Posts by tag: tribute

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Ducati April 19, 2022 posted by

Featured Listing – 1991 Ducati 851 SP2 Tribute

Update 5.3.2022: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations buyer and seller! -dc

Legendary as the Ducati 851 was, the racing department made several updates which were offered in the guise of the SP2.  A previous owner and Northwest European’s present client honed their 851 into this sharp-edged SP2 replica, beautifully presented here.

1991 Ducati 851 SP2 Tribute

Arguably Ducati’s first superbikes, the 851 was powered by their first desmoquatro, with water cooling and fuel injection also firsts for the model.  The SP2 had well over 100 hp per liter available at 116 hp, pushing the full fairing through the speed traps north of 150 mph.  The trellis frame, single rectangular headlight and hinged fuel tank are classic now, but new then.  But it was largely the components that the SP2 was sold to homologate – a close ratio gearbox, fully adjustable inverted forks, Öhlins monoshock, and cross-drilled Brembo brakes. 

Jason at Northwest European is a friend of RSBFS, and has helped the owners of this SP2 replica preserve and maintain this excellent tribute.  Though not an 888, so many SP2 details have been up-cycled that it is a dead ringer for the unicorn.  Most evident are the monoposto tailcone and SP2 triple tree with number plate, but look underneath for the alloy seat and fairing supports, billet brake calipers, and braided lines.  The carbon rear mudguard and large diameter Ferracci exhaust are more modern upgrades.  A few of Jason’s notes from the Northwest European web page:

Visually, the overall condition of this Ducati beguiles the 30 years since original construction. Essentially every detail of this machine from the lightweight bodywork, front and rear aluminum subframe, OEM Ducati tail section, machined details, and refined mechanical features are beautifully polished, honed, and properly maintained to factory specifications. The tires, massive Brembo brake calipers, drilled disc brake surfaces, and drive chain are all in excellent condition. The engine fires off brilliantly with crisp throttle response, fantastic exhaust note, and blistering acceleration even on mild throttle. Every aspect of this SP2 tribute confirms the magic and iconic status of these original race-bred bikes.

This Ducati is accompanied by a factory owner’s manual, service manual, original tail section and subrame and a support stand dolly for the rear wheel. Also includes original exhaust. Featuring fresh fluids throughout, and less than 50 miles on the cam belts, it’s a true museum piece, or ready to ride this weekend as desired.

Please contact Jason Harris at 206-355-7727 for more information on this 1991 Ducati 851 SP2 Tribute.

Rarity for the 851 is assured, with production well under 1,500 in any of its five years, though seasons might pass between SP2 sightings.  And while not sure the 37cc difference from the 888 would be easy to discern, DMV will quickly point out that SP2’s were never intended for the street, but this replica can be ridden and not only trailered to an event.  This might be a perfect compromise for a rider / collector – skillfully conceived and executed, impeccably maintained, and ready to show and register.

Check out – Northwest European’s page –  or give Jason a call at 206-355-7727 to discuss.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1991 Ducati 851 SP2 Tribute
Suzuki January 17, 2022 posted by

Upsizing – 1985 Suzuki RG500 in Australia

Update: this listing expired overnight, but is still worth a look !  Push “See original listing”  -donn

Most RG500’s seen on RSBFS chronicle the lucky-if-you-can-hang-on 500 two-stroke, but this Aussie example has been bored out to 570cc and well equipped to handle the extra ponies.  It’s finished in a very good dub of Heron Racing’s 80’s livery, and looks just about flawless.

1985 Suzuki RG500 ( Australia ) for sale on eBay

Suzuki had delayed the road-going RG500 until GP technology had moved on a bit ( and engineers had also wrapped up their work on the GSX-R750 ) but it was still heralded as a race bike for the road.  Its 95 hp were a revelation for a ride weighing under 400 lbs., though the square four’s airboxes filled out the fairing.  Using a small cross section alloy chassis, Hamamatsu carefully engineered the RG500 to handle the power, along with air adjustable forks with anti-dive.  Smallish 260mm brakes and staggered 16 and 17-inch wheels were along the smaller, lighter line to quickness.

Evidently built and imported from England, this RG500 shows beautifully and has some later, larger brakes to go with its additional horsepower, and lightweight modular Astralite wheels.  Not quite sure what year this animal is, but there’re no significant differences over the three model years.  Suzuki had their own Skoal livery for a few limited editions, but this more faithful replica has a bit more flash.  Comments from the eBay auction:

Well this is a hard one as I absolutely LOVE this bike.
Bike was built in England and I have many many receipts, can’t remember when she was brought into Australia but it was a long time and has been previously registered in WA, so no issues there.
The bike is now a 570 with Jim Lomas pipes, Astra Light Wheels and bigger brakes etc, all of the original parts paper work and workshop manual go with the sale.
Plastics are all original Suzuki, also have the original pillion seat.
I ride this bike at least twice a month and it absolutely beautiful to ride, I am fortunate enough to have two RG’s and this is my favorite but due to downsizing she has to go.
This bike is an absolute show stopper and I doubt you will see another one like her, irreplaceable in my mind. 

Team Heron was contracted when Suzuki took a break from a works GP team, and had some significant success with factory support.  They even commissioned a series of – carbon fiber chassis and swingarms – which gave the fire breathing lump a stable if all-enclosing platform.  Suzuki’s Skoal livery was a tribute to the team’s efforts, and appeared on a few different models.  Nice to hear this example is ridden regularly, and looks so great even so.  The ask is right up there and the post-transaction costs won’t be insignificant, but could be a smart investment given the current market.

-donn

 

 

Upsizing – 1985 Suzuki RG500 in Australia
Honda November 19, 2019 posted by

Your Lying Eyes – 1984 Honda VT-500FT Ascot

Honda’s middleweight Ascot shared the legendary dirt track’s name with a basic fun-looking design. Marketing knew better than to play up the innovative engine and low-maintenance shaft drive.  This low-mile example has been lightly customized as an HRC lookalike.

1984 Honda VT-500FT Ascot for sale on eBay

Never just sticking a toe in, Honda had carefully considered the VT engine, and used a traditional-looking 52-degree angle, but offset the crank throws to reduce vibration.  Engineers had also been at the heads, and specified a three valve arrangement with twin spark plugs, grabbing 50hp from the 491cc’s.  Water cooling kept the rear cylinder cool and made the fins a styling element.  Brakes were on a budget with a single front disk and drum rear, and the shaft drive had just the right geometry to not over-react.  High pegs, small tank ( and seat ) and low bars kept the emphasis on sport.

This California owner has done a masterful tribute with a paint scheme evoking HRC’s RS750 racer, and incorporated Ascot Park’s logo on the side covers.  35 year-old mechanicals have been freshened up with a dual exhaust, carb cleaning, and new rubber.  The round headlight is a nice touch.  From the eBay auction:

The bike has some nice new or newer accessories on it including:
* Beautiful new HRC paint scheme professionally done with period decals.
* A nice two into two chrome exhaust system getting rid of that boat anchor, restrictive OEM system..
* New Dunlop K180 rear tire. Front tire is almost new.
* Control Cables.
* New battery.
* Carburetors were cleaned.
* New turn signals and round headlight (replaces the ugly square one).
* Starts right up and runs, shifts and stops as it should.
Lightweight and peppy little shaft drive bike.  Really cool around town or even for medium distance freeway rides.  Sounds nice with this new exhaust system.  Slick 6 speed transmission with a cute little light that says OD when you shift into 6th.  Be the only one in the pits with a “one off” RS500 Honda!  All electronics work.  Headlight, hi/low beams, turn signals, horn, etc.

Leave it to Honda to have a sportily camouflaged bike with a bunch of the latest technology aboard, almost maintenance free to boot.  Precious little in common with the fire breathing four-valve RS750 which took the Grand National Championship 1984-87, but the VT engine went on to power a gazillion Shadows.  The factory exited the flat track arena after intake restrictors were introduced, but had certainly proved their point.  This knowing homage looks to be a lot of fun with a low starting bid.

-donn

 

Your Lying Eyes – 1984 Honda VT-500FT Ascot
Kawasaki July 12, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 “Goose” Tribute

Update 8.24.2018: The Goose has been SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Rather than the bloated KZ1000P CHiPs workhorse, Mad Max’s not-so-distant future police bike was more of a café racer with lights.  And a siren.  This owner gave a down-on-its-luck Z1000 LTD a makeover right up Goose’s alley.

1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 “Goose” Tribute

The LTD turns out to be a nice choice for the Main Force Patrol build, with its slightly smaller and more responsive Mikuni carburetors with accelerator pump.  The 1015 cc’s on the stock machine made 86 hp and 61 ft.-lbs. torque, though the PMC exhaust fitted here may release a few extra ponies.  Most of the LTD’s other attributes are cosmetic, except for the 16-inch rear wheel which has been corrected to an 18.  Elsewhere it’s standard Z1000 – endless torque, three big stainless disk brakes, and just a hint of secondary vibration.

Owner / builder Dave kept an eye on usability during the work, though it is the spitting image of the movie machine.  Airtech’s decision to manufacture the bodywork was a key motivator.  The chassis and drivetrain were gone over, and only altered in terms of the imported PMC exhaust.  Execution is sanitary and graphics are spot on.  Bespoke rearsets led to rear brake updates and handlebar controls were modernized.  Dave says  this about the work:

Many components have been upgraded in the process and in and effort to make the bike as close to the film version as possible.

First off the 16” LTD rear wheel was tossed in favor of the correct 18” variety. This was sourced from a 1984 GPz 750 and completely refurbished with new bearings, spacers, paint, polish and clear coat.

The existing rear brakes were worn out and not worth saving, so the rear caliper is now a 1985 KZ1000P,  connected to a rear master cylinder from a 1996 ZX600, as required by the custom, billet rear sets from PDM Fabrication.  

The exhaust is a very rare, PMC 4-2 crossover system from Japan, that is a flawless recreation of the system that was on the movie bike. It also sounds brilliant. The carbs have been completely gone through, cleaned thoroughly and jetted properly for the exhaust and airbox combo.

Front wheel is the correct 19” factory mag, completely refurbished as well and sporting new bearings and spacers.

As stated, all the body work came from Airtech and was painted locally by Anthony at Bridge City Cycles

The matching Airtech seat pan was covered by Shelby Schafer and is a perfect fit over the tail section.

All the handle bar controls are 1996 ZX600 parts.  This isn’t screen accurate, but the quality is so far ahead of the vintage stuff, it’s worth it to have a slight inaccuracy. Also with a nod towards modern technology, the front master cylinder is from a 06 Yamaha R6 and the clutch perch is from the same ZX600.

The “Max” movies launched a fan cult that continues almost forty years on, and there are kits of MFP bodywork to fit 1/12 scale models of the Z1000, as well as Jim “Goose” action figures.  But this one you can actually ride.  Restoration and upgrades have resulted in a much safer and better-running Z1000.  It’s sure to be the hit of any show, though younger riders might have to google MFP.  Dave asks $12,000 for the Goose tribute.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1980 Kawasaki KZ1000 “Goose” Tribute
Kawasaki July 16, 2014 posted by

Sweet Ride, Man: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale

Here’s one I’d normally post up over at our sister site classicsportbikesforsale.com, but it’s rare and it’s a sportbike, so I thought this crowd could use a formal introduction to the Kawasaki Z1R-TC. If you’re one of those folks who equate “sportbikes” with “handling”, you may not be familiar with this hulking brute of a machine with a hand grenade for an engine and power to severely overwhelm the limited frame and suspension technology of the day. What’s more exciting than that? I mean, Russian Roulette counts as a sport, right?

In the car world of the 1980’s, turbos seemed like the perfect way to increase power and performance in a world suddenly obsessed with efficiency and air quality, and they were getting slapped onto just about everything, so it was only a matter of time before the obsession with boost spilled over into the two-wheeled scene, and Kawasaki was way ahead of the curve on this particular trend.

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC L Side

The TC was conceived as a quick way to move some lame-duck stock out of showrooms and give Kawasaki a performance feather in their cap. Collaborating with the Turbo Cycle Company, Kawasaki simply converted complete bikes with a bolt-on kit running 8-10psi of boost. Upgraded internals were available for purchase separately but were generally not installed.

In what would be an almost comical nightmare of liability today, buyers simply signed off on powertrain warranty waivers before whooshing off into the nearest wall, or blew themselves up when they ignored the sticker clearly warning them not to tamper with the wastegate to increase boost. Now who’d wanna do something like that?

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC L Side Low

And even if you didn’t detonate your engine or wheelie into a tree, the very crude turbocharging technology led to wild, on/off boost delivery and made riding this a bit more terrifying than exciting: bendy 1970’s frame and suspension technology combined with an engine that was already plenty powerful before you stuck a honking big turbo on it to give you the worst of both worlds, and a challenge fit for the manliest of motorcyclists…

This particular machine is technically not one of the original bikes and is, according to the seller, a “tribute” built up from a regular Z1R. But honestly this probably feels pretty authentic, since the original bikes were mostly cobbled-together from completed stock bikes.

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC Dash

I really do wish these people would roll their bikes out of the garage to take some of these pictures, though. It will probably help if you imagine Matthew McConaughey reading this out loud as his character from Dazed and Confused.

From the original eBay listing: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale

Truly awesome looking Z1R turbo with custom Molly graphics and recently painted black bodywork updates,powdercoated frame, many chrome parts on engine,kickstand,etc…very nice Z1R mag wheels,1 of a kind custom seat,early ATP turbo kit with log header pipe + “F” flow high volume compressor complimenting the 1200cc big bore motor  This is not a bike for the timid or in-experienced pilot….even with only 8-10 lbs. boost ,its very VERY fast!(of course you can ride it all day long without getting on boost,its all in your right wrist you know) This is a one of a kind bike with many tasteful updates + cool improvements…tires are in great shape..bike is very stable at high speed with  front steering dampner,fork brace and fully adjustable Marzocchi rear shocks keeping things under control…

Look, let’s be clear here: I’m sure those rear shocks are an improvement, but there’s no way they actually tamed this beast. You think you’re all slick, using trail-braking out there, or using a bit of rear brake to settle the suspension? Try this for some fancy footwork: the power delivery for the TC was so laggy that fast passing on the road called for you to hold the throttle open to keep boost up, while dragging the brakes to keep the speed under control, waiting for an opening in traffic. Sort of like a rolling drag-strip launch…

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC R Side Front

An exciting, hugely flawed stopgap before the much more modern GPz that followed, the Z1R-TC and the other turbo bikes of the era were an interesting footnote in motorcycling history. While not necessarily all that fast on a winding road, these are massively entertaining on the boost and could be a fun, point-and-hang-on-for-dear-life machine for scaring unsuspecting riders of modern bikes.

Ultimately, the turbo craze was a dead-end for motorcycles: they significantly increased complexity with no real upside: their power delivery was not really suitable bikes of the period and, in most cases, a simple displacement boost proved to be a more effective, reliable way of increasing performance. But whatever, man. Maybe people were just too square to get it.

-tad

1978 Kawasaki Z1R TC R Side

Sweet Ride, Man: 1978 Kawasaki Z1R-TC for Sale