Posts by tag: prototype

Norton January 7, 2020 posted by

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

The history of rotary motorcycles is relatively short and includes a few technologically interesting, but largely unsuccessful motorcycles by Hercules, Suzuki, and Nortons. I’ll admit that I’m stretching the definition of “sport bike” much more than I usually do with this Norton Commando P52 police bike, but it’s such an oddball I had to post it. I mean, how could I not post a fully-faired Norton rotary-powered motorcycle? Hey, at least the P52 shared the same basic engine with the very rare and sporty Norton F1!

A rotary engine is elegant simplicity in concept, but problematic in execution: they have very few moving parts, and no need for camshafts, as the rotors themselves effectively open and close the fuel/air inlets. There are no poppet valves to bounce and play havoc when they try to share space with fast-moving pistons, and their rotational motion means they’re extremely smooth, compared to a reciprocal piston engine. One can understand an interest in avoiding engine vibration, as Norton’s previous parallel twins required the company to engineer the famous “Isolastic” mounting system to prevent the bikes from basically shaking themselves and their riders to pieces.

Unfortunately, Norton traded one set of problems for another by switching to a rotary design and, aside from a few spectacularly cool racebikes that did well in competition and a few road going F1 replicas to match, the bike was a relative failure. Rotaries tend to run hot, so after an initial run of air-cooled motorcycles, Norton switched their twin-rotor design to liquid cooling, which helped control temperatures somewhat, but added weight and complexity. Overall, Norton managed to work out most of the bugs, aside from emissions, fuel economy, and problematic apex seals. Reliability improved, but the bike didn’t really offer much of a performance advantage, compared to conventional machines, and it never really found enough of an audience to justify itself or save Norton from insolvency.

Rotary-powered cars haven’t fared all that much better than rotary-powered motorcycles: enthusiasts may love them, but warranty claims for NSU’s R0 80 basically sank the company and Mazda’s rotary has been in and out of production for years, owing to their fairly horrible fuel consumption and issues with emissions, as well as rotor apex seal durability. Ultimately, they’re not the simplest, or most efficient way to motivate a motorcycle. Considering the hard miles law-enforcement machines rack up, I can only imagine the headaches experienced by officers using a Norton Commander P52 in the field…

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale

This is a very rare Norton Rotary motorcycle and is in running condition.  It was sold to the Dubai (Middle East) Police Department as a demonstrator, probably with the hope of a large fleet sale.  I purchased this bike in the UK around 1995 and have finally been able to go thru it and get it 100% running and titled in the State of Arizona.

This bike has matching frame (VIN) and engine numbers.

This bike has a calibrated speedometer and has only 1150 original miles from new. Very little was done to bring the bike up to full running condition. As it sat for years (always indoors), I had to professionally rebuild the SU carbs with proper parts from the UK. As a safety measure the fuel lines were replaced due to age and hardness. (I have the old fuel lines for historical reasons). 31 years ago Iridium spark plugs were not yet either in wide use or even available. These plugs are well suited for an engine that burns oil  (as is the case in 2 stroke or rotary engines) so I installed NGK Iridium plugs in this bike to minimize fouling and promote easy starting and running. Again, I have the stock plugs. Norton also recommended Shell Rotella oil but once again I did some research and was advised by several people in the know that the Shell oil is perhaps not the best modern choice of rotary oil. Mazda, who perhaps has more success with the rotary engine in the world had commissioned Idemitsu  of Japan to develop a full synthetic oil for use tn their rotary engines. I decided that the Idemitsu oil was the best modern choice for the Norton Rotary and drained the oil tank and replaced the engine oil with Idemitsu full synthetic oil designed for the rotary engine.

The bike has all the equipment as shipped from the factory, including a 58/100 watt siren, front and rear blue flashing strobe lights and the STOP POLICE illuminated  rear sign. I have 2 new screen printed extras that were made by a friend of mine in the sign business. The siren can be heard for miles so I will include a 100 Watt audio L PAD that can be plugged in line with the siren driver to safely adjust the volume to a comfortable level. I Laser cut a “Norton” sign to replace the Police sign if so desired.

The machine uses 2 batteries and new sealed batteries were installed recently. ALL keys are included and except for the trunk key, duplicates were made for the rest.

