Posts by tag: Deltabox

Yamaha December 5, 2018 posted by

Museum Quality: 1991 Yamaha TZR250 SP for Sale

Let's get this out of the way up front: the seller is asking $16,000 for this bike, and that's a big number for a Yamaha TZR250. But obviously, a thing is worth what someone will pay for it, and I'm not sure that the seller won't get what they're asking here, since prices have been increasing steadily on all two-strokes for the past few years. If you're a collector for whom a couple grand one way or the other really doesn't matter, and want the very best example for your collection, this TZR250 SP might just be what you're looking for. Sure, $16k is a lot to pay right now for a TZR, but that might seem like a bargain in just a few years.

There are three generations of Yamaha's two-stroke sportbike: the early parallel-twin 1KT/2MA, the reverse-cylinder 3MA, and the v-twin 3XV seen here. Personally, I love the style and general weirdness of the 3MA, especially that version of the gorgeous Deltabox frame, but the 3XV seems to be the most highly sought-after version of the bunch. There were a variety of different specification levels for the 3XV version, designated by the usual alpha-numeric gibberish: R, RS, RSP, SP, SPR. Wet and dry clutches were available, ignition and powervalves had different performance characteristics, and fairings were not always interchangeable between models. Ferreting out detail differences in these Japanese market bikes can be tricky, so experts are welcome to chime in in the comments.

The seller claims you can get 90hp from an unrestricted example which, from what I know, is theoretically possible, but at the expense of any pretense of durability. That's pretty much race-spec, a smoky grenade you should ride with your left hand covering the clutch. Somewhere in the neighborhood of 60hp is more reasonable for a highly-tuned streetbike, and doesn't really change the seller's point at all, that an unrestricted bike would be much more powerful.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Yamaha TZR250 SP for Sale

This bike is fantastic. It has 1800km (1100 miles) it is a Japanese Domestic bike which I imported personally. There is no bond or restriction from Customs you can get it on the road virtually anywhere if you wanted to street ride it.  As you prolly know the SP bikes were about halfway between a standard TZR and a customer-racing 250. Restricted it's 50hp and less than 300 lbs. It's a weapon - even after 28yrs!! I have been told that derestricted with basic mods you can get 90HP from these which is just insane, of course. Thanks for looking!  

From the photos and description, this thing is just about perfect, in very original condition. And that's maybe the only issue here: in stock, restricted form, the whole gang of quarter-liter two-strokes made a government-mandated 45hp. But it really depends on what you're looking for: a wicked weekend ripper or a perfectly preserved museum piece. And I get the feeling that a dead-stock example is the way to gamble if you're looking at investment potential.

-tad

Museum Quality: 1991 Yamaha TZR250 SP for Sale
Yamaha March 14, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Update 3.14.2018: Turns out this one sold faster than we could post it. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

A modern literbike is a relatively peaky beast: chasing horsepower without increasing displacement means ever-higher revs are required, and a six-speed box makes sense. It's telling that bikes like today's Featured Listing Yamaha's FZR1000, one of the cutting-edgy-ist sportbikes of its day, made do with just five and could still be considered fast now. Six-speed gearboxes had become the norm for motorcycles by the late 1980s, unless you were looking at cruisers, touring machines, or big-bore sportbikes. Why? Well, narrow, peaky powerbands require more gears to effectively exploit and the big-inch engines of the aforementioned six-speed exceptions had enough flexibility and torque to make them window-dressing: an extra gear just wasn't needed.

Considering that Yamaha's FZR1000 makes just 20 more claimed horses and weighs nearly 40 pounds more than a modern R6, you might think that these old-school machines would be no match for even a much smaller machine from today. But it's the 79 ft-lbs of torque from the FZR that makes it so effective: a modern literbike like the BMW S1000RR makes just a few more foot-pounds. So how did they do it? Well the GSX-R1100 obviously benefited from a few more cubes, but the smaller 1002cc FZR1000 combined Yamaha's five-valve Genesis head with their EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve to provide both low-end torque and high-end power.

Five-valve heads have pretty much disappeared these days, the theoretical advantages proving insufficient to outweigh the additional complexity required, but EXUP-style exhaust valves are ubiquitous, now that Yamaha's patents have expired, allowing other manufacturers to take advantage. By the late 1980s, servo-operated "power valves" were common on two-strokes, but this was the very first use of the technology in a four-stroke, and the result was a very flexible engine with a 170mph top speed.

Introduced in 1987, the 1989 redesign seen here looked similar, but included updates to the frame and engine: the original had a 989cc engine bumped to 1002cc and rotated backwards in the Deltabox frame for a shorter wheelbase. Later, the bike adopted a single headlight design to help modernize it, but you can't go wrong with a pair of big, round lamps. As you'd expect, performance and in particular handling improved throughout the bike's lifespan, but this particular model strikes a nice balance between classic superbike styling and the better performance and handling of the redesigned bike. I happen to prefer the looks of the earlier machines: the single-headlight version does look pretty sharp, but it just doesn't have the old-school round-lamp charm.

From the Seller: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

For being 28 years old the bike looks and runs awesome! It has less than 18k original miles, has never been dropped and has only a few minor cracks around the fairing mounting areas from the tightening of the bolts, which is normal for these older more brittle plastics (see near bolts in pics attached).

The 1989 version, crowned the "Bike of the Decade" by Cycle World, had 0-60 acceleration of 2.9 seconds, and a top speed of over 167 mph. I purchased one of these brand new in Miami Fl in 1989. I got on it and rode that bike all the way the Newline Vermont, 1460 miles in two days. It was a amazing adventure and the bike never missed a beat ripping off 700+ mile days with ease. This is truly a sports cruiser rather than a rep-racer R1. This particular dual headlight model was only produced one year, Yamaha went to the single (ugly) headlight in 1990. Anyway buy this unit, gas it up and head to for the opposite coast! We can deliver this bike anywhere in the United States for $500 enclosed and insured.

A few notes about the bike:

  • The bike was owned by 1 famous owner from new until when I bought it three years ago. It was a famous biker from the publishing world who collects bikes (Forbes magazine) and the bike was in Palm Beach all of its life until I got it. I have a copy of the title with his info on it that I can provide.
  • The bike was purchased from him for $4,500 and needed some TLC.
  • The bike had extensive work done to get the bike all up to modern running equipment. I spent over $4,500... All well documented (will provide) at Fast by Ferracci.
  • I also had a GPR slip-on imported from Italy (over $500) and it sounds awesome!
  • The carbs were also completely rebuilt, last summer 2016, and has all new gaskets - the engine runs amazingly well!
  • We over $9,500 invested in the bike. Went way overboard in its preparation. My loss, your happy smiles!

This does seem to be the version collectors will want, and in just a few years you may be kicking yourself for not taking advantage of the seller's $5,500 asking price. There are some minor cosmetic imperfections, small cracks and the like, but these are clearly documented and not unexpected on a Japanese bike from the 1980s: paint and finish were generally of a lower standard than on European bikes and they often age poorly, even when well-maintained and sparingly used. Luckily, the major servicing headaches have been taken care of and the bike is reportedly mechanically sound, meaning that this should be a great candidate for a rolling restoration, since collectors will likely want to replace that lighter, but non-original exhaust can and take care of the blemishes.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Yamaha September 4, 2017 posted by

Unblemished: Original, Thousand-Mile 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Obviously, the first-generation Yamaha R1 isn't particularly rare in terms of production numbers: this revolutionary sportbike turned the category on it's ear, offering big power in a middleweight package, and it sold well as a result. I'm posting this one up because, unlike most of the R1s you'll find on eBay and Craigslist, this one is almost completely stock, is pretty much perfect, and is barely broken-in, with a mere 1,138 miles on the odometer. Collectors take note: this thing is so clean you could basically eat off of it, and the chain still has the white grease on it that came from the factory!

It wasn't the first time a manufacturer had done something revolutionary in the sportbike world, but Yamaha definitely shook up the establishment with their follow up to the fast, but relatively heavy YZF1000 Thunderace when they dropped their YZF-R1 on an unsuspecting world. Introduced in 1998 and built through 2001, the R1 caught the other major manufacturers completely by surprise. It used an evolution of Yamaha's famous "Deltabox" aluminum frame and their five-valve "Genesis" inline four, now backed a six-speed gearbox with stacked shafts to keep the wheelbase short and maximize swingarm length, instead of the five-speed fitted to its ancestor.

With 150hp and weighing in at 419lbs dry, the bike featured the expected literbike power in a package as light as 600cc supersports at the time and it's still a compelling performer today, missing just twenty or so horses and the electronic aids required to manage it. Braking and handling were excellent, although the lack of a steering damper was a bit of an oversight, considering the power and handling available. Maintenance was a bit of a nightmare however: all that compact packaging meant plug changes and carb rejetting took more time on the R1 than they had on previous bikes. A small price to pay for such near perfection.

