Posts by tag: Endurance Racing

Suzuki September 25, 2019 posted by

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

Well this is obviously not some perfectly-preserved replica, so if that’s a problem, just move along. Me, I’m always glad pristine originals exist in museums, so we can tell what those original, factory-supplied decals on the tank looked like before years of spilled gasoline caused them to flake and peel. But I don’t really want to own those bikes. Original carbon canisters that clutter up a Ducati’s clean lines? Massive exhaust cans that make a superbike sound like a sewing machine? Ugly plastic fenders and bulky signals and all that are optional, in my book. A bike is a blank slate. Sure, you can go too far and create something tacky and ill-advised. But this particular Suzuki GSX-R750 walks that line perfectly, with classic, if not original graphics, and great 80s endurance-racer style.

Flat-slide carbs now feed the air and oil-cooled inline four, but it otherwise retains the classic GSX-R oil-boiler powertrain. The inline four had twin cams and four valves per cylinder, but it saved weight by eschewing a radiator and water cooling system. Instead, Suzuki’s first couple generations of Gixxer used the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System or “SACS” that featured a double-chambered oil pump to circulate and cool the bike’s lubricant, along with oil jets that sprayed the undersides of the pistons.

The colors here match the black-and-red Japanese-market Limited Edition version of the bike, decorated with tasteful period sponsor logos. I don’t know if this Yoshimura setup is period-correct, but it looks the part, and makes the bike look more lithe and nimble, more modern. There may be fans of the huge, perforated cylinder that passed for an exhaust can on the original bike, but I’m not one of them. Stainless-steel braided brake lines are obviously a later edition, but look good and should improve feel from the old-school four-piston calipers. The Fox shock out back should get handling closer to modern standards, and I love the single-lamp endurance-style fairing.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale

INTRODUCTION:

You are looking at a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race bike replica. This GSX-R750 was custom built to race spec but was never raced, it was mostly a show bike, this race build was inspired by the 1986 endurance race bike. The motor was fully race built from the crank up and a lot of performance bolt on parts were added or custom fabricated to replicate the endurance race bike of 1986. This bike is extremely fast and truly feels like a real race bike with the motor modifications and bolt on performance parts. But please feel free to read more about the specifics of this bike and see the pictures for detail. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. U.S. and International bidders are welcome to bid on this motorcycle but must arrange shipping themselves…

BODY:

The body work is all original and is in good condition. There are absolutely no cracks on any of the body panels, but there are some minor nicks and scrapes on a few of the panels.  We took pictures of the body work before all the decals so you can see the decals are not hiding any cracks or paint flaws. The wheels are perfect with no rock chips or scratches anywhere. The frame and engine have no corrosion and are nice and clean. Overall cosmetically this bike is in very nice condition.

MECHANICAL:

The bike runs and rides perfect, and shifts smoothly through all 6 gears. A full service tune-up was performed which included new spark plugs, chain, air filter, brake pads, oil change, new tires, and fluids flushed. All of the lighting, switches and electrical components work as they should.

RACE PARTS:

Professionally fully built motor from crank up, balanced crankshaft, over sized Wiseco pistons, race cams, adjustable camshafts sprockets, extended hardened rocker arms, performance valve springs, titanium valve retainers, and camshafts were degreed top performance race spec. 34mm Mikuni flat slide carbs, velocity stacks and pod filters included. Yoshimura race exhaust, fox fully adjustable rear shock, progressive front springs and emulators, larger 4.0 rear wheel, 520 chain conversion, pro flo clip-ons, larger diameter front brake rotors, braided steel brake lines, 4 piston large calipers. this bike also comes with a full JDM lighting kit for street, which includes JDM turn signals, and front headlight kill switch with city light options too.

CONCLUSION:

This is a great opportunity to buy a 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 endurance race replica. This race build was inspired by the original endurance race bikes of the time and was built to closely resemble and perform as the original Suzuki team endurance race bike. If you would like any additional pictures or have any questions please feel free to email us. Domestic & International buyers are welcome to bid but must arrange the shipping themselves. We will however be glad to assist with any loading of the motorcycle.  We have helped with the shipping of motorcycles across the country and overseas for other customers in the past. Please feel free to bid as long as you make the shipping arrangements.

