,500 starting bid might seem outrageous if this is your first time clapping eyes on an SFC1000. But if you’re a Laverda fan, that seems like a very reasonable place to start, considering what other rare Laverdas like the original Jota and even the standard RGS are going for these days.

-tad

Love, Italian Style: 1985 Laverda RGS1000 SFC for Sale
Laverda August 18, 2016 posted by

Throwback Thursday: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale

1983 Laverda RGS1000 R Front

While many of the 80s bikes we’ve featured recently look relentlessly forward, spending their lives on the bleeding-edge of sportbike design, other manufacturers were necessarily stuck in the past, limited by budgets and working to maximize the potential of existing, sometimes moribund designs like today’s Laverda RGS1000. Laverda had certainly earned its fair share of laurels in the 1970s with their SFC endurance-racing machines but, fueled by strong sales, the Japanese manufacturers’ experimental output exploded in the mid-to-late 1980s. We saw everything from big-bore inline fours to two-stroke, V3 race-replicas and the European manufacturers were left trying to shift some suddenly very obsolete machines.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 L Rear

Laverda’s manly 981cc three-cylinder Jota of the late 1970s was in every way a sport bike: uncompromised by comfort or practicality, obsessed with speed, power, and loud noises: it was rare, exotic, and required real commitment to ride, especially if you were under 5’10”. But keeping pace with the Japanese in terms of outright performance meant developing a new engine, something that the small company could not afford.

So Laverda wisely cashed in on their brand’s racing history and Italian sportbike credentials to recast their top-of-the-line sportbike as something more of a racy sport-tourer with a revised frame and fully-enclosed bodywork. The fuel door in the front of the fairing is an interesting detail and speaks to the bike’s new mission. Could the RGS keep up with the latest and greatest machines from the Land of the Rising Sun? Certainly not, at least on the race track, but handling was excellent and that big engine was no slouch. By pitching their revised RGS at a well-heeled clientele less likely to buy a bike based on some ever-changing performance-per-dollar ratio, Laverda targeted a premium segment and attempted to stave off the inevitable. Unfortunately, the bike was good but it was also expensive.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Cockpit

Although the cognoscenti typically prefer the earlier Laverda triples with their raucous 180° “one up, two down” crankshaft to the later, much more refined 120° bikes, don’t think that the RGS is some shrinking violet. “Refinement” is a relative term, and an RGS with a free-flowing exhaust is one of the best sounding motorcycles I’ve ever heard, even if the sound is snarling out of the pipes of a somewhat awkward-looking machine. Today’s example isn’t perfect, but appears to have been sympathetically maintained and it certainly hasn’t been left to slowly rust away in a shed somewhere, based on the miles its covered…

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Engine Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Laverda RGS 1000 for Sale

Good condition, strong runner. Has no mechanical issues. Recently gone through by noted Laverda experts Wolfgang and Chris Haerter. Many parts replaced including, but not limited to. Wheel bearings, drive chain and sprockets, tires, entire exhaust, brake lines, cam chain, engine oil, fuel lines, carburetors ultrasonic, DMC ignition, Dyna coils, Foot control linkages, all rubbers, mirrors. Has no leaks starts very well and sounds amazing. 

A very good example of a well looked after daily rider. 

1983 Laverda RGS1000 R Side

There are 86,000 miles on the bike, but these engines are very well built and, assuming the maintenance has been done as indicated, there should be plenty of life left in this beast still. Obviously, if your heart pumps premix and your riding boots all have their toes ground off, this probably isn’t the bike for you. But if a classy gentleman’s express appeals and you want something far sexier and more exotic than a BMW twin, the RGS can provide you with the traditional Jaguar values of grace, pace, and space.

-tad

1983 Laverda RGS1000 L Fairing

Throwback Thursday: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale
Laverda February 26, 2016 posted by

Italian BMW – 1984 Laverda RGS1000

An old joke about European heaven and hell ( in heaven the French do the cooking, the Italians romance, the British are the police, and Germans run the trains – you know what happens in hell ) came to mind when I read a review of the Laverda RGS1000, owners were so impressed by the build quality they termed it the Italian BMW.  Coming at the beginning of the end for Laverda, the RGS1000 was an inspired sport heavyweight that kept the brand alive and still has a following today.

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 right

1984 Laverda RGS1000 for sale on eBay

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 left grip

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 cluster

Based on the 981cc triple from the 1970’s Jota ( itself an evolution of the 750cc twin ) the RGS engine uses a 120-degree crankshaft, inherently smoother than the Jota but subject to a secondary vibration requiring rubber engine mounts.  The triple Dell’Orto carbs help the engine toward 83 hp and 57 ft.-lbs. torque.  Suspension is all Marzocchi, air assisted, and triple Brembo 280mm disc brakes.  A very low 30-inch seat height allow the upper-only fairing to protect the rider at the 137 mph top speed.  Chockablock with neat details, it has a beautiful mono seat fairing, Vitaloni mirrors and a tank ready for a magnetic bag ( fuel filler is on the fairing ).

