Posts by tag: FIve Valve

Yamaha October 10, 2020 posted by

Rare Homologation Special: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 for Sale

The Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 was one of the very last 750cc homologation specials and was available for just two years before Yamaha folded their World Superbike team and ended production. Utilizing the frame geometry from their GP YZR500, the OW02 featured many exotic components, as you’d expect from a bike like this. Unfortunately, in road-going trim, the engine put out a disappointing 106hp and its true potential could only be realized using one of several race-kits that included a carbon-fiber airbox that added a ram-air effect and activated a second, dormant set of fuel injectors.

The frame was a modified Deltabox II unit, with adjustable steering head and swingarm pivots, and fully-adjustable Öhlins suspension at both ends. Despite its lukewarm output as-delivered, you can see the potential in the engine, just looking at the spec sheet: a 72 x 46mm bore and stroke with 11.4:1 compression, titanium valves, forged aluminum short-skirt pistons that featured nickel-plated tops, titanium H-beam connecting rods, and a slipper clutch connected to a close-ratio six-speed gearbox.

500 were built for all markets, making these exceedingly rare. This example is located in Australia, and includes the very desirable “race kits” to get the bike into its intended fire-breathing 162hp form.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 for Sale

The bike is originally an Italian model brought into Australia 15 years ago. It is currently located in Melbourne, Australia. I am more than happy to assist with shipping at purchases cost of approximately US$1500-2000.
It comes with stage 1 and 2 kits as new from the factory. As you can see from the photos the bike is in very good condition with very low mileage (the speedo is currently in kilometres) I believe that they can be changed to miles and happy to answer any questions. 

Yamaha fans go bonkers for these, but I always thought the OW02 looked a little bit too much like an R1 with squintier eyes… However, there’s no denying the bike’s race-bred heritage and exotic components. Here in the USA, we received just 50 examples, and 10 of those were destined for the Yamaha factory teams. Starting bid for this one is $32,000AUS and might be worth a look, no matter what part of the world you’re in.

-tad
Rare Homologation Special: 1999 Yamaha YZF-R7 OW02 for Sale
Bimota April 19, 2020 posted by

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !

As the sun gets ready to shine on another riding season in the northeast, a nice example of a liter Bimota has become available.  Looks like this YB11 has undergone a careful riding restoration over the past few years.

1997 Bimota YB11 for sale on eBay

Bimota took a shine to Yamaha’s twenty-valve 1000 early on, and had a nice success with the YB6 and YB8.  With Bimota’s airbox and exhaust, the new ThunderAce engine was good for 145 hp and had a fueled weight in the mid-400’s.  The chassis was twin alloy beams connected with some of the nicest CNC machinings anywhere, with outsized 51mm Paoli forks with accompanying monoshock.  Brembo supplied their typically excellent 320mm brakes, and the exhaust on this example has been updated to an Arrow.

This owner caught the Bimota bug a few years ago, and went through their YB11 with an eye on the future.  The fuel system was refreshed from the filter to carburetors, and the forks got new seals.  The glass bodywork was reinforced and re-finished, and my favorite mod of replacing every appropriate fastener with stainless ensures that service will be easier next time.  From the eBay auction:

Summary of maintenance/upgrades

  • Paioli forks fully serviced
  • Fairing restored and ALL screw holes strengthened with Carbon Fiber backing to prevent future spider cracks
  • All original screws are replaced with hi grade Pro-Bolt Black stainless steel and 318 grade Stainless steel bolts
  • New Spark plugs
  • Carburetors rebuilt and Dynojet Stage 1 kit installed
  • New Fuel filter
  • New Fuel Pump
  • Rear turn signals replaced with sleek and super bright LED blinkers
  • Radiator replaced
  • New Radiator cap
  • New water pump
  • New OEM Yamaha hoses
  • Spiegler Steel Braided brake and clutch lines replaced original rubber lines
  • New brake pads
  • New brake/clutch reservoirs with billet covers
  • Beautiful billet levers with larger range of adjustments replaced original cheap levers
  • Bikes comes with both rear seat cowl and the rear seat
  • Arrows CF Exhaust

The YB11 reviewed as responsive for a big Yamaha, and almost cushy for a Bimota.  This one has been updated and maintained for the long haul, or a brilliant long weekend.  Just plan extra time for a little Q&A at every stop.