This particular bike has been lightly modified, but has just 1,138 miles on it. And it hasn't just been sitting in a corner, collecting dust on flat tires: it appears to have been lovingly maintained and is a very nice example in classic red-and-white "speedblock" Yamaha colors, although the R1 also came in a very striking blue.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1 for Sale

Up for sale my all stock, unmolested, absolutely 1138 actual miles R1. If you're looking for a first generation show collector R1 this is the real deal... You're not going to hear what the bad things are because there are no bad things: it's stunning in every way. It's new really like off the showroom floor. It's been in a climate controlled environment with humidity controlled at around 35% at all times. It still has that new bike smell when it's running if you know what I mean.

Still has the stock tires on it (Dunlop Sportmax 207's) which are in perfect shape with no dry rot. Stock chain still has the white grease on it as shown in pics. Only thing not stock is undertail and turn signals done in 2001. If you look at pics you can clearly see the nuts and bolts are still in new condition to match the authenticity of what condition the bike is. Inside of fairings and underneath also matches authenticity. It runs flawless with no hesitation at all. It has been kept up with oil changes every year just for show/collector status and preventative maint. Same for gas only non ethanol every 6 months with 2oz. of sea foam added at every fill. Bike is truly I think probably the nicest you will find in the US.Maybe the world. No dents dings, no fairings are cracked no broken tabs nothing at all. I mean just looking at the key ignition area you can tell. Fires to life after first push of sta rter button every time. Charging system perfect. It's a new bike really just kept in a time machine literally. That's really all I can say about the bike it's the real deal folks. The bike still to this day people ask new bike and I say no it's a 2000, they're shocked.

My feedback should speak for itself so no worries. If it's not what you expected I will give your money back I'm that honest in my description. Shipping is at your cost not mine but I will help out anyway I can to accommodate your needs. You're more than welcome to come look before you buy as matter fact I encourage you to if you're local. You will be so glad you got it and very proud. Just hope someone takes good care of it. That's it really nothing else to say. Ask any questions you want I will answer. More pics just ask.

The seller doesn't mention the frame sliders, but a little protection is no bad thing, and those turn signals aren't original, but I'd expect they are easy to source and put back to stock. It's hard to get my brain around the fact that someone would buy such a competent, easy-to-use motorcycle and then just basically maintain it, but for those of us who missed out on these soon-to-be collectible motorcycles, this offers up the chance to basically buy one new, only 17 years later...

-tad

Yamaha August 5, 2017 posted by

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

The Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP was named "Bike of the Decade" [the 1980s] by Cycleworld magazine, meaning it faced down some very tough competition, including the Ducati 851, Suzuki RG500, and the original GSX-R750. What made it so special? Well servo-actuated exhaust valves are pretty ubiquitous these days, but the big FZR was the first four-stroke to feature one on its five-valve Genesis motor. Yamaha's EXUP or "Exhaust Ultimate Power" valve varied exhaust flow to maximize high rpm power and low rpm torque, two characteristics that were often considered mutually-exclusive.

The 145hp and 79 ft-lbs of torque from the 1002cc engine aren't big news today, but still make for a very fast bike, even considering the slightly porky 460lb dry weight: we're still talking about a bike with a legitimate 170mph top speed and a supremely flexible powerband. The basic engine and five-speed package was good enough that Bimota saw fit to slot it into their lightweight YB11, and bike that still has the performance to surprise folks weaned on much newer bikes. The rest of the package was equally well-developed, and this iteration featured Yamaha's Deltabox II frame, upside-down forks, and new styling that replaced the twin-lamp endurance-style fairing with a sleeker, single trapezoidal unit that found its way into a couple of Bimotas as well...

From the original eBay listing: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale

Attention Collectors! Bike of the Decade... 1992 FZR 1000 EXUP Delta Box Genesis Great Condition / Survivor > Always stored indoors on carpet! extra Rare Corbin seat with back rest, plus original mint solo seat with fairing. Must see pictures. 8738 miles. Just serviced Clear Title / resides in living room / tank drained, carbs cleaned / clean unused oil, and new fluids, serious inquires, Seller reserves the right to end auction early for private or collector sale. Sold as is, wonderful bike.

The FZR1000 in red and white is a great looking example of a 90s superbike. It's not especially valuable as yet, but has the potential to appreciate as people snap up the few remaining pristine, low-mileage examples. The $7,500 the seller is asking is steep, but this looks like it's in very nice condition, with low miles so, if you're into Yamahas, this might be a great opportunity to add a nearly pristine example of this very functional sportbike to your collection.

-tad

Bike of the Decade: 1992 Yamaha FZR1000 EXUP for Sale
Yamaha April 7, 2017 posted by

Silver Fox – 1989 Yamaha FZR 1000

Yamaha's FZR1000 was their flagship from 1987-1995 and named "the bike of the decade" by Cycle World in 1989.  This European import is a second generation machine with the EXUP electronically controlled exhaust collector, but is also in a classy color scheme rarely seen stateside.  The mileage indicates a well-loved FZR, and a couple of foibles and faux pas might keep this superbike on budget.

1989 Yamaha FZR1000 for sale on eBay

Capable of 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds and the 1/4 mile in just over 10, the FZR1000 was a capital-S Superbike.  The 1989 update brought major engine and chassis revisions, the 5-valve 1002cc challenging the quicker-handling GT with 145 hp.  The alloy Deltabox frame carries the engine from the top only, and uses it to increase rigidity.  The formerly 18" rear wheel is now a -17, matching their gyroscopic forces.  With fresh air intakes under the dual headlamps, the fairing works as well as it looks.

The importer but not the original owner, this EXUP fan has brought this example through almost 31,000 miles, and looking pretty swell.  He discusses the limited edition paint in the eBay auction:

The fine silver was offered for one year only and sold in limited numbers, it was never offered in the US.  In the UK the nine digit VIN for '89 started with number 3LG000101.  As can be seen from the listing, this imported motorcycle is number 18 of that year for the UK.  I brought her in as it was always my favorite bike and it took me two years to find one in decent shape.  Attrition over the years has taken its toll on the remaining numbers.  She rides like she's on rails and runs smooth but I noticed when I started her earlier today she may need a carb balance as she coughed slightly. The mirrors are 1994 but I have the originals ( most people used the 94's ).  The screen is a replacement zero gravity in smoke and I have the original.

Reviewed as a fitting 2nd generation, the FZR1000 won quite a few endurance races and was the basis of the truly exotic Bimota YB6.  As too much garage time will do, the carburettors need adjustment, electric petcock repaired, and a rub here or there could be smoothed out.  But the geometric paint scheme will be worth the effort,  the three shades of silver metallic coolly telling about the long haul...

-donn

 

Silver Fox – 1989 Yamaha FZR 1000
Yamaha November 26, 2016 posted by

Black Friday – 1990 Yamaha FZR400

Junior welterweight-sized FZR 400's were made for markets with progressive licensing laws, and couldn't last in the U.S. displacement arms race.  Still, they are revered for their handling,  light weight and fun factor.  Many were fed into the racing mill, but this rare black version survived beautifully.

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1990 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

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Pushing nearly 60 horses out of the 399 cc inline four, the FZR400 had plenty of motivation, though it arrived at a tall 11,500 rpm.  While many larger sportbikes used steel frames, the 400's Deltabox was aluminum.  Front forks were right-sized at 41 mm, and the rear monoshock was only adjustable for preload.  Brakes are capable with twin 282mm front disks and 210mm rear.  Dual headlights dominate the front of the full fairing, and the smallish rider's seat is downstairs from a diminutive pillion.

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20161126-1990-yamaha-fzr400-left-wheel-unfaired

Appearing to be a one-rider bike with under 2,500 miles, this FZR appears unrestored though some freshening up has been done.  A few photos without fairing show this to be a very lightly used and clean example.  As the owner states in the eBay auction:

Impeccable as new condition, legendary Yamaha road racer. One owner 2478 original miles. I have in hand the original title,  bill of sale/invoice & all Yamaha documents. All stock, except for braided steel front brake lines, aftermarket fork springs, new tires & a new sealed gel battery. Carbs have a recent sync, head decarbonized & valve clearances checked. This bike runs as good as it looks. Starts & idles smoothly hot or cold. Great verbal history as well.

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20161126-1990-yamaha-fzr400-right-engine-unfaired

The Japanese manufacturers have an extraordinarily competitive spirit, and innovations of the mid-1980's that had recently been on their GP bikes soon found their way to the showroom.  While the FZR400 never had quite the speed of the Honda or Kawasaki, there was a build quality and price advantage which translated into more racetrack time, where truth will out.  This FZR400 has been renewed mechanically and looks ready to help the next rider discover that truth again, but this time in a subdued paint scheme, instead of the usual red and white...

-donn

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Black Friday – 1990 Yamaha FZR400