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 right rear

Coming out of Toronto, this RGS1000 looks excellent and shows only 6,600 kms.  Pictures aren’t hi-res, but once right side up ( how did that happen ? ) they show a clean un-hacked classic.  Nothing about repairs or maintenance, which is acceptable considering the low mileage.  From the eBay auction:

1984 Laverda RGS 1000.  6600 KMS.  Mint condition.  Comes with factory original mint exhaust as well as the three into one Laverda racing exhaust.  Both exhausts are mint as is this particular RGS 1000.  A true all original unmolested survivor. 6600 KMS from new!  A rare opportunity to purchase a true gem. None finer and not a restoration.

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 right engine

Almost a cult at this point, Laverda owners have several clubs and stay in close touch.  Just as well since despite the hand-built craftsmanship, the RGS requires valve clearance checks every 3000 miles, requiring removal of the fairing and fuel tank.  When carefully maintained, the smooth triple can have a long lifetime.  Though the bike is a portly 550 lbs., the fairing lends excellent fuel economy, and the RGS reviewed as a stable, invigorating ride.  Rare by any definition, only 250 or so of the 2500 total production made it to the states.

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 left fairing

In the end, the gorgeous heavyweight sport tourer made by a small, family-owned Italian firm could only delay the inevitable, and Laverda shortly entered the throws of bankruptcy before being bought and retired by Aprilia in 2000.  But well-made bikes like the RGS1000 live on.  In Laverda’s strange alternate universe, maybe Ducati would be making dual-sports and BMW sportbikes…

-donn

20160224 1984 laverda rgs1000 tank

Italian BMW – 1984 Laverda RGS1000
Laverda February 8, 2016 posted by

Gentleman’s Express: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale

1983 Laverda RGS1000 R Front

Laverda’s big-bruiser RGS1000 comes from an era when the European brands were struggling in the face of the Japanese Big Four’s onslaught. To keep pace required serious levels of financial and manufacturing muscle, and most of the European brands just could not compete.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Tank

Some, like BMW hung on to a niche market, with loyal sport-touring fans continuing to buy up their durable flat-twins, even as the company continued to innovate, building new triples and fours. But companies like Triumph struggled to update already obsolete machines and stave off their inevitable doom.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Clocks

Laverda, a tiny company compared even to Triumph, took a different path. They started with their powerful and chest-thumpingly manly 981cc three-cylinder engine and five-speed combination, then wrapped the package in modern, fully-faired bodywork, creating something new out of something old, a bike that wasn’t really trying to compete.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Engine

Although it was decidedly old-tech, the new sport-touring mission of the bike meant it wasn’t even trying to compete in the rapidly-escalating sportbike wars against the Japanese, and the bike, while not very light at 550lbs, offered Laverda’s famous stability, impressive midrange power, and reasonable comfort. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 L Front

From the original eBay listing: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale

I bought this beautiful Laverda RGS 1000 about five years ago from a Laverda collector in California. He was selling it and other bikes after suffering serious injuries in an accident. He had owned it for a number of years when he decided that he wanted more “oomph” so he wisely sent it to Scott Potter, Laverda engine builder and restorer par excellence for some high-compression pistons. The bike was in good condition and did not need restoration, but since the engine was coming out anyway, why not take advantage?

And well, here is Scott’s work order:

RGS 2029 Disassemble the machine down to every last nut and bolt. Send out all chrome components to be replated . Strip frame, center stand and rear fork to bare metal. Fabricate gusset plates to strengthen headstock. Powdercoat frame and rear fork gloss black. Renew headstock bearings and rear fork bearings. Disassemble engine. Clean sand cast engine components. Bead blast as necessary. Follow with hot tank wash and clear out all passages with compressed air. Polish all alloy covers. Replace wearing components as necessary. Lighten clutch basket and pressure plate. Machine true and lighten clutch drum. Send out cyl head for 3 angle Serdi seat cut. Reassemble engine to factory tolerances. Check valve timing to published specs. Disassemble, clean and inspect starter clutch. Reassemble with new springs, plungers, and rollers. Refit to engine. Refit engine to chassis. Disassemble front forks and clean. Check fork tubes for straight and true. Polish fork tubes. Fabricate adapters for cartridge emulators. Modify damping rods for cartridge emulators Reassemble with new seals and oil. Refinish yokes and instrument mount. Refit forks to chassis. Renew rear damper assemblies with custom Works Performance units. Disassemble brake hydraulics. Clean and reassemble with new kits, pads and pistons. Remove rotor surface area of iron oxide. Mount rotors to hubs with new fasteners.Install new black sheathed stainless brake and clutch hoses. Bleed all hydraulics with fresh Castrol GT LMA DOT 4 fluid Fit new sprocket and renew sprocket locking tabs. Refit wheel assemblies to chassis. Fit new drive chain. Polish footrest plates. Clean adjustment discs and assemble with antiseize compound Install new bronze bushings in shift and brake levers and hone to fit. Install new type designation plate Fabricate new mounts to fit Mikuni RS36 carbs to utilize stock airbox connectors Fit carb assembly to engine. Install new push pull throttle quadrant. Clean and repair/modify wiring harness as necessary. Install Witt/DMC ignition unit and Mitsu coil assembly Refit wiring harness and switch gear to chassis.