-donn

Brooklyn Charmer – 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera with 5,516 Miles !
Bimota November 30, 2019 posted by

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

This Bimota YB11 Superleggera isn’t just a sportbike, or even an exotic sportbike. It’s a high-performance boutique motorcycle, one of just 650 ever built. Of course, that’s pretty much mass production by Bimota standards. It doesn’t have quite the cachet of Honda’s limited-production homologation superbikes, but consider that Honda made almost 5,000 Honda RC30s, compared to just 650 YB11s. It’s still incredibly rare and plenty fast and, as a bonus, you can take your significant other with you on your high-performance boutique motorcycle: this was one of very few Bimotas ever built with passenger accommodations, although they’re about as comfortable as you’d expect. Still, it’s great to have that spare seat, in case of emergencies…

The “Superleggera” part of Bimota YB11 Superleggera refers to the focus on lightweight construction that allowed huge performance from an existing engine, along with the agile handling you’d expect. At the time, the bike weighed 403lbs dry, a full 80lbs less than the Yamaha YZF1000R that donated its 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed transmission. Power was rated at 145hp, with an impressive 80lb-ft of torque that allowed the five-speed box to be fitted to the open-class superbike in the first place, a characteristic it shared with Suzuki’s rival GSX-R1100. The light weight and power were enough to push the bike to nearly 170mph. All the way back in 1997.

Somehow, because of their hand-built nature and flaws, it doesn’t seem all that criminal to modify or improve Bimota’s 1990s motorcycles if it helps sort some of their more annoying quirks: a YZF750R six-speed can replace the original five-speed found in the YB11, and I’m sure somebody can figure out how to fit a stand-alone fuel-injection system to replace the carburetors. This example luckily has the earlier gauges that should hopefully prove more reliable than the later style, while looking better to boot.

It can be tricky to tell if we’ve posted a particular YB11 on the site previously: they all came in the same colors, have low miles, and are generally well cared-for. It’s even trickier when the seller refers to the bike as both a 1997 and a 1998 and appears to have “borrowed” some content from RSBFS in their description… Other than the occasional Termignoni system, aftermarket exhausts and accessories are virtually unheard of, and bolt-on farkles are generally considered undesirable. There appear to have been a few different exhaust hangers used, with and without passenger pegs, although it’s also possible those were fabbed up by the owners when new.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale

One of only 650 produced

1998 Bimota 1,002cc YB11 Superleggera 

Frame no. ZESYB1100TR00047

A Rimini-based manufacturer of ducting for heating and ventilation, Bimota soon turned to their first love of motorcycles. Founders Guiseppe Morri and Massimo Tamburrini began manufacturing in the early 1970s and have since built a reputation of exclusive and limited with inimitable Italian styling machines of performance. Using the best cycle parts and an array of the best outside manufacturers’ powerplants, the Bimota was always an uncompromised and expensive foray in to exclusive motorcycling. 

Powered by Yamaha’s superb Thunderace engine, the Superleggera YB11 was Bimota’s last word in Italian exotica of the 1990s. The 131bhp ‘four’ in stock form breathed through a Bimota-designed exhaust system, which could squeeze out a little more power. It was shrouded by the firm’s trademark aluminum beam frame and complemented by some of the finest cycle parts available, including fully adjustable Paioli 51mm forks, fully adjustable Paioli shock, Brembo brakes, 17” Antera wheels and carbon fiber-abound. At 403lbs, the YB11 Superleggera weighed some 80lbs less than the donor bike and its handling and performance were in a different league altogether; as was the price, which at about $20,000, was a staggering 50% more than the Yamaha.

In the late 1990s Bimota went through one of its periodic financial convulsions and production of the YB11 ended in 1999, although a second batch of bikes was completed later using stocks of existing parts. 

The bike offered, an early 1997 example, the 46th built, is presented in excellent condition throughout. With an indicated 8,700 miles, racked up in the first decade of use, the bike has been on static display since 2007, though regularly maintained. A fresh service was performed to ready the bike for sale and no back-fees are due to a California buyer, as the last registration was due over ten years ago.

With only 650 machines produced, this represents a perfect combination of Italian exotica, Japanese reliability, ease of maintenance and power and with such qualifications, is bound to be a future classic.

For additional information, photos, etc. please visit ClassicAvenue.com

Look, the Bimota YB11 is a flawed motorcycle. And maybe the flaws would be unacceptable in a bike that originally sold for the equivalent of $47,000 in today’s money, but they don’t cost that much currently: this one is being offered at $9,900. That seems to be a little bit on the high-side for a 90s Bimota currently, although I doubt that will still be the case in the future. For that kind of money, you’re getting a hell of a lot of exclusivity and performance that will still peel your face back, even today.

-tad

Underappreciated: 1997 Bimota YB11 Superleggera for Sale
Yamaha July 8, 2019 posted by

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

I co-opted Jaguar’s old motto for that headline, but it does seem to apply to the short-lived Yamaha YZF1000. Known in some markets as the “Thunderace,” the YZF1000 was quickly superseded by the class-breaking R1, but it was an open-class motorcycle in the GSX-R1100 and ZX-11 mold, offering handling, reasonable comfort, and real-world performance. Weight and power figures aren’t attention-grabbing by today’s standards, but these days you can pick up this handsome and versatile motorcycle for very little cash.

The “Genesis” inline four engine had Yamaha’s distinctive, forward-canted design and an odd 1002cc displacement. It was packed with their signature performance-enhancing technology, including five-valve heads and an EXUP Exhaust Ultimate Power Valve that helped with midrange performance. Pretty much every modern sportbike has some kind of exhaust valve now, but Yamaha were the first to apply the concept to four-stroke engines. The package was good for 145hp and 164mph, which is plenty fast for any roadbike, unless your weekends involve illicit drag races top-gear roll-ons against modern superbikes with extended-swingarms and nitrous on deserted stretches of freeway…

As with some other open-class sportbikes of the era, the “Thunderace” had a five-speed gearbox, since the engine had an ample spread of torque, but the six-speed from a YZF750R apparently will fit into the cases. So you can always bolt that in, if you happen to have one lying around. An updated Deltabox frame from the YZF750R was wrapped around the engine and gearbox, and the Thunderace saw one of the first applications of Yamaha’s famous “blue-spot” calipers that saw use on the original R1.

Today’s example is exceptionally clean, even considering the low miles. As the seller indicates, there are a couple of very minor flaws in the bodywork, but that can be easily overlooked if you just plan to ride it, or corrected if you plan to squirrel it away deep underground in your private, climate-controlled collection.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale

1997 Yamaha YZF1000R “Thunderace” 1003cc motorcycle with 8,980 original 2-owner miles with all original plastics and paint. I purchased from the original owner in early 2018. The YZF1000R was last year Yamaha used its bulletproof FZR1000 EXUP engine, stuffing it into a 600cc superbike frame – and this bike was only imported to the U.S. for one year (sold in Europe from 1996-2003). The YZF1000R is the bridge between the FZR1000 and R1 models. 

Perfect addition for ANY collection or to ride for the next 100k miles if you’d like. This bike starts/runs like a sewing machine, dives into corners like a champion, stops on an absolute dime, and rides/feels/looks like a nearly new bike. Maintains operating temperature as she should, pulling hard toward to redline from any RPM and in any gear. The only non-original item I can find on this bike are the installed Helibars, which have completely improved the riding position.

Bike was recently serviced by a former Yamaha mechanic and FZR/YZF1000R expert. New fork seals and oil, carbs cleaned and tuned/adjusted, new spark plugs, EXUP valve serviced, new valve cover gasket, new thermostat, o-ring and coolant. Also, installed new NOS cleaner element, rebuilt clutch using only OEM Yamaha frictions, springs and clutch springs, new OEM Yamaha front and rear brake pads, new OEM Yamaha oil filter, new OEM Yamaha fuel tank petcock (under tank), fresh oil, coolant, brake and clutch fluid. New NOS radiator cap installed, new NOS windscreen recently installed. Tires are nearly new with less than 800 easy miles on them. I’d estimate with the shop rates and parts costs, I’ve got $2000.00+ in the bike over the past year. With that said, she needs nothing else mechanically done to her.

Zero issues with this bike (e.g., does not pop out of gear on hard acceleration, strong clutch lever and grip, does not use or drip oil, etc.). Cooling fan come up when bike reaches proper temperature; she does not overheat in the Texas summers. Has only been fed non-ethanol fuel for the past year + Sta-bill additive = zero carb. issues (I don’t run ethanol-blended fuel in either of my bikes). Two original ignition keys come with the bike.

Winner of the bike will get all the original paperwork from the original owner, including the original sales invoice and other documents. Incredible documented history!

The only cosmetic flaws (see photos) came from shipping the bike. Note the left cowl where it meets the fairing is cracked (repaired inside the cowl – repair is not visible), note the cowl is cracked under/behind the LH mirror, note the fuel tank has a small ding in the top. Also note the original exhaust can has a dent underneath/to the outside (photographed) and scome scratching near the head pipe where your RH boot would be.  

The seller also includes additional pictures here, and a video of the bike running here, along with a video of Richard Hammond’s review. With a starting bid of $4,500 I think the seller might be aiming a bit high with this one, in spite of the low miles and condition. The Thunderace was a bit of a lame-duck bike for Yamaha: with the class-redefining R1 on the horizon, the YZF was soon very obsolete and the bike was only in production a short while, especially here in the US where it was only available for one year. That makes them pretty rare, but rarity doesn’t always equal value. Personally, I really like them, but I think the seller is overestimating its value at the moment.

-tad

Grace, Space, and Pace: 1997 Yamaha YZF1000 Thunderace for Sale
Yamaha January 21, 2019 posted by

Resurrected: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Having spoken with a couple people about the Yamaha FZR1000 of the late 80s and early 90s, I’ve gotten the distinct impression that, however competent it may have been, it really wasn’t cool in the way the Suzuki GSX-R1100 was. I think someone went as far as to say they were kind of the “nerdy” choice, at least among ballistic superbikes, so it figures I’d be into them.

It is a bit ironic that the FZR would be considered less cool than the GSX-R, considering that it was a much more advanced machine in many ways. The big Suzuki was a bit of a dinosaur, with an effective, but relatively primitive double-cradle frame, while the Yamaha was built around their light and very stiff aluminum Deltabox design, the first time the concept had been applied to a liter-plus bike.

Both bikes offered a broad spread of locomotive thrust, and did just fine with five-speed gearboxes, although the FZR managed to be as fast as the GSX-R, while giving away displacement to the Suzuki. And even though the GSX-R, originally eschewed liquid-cooling as a weight-saving measure, still ended up being pretty portly. The original 1987-1988 version of the FZR1000 used a 989cc version of Yamaha’s Genesis five-valve engine, although it lacked the EXUP valve that would become another of the FZR’s signature features. Five-valve technology has proven to add additional complexity for minimal returns and isn’t often seen anymore, but the engine’s steeply-canted design and under-tank airbox set the standard for sportbike packaging.

I think ultimately, the FZR was a victim of its own success. The Genesis was smooth, powerful and possibly a bit too refined. People generally don’t buy big sportbikes because they want refinement, or because they need them. It’s the same mistake Yamaha made with their RZ500: Suzuki’s Gamma was wilder and woolier, and stole the RZ’s thunder. Here, the Gixxer’s bad-boy reputation means that it’s an appreciating object of lust, while the Fizzer can be had for relative peanuts.

For now anyway.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

On the auction block is a 1988 Yamaha FZR1000. This is a really nice motorcycle that was recently resurrected after sitting for an unknown extended period of time. All fluids have been changed, including fork oil since seals were replaced. Coolant was flushed, oil was changed and all brake fluids, clutch fluids were changed as well. All brake calipers were rebuilt, clutch master cylinder and slave cylinder were replaced. Tires were just replaced 200 miles ago, after the wheels were freshly powder coated and bearings and seals were replaced. Battery is a new, sealed unit. Carbs were rebuilt, with all new gaskets, o-rings and needle valves. Air filter is new. Windscreen and mirrors were replaced, only because they were fragile or porous. Fuel valves were both replaced, as were fuel lines. New chain and sprockets. Runs and drives as it did when new. Low mileage example that looks to never have been dropped or crashed, but as with any bike 30 years old, not perfect. A lot of work done to get this one right. Tried to show as much as possible in pictures, but if there are any questions, please ask.

