Posts by tag: homologation

Ducati January 11, 2019 posted by

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

Looking at the history of the 916/996/998, it’d be easy to think that you were just looking at regular bumps in displacement as allowed by homologation requirements, especially considering that the bike itself appeared mostly unchanged throughout its development, minor changes in graphics aside. Even this very exclusive Ducati 916 SPS really looks like a 996 with a solo seat and white numberplates on the tail section.

But while all three models of Ducati's 90s icon are similar, and do share some parts interchangeability, they represent a continual development of the model. It made little sense to “throw the baby out with the bathwater” when the original 916 was such an impressive piece to begin with, and Ducati couldn’t really afford to start from scratch anyway, so evolution made more sense than revolution.

Given that every ounce counts on a motorcycle, especially one intended to be raced, each component is designed with a minimum of excess material, and Ducati’s original liquid-cooled, four-valve v-twin was limited to 955cc before the cases started cracking under the extreme pressures of racing, and the engine needed a significant redesign in order to safely allow additional displacement increases. The regular production 996 that followed used the updated cases and the larger displacement, but didn’t get all the other goodies included in the homologation model.

This 916 SPS in fact displaced 996cc, and was Ducati’s first use of their new reinforced engine cases and other changes that allowed the bike to continue growing in response to rules changes that increased displacement limits for Superbike racing. Externally, it looked pretty similar but internally, there were new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank. It was mated to a close-ratio gearbox from the 748. Up front was a Showa fork and an Öhlins shock helps keep the rear wheel in contact with terra firma. This 1998 year model also had a lighter frame and titanium connecting rods.

Originally, the SPS wasn’t technically road-legal in the US, but you could buy them here, and there wasn’t really much stopping you from buying a “for off road use only” bike and then registering it, since it had a VIN, lights, and mirrors. And of course Ducati damn well knew people would do just that. Thank goodness.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

For sale, 1998 Ducati 916 SPS Superbike. Like new condition. Second owner. Extremely rare bike. Number 401 of 1058 total manufactured, for both US and Europe. Homologated for racing, only 50 were officially imported into the US. This is a true collector bike. New timing belt and battery. Tires are in excellent shape. Meticulously maintained, this bike is ready to ride!

Introduced for 1994, the Massimo Tamburini-styled 916 superbike and its subsequent evolutions captured the motorcycle world’s imagination and finally established Ducati as a brand of note. Within a short time the original 916 Strada was superseded by the Biposto (two-seat) and the higher-specification SP. The engine remained at 916cc for both models but the SP came with twin fuel injectors and bigger valves for more performance, together with a single white panel seat and an Ohlins rear shock. Next came the ultra-exclusive homologation-special 916SPS or Sport Production Special for 1997 and 1998. The SPS enjoyed a 996cc engine – complete with reinforced crankcases, new heads and barrels with both bigger combustion chambers and valves, high lift cams, a 11.5:1 compression ratio, close-ratio gearbox and various lightweight parts – delivering a mighty rear wheel 132 horsepower.

Ducati made 1,058 SPS models for 1998, so it’s less rare than earlier SPS and SP bikes, but still very much a collectible. This example has just 2,150 miles on the odometer, and bidding is up to $11,000 with the reserve not met and very little time left on the auction. The 916 was always going to be collectible, and even the most ordinary models are beginning to appreciate in value. But for collectors, this one's at the top of the list with serious exclusivity for a "production" bike and historical significance, with serious racing links. It also helps that it has a reputation for being a pretty ferocious bike to ride, and feels far faster than the claimed power would suggest.

-tad

Sport Production Special: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale
Kawasaki January 8, 2019 posted by

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Slathered in Kawasaki’s traditional lime green, the ZX-7RR was the homologation version of their 750cc superbike. It wasn’t quite as trick as Honda’s RC45, but its more pedestrian underpinnings make it a bit of an underdog, and the bike had surprising success and longevity for a machine that was updated in 1996, as you can see from this 2001 example. It was obviously pretty long in the tooth by then, but still provided a solid foundation for production-based racing.

The parts you’d expect are there: an adjustable steering head and swingarm pivot, and suspension provided an even broader range of adjustment, compared to the regular bike and, up front, Nissin six-piston calipers replaced the stock Tokico units. The bike had a close-ratio gearbox, and the cases were reinforced, and the engine used a heavier flywheel in an effort to improve traction off corners.