As you can see it is a comprehensive rebuild, but not a complete restoration as the original durable Laverda paint was in great condition still. The owner was able to put only a few miles on the restored bike before his accident. Since I bought it from him, I have put about 1200 miles on it. I treated it as a new bike and carefully broke it in. I then changed the oil (Mobil 1), re-torqued the head and adjusted the steering bearings. I have changed to the shocks to Ikons from Wolfgang as the Works Performance shocks were a little soft. The only negatives that come to mind are the tire-changing marks on the rims and the older tires that have plenty of tread but should be replaced before any serious cornering takes place. It starts and runs well with plenty of power. The clutch action and shifting are great- better than any of the Lavs I have owned. It is an imposing bike in looks and sound and it makes a decent sport-tourer with the bags attached. I am including some pics of the rebuild and one of me riding it on the Dragon. I forgot to mention that this RGS has the dealer installed Executive package which consists of the hard bags, higher handlebar, and additional wind protection for the hands.

Bidding is up to $8,500 with the Reserve Not Met and a Buy It Now price of $14,500, which seems pretty on-the-money for a nice RGS. Although this uses the later, 120° crankshaft and was pitched towards a more “civilized” audience, these are still pretty raucous if you’re used to something like a modern Speed Triple.

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Front Wheel

They’re very rare, with just 250 imported to the US and if you want a classic Laverda to ride and enjoy, these are stylish, durable and, with the fitted luggage included with this bike, make great sport-touring mounts. And, in case you’re wondering: yes, that little door in the front right fairing does in fact hide the fuel filler cap. Obviously you’d need to find a good mechanic, or be handy with a wrench, considering the age and rarity. But the Laverda community is close-knit, and many owners take great pride in wrenching on their own machines.

-tad

1983 Laverda RGS1000 Ride

Gentleman’s Express: 1983 Laverda RGS1000 for Sale
Bimota April 11, 2013 posted by

Month in Review: March 2013, 27 Bikes in Total

Here is the latest round up of bike sales or bikes that saw high bid activity. We’re starting with Feb 25th and moving forward as they hadn’t been reported on in the last Month in Review as they were still open at the time of publishing. Each picture is linked to eBay as they haven’t been archived yet.

We blogged over 60 bikes in March and these are the ones we have sale values on. A great read for savvy buyers and sellers alike!

dc

Katana 1000 for sale

1982 Suzuki Katana 1000 Sold for $7000


Suzuki TL1000R For Sale

2002 Suzuki TL1000R Sold for just $4100


1987 Yamaha FZR750R For Sale

1987 Yamaha FZR750R Sold to one of our readers!


2008 Bimota DB5R For Sale

2008 Bimota DB5R Sold for $21500


2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 Scott Russel Race Bike For Sale

2008 Yamaha YZF-R1 Scott Russel Race Sold for $8215


1996 Honda VFR750 For Sale

1996 Honda VFR750 Sold for just $3223


1985 Honda VF1000R For Sale

1985 Honda VF1000R Sold for just $4500


1974 Yamaha TZ750 For Sale

1974 Yamaha TZ750 Factory Racer Sold for $42500


Honda CBR600 F2 For Sale

1993 Honda CBR600 F2 Sold for just $2750


1978 Laverda 1200 Jota America For Sale

1978 Laverda 1200 Jota America sold for $10401


1987 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 For Sale

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 1100 sold for $4800


1989 Yamaha FZR400 For Sale

1989 Yamaha FZR400 For Sale


1990 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 For Sale

1990 FZR750R OW01 sold via Craigslist, owner reported bike as sold.


1988 Yamaha FZR750R For Sale

1988 Yamaha FZR750R sold for $5200


1981 Laverda 1200 Mirage For Sale

1981 Laverda 1200 Mirage sold for $10300


2001 Honda NSR150 SP For Sale

2001 Honda NSR150SP sold for $3550


1986 Honda RS250 For Sale

1986 Honda RS250 sold for $3750


1988 Ducati F1 750 For Sale

1988 Ducati F1 750 sold for $13700 to one of our readers


1989 Yamaha FZR1000 For Sale

1989 Yamaha FZR1000 sold for $5500 to one of our readers


1993 Honda CBR900RR For Sale

1993 Honda CBR900RR sold for $5000


1991 Ducati 851 For Sale

1991 Ducati 851 sold for $8700 to one of our readers!


1995 Aprilia RS250 Chesterfield For Sale

1995 Aprilia RS250 Chesterfield had met reserve at $8500 but was pulled from eBay. The seller’s website indicates it as available for $8950.


Ducati 999R For Sale

2006 Ducati 999R with 6 miles sold for $23000!




Honda NS400R For Sale

1986 Honda NS400R sold to one of our readers for $7500!


2000 Aprilia RS250 For Sale

2000 Aprilia RS250 sold for $7200


1979 Suzuki GS1000S Wes Cooley For Sale

1979 Suzuki GS1000S sold for just $5000


1983 Laverda RGS1000 For Sale

1983 Laverda RGS1000 sold for $8250