This FZR1000 is a classy bike and looks very nice from the pictures. Maybe a bit too nice to use as a budget sport-tourer… There are the minor imperfections you’d expect in an original bike that hasn’t been restored, but it appears very complete. The FZR doesn’t have Suzuki’s wild, bad-boy reputation, but had very competitive performance and I happen to really like the clean blue-and-white graphics. The FZR may never achieve the desirability of a GSX-R1100 but, given how the values of all bikes of this era seem to be on the rise and how scarce really clean examples are, now’s the time to jump in if you want to recapture your youth or just want a very cool, versatile retro ride.

-tad

Resurrected: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Bimota January 3, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

Update 3.11.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

For the money, 1990s Bimotas offer some pretty incredible bang for your buck. Obviously, a more modern machine of equal value will be faster, as well as more reliable and practical, but if the goal is to own something different, something exotic, and something with real style, not much can compete. This Bimota YB10 Dieci being offered by Iconic Motorbikes has an asking price of $11,100 which is barely a third of what an RC30 is currently worth.

Of course, there are some compromises. An RC30 from the same period represents some of Honda’s very best engineering, with an almost obsessive attention to detail and few mechanical quirks. The YB10 Dieci is a rolling monument to quirk: Bimota’s motorcycles of the period were really racebikes first, with concessions to practicality an afterthought at best.

The Dieci obviously has the design cues common during the 90s, with a pair of round headlamps up front, an aluminum beam frame, and sleek, fully-enclosed bodywork. If that looks overly familiar, as if Bimota was just following a trend, you’ve got it all backwards: Bimota basically started the trend with the race-only YB4 that debuted back in 1987, a bike that only appeared in roadgoing trim after World Superbike rules required a run of street-legal machines be sold to the public. They’re mostly forgotten by everyone but us motorcycle geeks now, but Bimota was one of the original competitors in World Superbike and nearly won the inaugural event. The YB10 is an evolution of that bike, with a larger engine.

Invariably, Bimota tuned its borrowed powerplants for increased performance, although the results were often dubious and the claimed power gains generally minimal anyway. Bimota’s real claim to fame was chassis design that resulted in light weight and incredible agility. In an era when Suzuki’s GSX-R was using an antiquated double-cradle frame, Bimota’s gorgeous aluminum beam design pointed the way forward, and a close look at the craftsmanship on display is impressive. Racy styling is easy to do, and the term “sportbike” gets thrown around pretty liberally, but the YB10 was the real deal. If you’ve never seen one of these without the bodywork, it’s amazing how spare and minimalist it is: there’s almost nothing there that isn’t dedicated to speed.

Bodywork consists of just four major pieces, plus a couple inserts for the radiator vents. The tail and tank cover is one piece, there are two side panels, and the upper fairing, all held on by quarter-turn fasteners, so the bike can be naked in minutes. Which is good, since working on the bike is frustrating at best, with that gorgeous frame wrapping so closely around Yamaha’s 1002cc five-valve Genesis engine and five-speed box that access can be difficult, depending on what you’re trying to do.

Also guys, it’s pronounced “bee-mo-tuh” not “by-mo-tuh.” Just as Italian cars with two turbos like the old Maserati Biturbo are actually “bee-turbos” not “by-turbos.” Just had to get that off my chest.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci – Rare 1 of only 224 – Fully Serviced!

Bimotas are well known for their Italian style, class and over the top engineering.  This YB10 is no exception to the rule with its billet machined frame, its one piece (and seamless) upper fairing, billet triple, classic style wheels… so cool!

The YB10 wasn’t just eye candy either, it was tested my a few magazines and came back with a top speed of 172.9 mph which is quite respectable for 1993!

Only 224 of these were every made!

Not only do you get Italian style but you get the reliability of a Japanese motorbike with the YB10.  The power is supplied by a FZR1000 which means motor parts are never a problem to source!

This Bimota was serviced by Bob Steinberger, a very well known Bimota expert about 2 years ago with very few miles after the tune.  Service included new tires, new chain and sprockets, new battery, fresh oil, new jets, etc.

She’s in fantastic condition with only 12,885 miles and ready for a new home.

Want to see her in person, fly into LAX, we’re only 15 minutes away and ride out!  We’re right on the border of Venice beach and only a few miles from Santa Monica.

Nice to see this one’s been ridden a bit, so you can actually put some time in on your new exotic without “ruining” a zero-mile museum-piece. As indicated, parts for the powertrain shouldn’t be a problem, although the aforementioned tight packaging within the frame means servicing will be more time consuming and expensive than it would be on the donor Yamaha. Bodywork, on the other hand, could be a real issue, although Airtech does have Dieci panels available. I’ve long said that if I ever bought one of these, I’d buy a set from them, have it painted to match, and display the OEM bodywork so I could ride the bike without worrying that a patch of gravel would ruin one of the 224 ever made!

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Yamaha July 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Update 8.20.2018: The seller has notified us that this bike is SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The precursor to Yamaha’s extremely desirable OW01, this very clean FZR750R is actually even rarer, but a bit less exotic as well, both in terms of components and construction. Instead of rare materials and hand-welded parts, the RT was a bit more of a parts-bin special, but just 200 of the “T” were built in 1987 and another 200 in 1988 for the “U” model to satisfy homologation requirements for AMA Superbike racing.

The FZR750R formula should be familiar to Yamaha fans: an extremely light and stiff aluminum Deltabox frame that debuted in 1987 on the FZR1000 and was light-years ahead of cradle-style frames as seen on the GSX-R750, Yamaha’s signature five-valve “Genesis” head atop a 749cc block, and a six-speed gearbox in place of the bigger 1000’s five-speed. Front wheel was 17” and matched with a typical 18” rear often found on sportbikes of the period, and both were wrapped in radial rubber.

Suspension adjustable for preload and rebound at both ends was novel for the time, especially on a street-legal bike. Although Yamaha really didn’t intend for any of these to actually see the street, and actively discouraged dealers from selling them to anyone who was planning to use them on the road. Unfortunately, the 484lb [dry] package ended up significantly heavier than their road-racing rival over at Suzuki, and drag-strip performance was hampered by the ratios in the gearbox. But that was really beside the point, and the bike had some of the best brakes and handling available.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Up for NO RESERVE AUCTION is a very nice original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT.

The precursor to the OW01, the FZR750R Genesis is a rare collectable. Homologated for AMA racing with only 200 examples made for the US market. This machine came out of a dealership in Oconomowoc Wisconsin and thankfully never seen the track.

I purchased this bike from its second owner in WI about 12 years ago. I have enjoyed owning this bike and took great care of it but its time to pass it on to a collector. I recently moved from WI to Denver Colorado where the bike is currently located. I’ve only had the bike here in Denver a few weeks,  it started right up but I haven’t driven it because I anticipate it would need adjustments for the higher elevation. Have not registered the bike here in Denver either so it is currently titled and registered with collectors plates from WI. Title is clean and clear of any leans. Cycle has 26,403mi.

Bike recently had a $1500 overhaul including fuel pump rebuilding, fork seals, brake pads, carb cleaning, clutch, adjustments etc (see photo of receipt). Runs strong and as it should. Has 26… k miles. Has vintage Yoshi exhaust, vintage Storz steering stabilizer, is properly jetted for the exhaust, original race sprocket was changed out for a more street friendly ride. ALL ORIGINAL PARTS INCLUDED and many extras including vintage riding apparel, period Corbin seat, parts, all manuals, period feature magazines, bike stand, cover and more

Motorcycle is for sale locally so I reserve the right to cancel the auction early if sold. I work during the day so evenings are my best time to answer any questions.

I would really like to see the bike end up in someone’s collection that will really appreciate it. I will be happy to help the new owner with loading the machine and any other arrangements to make it a smooth transaction.

The FZR750RT is a historically significant machine that was incredibly trick when it was new, and I expect we’re seeing a low point for values right now. As the seller mentions, this is no garage queen but condition is way more important than mileage if you actually plan to use a car or motorcycle, and this example has been serviced and is ready to go. It’s not a museum piece, it’s a living, breathing bit of sportbike history.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale
Yamaha July 6, 2018 posted by

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Over in the comments sections of another post, we’ve been debating the relative merits and values of some of the priciest motorcycles, but it’s still possible to find something cool, collectible, and very competent if you’re on a limited budget. It’s not one of Yamaha’s fastest sportbikes, but this first-generation FZR1000 might be their most historically significant. At the moment, it’s also one of the most unappreciated machines of the modern era: if the GSX-R was the first sportbike of the modern age, it can be argued that the FZR1000 actually codified the formula.

The original version of the FZR1000 built from 1987 through 1988 seen here was powered by a 989cc version of Yamaha’s inline four. It did not feature their signature EXhaust Ultimate Power or “EXUP” valve in the exhaust system, but did use their “Genesis” heads with three intake and two exhaust valves. Five-valve technology proved more useful in theory than in practice, in spite of the fact that Yamaha stuck with it for a pretty long time. But, perhaps more importantly, the Genesis engine’s characteristic steeply forward-canted cylinder head allowed the airbox to be located under the fuel tank instead of between the rider’s knees.

However, the bike’s defining feature was the aluminum beam “Deltabox” frame, the first time one had been used in a big bike like this. The contemporary GSX-R used an aluminum frame, but the square-tube construction was more of a cradle-type that looked backward towards past designs, while Yamaha’s beefy Deltabox was a much more forward-thinking concept. The frame spars were positively massive for the time, but the thin-walls meant the structure was as light as it was strong, and while five-valve heads proved to be a bit of a fad, thick beam frames have stood the test of time.

Looking at the spec sheet, all you’d need to do is add a sixth gear to the box and you could be looking at something from just a few years ago: the aluminum beam frame, liquid cooling, under-tank airbox, and 17″ wheels all sound very modern. It’s obviously from a different generation and is both heavier and less powerful by far than current literbikes. But it was very much the complete package when new, and the five-speed gearbox speaks to the bike’s seemingly bottomless well of torque and flexible midrange, qualities shared with the GSX-R1100, a bike that also lacked a sixth cog.

Ideally, if you’re looking at an FZR1000 you’d probably want something just a little bit newer, as the thorough redesign for 1989 featured a slight bump in displacement and the addition of the EXUP valve, but this is the original, and looks very sophisticated in blue and white speedblock graphics.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Up for auction is my 1988 FZR1000.  It is titled in my name and is currently registered in  the state of California til October 2018.  It is a nice survivor.  It has various scratches and some cracks here and there but overall in very clean condition.  It has good tires, a new fuel pump, fuel filter, various fuel lines, carb cleaning and synchronization done Dec of last year, rebuilt fuel valves, battery new last year, new windshield, front brake master cylinder rebuilt and a couple other things I can’t remember  now.  It comes with a tank bag, some spare parts and a service manual. It handles, runs, starts, brakes fine….although maybe it could use another carb cleaning as it has been sitting.  Still you could ride it right now…..it has  good  power.

Some things it would need is a new headlight.  Choke doesn’t work but it still starts easy when cold. Return throttle cable not hooked on.  Fuel pump is controlled by a switch in the back  so you may want to hook up correctly…..and I’m sure a few other things I can’t remember right now.

If anyone is interested but not local…PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE ask questions and request photos of any area of the bike you would like.  I REALLY PREFER SOMEONE LOCAL WHO COULD COME BY AND KICK THE TIRES AND INSPECT IN PERSON but if not please ask all the questions you want before bidding.  Although this bike is clean and a survivor it has not been in a box the last 30 years ridden only 50 miles so keep that in mind.  It currently has 20950 miles. I may make a couple trips up the mountain before it’s gone so there may be a few more miles on it.

Here is a video of it running.  

I am selling because  with my back condition I cannot use it like I thought I could.  

If you have any questions please ask.  If you think I left something out please ask.  If you need better pictures please ask.  I want to be as honest and accurate as possible so please ask anything.  If the winning buyer comes to pick it up and dosent want to go through with the deal for any reason no worries…..I will cancel the transaction….no problem.  The previous owner named this bike Noah. I want to see this go to a good home.

The Yoshimura tri-oval exhaust obviously isn’t stock, and isn’t even trying to look period-correct, but I actually like it: stock exhausts of the era are often pretty heavy and very ugly. Overall, the bike has some usual chips and wear you’d expect on a bike this old, but it seems honest. And the seller includes a nice video of the bike starting and running, with some closeups. Slingshot Gixxers and other late 1980s sportbikes have been rising in value, but the Yamahas seem to have been lagging behind a bit, and while the later EXUP models will probably be a bit more desirable, this early machine is historically significant. And also pretty cool. There are several days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $2,150 opening bid. It may not be original, but this could be a hell of a do-it-all machine with style if you’re on a budget and looking for something out of the ordinary.

-tad

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale