Posts by tag: Gixxer

Suzuki July 10, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Gorgeous One-of-500 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR

Update 7.31.2018: Price reduced to $18,000 USD or best offer. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

The formula for out-of-the box racers has ever been simple: take the street bike, throw in more air and fuel, nip, tuck and trim, and generally make everything less comfortable. Then, cut production, raise the price and call it a special edition. Yamaha is in the midst of making history with its unbelievable R1M, but before all that came the 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR.

It weighed less than the normal version, and went back to the original Gixxer's longer-stroke motor. It was aimed at amateurs and club racers, but could be run as a straight-up streetbike. Not that you'd be able to stomach the agony for more than a few minutes at a stretch, but that didn't matter, did it?

Today's featured listing is a gorgeous example of the model, despite having covered an almost alarming 15,500 kilometers. It's one of a very few that got imported to South Africa, which is where it resides. It's an early bike at number 47.

From the seller:

For sale, this very rare and collectable 1989 Suzuki GSX/R750RR Limited Edition, race replica. Only 500 produced worldwide! This is number 47. Excellent original condition. Even though this is a Japanese model, it has been fully de-restricted and makes full power i.e. Carbs and Jetting, Exhaust, Ignition module.Completely original except for de-restriction. Perfectly maintained, Never raced, Never dropped, Unrestored. Recently serviced and all fluids changed

For avid collectors only. No chancers please! Call Robbie at : 082 4100787 or e-mail directly to boss@bolandbikes.com. R250 - 280K Reasonable offers considered.

The price is listed is now $18k USD obo, which is before you pay to import it, assuming you don't live in South Africa. These things are on their way up, and the way Japanese bikes have been trending, that doesn't seem poised to turn around any time soon.

Featured Listing: Gorgeous One-of-500 1989 Suzuki GSX-R750RR
Suzuki May 22, 2018 posted by

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

"Ram air" was a very 90s gimmick with dubious benefits, especially on the road, but they gave bikes of the 1990s like this Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD a distinctive style, with oversized fairing nostrils and large intake tubes that curved through the rider's view and into the top of the tank to pressurize the airbox. Well "ram air" implies airbox-pressurization at least, but the reality in this case was more form than function. But that minor point aside, the new model was a significant milestone in the history of the Gixxer, and there are very few remaining in this kind of clean, low-mileage condition.

After generations that saw Suzuki's range of sportbikes getting more refined, but ever heavier and slower, the 1996 GSX-R750 SRAD and the smaller 600cc version finally reversed that trend. Suzuki's new Ram Air Direct model was really a complete overhaul of the existing GSX-R: an entirely new aluminum beam frame with claimed ties to Suzuki's GP bike replaced the cradle design, the liquid-cooled engine was narrowed by moving the cam-chain to the end of the block, and basically everything was made smaller and lighter, more compact. It debuted with a bank of carburetors, but the 1998 version seen here added fuel injection.

The result? A bike that was, marketing hype aside, as light as a contemporary 600: 395lbs dry, almost 45lbs lighter than the previous version, with a screaming, 128hp rev-monster motor and a very slick six-speed box that you really needed to abuse if you wanted to make good progress up to the new Gixxer's near 170mph top speed. But that wasn't a problem because the new Gixxer liked abuse. Fully-adjustable upside-down forks helped the bike handle and the six-piston calipers up front may have fallen out of fashion, but certainly look pretty trick.

No one I know seems to be able to clarify for me: do you say "es ar ay de" or do you say "srad" when talking about these bikes? When I ask people keep looking at me like, "Hey, I thought you were supposed to be the expert." However you say it, the SRAD is a nearly classic sportbike with the handling, if not the outright power, to take the fight to modern machines. But throw on some fresh rubber, modern brake pads, and a set of steel-braided lines, and this could be one fun bike with the performance to go with all that nostalgic 90s style.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale

1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 fuel-injected with only 8,000 actual miles! 100% stock. Adult owned! Looks and drives like new! Never dropped! Always in a garage! Has a factory Suzuki bike cover, rear seat, tie-down strips, color-coded tank bra. This is a must see! Turns heads wherever it goes!

I've spared you the all-caps listing and deleted a whole bunch of extraneous exclamation points. You can thank me later. The seller's enthusiastic writing style aside, this is a very clean bike with a clean title and just 8,000 miles. It'd probably be even more desirable in classic Suzuki blue-and-white, but I'm sure the more subtle red-silver-black seen here has its fans.

-tad

 

Ram Air Direct: 1998 Suzuki GSX-R750 SRAD for Sale
Suzuki February 10, 2018 posted by

Rare Screamer: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale

Most times, even if their models share no significant components, motorcycle manufacturers go to great lengths to make sure their bikes all share a strong familial resemblance. In fact, the most recent GSX-R600 and 750 are virtually identical and appear to share their frames and body panels, with only their engine displacements, graphic treatments, and tachometer faces to differentiate them. That makes particular sense at the moment, since the GSX-R750 has pretty much been in a class of one since the the ascendance of the 1000cc machines and developing a bike that shared most of its important components with another mass-produced model was virtually a requirement. Ironically, with the seeming demise of the 600 supersport class, I wonder if it won't be the 750 that has the last laugh... In any event, the designers of the GK71 version of the Suzuki GSX-R400 clearly didn't get that memo.

Taking a look at the bigger 750 and 1100 versions of the GSX-R, this 400 looks markedly different. The tail is sleeker, with a pronounced taper when viewed from the rear, the fairing has several rows of gills, like a small, primitive shark, a single headlight in place of its bigger siblings' round units, and an actual dash, instead of a foam instrument surround. All-in-all, it's very obviously a Suzuki, but looks very little like the larger GSX-R models.

The seller refers to this as a 1987 and a shot of the title confirms this but, supposedly, the 1987 had twin headlamps and gold brake calipers, so this may in fact be a 1986 model year bike, since that appears to have been the only year with the rectangular headlamp. The exhaust pipe would also have more of a perforated style shroud like the 750 and 1100, but the aftermarket Micron fitted here makes it hard to say for sure. Regardless, you're looking at a 398cc inline four making 60hp and backed by a six-speed gearbox, hung in an aluminum twin-spar frame with a weight of 337lbs dry.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale

Here we have a rare, well maintained, and super quick Suzuki GK71 GSX-R400. This is a clean machine sporting corrosion free aluminum frame/swingarm, stock fairings, and only minor imperfections. It sounds great, and pulls linearly all the way up to redline. I had great fun running this bike over the mountain during last year's TT races on the Isle of Man. It ran faultlessly, and was the impetus of many a conversation with other race fans.

The GSX-R400 was rarely seen outside Japan, and there's been little interest in the bike for the most part, as it wasn't nearly as exotic as the Honda NC30, as refined as the CBR400, or as agile and affordable as the FZR400. It was a bit crude in comparison, but was still a very competent, relatively sophisticated machine, and a slight lack of performance compared to rivals shouldn't discourage anyone at this point. 30,000 miles is on the high end for a collectible sportbike, but assuming it's been properly maintained and cared for, that wouldn't put me off too much assuming the price was right. And considering the bidding is up a bit over $1,500 I think you'd have a hard time finding something else that offers this combination of rarity and unintimidating performance.

-tad

Rare Screamer: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK71 for Sale
Suzuki February 2, 2018 posted by

Big Style, Modest Power: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK76 for Sale

I ran into a nice young rider the other weekend while I was eyeing his flat grey EBR 1190RX. We talked about the bike and all its neato Buell-y features, and he asked me what I was riding, so I introduced him to my Daytona, which also happens to be grey... "Aren't you a little big for that?" He asked.  Obvious "that's what she said" jokes aside, it highlighted a common misconception, at least here in the USA: smaller sportbikes are "learner" machines, and serious riders should move up to a "real" bike as soon as possible. Of course, bikes like today's Suzuki GSX-R400 are an argument that maybe smaller is just fine, and that there's plenty of fun to be had on a motorcycle that offers serious handling, but only modest straight-line performance.

Strict licensing and taxes on displacement mean that bigger bikes can be flat out impossible in many overseas markets, no matter your experience or skill. In those places it was often the 400cc class that was hotly contested throughout the late 80s and early 90s: witness the fact that the FZR600 was the lowest-spec bike of Yamaha's sportbike range with a glaring, low-tech difference: it used a relatively heavy steel frame instead of a lighter aluminum unit as seen on the 400cc and 1000cc models. In fact, the very first GSX-R was actually a 400cc model, and Suzuki applied the lessons learned to their smash-hit GSX-R750, although many aren't aware that the earlier bike even existed.

The third iteration of the evergreen Gixxer is also currently the least desirable, and this GSX-R400 is styled to match its bigger siblings. Not only does this generation still exist in that nether region between classic and modern, the bikes were generally heavier than the bikes they followed, with less performance. The Gixxer was peakier and a bit cruder than competitors like the CBR400, and as a result it was a bit of an also-ran, although it should still offer plenty of bang for your buck. Weight for this version of the GSX-R400 was 367lbs dry and the little 398cc inline four made 59hp at 12,500rpm.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 for Sale

Up for No Reserve auction we have a 1991 Suzuki GK76 GSX-R400. This bike sports slick OEM graphics, and is quite a good looking machine. It has recently been tagged and registered in Tennessee and is ready for the road. On the performance front I feel the carbs would benefit from a good cleaning. With that said, the bike starts up easily enough, idles, and runs right on up to redline. These are rather difficult to come by, and this one will make a nice addition to someone's collection.

Considering how popular Suzuki's sportbikes have been worldwide, it's surprising we haven't seen more of these up for sale here in the US, now that they can be legally imported. They certainly weren't the the best 400s but, being a Suzuki, plenty were sold. The seller includes a nice little video of the bike being zapped up and down a backroad, and it's nice to see that the bike is a solid runner, because it's not in showroom-perfect condition: aside from some scratches and plastic bits that have naturally discolored with age, the end can looks to be in pretty sorry shape and the non-standard turn signals are small and unobtrusive, but their fake-y "carbon" finish isn't very tasteful and originals might be difficult to source, depending on whether or not they're exclusive to this model... But all of that can be overlooked if the price is right, and with just two days left on the auction, that price is a mere $2,225 which could make it a screaming deal of a little screamer, if the bidding stays low.

-tad

Big Style, Modest Power: 1991 Suzuki GSX-R400 GK76 for Sale
Suzuki August 28, 2017 posted by

Classic Racer in a Box: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 for Sale

Looking for a fun weekend project to keep you busy for a while? Well look no further than this ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 racebike. It's not exactly finished, but all of the really important parts appear to be there to get you started... Strangely enough, it seems like the AMA racebikes used many of the stock Suzuki components, even switching from the more exotic dry clutch to the standard wet unit, according to the seller. So that should help, right?

The introduction of the Suzuki GSX-R750 in 1985 was a seminal event in the history of motorcycling. It may not have been the first or only bike to use fully-enclosed, endurance-racer styling wrapped around a bulletproof, large-displacement inline four and monoshock aluminum frame, but it made that formula affordable and available to the masses, and led directly to the sportbikes we know and love. Later sportbikes would add liquid-cooling to the equation to help generate maximum power, but the Gixxer eschewed such frippery as too heavy for their pure speed machine: in spite of the visible cooling fins, it's oil that does most of the work. The oil-cooled powerplant utilized their SACS or "Suzuki Advanced Cooling System" that used a double-chambered pump and oil jets directed at the underside of the pistons to keep temperatures under control. Other than oil cooling, it followed modern designs and used dual overhead cams and four valves per cylinder.

Obviously, as a race-spec machine for the street, the GSX-R750 spent plenty of time competing in various classes both abroad and here in the US. This particular bike was used in AMA racing and was ridden by Doug Polen. Polen was a world-class rider who got his start in AMA racing but left to compete in the World Superbike Championship, where he won the title on the trot in 1991 and 1992. He continued to compete in both international and American roadracing with success, netted a win at the Suzuka 8 Hour endurance race, and even dabbled in MotoGP.

There's additional information about the bike, its history, and the included photos over on eBay, so head over and take a look.

From the original eBay listing: Ex-Doug Polen Suzuki GSX-R750 AMA Superbike for Sale

I have researched the photo archives of Cycle World and Cycle magazines and obtained a number of unpublished photos from their records.  I've also bought photographs from freelance photographers that covered AMA racing in that year.  Special thanks to Larry Lawrence, of The Rider Files website.  I will provide these photos to the buyer with the proviso that they remain unpublished.

Each rider had two chassis.  The chassis and motors evolved constantly through the season and Doug probably got the good parts first, as he did better than Otter in the results, starting with the first race.  Their A bikes had all of the good parts at each race and the B bikes had more stock components.  You can clearly see in the photographs the progression of modifications during the season for all of the bikes and the lower spec of the B bikes.

The chassis is un-braced, with modified stock forks, Kosman Triple clamps, Kosman brake discs, AP calipers, a Fox shock and Marvic magnesium wheels.  The swingarm has been slotted, to allow for more variation in wheelbase.  Jim Lindemann worked with them on the shock valving, although he passed away a few years ago.  I have spoken to an ex-Fox engineer and he'd be happy to restore the shock but the records they had of those years were destroyed a few years ago.  Sandy Kosman now lives in Portland Oregon and the last time I talked to him, he was willing to get the discs reground on a Blanchard grinder, if desired.   One of the previous owners began the restoration years ago and the chassis, as pictured, is where he was when he sold the bike to the next owner.

The bodywork used was stock Suzuki plastic.  Early in the season it was raced in 1986 blue/white Suzuki colors; later in the season some of it was sporting the 1987 blue/white Suzuki stock colors.  A perforated metal filler panel was incorporated into the lower fairing V and the lower fairing panels had holes cut in them to allow for more ground clearance.

The motors were modified during the season and varied quite a bit.  They had Yoshimura (either kit Suzuki or Cosworth) pistons, different crank bearings, heads ported by Ron Scrima, Megacycle cams with Yosh retainers, a Tsubaki cam chain tensioner, and various carbs and exhausts.  At one point they obtained dry clutches and close ratio transmission gears but went back to running wet clutches and stock transmission ratios.  They may have run an ECU with a higher rev limit.  Ron Scrima passed away in 2011 but his company (Racing Engine Service) is still in business in Texas and the current owner was with Ron for about 25 years, so they might be my first choice for an engine refresh.  Another option would be Kelly Roberts, also in Texas.  I have never disassembled the motor, so I do not know what internal components are present.

I am interested in selling this project to someone that has the necessary resources and desire to restore it to an as-raced condition and to preserve it for the future.  It is a significant bike, as it was one of the highest placed privateer AMA superbike efforts of that era and was ridden by the rider that probably had more success in the USA racing the first generation Suzuki GSX-R than any other rider.  I would be willing to discuss this bike in more detail, via telephone, with any serious prospective buyers.  I am also willing to provide additional photos, a more complete listing of what components will come with the bike, and an approximate idea of what additional components will be needed to complete the restoration.

I have listed the mileage as 99999, as eBay requires that the mileage be listed for any vehicle sale.  The true mileage is unknown, as it was never recorded, which is not unusual for a race bike.

It also looks like the bike went through several iterations, giving you a bit of flexibility in terms of the color scheme you choose. If it were complete and in as-raced condition, this would probably be a very valuable motorcycle. As it stands, it's a valuable... basket case. How valuable? Well the But It Now price for this bit of American roadracing history is $4,950. This is going to need a lot of love, time, and money to finish, but I think this GSX-R deserves to be restored to its former functional glory.

-tad

Suzuki May 24, 2017 posted by

Contradictions – 1993 Suzuki GSX-R600 with 2200 miles !

Busy with the 750, Suzuki arrived late to the 600cc shootout, and stayed only for a couple of years before taking a break and then returning with a new generation.  The early GSX-R600 had a great deal in common with it's bigger brother and was a great favorite of budget conscious privateers.   Seldom seen in this kind of shape, this 1993 model has just break in miles and great light colors with red option wheels.

1993 Suzuki GSX-R600 for sale on eBay

Air-oil cooling was no longer cutting the mustard as the 1990's brought engines capable of well over 100 hp per liter, and the new water-cooled engine was installed in the GSX-R, the 600's slightly smaller bore and stroke still nicely oversquare.  Suzuki's alloy double cradle had heavy bracing for the steering head, with great access to the 36mm carburettors under the color-keyed side cover.  Evidence of the platform shared with the 750 is the weight in the late 400's.

Evidently spirited away early on, the owner doubled the mileage just this year.  Still basically new, save a past tipover.  From the eBay auction:

Bike purchased with accurate 868 miles on in 2017  (that's 36 miles average ridden per year since 1993)

The break in period was completed as per the Suzuki Factory repair manual (included in sale) specifications, at which point the engine was switched to Amsoil full synthetic.

Bike is 100% stock. Has split in fairing on left side. Probably fell at some point in it's 24 years.

As the FIM evolved the WSBK support racing classes, Suzuki went back to the drawing board and returned in the late 1990's with a SuperSport World Championship winner.  Limited pictures will require an in-person inspection, but no mention is made of running issues, a minor miracle for the four Mikunis.  Build quality of period Suzuki's can be variable, so it's fair to expect some projects as this bike approaches the  quarter century.  Might be a great example of a puzzlingly rare 600 sportbike...

-donn

Contradictions – 1993 Suzuki GSX-R600 with 2200 miles !