The factory workshop manual only ever existed as a “work in progress” but I was able to secure a copy of the manual as a draft. All further work on the full published manual stopped when Norton shut down. I was also able to secure a full wiring drawing of the bike.

Several sales brochures  for the strobes and siren manufacture are part of the literature package included. A full parts list with images is part of the sale.

Norton designed in some unique features into this machine such as a 100% enclosed rear drive chain with an oil bath to promote long life. Built into the trunk is an on board battery charger with the typical UK plug and 240 volt AC input. I designed and built a 110 VAC to 240 VAC step up transformer, all mounted in a plastic box with a UK socket. This allows the built in battery charger to operate properly from US 110 VAC power.

The original owners manual, operators manual, and color sales brochure are part or the package along with letters from Norton to the Dubai authorities and letters in Arabic back to Norton.

The brake system had to be 100% rebuilt as the DOT 3 fluid had started to degrade. All calipers, and master cylinders were completely rebuilt and the fluid was replaced with DOT 5 silicone fluid to eliminate any future  concerns. Again, due to the age of the machine I did change the antifreeze coolant. The rubber hoses connecting the radiator to engine have hardened to the point of minor leaking… I have factory original  replacements that  have not been installed yet.

The tool pouch was missing the basic tools except for the important real wheel axle spanner wrench.

As the bike in NOT restored, various scratches and blemishes exist. I went so far as to NOT polish the bike in any way. To the best of my knowledge the bike is as described.

The Norton F1 is the bike we’d normally want to feature here on RSBFS, being a full-on race-replica with pretty solid performance credentials. The sport-touring Commander seen here used a variation of the liquid-cooled two-rotor powerplant, with fully-faired bodywork that included integral panniers, although later machines used detachable luggage instead. The starting bid is set at $15,000 which seems… honestly, I’d have no idea how to value this bike, but hopefully some collector with a taste in interesting machinery will give it a good home!

-tad

You’ll Never Take Me Alive, Copper! 1989 Norton Commander P52 for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale March 25, 2018 posted by

Prototype Brawler: 2012 Confederate X132 Hellcat Serial #001 for Sale

All right, all right. I know it’s probably not technically a sportbike. But all Confederates are extremely rare by their nature, and the very definition of exotic. The X132 Hellcat is more musclebike in terms of looks and riding position, the components list looks like an exotic owner’s Christmas wish list: BST carbon-fiber wheels, Berringer brake and clutch master cylinders, huge Brembo calipers, WP suspension, and a classy, high-tech MotoGadget gauge to keep tabs on the revs and other parameters.

There’s an American v-twin powering the Hellcat, but you’re looking at much more than a warmed-over Harley engine. It’s been built by Harley specialists S&S, but is their own design and shares nothing but inspiration with Harley’s 45° twin. Cylinders are splayed at 56°, with square internal dimensions and huge pistons that displace 2163cc. The result? 121 horses and an insane 14o ft-lbs of twist that almost justifies the 240-section rear tire wrapped around the carbon-fiber wheel. The box has just five speeds but, given that torque, it’d probably work just fine with four. Or three…

 

Sure, the Hellcat sacrifices cornering a bit for style, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing, since most of us shouldn’t be pushing the limits of a bike this valuable. And even if you don’t like the overall looks, it’s hard not to get lost in the details: the clear window in side of the cases that show off the gears that drive the cams, the sight glass in the frame behind the steering head that shows the oil level, since it’s conveniently stored there, the machined-from-billet everything… Love it or hate it, this is a boutique motorcycle with the very best hand-crafted components.

From the original eBay listing: 2012 Confederate X132 Hellcat Prototype Serial # 001 for Sale

Up for auction OR TRADE FOR COLLECTOR/SPORT CARS (AND TRADES FOR 1986 HONDA Z50 CHROME CHRISTMAS SPECIAL MINI BIKES) is a rare opportunity to own a piece of motorcycle history. This bike was owned and operated by the land speed record holder, James Hoegh until I purchased it directly from him. I purchased this bike because I fell in love with the design, and the history. Its not a practical bike for me and it belongs in a collection or a museum. This is a unique bike that has lots of custom attributes listed below: It does have Dual high intensity xenon headlights. Clip on handle bars. 132 CI S&S Engine with a 1 piece forged crank. 132 HP and 145 ft’ of torque. 5 speed manual transmission with GP style shifting, 1 gear up and 4 gears down. Custom Marzocchi 50MM race forks that are adjustable. Race tech coil over shock in rear that is fully adjustable. Dual disc Brembo brakes up front with a single brembo disc in the rear with a 2 piston caliper. BST carbon fiber wheel, front and rear. 28″ seat height. Oil is circulated through the frame for cooling purposes. Large oil sight glass on on driver side where triple tree meets frame. There are a couple rock nicks in the forks which I have photo graphed. This bike is sold with a framed certificate of provenance & authenticity from Confederate motorcycle company.