This is a very sharp bike, although the gauges are pretty faded and some other details show the bike’s age. Overall, it seems like a very nice rider, a bike to be enjoyed and shared, not bubble-wrapped or displayed in a museum. Bidding is very active and up to just north of $5,000 with several days left on the listing.

-tad

Going the Distance: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R750 Race Replica for Sale
Honda May 12, 2019 posted by

Hold On: 1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA

Rare bikes are, well, rare. The whole point of RSBFS is to highlight those unique rides that exist in only limited numbers. And while the world is a relatively large playground, it is not unusual to see repeats on especially rare offerings. Today’s Bol d’Or 24 hour endurance replica Honda CB900F is one such example. Last seen on these pages over two years ago, this interesting offering is the product of Belgium racing family D’Hollander. Constructed in the spirit of the racers that competed in such events as the aforementioned Bol d’Or 24 hours, DHOLDA-prepped bikes were also competitive at the 1000 km at Mugello, the 24 hours of Francorchamps (Spa) and the 24 hours of Barcelona.

1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA for sale on eBay

Being that this is a 1979 machine from a bespoke builder, it is impossible to tell what has gone into the engine from simply sitting on the sidelines. Even if we had a build sheet, the likelihood of a 40 year old machine remaining truly as delivered when new is pretty scarce. Still, as recounted in our earlier article from 2017 on this exact bike, DHOLDA was known for building hot rods that could go the distance – and this one continues to accumulate the miles.

From the seller:
Jean D’Hollander “Dholda” Racing of Belgium raced and won the Bol d’Or in 1978 and 1979 on a modified Honda EU-spec CB900F bored out to 1000cc. D’Hollander created replicas of this race bike and sold them to the public, calling them Dholda. Bike is currently registered and inspected in Vermont with a clear Vermont title. Has recent Michelin Pilot tires, battery, and full service showing some $1653.54 in work done.

Not sure exactly what was done to the engine by D’Hollander but it is very fast and sounds amazing through the 4-1. The mechanic noted he estimated hp in 120bhp range but has not been dynoed. I imagine there is a race cam and porting with race carbs and velocity stacks, perhaps a lightened and balanced crank. Does anyone know more? Valve covers have a “220” stamp, which maybe is the compression ratio. Euro spec KPH speedo showing 13,554 km or 8,422 miles. Bodywork in excellent condition with one small spider crack on the fairing lower. Local bidders are welcome to inspect in Vermont. I can email service records and previous emails from Dholda Racing. Carbs rebuilt, and new fork seals installed.

*During my last ride I noted the indicators are flashing together only and the lights work under flasher but not high/low. I expect a switching problem for both but have not looked closely yet. All bulbs are getting power and light up, just not through the correct switch circuit as normal. Tires were new 2017 but have a slow leak at rim-bead and need tubes or remount.

eBay records show that this bike sold back in January of 2017 for $5,300 – well below the $11,900 Buy It Now number. The sale number seems to be impossibly low given the history of the tuner, and the shape this CB900F is in. But that is always the problem with extremely rare and one-off motorcycles; there is just not enough sales history on which to nail a value (or even a prediction). This example now has one recent sale (eBay 2017) and just 161 additional miles. The pictures are all new, and thus should be considered as the bike in current condition. There is also the video (see above) to show you how the bike sits today. Finally, there is the service receipt, which shows some care and maintenance. The Buy It Now figure on this rare model is set at a mere $5,900 – which still feels like a bargain for such a unique niche machine. Check it out here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Hold On:  1979 Honda CB900F DHOLDA
Laverda April 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

This is an unusual opportunity to buy a rough-and-tumble, forged-in-fire vintage racing Laverda. If you’re searching for a display piece to adorn your Manhattan loft, you should probably look elsewhere. This SFC-spec SF2 was made to run, and run hard. It’s all killer and no filler, built to race. Period. The original SFC is one of the most desirable and iconic sportbikes of the 1970s, with a stylish half-fairing, bright orange paint, and solo tail. The 744cc parallel twin was supposedly heavily influenced by Honda’s CB77 Superhawk engine, and Laverda built their bikes to last, with five main bearings in the engine, electrical components from Nippon-Denso, ignition components from Bosch, and a Verlicchi frame, and suspension from Marzocchi.

The result was the perfect basis for an endurance racer, and Laverda whipped up a hand-built factory special to capitalize on that potential. The SFC or “Super Freni Competizione,” which translates to “Super Competition Brakes.” The engine featured the usual race-oriented updates: a lighter crank, polished connecting rods, bigger valves, and high-comp pistons. 36mm carbs fed the high-performance engine and produced as much as 80hp, depending on the year, while a two-into-one exhaust made sure everyone within miles could count every one of them.

The original SFC was technically a road-legal bike, but it was stiffly-sprung, over-carbureted, and generally temperamental. Many that have come up for sale have their road-legal parts in a box that comes with the bike, since they really were a bit of an afterthought anyway. Even that solo tail is specifically shaped to include a round numberplate, as you can see. The bike was a literal “racebike for the road” in a way that you just don’t really see anymore. Or maybe it’s just that all serious sportbikes are racebikes for the road, but they’re just not really all that much of a compromise now, with 200hp, a gel touring seat, and heated grips…

This particular bike isn’t an authentic Laverda SFC, it’s a high quality replica built from the ground up using a regular production SF2 with many trick parts, and uses the powerful twin-disc front brake setup from the later bikes that should work much better on track than the earlier drum, although it doesn’t look quite as sexy. Speaking of the track: this started out as a regular road bike, but it’s been converted to race duty and campaigned for years by Larry at New York City Motorcycles [who is also selling his Harley Davidson XR750 here on our site], who is currently based, ironically, in Venice, CA.

His original eBay listing tells a great story about how the bike came to be: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale

Where to begin…

Gorizia, Italy (on the Northeast corner of Italy 1km from Slovenia). July 2012.

That is when this Laverda came into real life, from the pages of every conceivable magazine and poster since childhood.  In fact the first time I laid eyes on a Laverda 750SFC was at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City in 1998, at its renowned exhibition, Art of the Motorcycle. If I wasn’t already hooked, now I was obsessed.

In the years since that life changing show, I was always on the “lookout”.  Sorta like John Walsh chasing fugitives!  I can recall being wide awake at 3am looking in remote places, the mideast, japan and of course the US and Europe.

I couldn’t believe my eyes in the summer of 2012.  In fact, I couldn’t understand the Italian listing on eBay Italy, either.   When the sun rose the next morning I was at my neighbor’s door, an Italian.  Within hours we had the bike’s owner on a conference call.  I had a million questions.  My neighbor just wanted to go to work.

I learned that the motorcycle was built to race throughout Italy by an engineer who also owned a genuine SFC.  Too precious to race, he saw no obstacle to making an exact clone, particularly the specification of the motor:

  • 10.8:1  Compression
  • Carillo Rods
  • SFC Crank
  • SFC Cams
  • SFC Pistons, valves and porting
  • 36 mm Dell’Ortos

The rest is simply bodywork… on an SF2 frame. Other than the factory 750SFC’s VIN series and frame insignia depicting that its a factory SFC, this bike is exactly the same in specification and appearance of a 1974 (Disc brake front) 750SFC.

The last thing I thought about doing when I bought, imported and titled it in the US, was racing it. So it was cosmetically and exhaustively restored as a streetbike. Laverda’s are known to have indestructible motors. And this was no exception. When it cleared customs it set off car alarms a quarter mile away…

My good friend Kenny Cummings, the owner of NYC Norton had been taking care of another parallel twin of mine, a Norton Commando. And every few weeks Kenny would be “gone racing.” So it’s technically his fault. I caught the bug. And became just as obsessed about racing as Laverdas. 

I raced two years before I became obsessed with the Laverda for a different reason. Though it was exhilarating to ride as a streetbike (outside of New York City where I lived), I soon learned this was a motorcycle that was designed, built and wanted to race. Long story short(er), that’s what it became.

The Laverda’s trophies include AHRMA National Series 5th Place in Formula 750 in 2015, 3rd Place AHRMA Pacific Crown, and various podiums at some of the most storied racetracks in America.

Recent marriage and move to Japan has put new goals on the horizon. Its time for my beloved Laverda to go from my back burner into the hands of someone whose passion picks up where mine leaves off.

The fuel tank is a Wolfgang Haerter special edition alumnium tank. 

As mentioned, it has never crashed. It could benefit from some TLC ie, valves adjusted, carbs rebuilt. A simplified wiring harness – though what’s on the bike now is perfectly functional for its current set up as a racer.

So much to list, these are the key pluses and minuses:

*The windscreen is cracked – it was “stitched” together with zip ties and continued racing. I always thought it adds character 🙂

  • One Sidecover flew off the bike at Willow Springs during competition. It was recovered but in a mangled condition (see photo)
  • Starter and generator (included; sprag gear is worn and should be replaced) were removed for racing; running a “total loss” set up
  • Needs a new battery
  • Missing the ignition key: bypassed
  • Runs an EMC electronic ignition (excellent) from Wolfgang Haerter
  • Slight weep from gas tank rubbing the frame. New Owner should either have the seam rewelded or coat the tank with Caswell
  • YSS Shocks in rear and Works Performance Springs in Front – Original Marzochi shocks included
  • Powdercoated frame completed 2014
  • No rust anywhere
  • 2 into 1 Conti exhaust
  • New York Title in my name
  • Street faring, street seat, tachometer included
  • Set of rear sprockets included
  • Uses an SFC’s shop manual, not an SF2’s.  Reproduced copy included
  • New racing foot pegs
  • Original Laverda clubman bars
  • Other extras all included

The motorcycle is sold as is, where is, and there are no warranties expressed nor implied. Judge the photos and make your own assessment of the bike’s condition, rather than rely on my opinion and/or description. Questions and clarifications are encouraged. These are my personal opin Bidders must be certain of their commitment before bidding, as once its submitted. If you win it, you bought it. No time for nonsense please. Bidders with less than 10 or any negative feedback must contact me prior to bidding or else expect your bid to be cancelled and removed.

This motorcycle requires thorough inspection and recommissioning before running or riding. Know what you are buying before you bid. If you don’t have the expertise and/or the budget, with all due respect, this is not the bike for you. 

New York City Motorcycles (nycmc dot com) is reasonably well known in the vintage motorcycle community and this is not the only platform for offering the bike. Therefore please consider not waiting until the final seconds of the auction to bid. Because while you’re waiting to pull the trigger, if a fair offer arrives from elsewhere and there is not a comparable bid here, the auction will instantly disappear from your watched items.

Multiples of the start price has been invested in this motorcycle. It was a privilege to lose money on this fabulous machine. Boyhood dreams fulfilled and then some 🙂

Motorcycle is located in Venice, CA. I will work with your shipper but its your responsibility.

On a personal note, I’ve come across this bike and owner before: I bumped into him at a 2014 AHRMA event in South Jersey, where I took the picture above. He was wrenching on this bike under a popup tent and, when I came over to babble excitedly about the Laverda, he stopped what he was doing to fire it up for me, a gleeful grin on his face. To me, that says about all you need to know about his passion and enthusiasm. The bike obviously isn’t a “real” SFC, but it is a real Laverda, and the engine specifications are, as he describes, SFC-spec. With real SFC prices headed into six-figures, they’re less and less likely to be raced as intended. Real or not, this Laverda won’t be cheap to buy or run, but is your best bet if you want to actually ride one of these fire-breathing Italian twins in anger.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1974 Laverda SFC-Spec SF2 Race Bike for Sale
Honda July 12, 2017 posted by

Pristine: 1985 Honda VF1000R with 442 Miles for Sale

When you mention Honda’s endurance race replicas, most folks are likely to think of their iconic RC30 or RC45 machines, some of the best-looking bikes of their era, or maybe the smaller NC30 if they’re more budget-minded. But the VF1000R had endurance-racer styling and a host of sophisticated features to homologate them for competition. Possibly the bike has languished a bit forgotten as it hails from an in-between period of sportbike design, as the formula was still being established. It’s bulkier and heavier than you might expect for a sports-oriented bike, at 600lbs wet. But 125hp and a spread of V4 torque meant a top speed of almost 150mph and, in keeping with the endurance-racing theme, it could charge along at that speed all day long.

So why was this racing-styled beast so heavy? The typical Honda tendency to over-engineer everything: fairings on the bike featured spring-loaded flaps to vent hot air, and the rear brake actually has a vented disc. Torque-Reactive Anti-Dive Control forks were designed to reduce brake dive and featured quick-release axles, adjustable bars meant ideal setup for a variety of riders, and modular Comstar wheels were wrapped in radial tires, a relatively new development for motorcycles. At the heart of the machine was a 998cc V4 with gear-driven cams that gave precise timing and that distinctive whine.

The VF1000R is not exactly an agile machine, but handling is stable and good wind protection combined with those adjustable ergos mean reasonable comfort. This particular example appears to be in pristine condition, as you’d expect with just 442 miles on the odometer. The only possible downside is that slightly less-desirable single, US-market headlamp. Interestingly, Honda developed that configuration just in case the Euro twin-lamp [behind a single lens] set up didn’t pass regulations here. They needn’t have worried, apparently, but typical Honda thoroughness won out and luckily both treatments look good.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R with 442 Miles for Sale

Up for sale is my 1985 Honda VF1000R from my collection and it is in pristine condition and is listed with an astonishing 442 miles. The bike sat indoors for 27 years but that a full refresh has already been completed (details below).

Honda’s enthusiasm for the V4 engine layout in the early 1980s was such that by 1984 the VF range comprised six models and the fastest and most glamorous was the VF1000R: a limited-edition super-sports machine that was created, with little expense spared, to dominate production racing in the way that the straight-four CB1100R had done three years earlier.

Refresh details:

  • Flushed brakes, add stainless steel braided brake lines, rebuilt rear master cylinder
  • Lubed and adjusted throttle and clutch cables
  • Flushed cooling system
  • Torqued and checked all chassis fittings and fasteners,  check/tighten steering head bearings,
  • Replaced shock (rear) with Hagon coil-over upgrade, shock was valved and springs for me being a 180 lb. solo rider optimum.
  • Replaced battery, NGK spark plugs,
  • Performed compression check and full tune, including clean and synch carbs, flush fuel tank and add 1 gallon bath metal rust remover, replace petcock assembly (leaking).
  • Added engine top-end oiling kit from Daughtry Motorsports (early VF1000’s were reported to suffer top end oiling deficiency and this kit addresses that fully).  Includes oil filter with adapter for top-end oiling kit.
  • Replaced original tires (old and cracked) with brand new Bridgestone Battlax BT45’s.  Went to 150/70/17 rear (stock was 140) and 120/80/16 front (stock size).

Starting bid for this listing is $12,000 with no takers yet plenty of time left. These have been selling for shockingly low sums up until very recently, considering their rarity and specification, but collectors appear to have finally gotten wise to this forgotten gem. The seller is looking for big money, but I’d expect you’re looking at the nicest, lowest-mileage example in the US. I’m not sure how much time it will take before that looks like a bargain, but I have the feeling it won’t be all that long…

-tad

Pristine: 1985 Honda VF1000R with 442 Miles for Sale
Honda April 28, 2017 posted by

Overbuilt Race-Rep: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

Values of Honda’s overbuilt homologation special VF1000R have been shockingly low up until very recently, but these red-white-and-blue beasts are starting to see a significant increase in price. They’re not lightweight or nimble at nearly 600lbs with a tank of fuel, but Honda’s build quality and engineering prowess are on display throughout the bike: the 998cc V4 used gear-driven cams in place of chains, Torque-Reactive Anti-Dive Control forks for better performance under braking, modular Comstar wheels and radial tires when radial tires were still rare and exotic, quick-release axles, adjustable bars, and even a vented rear brake… No, I don’t mean cross-drilled, the rear brake was vented.

The style of the bodywork reflected the VF1000R’s endurance-racing roots and features some interesting little quirks: you can see where Aprilia got some design ideas from those funky mesh side-panels. Two different headlight configurations were available, depending on year: the dual-headlight setup is generally considered more desirable, although they’re both tucked behind a single rectangular lens so they don’t look like you’d expect if you’re picturing something like an RC30. This example uses the single headlight that has a couple of additional vents around the sides and top to take up the space left by the bigger unit. Why two styles? Honda was worried the dual setup wouldn’t pass US regulations and created an alternative treatment, just in case.

All-in-all it was typical Honda overkill, which is fine unless it leads to a significant increase in weight which blunts performance significantly: the VF1000R certainly isn’t a slow bike, but it’s not all that fast either. Handling was a bit ponderous, but good set up can help quite a bit and the positive news for road-riders is that the available performance is pretty effortless, the fairings provide good wind protection, and the bike can cruise at its near 150mph top speed with ease.

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda VF1000R for Sale

This was the superbike of the day in 1985. I looked long and hard to find one in really nice original condition as it is getting hard to find good ones. This one was always stored inside and I have in in a climate controlled facility. I don’t think it has ever been laid over as it is basically scratch free EXCEPT for on both sides of the front fender there are scratches that I guess were caused by someone’s poor quality tie downs. You can see the scratches in the pic’s. It has new tires. It has he original pipes which is unbelievable in itself.

The seller is right that these are rare bikes, although nice ones do show up pretty regularly on eBay. They’re the kind of bikes people bought and cherished from new, so thrashed examples seem more like the exception rather than the rule. Which is good, because finding replacement parts is pretty difficult and the aftermarket is basically nonexistent. So why didn’t these capture the public’s imagination in the way the later RC30 and RC45 did? Probably a combination of the aforementioned visual and physical bulk. But maybe it also had something to do with the V4’s negative perception at the time that resulted from a few of the early VF750’s chain-driven cam lobes de-lobing, sometimes referred to as the “Chocolate Camshaft” syndrome. That issue actually affected only a small group of the early V4 bikes with chain-driven cams, but Honda’s reputation took a big hit and required the incredible high-quality of the VFR750 that followed to erase that black mark.

-tad

Honda December 15, 2015 posted by

Retro Corner: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale in Australia

1980 Honda CB1100R R Side Fairing

Today’s classic and very striking Honda CB1100R was based on the CB900F and built to homologate Honda’s big-bore sportbike for endurance racing. It was powered by a 1062cc version of their air-cooled four that featured plenty of exotic go-fast bits, made 115hp, and motivated a claimed 520lbs dry. That figure sounds pretty portly by today’s standards, but it was pretty par for the course in the early 1980s.

1980 Honda CB1100R L Side

A beefed-up frame helped keep all that power and mass in check, and the resulting bike had the traditional Japanese superbike qualities of speed and supreme stability. Honda’s first use of dual-piston calipers helped the heavy machine stop as well, and it was pretty successful in taking the fight to rivals from Kawasaki and Suzuki.

1980 Honda CB1100R Gauges

This bike is listed as a 1980 model, I’d understood that these were built between 1981-1983. Regardless, just 1,050 of the first-year “RB” models were sold, with a mere 1,500 built in ’82 and then another 1,500 in ’83, so these are rare birds no matter what year is listed on the title.

1980 Honda CB1100R Rear Suspension

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale

I have for sale a genuine Honda CB1100RB that has not been restored, never raced, tampered with, and has genuine 1617 km on the bike.

This model is one of the first 130 bikes ever made and sent too Australia for sale. A lot of the early model bikes were used in the Castrol 6 hour production race. 

The early bikes all arrived from Japan Without fairings as did this one but I later purchased the genuine Honda fairing for this model when they arrived .

The total number of bikes produced was 1050 world wide in which many of them were raced and or crashed beyond repair.

Whoever purchases this investment will not be disappointed. 

1980 Honda CB1100R L Rear

This bike appears to be in very nice condition and, although CB1100Rs straddle the vintage and modern eras, they can go for $20,000 or more on the rare occasion one does come up for sale. It’s a shame I’m unlikely to see one here in the states: they were never sold here and this particular bike is available in Balgowlah, Australia, which sounds like an awesome city to be from. I’ve never been there, so I’ll just pretend it’s wild place, full of dangerous local fauna, although it’s more likely just a quiet suburb of northern Sydney…

-tad

1980 Honda CB1100R R Side

Retro Corner: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale in Australia
Kawasaki April 7, 2010 posted by

1989 Kawasaki ZX-7 H1 Ninja Completely Original, Signed By Doug Chandler & Scott Russell

A completely original ’89 ZX-7 signed by Doug Chandler and Scott Russell!  Located in Wasilla, Alaska is possibly a one owner 1989 ZX-7 with very low miles.  Pretty much everything on this bike is speculative as they only definitive information is gained from the photos.  The seller does state that he has owned this bike for twenty-one years, making possible that he is the original owner.  The seller does state that this bike is showroom perfect and that the tank has been signed by Doug Chandler and Scott Russell.  Unfortunately, the seller makes no mention of current mileage but this bike does look to be completely original–with a lime green windscreen which could almost be considers stock for the early ’90’s–with either low miles or a very careful owner.  These bike’s didn’t come signed by the boys so it’s very cool especially if you’re only planning on showing this bike.  The asking price of $4,000 is a bit higher than most other ’89 ZX-7’s but, I doubt any of them come anywhere close to this bike.  The seller may have time on his side getting things together as this bike is located in the frigid–and far–north making it a long trip from anywhere but Anchorage.  This is the first year for the ZX-7, it replaced the GPX750 with a new frame and uprated motor.  It wasn’t the most radical 750 out at the time as Kawasaki chose to sell a very good road bike that could be transformed into a race bike not the other way around.  Many of these bikes were dropped, modified, or raced during their short lives so it’s refreshing to see a very nice ZX-7 Ninja alive and well.  See this bike on Craigslist here.  Note:  The ad only lists a phone number for contact so, please be mindful of timezones.

AG

Honda February 28, 2010 posted by

1994 Honda RVF750R RC45 #19 Of 50

A very nice looking RC45 has become available in Ohio!  Located in Canton, Ohio is a 1994 Honda RVF750R with less than 2,000 original miles.  The seller states that this bike has been meticulously maintained and is in perfect condition.  The seller states that this bike is number nineteen of the fifty RC45’s that were imported into the U.S to satisfy AMA requirements.  The bike has been fitted with a titanium full exhaust system by Yoshimura (A rare piece in and of itself), Zero Gravity windscreen, and a K&N air filter.  The seller states that “The PGMFi has also been wired to top secret HRC specs.”  I suspect this is a reference to the ECU that originally limited the power output to 85hp but could reach 148hp with serious HRC components–I doubt this bike has that much power but it would be curious to know what “top secret” things have been done to it.  Phil posted a UK RC45 with zero miles that was listed for $39,000, making this bikes price of $35,000 agreeable as it is actually in the U.S., has less than 2k miles, and is fitted with the titanium Yosh system.  The original MSRP for these bikes was $27,000.  The RC45 was the first production Honda to feature USD forks and is fitted with the sixteen inch front wheel that Honda preferred during the 1990s.  As with the majority of the bikes we post on RSBFS, this is one that I’d be happy to own.  See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG