Posts by tag: dohc

Honda September 19, 2021 posted by

(Over)Use as Directed – 1990 Honda CBR400RR

Update 9.19.21: Sold Friday night but still worth a peek, push “See original listing” – donn

Painting a street bike in the colors of Honda’s 250 GP team might be a giveaway that it was going to get a workout.  This CBR looks to have been ridden hard and possibly raced, but is at least worth a look as a project.

1990 Honda CBR400RR for sale on eBay

The specs for the baby Fireblade read like a full-fledged superbike, with double overhead gear-driven cams, alloy chassis, and assymmetrical gull swingarm.  Some components are sized for the expected stresses, like the 275mm brakes, and some ruled by budgetary concerns, like the semi-adjustable suspension.  But considering the intended market in countries with progressive licensing, and the intended youthful riders, it’s somewhat hipper than the current single cylinder starter sports.

No corner of this CBR has been spared, or had much attention lavished on the cosmetics, though the tank and seat fairing look undamaged.  The fairings have the advantage of being easier to remove and most repairs can be made from the inside.  No claims of recent maintenance, so some questions to the owner might be in order.  Notes from the eBay auction:

NC29 JDM
current registration,
clean title in my name,
runs excellent,
moto gp, gp250 Advance Shell HRC team replica color.

Replica bikes of medium-sized racers of this era have
ultra-high quality, powerful and excellent handling.

I hope you enjoy the proficiency of this excellent machine at 17000 rpm.

Preferably this Blade would’ve been fawned over rather than neglected, even if pushed to the limits.  Pre-pandemic readers will recall similar models selling for much less ( and in really nice shape ), but these are a certain rarity, never offered here except as a one-at-a-time import.  For a well-equipped garagiste with an empty lift, this might be a worthwhile project and the Make Offer button is available.

-donn

(Over)Use as Directed – 1990 Honda CBR400RR
Honda July 3, 2021 posted by

Another Era: 1982 Honda CBX Supersport

History will show that Benelli – not Honda – produced the first factory six-cylinder motorcycle, the 750cc Sei. However the riding public will likely not care who was first, and will always look at the Honda CBX as an engineering marvel, which it really is. And while the original 1978 CBX was a bare-knuckle brawler in its naked form, it is the post-1981 sport touring version we are highlighting here. This 1982 Honda CBX is the final model year of the breed, and represents an excellent example of the beauty and complexity of the model.

1982 Honda CBX Supersport for sale on eBay

The heart of the CBX was – and will ever be – the giant 1,047cc transverse cylinder inline six. The 24 valves are operated by double overhead cams, fed upstream by a brace of six Keihin carbs. Although the engine looks impossibly wide, Honda invested considerable effort in consolidating typical end of crankshaft items such as ignition and alternator behind the bank of cylinders. This kept the overall width only slightly wider than conventional fours. The original naked CBX enjoyed a robust 105 HP or more when introduced, but the shift to sport touring in 1981 saw a modification to the power delivery, and ultimately a drop in top end output by 5-7 HP. This was balanced by an increase in weight due to the additional bodywork, frame modifications, and color keyed hard bags. On the plus side, Honda introduced their air-assisted Pro-Link rear suspension linkage in place of the original pair of rear shocks, as well as larger front fork tubes to aid in handling.

From the seller:
Honda’s engineers and management liked the appeal and sound of the six-cylinder they produced. Some have compared it to old-school Formula 1 car exhaust. It also let the Honda CBX top out at 135 mph, Which made it the fastest production motorcycle in the world. 1981 saw the Honda CBX go from a standard into a sports tourer motorcycle. The resulting Honda CBX 1000 SuperSport came with extensive wind fairing, hard-sided saddlebags, and an adjustable rear mono-shock. It also had upgraded brakes, with new calipers and, in front, ventilated dual discs. The front fork was also adjustable, using a special air pump that came with the bike. In terms of straight-line speed and engineering complexity, the Honda CBX was a superbike. While the six-cylinder wasn’t exactly fuel-efficient, it was extremely smooth and sounded great – Especially with the Denco 6 into 6 ‘Ferrari’ sounding Exhaust. Jay Leno bought a 1981 example brand-new, and still owns and enjoys riding it, today. — DETAILS — This is my 6th CBX and I love them, I changed out the front turn signals, custom windscreen, custom turn signals and 6 into 6 Denco Exhaust. Carburettors were rejetted for the Denco Exhaust..

More from the seller:
“”THE BAD”” I had surgery a few years ago and the hospital almost killed me, and I try as I might, I can’t ride anymore, SO THE CBX HAS SET FOR TOO LONG AND NEEDS THE CARBURETTORS CLEANED, BRAKES FLUSHED OUT AND MAYBE SEALS OR EVEN A NEW MASTER CYLINDER, AND GAS TANK CLEANED. IT RAN PERFECTLY UNTIL MY SURGERY. IT’S ALWAYS BEEN INSIDE AND LOOKS ALMOST NEW ESPECIALLY FOR ITS AGE, HAS VERY LOW MILEAGE AND WITH THE DENCO 6 INTO 6 EXHAUST IT IS ALWAYS A HEAD-TURNER AT ANY MEET YOU GO TO.. I JUST TURNED 70 THIS MONTH AND IT BREAKS MY HEART NOT TO RIDE ANYMORE,, I BOUGHT MY 1ST MOTORCYCLE ON MY 14TH BIRTHDAY AND HAVE RODE EVER SINCE. I took it to a motorcycle shop down the road from me because my driveway is too steep for me to move it in and out, now. I bought my son’s 1st motorcycle from him. He is trying to sell it as well, but since I’ve bought and sold a lot on eBay I decided to put it on here, also. The buyer is responsible for any freight and of course, the motorcycle needs to be paid for before it leaves the shop, personal checks must have time to clear my bank before shipping. So, it’s a project bike of sorts, but being as clean and rare as it is, it is well worth the investment to put it right, and back on the street where it belongs…I have the owner’s manual, shop manuals and more, that will go with the bike.. Thanks for looking

From a collector perspective the original naked model still holds a financial edge by the latest auction outcomes. However at some point the NOS bodywork will disappear, flipping the supply-vs-demand equation and elevating well-kept later models to a higher price point. We have not seen that yet, but if I had a dollar for every time I hear “I remember when you could buy a for next to nothing!” I could afford one of these mega-buck collector bikes. The market for the fully-faired CBX has not hit crazy heights as of yet, so if six is your lucky number now might be the time to act. This one looks to be complete, but the seller cautions that it has been sitting. There is only a single $5k bid at time of writing with reserve still in place. Check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Another Era: 1982 Honda CBX Supersport
Honda May 11, 2021 posted by

Add Blue Here – 1984 Honda VF1000F Interceptor

Honda introduced a V4 superbike just a year after the 750’s intro, but then made significant changes and didn’t refer to it as an Interceptor in 1985, making the ’84 a rarity.  Here’s an Ohio example which has low miles and looks quite good.

1984 Honda VF1000F Interceptor for sale on eBay

Honda bored and stroked their 750cc engine, pressed steel liners in and claimed 122 hp.  The four overhead cams were chain-driven, and torque was such that a five-speed trans was considered a better choice than six lighter gears.  The double basket chassis was crafted of steel tubing, with selectable adjustments on the air forks and Pro-Link monoshock.  Triple 276mm disks seem undersized for a liter these days, but not in 1984.  The bodywork had a nice flow accented by a racy engine scoop.

This Interceptor looks very clean, and seems to have just a pair of SuperTrapps as mods.  The white fuel cap pretty much confirms a re-paint, but the striping is faithful to the original, and even the “1000” on the white! seat is accurate.  It wouldn’t take much to push this VF1000F over the goal line – add the blue field on the tank and sidecovers, find a better license plate bracket, refinish the forks and black out the mufflers.  Might have to sacrifice that bright seat for a stock cover.  Comments from the eBay auction:

With title and only 14,207 miles. This is one of the coolest and fun bikes Honda ever made. This 1000F Interceptor was made in only 1984 before it became the 1000R which makes it very rare. Bike runs and rides great and is fast. Anyone whoever rode one will tell tell you how fun and cool sounding they are. It has  very nice pearl paint on it. New rear tire and the front is like new. Everything works like it should.

The compact V4 could do just about anything, except repeal the law of gravity.  Quite a few of the early engines succumbed to a cam oiling design deficiency, and Honda re-designed the cam drive with gears in 1985.  But at this point a survivor is unlikely to be affected.  The succeeding VF1000R had an endurance racer’s full fairing, but hid the big V4 and was no longer an Interceptor.  This one should give a lot of capability for the buck, and marks an interesting page in Honda history.

-donn

Add Blue Here – 1984 Honda VF1000F Interceptor
Suzuki March 29, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

The 1980s: A period of rapid and wild development that set the motorcycling course for the next several decades. It seemed for a time that every innovation was rapidly made defunct by the next quantum leap in engineering – or experimentation. From the end of the 1970s right into the 1990s the world saw massive jumps in suspension tech, chassis engineering, internal combustion enhancements, clutch and transmission improvements, and aerodynamics. Some of the innovations worked and became mainstream. Others were fated to be “one year wonders” as manufacturers rapidly pivoted to something new. In between the extremes some absolutely amazing motorcycles were created. Today’s Feature Listing is one such model: the 1983 Suzuki GS750ES.

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES

The Suzuki GS750 first bowed to the world in 1977. At that time it was more of a UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle), or what would be better known as a standard motorcycle. This was a response to Honda’s dominant expertise in the inline four game, and at which Suzuki was playing catch up. But catch up they did, steadily evolving the GS750 into an absolute gem of a sport bike; the ’83 ES variant enjoying a 16-valve DOHC head with Suzuki’s trademarked Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber (TSCC), a greatly updated chassis which included the cutting-edge Full Floater single shock setup in the rear, and trick anti-dive forks up front. And rather than the 18/19 inch combo front and rear carried by predecessors, the ES model now carried a 17 incher out back and a GP-inspired 16 inch wheel up front. The smaller front wheel did turn out to be a short-lived fad, but the reduction in rotational weight and gyroscope tendencies helped the smallest and lightest of the GS750 lineage turn and track like no other.

From the seller:
Completely stock, unrestored, unmodified and un-faded
Classic 80’s sport bike style
Two adult owners from new, 3,000 miles believed correct
As close to a showroom-new GS750ES as you’re likely to find
Original tool kits come with bike
Regularly and recently ridden

Price: Mecum Auction Lot F67 April 28 – May 1

Contact: Bob (superhawk65@gmail.com) or visit the Mecum Auction site

The 1983 Suzuki GS750ES was the last of this particular lineup; the economy stalled any further development and unsold units were sold off as 1984 models (unchanged). By 1985 H-D began the Great Tariff War and capacities were dropped to 700cc to avoid additional taxation. That makes this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES the last of its kind, and in about the best shape we’ve seen one of these retro machines. With 70-ish HP on tap and relatively modern components, the GS750ES is a great pick for anyone wanting to pick up some nostalgia – and who also wouldn’t mind riding it around. Suzuki did crank out a large number of the GS750 models (a definite best seller for the Hamamatsu manufacturer), but today few of them survive in this kind of condition.

Today’s Featured Listing will be enjoying the limelight at the Mecum auctions in Las Vegas, April 28 – May 1. With very few miles and sitting in stock, original condition, this bike will certainly catch the eyes of collectors. Interested parties might want to chat with Bob ahead of the auction to learn more. This bike is an incredible time capsule of the pinnacle of the pre-GSXR world, and will certainly be grabbing attention wherever it shows up. Whether you were there and had one, missed out but always wanted one, or just learning about the era now, this 1983 Suzuki GS750ES is worth the effort. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1983 SUZUKI GS750ES
Kawasaki December 3, 2020 posted by

The Way Things Were: 1984 Kawasaki GPz 550

Orwellian theory aside, big brother was indeed watching in 1984. In fact, the whole world was watching in 1984, as the last truly competitive “old school” middleweight sport bike strutted its stuff. Today this is better known as a classic – even potentially an antique given its 36-ish years of age – but back then this was the pinnacle of what we in the US considered a smaller motorcycle. The 550cc set was what constituted the middleweight class in the 1980s (save for the odd Yamaha 350cc RZ or 600cc FJ) and Kawasaki threw everything they had into the last year of the GPz 550. This glorious time capsule is waiting to bring back the memories of synthesizer-driven music, Ghostbusters at the box office, and Dynasty on the tube.

1984 Kawasaki GPz 550 for sale on eBay

Even by standards of the day, the GPz was far more evolution than revolution. Honda had released the 500cc Interceptor, Yamaha had liquid cooled the spirit of the RD350, and everywhere there were new and cutting edge motorcycles to be found. But the GPz excelled against more modern foe with solid handling, decent power and upgraded chassis and componentry. While only air cooled and breathing through two valves per cylinder, the GPz was good for 65 horsepower. Triple disk brakes helped with the stopping duty. The forks up front were complemented by an anti-dive mechanism, and a modern rising rate “Uni Trak” single shock held station out back. The double down-tube steel frame was beefed up to handle the additional power, and the whole package was topped off with bigger brother’s 3/4 fairing and nifty LCD display located on the tank. In this final year the GPz was truly a polished package, showing methodical upgrades and updates since inception.

From the seller:
Mint mint mint! This 550 GPZ is an example of a absolutely mint condition unrestored survivor. This bike starts and runs flawlessly buy it, ride it, display it, whatever you feel necessary to enjoy this classic time machine. Please look at all the photos and you will see how nice this bike is and sorry if I sound like I’m bragging but it will be hard-pressed to find another this nice! title is being transferred into my name should have it back in 5 to 6 days. Everything is done online with the new Covid restrictions. I can store this bike as long as needed for you to find a shipper.I would be glad to provide you a video of the bike running, riding, or just another walk around…

The whole GPz line (1100, 750, 550, 305) performed well for Kawasaki, and built a solid fan base. The future was only days ahead, with the introduction of the GPz900 “Ninja” and the follow-on 600cc variant, but for this year anyway, the GPz 550 ruled the roost. Available in red with white/blue stripes as well as silver with black/red accents, the 1984 model can best be identified via the LCD panel and the unique to this year 3-spoke wheels. Today’s example is the more popular Kawi Red, and it looks to be extremely clean. The black chrome looks immaculate (something that was pretty fragile in the early GPz years), the decals are in great shape, and the bike appears generally devoid of scrapes & scratches (although I *may* detect some rash at the extreme end of the right-hand side muffler).

This 1984 Kawasaki GPz 550 appears to be completely stock except for the foamie handgrips – which is not a big deal IMHO. With 14,000 and change on the clocks, this is not a new bike, but hardly over-used. The best part is the Buy It Now price of a lowly 5 grand USD. That is a LOT of nostalgia and fun for not that much dosh. Check out all of the details here, and be sure to share your GPz stories with us in the comments. Stay safe, and good luck!!

MI

The Way Things Were: 1984 Kawasaki GPz 550
Honda October 18, 2020 posted by

Rim Shot – 1989 Honda CBR250R

This mini-FireBlade has been a grey-market import twice, but still has just over 9,000 miles and looks very good.  Tipping the scales at 350 lbs. with half a tank of fuel, its 40hp are plenty to have a ball.

1989 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

Made since 1986, the four-cylinder had bores of around 2 inches and peak power was at 14,500 rpm.  The twin spars of the frame and swingarm were aluminum alloy, and single muffler and front disk kept the mass down.  Home-market rules stipulated the horsepower limitation, but the little CBR handled with abandon.  Set up for a pillion, but probably not two 90th-percentile adults.

This third owner is Chicago-based, and says it’s a long-term relationship.  It looks quite stock, with the natural exception of the rear fender-ectomy.  No particular damage, but corrosion never sleeps and is evident on many fasteners, maybe due to its western Pacific origins.  The flickering livery is pretty unusual and striking in red metallic.  Comments from the eBay auction:

The cosmetic condition of this machine is just as it looks in the photos. The running condition of the machine is flawless, starting immediately.

This bike has been part of my collection for many years, is actually ridden once in a while, and is a LOT of fun to ride. It runs and rides with absolutely no issues. And the 4 valve, 4-stroke, dual overhead cam engine revs up to 19,000 rpm, so you can imagine how much fun it is when it’s really wound up. I am the third owner from new. It was originally imported from Japan into Australia, then to the U.S. in the late 2000’s. It has a clear, valid title, so there will be no issues plating it in any state.  

 Everything on this motorcycle is original. Every one of the finishes are totally original, as is the seat. As you can see from the photos in the photo section, the machine has had absolutely no restoration performed to any part of it. The condition is exactly what it looks like in the photos. I looked at a quite a few of these bikes before I finally bought this one, and I’ve never seen a better original one before or since.

 The Honda runs and rides the way you expect a machine with this type of mileage to run. All of the mechanical components have been checked over to ensure they work properly including the clutch and brakes. 

 Oil has been recently changed, a new battery was installed, and the carbs completely gone through this season. Everything works. There is absolutely nothing you will have to do to this motorcycle to ride and enjoy it for the rest of this season and many more to come.  

The CBR250R not only had to compete against other domestic manufacturers, but in-house competition from the NSR250R, and wasn’t exported until 1996, then just to Oceana.  Yearly changes were incremental until 1990, when a new chassis was introduced.  Hopefully the reserve will leave a stainless fastener allowance for this rider, and bidding is active just one day in.  The next owner will have a rarity in the U.S., and in quite nice original shape.

-donn

Rim Shot – 1989 Honda CBR250R
Suzuki September 11, 2020 posted by

Rare and Wonderful: 1982 Suzuki GS550 Katana

When the original GS1100 Katana hit the motorcycle show circuit ahead of it’s launch, the world gaped. The Katana was like nothing the motorcycling community had ever seen. It was also tremendously popular on the showroom floor, and consumers flocked to Suzuki’s flagship sport bike – advertised to be the fastest in the world in 1981. Keen to capitalize on the popularity, Suzuki utilized the Katana brand name and applied it to a number of very different motorcycles, including today’s example of a 1982 GS 550 Katana. Looking nothing like it’s bigger sibling, the 550 had much more in common with the previous years’ GS model – but as Katana was the word of the day, many models within the Suzuki lineup were so branded.

1982 Suzuki GS550 Katana for sale on eBay

While the competition was coming up with all new middleweight offerings in the 550cc category, Suzuki essentially restyled an existing model to make it look newer and more exciting than it really was. Thankfully, the reality was much better than the “lipstick on a pig” analogy might suggest. Because the GS 550 that preceded the Katana nameplate was actually a pretty solid motorcycle. The air cooled, two valve inline four cylinder engine produced 50+ ponies (specs vary from 50 to 54 hp), and while the steel backbone frame might not have been cutting edge in light of the perimeter frames and the aluminum cradles to come, it was reasonably rigid albeit somewhat heavy. With 450+ pounds (dry) of mass to push around, the 550 Katana did not have the punch of the bigger bike, but remains a loved and respected middleweight for the day. Those days were short, however, as the 1980s ignited a technology storm that brought all existing sport bikes to their knees.

From the seller:
1982 Suzuki GS550 Katana with only 325 miles. (Mileage may increase slightly as owner frequently rides bike). Reported to have been donated to college where it sat mostly neglected for 30+ years. Current owner purchased bike with only 147 miles in 2019. Restoration consisted of replacing battery, cleaning and replacing all O-rings and fuel line nipples in carbs, changing brake fluid and engine oil, replacing petcock on fuel tank, replacing gas cap gasket, replacing front fork seals, replacing mirrors (not OEM), lubing chain & cables, and considerable cleaning of entire bike. Bike now runs like new and all systems perform perfectly. There are no known mechanical or electrical problems with bike.

Owner has added hard-to-find OEM fairing, a voltmeter & on/off switch, headlight on/off switch, headlight modulator, and rear wheel splash guard. The bike has not been modified / damaged in any way with the installation of these parts and all may be easily removed.

Fairing / cowling assy part no: 94400-34300-13L

The bike is an extremely nice survivor but it is not a show quality machine. There are a few cosmetic problems remaining ; the starter cover has lost some finish as has the left side engine cover. There may be some insignificant flaws elsewhere. In spite of these “warts” the bike always receives many favorable reviews from the general public.

Sale includes tool kit (mostly complete), owners manual, and related literature.

Clear Florida title in owner’s name.

It seems unbelievable that a mid-displacement standard from 38 years ago could have so few miles, and look so good. The seller notes it is not perfect, but one could expect something this old to look a lot worse from just sitting around. The bodywork looks to be in great condition, and the addition of the bikini fairing and the extra mudguard just seem to enhance the age-old good looks of the bike. It looks like the seller has recommissioned the bike from sitting around, including a run-through of the fuel system (undoubtedly necessary if the bike had fuel in it during its dormant phase).

This bike is a real time period piece; it is a Katana in name, but not ever considered THE Katana. It was a sport bike, but never really THE sport bike of the period. But today it looks fantastic, and is exactly what you might want if you are looking for a rider that is a bit different, yet still as capable as a twin shock blast from the past might hope to be. Opening bid for this one is a mere $3,495, with zero takers thus far. The bike is located in Florida, and thus is in the continental US (for those unwilling/unable to travel outside of our borders). Check out all the details here, and revel in this future classic today. Good luck, and stay safe!!

MI

Honda November 28, 2019 posted by

Gym Buddy – 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30

Sport riders tend to head toward the lighter side when working on their skills or the racetrack beckons.  Now closer to thirty years of age than twenty, the NC30 is a perfect choice for a workout partner.  This grey import is even more unusual in the black / red livery.

1992 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

From across the four-lane it would be easy to confuse the NC30 with its 750cc sibling, but the general scale ( and 400R decals ) give it away.  The 59 hp are responsible for motivating only 364 lbs. dry, and it stays under 400 lbs. with full fuel.  Right wrist and gearbox will get exercise, since peak power is at just under 13,000 rpm.  Don’t miss shoulder day too often, since the compact package and 16-front / 18-rear wheel stagger will keep weight on the bars.  The last-gen NC30 had the 360-degree “big bang” crank, shows off the rear wheel courtesy of the left-hand muffler, and sports a 14,500 rpm redline.

A little light on pictures and description, this example calls for more information.  In the meantime we can enjoy the striking livery, new Battlaxes , and carbon muffler, and no evident damage.  From the eBay auction:

I have for sale a very rare color combination 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30, new tires , brakes, forks rebuilt, bike is in a good condition , has aftermarket exhaust , 18,000 kilometers (11,300 miles).

Comes with Vermont registration in my name which can be registered in any state.

Won’t need your headphones at this gym, just earplugs, as the gear driven cams will be music to your ears.  Reviewers advised that the NC30 had fallen off the sharp edge of the 399cc class, but the smooth power delivery, soft spring rates, and high build quality resulted in high overall ratings.  Even with its high ask, this one deserves further investigation.

-donn

Gym Buddy – 1992 Honda VFR400R NC30