The price for muscle-bike perfection and visibly, spin-y gears? A Buy-It-Now price of $40,000 which seems almost reasonable, considering the prices of new Confederates. Certainly, if you’re looking to add something rare and unusual to your collection, you can’t go wrong with #001, although it’s a shame you’d damage the value by putting miles on it. Maybe if you just live your life a quarter mile at a time and blast from stoplight-to-stoplight, it’ll take a long time to add up any meaningful mileage…

-tad

Prototype Brawler: 2012 Confederate X132 Hellcat Serial #001 for Sale
Suzuki December 28, 2017 posted by

Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Although displacement was technically a bit more than a liter, the first generation Suzuki GSX-R1100 really established the modern literbike formula: take a big inline four engine, and squeeze it into a 600 or 750 sized package. The philosophy that created the iconic Gixxer was initially tried out with Suzuki’s GSXR400, and the result was so good they applied the same lightweight methodology to a 750cc machine, and the GSX-R750 was born in 1985, with the 1100cc version following in 1986. Frames of the 750 and 1100cc versions aren’t identical, but are pretty similar, with the 1100 using thicker square-section aluminum tubing to increase rigidity and handle the extra power of the larger engine.

The 1100 engine actually displaced 1052cc and shared its SACS oil-cooling system with the 750cc version: in both cases, Suzuki avoided the additional weight and complexity that water-cooling would bring by using air and oil to keep the twin-cam, four-valve engine within appropriate operating temperatures. But the high-performance engine needed some additional help to keep from exploding, so the Suzuki Advanced Cooling System used a complex oil pump to circulate oil, lubricate bearings, cool the heads, and even featured oil jets directed at the bottom of the pistons. With 137hp on tap, the big Slabbie was a bit of a monster, as it had just 489lbs dry to push around. That’s obviously not hugely impressive today, but keep in mind that the bike’s 75lb-ft of torque isn’t all that far off a modern superbike and meant that the big Gixxer could pull like a freight train.

The 1100 wasn’t exactly agile, but it did handle well for the time on its 18” wheels with tires that are laughably skinny by today’s standards. The 1100 featured a set of sophisticated anti-dive forks and Suzuki’s Full-Floater linkage rear suspension kept the power in check, while providing a less punishing ride than was typical of hard-core sportbikes of the era. A modern-ish brake set up with a catchy Deca-Piston name slowed things down for the next bend: a pair of four-piston calipers up front mated to a twin piston item in the rear meant ten whole speed-retarding pistons were on hand to keep you from crashing into a hedge when the world turned twisty after you got a bit too liberal with your right hand. It all added up to a bike that was a little on the heavy side, but one that offered good stability and world-class power, a wildly fast GT with Japanese reliability. Obviously, companies like Bimota used the same elements to create their lightweight road weapons prior to the introduction of the GSX-R, but Suzuki took that basic formula, added a dash of reliability, and brought it to the masses.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale

Obviously the posted asking price is a silly one, but we are open to all offers that respect this motorcycles exceptional condition as well as its rarety and we will not scoff at anyones idea of what its value should, would or could be in todays international bike collectors market place

Suzuki GSX-R1100 No. 1 Details

This mid 1985 build / 1986 first registered Suzuki GSXR-1100 was one of the centerpieces of our small private collection and is one of just a handfull of bikes left from said collection which we have been dissolving this past year, mostly due to age and health related reasons and because we are consolidating all our personal items and scaling back from multiple locations to just one place to live and because we are giving up our motorcycle hobby alltogether

This is not a ‘normal’ motorcycle in ‘average’ condition so the text describing it and this sale’s particulars might be somewhat different than what one would normally see in a listing here on Ebay. Please go to our Seller Feedback Rating to see what previous buyers have consistently been saying about us in the past 17 years in regards to every single item we have sold here on Ebay

The first GSXR 1100 was a groundbraking motorcycle in more ways than one, it started the era of large displacement, light weight Superbikes in the mid-80-ies

Being able to own an original, genuine, verifiable with factory documentation, unrestored Vin-1/Engine-1 vehicle of any type, make or model has got to be at the top of most collectors list of must-have‘s.

The vehicle being a top displacement model from one of the major motorcycle manufacturers should make it even more desirable

Details:

Mid-1985 build earliest prototype Suzuki GSX-R1100 in existence

Was the secret ‘Star’ in our small personal bike collection for many years

Verifiably a genuine Serial No.1 and Engine No.1 motorcycle. One of a small number of GSX-R1100-eds build by hand in the factory to set up the subsquent 1986 assembly line production run. This motorcycle was build with a handmade, prototype frame, on a prototype frame jig and it contains many one-off features and components.

Details on request in person would be best; to list just a few major ones:

This GU74 series bike has the early prototype exhaust without the toe-heatshield, it also has the early version clutch cover without any oil-amount stamped in the specific location where all other bikes have the cc amount stamped in

It has the correct, prototype-only all metal footpegs for rider and passenger since the rubber/metal type was not yet ready for use. It has all the original bodywork pieces mounted, in the original factory paintjob.

Some of the panels have some lines and colors that do not really match and line up correctly and do not match any other painted-alike original bike of the same type.

There are many more differences and details on this special bike,

too much to list them all here in this basic description

A correct and proper title exists for this motorcycle as does its original November 1985 first print Din-A5 owners manual.

Also present is the correct, original and super rare 4-language, first edition spareparts manual, printed in Dezember of 1985 in which this specific motorcycle’s exact Vin Number is listed as the starting Vin for the entire series of GSXR 1100 bikes for the next 3 year production run.

Four original sales brochures including the first edition english market version with print date of December 1985 are included in the memorabilia folder. The original keys, 4 correct A27 dark tinted turnsignals, the original toolkit with the rare Suzuki air gauge in its pouch, used for fork pressure and tires and the original GSX-R prototype factory display stand for motorcycle shows complete this offering.

We have owned this motorcycle for many years and have done a lot of research into the history of these early prototype GSX-R 1100-eds (the GSX-R750 also had some early prototypes build in the factory in Japan, none of which we have ever seen come up for sale in the past 15 years)

We have never seen any prototype GSXR-1100 for sale, they were not supposed to be sold to the public, being used mostly for press events, cycle shows and as photo models for the many different manuals and brochures. They were also being returned to the factory after they had been used for all these events and most of them were destroyed

Rumors of an early prototype 1100 existing in the UK in a private collection have so far not been confirmed. In any case, the bike offered here for sale is one of a kind, completely original, never repainted, never restored, exceptionally well kept up mechanically as well as cosmetically and should deserve a place in a serious motorcycle collection or possibly a private museum of some sort. It was ridden extensively in its 33 years, but always cared for and babied to keep it in this exceptional condition

We have prepared an online photo album showing this motorcycle in detail in more than 100 high quality images that might be of interest to a serious collector.

The seller mentions the “silly asking price” and $250,000 [yes, you read that correctly] is certainly silly for anything short of TE Lawrence’s Brough Superior or a MotoGP bike in rideable condition with a truckload of spares. But they’re just putting that out there, and are open to offers. Which is a good thing because, as cool as this is, I doubt it’s worth anything near $250,000. Obviously, a rare bike is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it, but I get the feeling that only a very particular sort of collector will want to pony up, since although it’s rarer, it’s also a little bit cruder, from the seller’s description. The question is: what is it worth? Well, nice original “slabbie” GSX-Rs sell for around $7,000 or so, with only the GSX-R750 LEs really getting much higher. This one could obviously worth much more, being a prototype machine and the very first registered example of a bike that pretty much defined the modern superbike. I’ll be curious to see where it ends up.

-tad

Number One: Prototype 1986 Suzuki GSX-R1100 for Sale
Ducati November 29, 2017 posted by

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ducati built just 1,000 of the stunning MH900e in 2001 and 2,000 the following year, making this one obviously a bit interesting right out of the gate. It’s apparently a pre-production prototype, with some clear differences between it and the regular production version, although the original flat-black pre-production bodywork has been replaced with a set of very sexy carbon-fiber Ducati Performance parts as seen in the photos.

Pierre Terblanche’s redesign of Ducati’s 998 superbike may have been controversial, but he was on-point here with this Mike Hailwood tribute. The styling of the MH900e wraps a modern-ish two-valve v-twin powertrain, stiff trellis frame, and quality suspension in bodywork that manages to be both futuristic and retro at the same time. There are hints of NCR’s racebikes, the Ducati Pantah, Hailwood’s TT machine, and the undertail exhaust suggests the 998.

Power from the 904cc air and oil-cooled twin was modest, with a claimed 75hp at the rear wheel, although the engine’s flexibility and torque mean that there’s more performance on tap than meets the eye when pushing the 410lb machine. Ergonomics were pretty cruel and the seat very tall, but at least the tiny stock 2.2 gallon fuel tank meant plenty of chances to stretch when you pause to fill up: even allowing for the Ducati’s good fuel mileage, you’re still looking at just 90 miles or so between stops.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Ducati MH900e Factory Prototype for Sale

For sale a unique, once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire the real factory prototype of the DUCATI MH900e.

Here below a little description of this particular model:

The MH900e began as a concept created by the Ducati designer Pierre Terblanche in homage to Mike Hailwood’s 1978 win of the Isle of Man TT. Giving way to the model designation “MH”.

In September 1998 the sketch was presented to the general public at the Intermot Show in Munich and met with rave reviews. Due to the enthusiastic response from the press and public, Ducati decided to post a questionnaire on their website to test the true interest of the MH900e fans. 300 Ducatisti responded positively. With this information, Federico Minoli and Massimo Bordi (General Manager of Ducati) decided to take the risk and produce a limited run of two thousand hand-built bikes. The first one thousand bikes would be produced in 2000 and the second thousand would be produced in 2001.

The sale of the MH900e was as unique as the bike itself. Ducati made the decision to sell the new bike directly to the consumer exclusively via the Internet in a form of e-commerce known as B-2-C (Business to Consumer). This was a first for any motorcycle manufacturer. It was a risky move, but the result could not have been any better

The Ducati website opened for orders on January 1, 2000 at 00:01am GMT at a price of 15,000. The first 1000 units were sold out in 31 short minutes. The remaining bikes were sold over the next few weeks. Individuals made purchases from 20 different countries. The estimated breakdown of the sales was 30% from Europe, 30% from the US and 39% from Japan.

This particular bike was used by Ducati Experience Department to control all assemblies, parts and components, to make sure everything was fitting and operating properly before production started. Many components are “one-off”, and many were pre-production pieces. the battery holding frame is unique, showing a different position of the battery with respect of the production bikes. also the front fairing frame is a bit different than production ones. All of these parts were carefully kept to maintain the originality of the bike, and to show the real spirit of this amazing prototype. like the top fork tee which was left raw instead of being polished like the production ones.

On the gas tank there are signatures and dates, possibly showing various stages of testing and different phases of assembly. every single piece on this bike is authentic and original Ducati for this model, nothing has been altered or manufactured to complete it.

The bike was acquired from Ducati with a non-production plastic body, painted flat black like the rest of the bike, including frame and swingarm. the exhaust was also custom-made, clearly an assembly try-out, yet perfectly working.

We did a “conservative” restoration on the bike, taking it completely apart, making sure every original bit and piece was kept and restored to obtain this amazing piece. we also decide to maintain the black look that sported when we got it, just upgraded it a bit with proper carbon body and custom-made graphics (Ducati made them for us).

the frame and swingarm are pre-production original and authentic DUCATI MH900E, with correct ZDM homologation number, properly and correctly stamped on the neck, with frame serial number being 0000001. everything legit and correct. fully documented with invoice showing frame and motor number.

Some minor parts like clutch, oil tank, and front brake tank aluminum holders, or the steering damper, are not installed but will be in a short time. Everything works perfectly as it should on this amazing piece. A solid investment for any collector or Ducati aficionados, this is the kind of bike that, few years down the line, will be popping up at auctions. Don’t loose the opportunity.

Shipping worldwide properly crated. Bike is located in Modena, Italy.

There are no takers yet at the $50,000 starting bid, but there’s plenty of time left on the listing. Regular production bikes already command prices of just under $20,000 or so, so I expect that the right collector would pay more for this museum piece. Certainly, it’d be criminal to run it on the road, considering its historical value, even if you could legally register it for road use…

-tad

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati December 28, 2014 posted by

Something Special: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike R Side Front

1987 saw the introduction of a new four-valve, water-cooled L-twin engine in Ducati’s new 851. While the air/oil cooled two-valve motor was and continues to be a motor with impressive tuning potential and durability, it had hit its performance limit in racing, and something new was needed to compete against the four-cylinder bikes from Japan. The liquid-cooled twin was based generally on the air/oil cooled motors: the clutch covers are even interchangeable. But the new engine could rev higher and breathe better, and this meant that Ducati could once again compete on the world stage. Displacing, strangely enough, 851cc’s and producing nearly 100hp in roadgoing trim, the bike challenged the high-winding fury of the fours with a thundering midrange, while the narrow engine allowed for slipperier aerodynamics.

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike R Side Rear

Some bikes look great, no matter what paint scheme, like Ducati’s 916: in nearly any color or race-rep scheme, it always looks terrific. Some are best as roadbikes, like the Triumph Daytona 675: the missing headlights on track bodywork give the bike a sort of blank look to replace the smirking catlike face of the stock machine. Other bikes look much cooler in track bodywork: I really dislike the design of recent GSX-R’s in roadbike trim, but somehow that bulging fairing center that replaces the headlight on an aftermarket fairing gives the bike an aggressive, shark-like aspect.

With slab-sided bodywork and rectangular headlight, I always feel like the 851 just looks dated as a road bike. As a race bike though, it looks brutal and purposeful and this example is much, much more than just some battered privateer 851 racer…

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike L Side Stripped

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale

Fresh from over 20 years of ownership by Mario Calonaci is this Ducati 851 works SBK 1990 prototype. He was a works Ducati mechanic for Giancarlo Falappa, season 1990, 1991, 1992 (and later in SuperSport with Gia.Ca. Moto Ducati 748 with Casoli) but his experience is impressive! He was partner of Segoni and was the mechanic for all his bikes through all the Endurance competitions in the 70’s, then 2 years in Formula One, etc… Unbelievable…

The bike is amazing even if conditions are a little scruffy (stored since 1991, untouched!) as from every detail you see it is a real prototype- hand built!

It has many AMAZING details…such as the casting of the engine cases is marked 1987!!! Please note that production of 851 started in 1988, these are proper early prototype cases (you see also from other details).

Very rare front brake calipers like only the 1990 works (the 1989 were same shape but more gold)-magnesium Marchesini wheels-only works 1989/1990 magnesium yokes made by Marchesini forged (this one marked 20) the following ones were production made by Ohlins-MagnetiMarelli/Weber elettronics with Raychem (f1 silver cables) wiring with position of the CPU on the back, from 1991 they were in front close to the dashboard-all bottom of engine cases machinered for lightning reasons (!!!)-engine cases casting 1987 as only the first racing serie bikes had-amazing unique prototype swingarm!-rear metal subframe, only 1989/1990 works, from 1991 was alluminium-alluminium Termignoni silencers, from 1991 works were carbonfibre- 1989 works clutch -handstamped VIN (with also the homologation code, SBK rules!) as only the first Racing had, later ones were different stamping-as you can see the heads inside are machinered and unused-spring on the rear brake master cylinder as i the works 1989

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike Brake Detail

There are plenty of other quality photos at the original listing, and are well worth a look. The listing also includes a letter from previous owner Mario Calonaci that describes a bit of the bike’s history. The starting bid is $27,500 so you’re looking at a hefty chunk of change for an 851, although even bone-stock examples are steadily increasing in value. This is a very cool machine, although it will probably need a bit of [expensive] love before it’s ready to terrorize your local race track, as it’s been sitting for a while. So buy it and leave it as-is to display it, or get it ready to go as well as it shows and expect to answer a whole lot of questions when you arrive at the track.

-tad

1989 Ducati 851 Race Bike L Side

Something Special: 1989 Ducati 851 Factory Superbike Prototype for Sale