Interestingly, the bike was homologated with both 39mm and 41mm flat-slide carburetors, up from the 38mm CV units on the regular R. Kawasaki was covering their bases by offering that choice to racers, but conventional wisdom is that the 41s are just too much carburetor, especially on the street and even some racers went with the smaller 39mm units.

At 441lbs dry, the bike is a bit of a porker, but these Kawasakis were always more than the sum of their parts. Track down an old magazine article, or read a more recent review of these now “classic” sportbikes, and the writers will wax poetic about the bike’s “sublime front-end feel” and stability.

As you’d expect, it was pretty expensive for what was really pretty close to the standard model, but didn't work as well on the street, or even on track for that matter, in the hands of ordinary riders. The RR was $11,999 compared to the R’s $8,999. $3,000 was a hefty chunk of change then and even now, but compared to the RC45’s $27,000, it was a screaming bargain, and one of my favorite Japanese superbikes.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale

Kawasaki ZX-7RR Ninja (750NNA - 2001 Registered)

Genuine motorcycle, which has traveled just over 5,200km from new. I purchased this example about 5 years ago on a trip to Tokyo, Japan and shipped it to New Zealand where it has been in my private collection. It is an exceptional example, all original, and appears not to have ever been ridden in the rain! The spare key still has its factory protection on it. The motorcycle was featured in a newspaper article on the model a couple of years ago.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/motoring/bikes/74403132/null

The original Japanese registration documents show it was first registered in Japan in 2001, and may well be one of the last of these RR versions manufactured. I have not complied and registered it in New Zealand, but have the paperwork and can arrange this if this buyer so desires.

I own a classic motorcycle restoration business and have shipped many motorcycles worldwide. It will be securely wrapped, packed and shipped in a steel crate, clad in plywood for safety. Feel free to contact me for a shipping quote, we use a broker and CFR Rinkens for shipments to the USA.

This is a very rare opportunity to secure what I consider may well be amongst the best ZX-7RR examples in existence.

Excellent condition, has been part of a private collection for a number of years. Run up about every six months, but seldom ridden.

Well, this particular collectible Kawi looks to be in great shape, with low miles and a sharp Buy It Now price of $20,000, although bidding is only up to $15,000 with very little time left on the auction. The only downside? It's in New Zealand, and that makes shipping a bit of a pain if you're here in the US.

-tad

Kiwi Kawi: 2001 Kawasaki ZX-7RR for Sale
Featured Listing January 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2

Update 1.2.2019: Brent has renewed his Featured Listing for this RC51. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

The Honda RC51 got right to the point when it came out, knocking Ducati and the other Japanese brands off their seats at the top of the World Superbike grid beneath future MotoGP star Colin Edwards. To do it, they had taken a page from the Italians' book, relying on rules that let v-twins have 1,000ccs to take it to the 916 and 998. It won the title again in 2002, and accomplished the same feat in AMA Superbike with the peerless Nicky Hayden.

The RC51 did it all with reliability, aplomb and majestic build quality -- the only way Honda knows. It was a death blow to Suzuki's wayward TL1000R, which never really hit its stride as either a street or race bike, and it showed the Italians that mechanical sex can also be totally reliable. The critical numbers from the throaty, snarling v-twin are: 130-ish horsepower at the crank, and the better part of 165 mph on the big end.

This 2005 Honda RC51 looks incredible, wearing the pretty charcoal fairings of the later bikes, and blessed with the SP2's updated fueling system, which nixed spotty low-end fuel delivery from the SP1 machines. It has done just 5,000 miles, and wears a Sato titanium exhaust system and a custom-tuned Power Commander.

From the seller:

The RC is #189 and tastefully
modified with all original equipment mint and in my possession . The bike has under 5500 miles and has less than 1000 miles on the latest Q3+ Dunlop’s . Sato Banzai titanium exhaust, Kyle Racing tuned power commander and tail tuck kit.

The bike has never been down or repaired in any way. Spark plugs have been replaced at 4000 miles. Meticulously maintained. I am second owner . Have owned for last 1500 miles. Bike is is in top shelf working condition and needs nothing. Bike was built as is from zero miles . Has gear adjustment and speedo correction performed as well. As previously stated I never intended on selling but the 2017 CBR1000RR SP2 is on the menu. Although I haven’t completely convinced myself that it is a true legacy bike.

Brent, the seller of this magnificent beast, is asking $10,000 and can be reached at 405-613-7607.

Featured Listing: 2005 Honda RC51 SP2
Honda December 25, 2018 posted by

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Long before "mass centralization" became a popular marketing buzzword for sportbikes, Honda was investing its bubble economy-inflated budget in a bike that took advantage of that very concept, the exquisitely-engineered VFR750R, otherwise known as the legendary RC30. Honda was so invested in sportbikes at the time that it actually sold an I4 and a V4 range of bikes concurrently, with their CBR and VFR filling slightly different niches. But when it came to their homologation bikes, Honda took their hard-won knowledge from the street-oriented V4 bikes and used it to develop the bike seen here, the VFR750R.

If you're passingly familiar with Honda's roadbikes, "VFR" probably evokes images of practical and engaging sport-touring bikes that lean on the sport end of the spectrum. This is not one of those bikes. The RC30 was developed to win production-based racing classes, specifically the then-new World Superbike Championship, although the ELF-designed single-sided swingarm hints at the bike's endurance racing capabilities as well.

At the heart of the bike is obviously a compact V4 engine with a relatively narrow frontal area for good aerodynamics and very centralized mass, gear-driven cams for extremely precise valve control, and a 360°crankshaft that improved traction at the rear wheel, compared to a more traditional 180° unit. The concept of the 360° crank is that the combustion events are clustered close together, instead of spaced evenly throughout each engine revolution to allow the rear tire to "recover," increasing traction and improving tire life. It also gives the bike a flatter powerband and a distinctive soundtrack that can be appreciated, even if your skills don't extend to tire-spinning corner exits. The downside of a V4 is generally increased weight compared to an inline-four and tight packaging, especially with a 90° v-angle, as used here. Stripped of its fairing, the RC30 looks very dense and packed with mechanical bits, and V4s can be a bit of a bear to work on.

Reviews then and now describe it as an easy bike to take full advantage of, a bike that rewarded finesse, a bike that just did as it was told and allowed the rider to get on with winning. Power was unremarkable, weight was average, and nothing about the bike screamed "race winner." But win it did, even against stiff opposition from Ducati, Bimota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, and Honda only abandoned the V4 formula when it decided that rules in WSBK favoring v-twins were onerous and biased. So they built a v-twin and showed everyone they could win with those as well, but it was clear their hearts would always belong to the V4...

The RC30 is a handsome bike, with nearly perfect proportions and a wealth of amazing details, although it doesn't have the easy wow-factor of something from Italy. It's not often you can accuse Ducati of cribbing styling elements, but the 916's taillights and distinctive single-sided swingarm look awfully similar to what you can see here. And unlike those Italian machines, every single component is carefully thought out to work as part of a complete package, and engineered to near-perfection.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

  • Long term ownership and fewer than 5,000 miles
  • 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30
  • Frame Number: 2100129
  • Engine Number: 2100162
  • Legendary 16-valve gear-driven DOHC 90 degree V4 engine
  • Reportedly fewer than 3000 produced
  • Single owner since 1990
  • Fewer than 5,000 miles from new.

One of the modern era's few immediately collectible classics, the Honda VFR750R - better known as the 'RC30' - was created for just one reason: to win the World Superbike Championship, a feat it achieved in the nascent series' first two seasons of 1988 and 1989. And while American Fred Merkel was bringing Honda its first two WSB crowns, Britain's Carl Fogarty used an RC30 to win the TT F1 World Championship in 1988 and 1989, and the equivalent FIM Cup in 1990. No mere short circuit scratcher, the RC30 and its derivatives proved durable enough to win a hat-full of Endurance Classics too. That this latter requirement was also part of the design brief may be determined from the fact that a quick-release front fork and single-sided swinging arm - essential for speedy wheel changes - were part of an unrivaled specification that included a twin-spar alloy beam frame, 16-valve V4 engine with gear-driven cams, close-ratio six-speed gearbox and four-pot front brake calipers.

All of which did not come cheap: at the time of its launch in 1988 an RC30 cost near double that of other super-sports 750s. Despite the passage of time and progress of motorcycle technology, the RC30 remains a match for the latest generation of sports bikes but possesses an exclusivity that none of them can approach. 'No other bike from the late-Eighties is lusted after like the RC30', reckoned Bike, and few would disagree. And then there's the exhaust note – loud, of course, but soulful enough to bring a pit crew to tears.

This RC30 was only very recently liberated from its second and very long-term owner. Purchased in the UK in 1990, fewer than 5,000 miles have been put on the bike since it was new. Not long after acquisition, the superbike was taken to the Isle of Man where it was driven around the race track, but not actually raced. In 1991 the machine was brought stateside. Regularly maintained since new, the previous owner reports that the RC30 was taken to the local Honda dealer for a pre-sale service within the last couple of months.

Fresh from nearly three decades of single owner care, this legendary machine is offered in excellent condition throughout. The engine starts readily, idles smoothly and has an abundance of power. The clutch is silky-smooth and brakes and suspension are near perfect. I would opt for a new pair of tires before serious road use and am happy to negotiate your tire choice in to the price.

This is a rare opportunity to acquire a motorcycling icon of performance and provenance and a must-have for a discerning collection.

For additional information and photos go to ClassicAvenue.com

V4s are all the rage these days, but Honda really pioneered them for modern motorcycle applications. Because who the hell else would want to design around such a packaging headache? Obviously, Honda has a history of doing things just because they can, practicality be damned: their oval-pistoned racebikes grew out of a staunch refusal to adapt to the changing technology of the Grand Prix scene and simply build a competitive two-stroke. And although that particular experiment was a failure, it shows the lengths to which Honda will go when they believe in an engineering concept. Luckily, the V4 wasn't quite so complex and was ultimately vindicated by both in-period success and by the legacy it left behind. This example has very low miles and appears to be in very nice, original condition with an asking price of $44,900 and just one more day on the listing, so if you didn't get what you wanted for Christmas this year and happen to have a bit of your holiday bonus left lying around...

-tad

Christmas Bonus: 1989 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Yamaha December 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike

Update 12.14.2018: Tom has renewed the Featured Listing for the OW01 and the updated price is 37,500 Euros or approx $43200 USD. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This is not your ordinary RSBFS Featured Listing. This is a honest-to-god Yamaha OW01 WSBK racer. Competing successfully at the highest level of production-based motorsports, this exact bike won the Spanish Superbike championship in 1991 (and we all know how competitive the Spanish are when it comes to racing). In fantastic condition with a pile of spares, this proven racer is ready to hit the track again.

1991 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 Racer in Spain

The FZR750R should need no introduction on these pages. Developed by Yamaha specifically to compete on the World Superbike stage, the road-going OW01 was built in just enough numbers to qualify under homologation rules. That makes the model extremely rare; the OW01 is one of the top collectable models to be found on RSBFS. This example takes this rarity and kicks it up a notch with professional race-prep including top-level Ohlins suspension, Brembo binders, lightweight components such as carbon fairings and lithium battery, and race-specific items such as the massive swing arm and the radiator (which doubles as a work of art).

From the seller:
Bike in good condition and ready to race. The bike will be delivery fully revised. Engine fully revised and ready to run. Swingarm KIT, Suspensions Ohlins, Brembo brakes, Radiator KIT, Carburettors Keihin FCR 39, Carbon fairings, Litium batt and many other high components.. is a really SBK.

Extra parts included with the bike: Rear stand, Sprockets set (6), Crash set (support + footrest + levers), brake hose (1), Spring Ohlins for rear shock (1), Spark plugs, Farings, Gaskets, Clutch set, Wheels set Dymag (F+R) with discs.

For more information please contact: info@gpmotorbikes.com

Check out all of the details on their website

More from the seller:
Ex (Louis ) Carlos Maurel ( 1990 250cc European Champion )

Season: 1991 WSBK
http://www.wsb-archives.co.uk/profiles/rider-profile.php?riderID=364

He and the bike were also the Spanish SBK champion in 1991

It would be very competitive for AHMRA NextGen SBK.

For more information please contact: info@gpmotorbikes.com

Check out all of the details on their website

Look very closely at the numerous, high-quality photographs. What you will find is not a tired, clapped out racer that is out of date, but rather a spotlessly clean and well-preserved icon that took the fight to Honda, Ducati, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Bimota. And while the OW01 was not dominant in WSBK thanks to the likes of Raymond Roche & Doug Polen on Ducatis, it remains a competitive, rare and lusted-after model. This particular specimen is far and away the cleanest competition example of the breed we have seen, and is definitely worth a closer look.

