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Rim Shot – 1989 Honda CBR250R

This mini-FireBlade has been a grey-market import twice, but still has just over 9,000 miles and looks very good.  Tipping the scales at 350 lbs. with half a tank of fuel, its 40hp are plenty to have a ball.

1989 Honda CBR250R for sale on eBay

Made since 1986, the four-cylinder had bores of around 2 inches and peak power was at 14,500 rpm.  The twin spars of the frame and swingarm were aluminum alloy, and single muffler and front disk kept the mass down.  Home-market rules stipulated the horsepower limitation, but the little CBR handled with abandon.  Set up for a pillion, but probably not two 90th-percentile adults.

This third owner is Chicago-based, and says it’s a long-term relationship.  It looks quite stock, with the natural exception of the rear fender-ectomy.  No particular damage, but corrosion never sleeps and is evident on many fasteners, maybe due to its western Pacific origins.  The flickering livery is pretty unusual and striking in red metallic.  Comments from the eBay auction:

The cosmetic condition of this machine is just as it looks in the photos. The running condition of the machine is flawless, starting immediately.

This bike has been part of my collection for many years, is actually ridden once in a while, and is a LOT of fun to ride. It runs and rides with absolutely no issues. And the 4 valve, 4-stroke, dual overhead cam engine revs up to 19,000 rpm, so you can imagine how much fun it is when it’s really wound up. I am the third owner from new. It was originally imported from Japan into Australia, then to the U.S. in the late 2000’s. It has a clear, valid title, so there will be no issues plating it in any state.  

 Everything on this motorcycle is original. Every one of the finishes are totally original, as is the seat. As you can see from the photos in the photo section, the machine has had absolutely no restoration performed to any part of it. The condition is exactly what it looks like in the photos. I looked at a quite a few of these bikes before I finally bought this one, and I’ve never seen a better original one before or since.

 The Honda runs and rides the way you expect a machine with this type of mileage to run. All of the mechanical components have been checked over to ensure they work properly including the clutch and brakes. 

 Oil has been recently changed, a new battery was installed, and the carbs completely gone through this season. Everything works. There is absolutely nothing you will have to do to this motorcycle to ride and enjoy it for the rest of this season and many more to come.  

The CBR250R not only had to compete against other domestic manufacturers, but in-house competition from the NSR250R, and wasn’t exported until 1996, then just to Oceana.  Yearly changes were incremental until 1990, when a new chassis was introduced.  Hopefully the reserve will leave a stainless fastener allowance for this rider, and bidding is active just one day in.  The next owner will have a rarity in the U.S., and in quite nice original shape.

-donn

6 Comments

  • This is interesting. If I’m not wrong, this is an export model, not a JDM. Not that it matters, but I’ve just never seen one before.

  • A friend had one of these 20 years ago, very entertaining power band on these things.

  • j.b., one of the websites I looked at – https://netrider.net.au/threads/honda-cbr250rr-a-review-for-the-new-rider.124340/ – had examples of new and grey import VIN tags… 🙂

  • That is an interesting read…this is 89, I wonder which country it was exported to. There wasn’t this color scheme available in Japan at the time. My memory is fading of old age, but I’m pretty certain of that.

  • The paint scheme is someone’s copy of a later year Australian version. I believe where the confusion comes in. Is that there was probably a bunch of leftovers in Japan. They were sold as brand new by the importer and they came up with these different colors to keep them fresh.

    One of the finer details would be the vin number. I believe by this point Australia had the 17 vin in place. If it was officially sold by Honda aus the Japanese frame number would be covered up.
    Either a plate riveted to the frame or it’s possible they stamped them at the importer level.

    A similar thing happened with the Honda nsr150sp. There was a bunch of leftovers, honda officially stopped production in 1998. Even in se Asia because they were expensive and didn’t sell well. It was easy to find new ones up till 2000.

    They remaining stock was sold on the Australian market as 01 thru 03. They too also had 17 digit vins. It confuses people on the exact production run years. For both bikes.

    I also believe that the offical version that was imported as leftovers to Australia was the. ’90 thru ’96 cbr250rr mc22. In Australia they sold them all the way up to at least ’98 maybe ’99 – ’00.

    This particular bike i think was originally a jdm bike imported to Australia. Then restored and repainted to look like one of the later year Australian leftover models. If you Google search images you can find this color scheme on the 96 – 98 years. In red, blue and yellow? As well.

  • Fantastic research. Why I love this site and still appreciate it after all of these years.

Comment rules: Add something useful and constructive, and don't be a jerk. Comments that don't add value will be deleted. Comments will automatically close after 30 days. Thank you. -dc

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