Located in Spain, this fabulous FZR750R OW01 is looking for a new home - and hopefully one that involves some track time. While this is a museum quality example of a very special breed (and would be great as the centerpiece of any collection), this is a machine built to run. I could imagine no better outcome than this bike returning to the tarmac and run in anger once again. The pedigree is there, the prep is there, the spares are there - all that is missing is you. Reach out to GP Motorbikes or check out all of the details on their website. And while you're there, don't forget to look at some of their other offerings!

MI

Featured Listing: 1991 Yamaha OW01 FZR750R Race Bike
Ducati November 13, 2018 posted by

Heart Transplant: 1997 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

Continuing our recent trend featuring flawed homologation specials comes this Ducati 916 SPS that is, quite tragically, missing its original engine. A truly original example would be pretty pricey, so that missing engine means it might be possible to pick this one up for a relative song. And that's no bad thing because there's more to an SPS than just the engine. There's that numbered plaque, for instance...

The problem is that the SPS engine was pretty trick, and responsible for the bike's fire-breathing character. That was the whole point of the SPS, after all. Simply bolting in another engine from the later 996 won't really do much except get you the correct displacement, and building something close to the original specifications will also be an expensive proposition, and won't restore the lost value.

As is typical for Ducati, it's a guessing-game as to whether or not the bike's numeric designation accurately reflects the engine's displacement. In this case, it most definitely doesn't: the 916 SPS was the first bike to use the 996's reinforced engine cases. The older 916 engine effectively maxed out at the 955cc often seen in early bikes with big-bore kits by Ferracci and others. But the new engine was significantly revised to take the bike closer to the 1000cc limit for World Superbike v-twins and included new heads, barrels, pistons, crank, injectors. The new engine was mated to a close-ratio gearbox shared with the company's 748.

The FG43 Öhlins FG43 fork on this bike is a significant upgrade over the original Showa unit, and the included radial Brembos should improve the already excellent stopping power. The SPS had an Öhlins shock as standard, so I'm not sure if this is the original part or an aftermarket upgrade. The rest of the changes are typical for a 916 and are of good quality, although it's not clear if the bike has a vented engine case, as indicated by the seller, or just the rather generic vented clutch cover seen in the pictures.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

1997 Ducati 916 SPS #99. 1 of 50 imported to the US, 1 of 4oo worldwide. VIN & frame verified by Ducati HQ as authentic.  Engine is not an original SPS, it is a stock 916 motor. I do not know why it was removed or where it is now. Otherwise it would be $15k-$20k bike. This bike has the European headlight on/off switch, another feature unique to the SPS. 

VIN # -  ZDMH100AAVB000117 

Bunch of nice goodies on this bike. Clean and clear title. This bike is worth over $10k in parts alone. 

  • 14k miles
  • FG43 Forks and Radial Brembo Calipers
  • Ohlins Rear Shock
  • Marchesini magnesium wheels with brand new Michelin Power RS tires
  • Vented Engine case (clutch side) (WSBK style)
  • Samco Hoses
  • Yoyodyne Slave
  • Fast by Ferracci Clip Ons
  • Forza Exhaust
  • Aftermarket water pump cover
  • STM pressure plate
  • Harris Billet rear sets
  • Bigger gauge stator/rectifier wiring
  • New Chain
  • New Battery

Bruce Meyer's from BCM supposedly went through the stock motor to verify everything was good to go.

Fairings are all OEM Cagiva Ducati. But the side fairings could use some love (just paint) and the front fairing had some touch up paint sprayed on but a slightly different tint. But again, all original Cagiva fairings are on the bike.

Honestly, maybe the next owner can track down an original SPS engine someone has lying around, or build a 996 motor to SPS specifications and beyond. I'd guess the non-numbers-matching status will murder the value, although the seller doesn't indicate their reserve, so perhaps they're being realistic. Bidding is very active, but is only at $3,000 at the moment, so maybe someone will be able to pick up what amounts to a nicely upgraded, non-original 916 with that very tasty numbered plate on the top triple.

-tad

Heart Transplant: 1997 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale