Posts by tag: FIve Valve

Yamaha July 24, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Update 8.20.2018: The seller has notified us that this bike is SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The precursor to Yamaha’s extremely desirable OW01, this very clean FZR750R is actually even rarer, but a bit less exotic as well, both in terms of components and construction. Instead of rare materials and hand-welded parts, the RT was a bit more of a parts-bin special, but just 200 of the “T” were built in 1987 and another 200 in 1988 for the “U” model to satisfy homologation requirements for AMA Superbike racing.

The FZR750R formula should be familiar to Yamaha fans: an extremely light and stiff aluminum Deltabox frame that debuted in 1987 on the FZR1000 and was light-years ahead of cradle-style frames as seen on the GSX-R750, Yamaha’s signature five-valve “Genesis” head atop a 749cc block, and a six-speed gearbox in place of the bigger 1000’s five-speed. Front wheel was 17” and matched with a typical 18” rear often found on sportbikes of the period, and both were wrapped in radial rubber.

Suspension adjustable for preload and rebound at both ends was novel for the time, especially on a street-legal bike. Although Yamaha really didn’t intend for any of these to actually see the street, and actively discouraged dealers from selling them to anyone who was planning to use them on the road. Unfortunately, the 484lb [dry] package ended up significantly heavier than their road-racing rival over at Suzuki, and drag-strip performance was hampered by the ratios in the gearbox. But that was really beside the point, and the bike had some of the best brakes and handling available.

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale

Up for NO RESERVE AUCTION is a very nice original 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT.

The precursor to the OW01, the FZR750R Genesis is a rare collectable. Homologated for AMA racing with only 200 examples made for the US market. This machine came out of a dealership in Oconomowoc Wisconsin and thankfully never seen the track.

I purchased this bike from its second owner in WI about 12 years ago. I have enjoyed owning this bike and took great care of it but its time to pass it on to a collector. I recently moved from WI to Denver Colorado where the bike is currently located. I've only had the bike here in Denver a few weeks,  it started right up but I haven't driven it because I anticipate it would need adjustments for the higher elevation. Have not registered the bike here in Denver either so it is currently titled and registered with collectors plates from WI. Title is clean and clear of any leans. Cycle has 26,403mi.

Bike recently had a $1500 overhaul including fuel pump rebuilding, fork seals, brake pads, carb cleaning, clutch, adjustments etc (see photo of receipt). Runs strong and as it should. Has 26... k miles. Has vintage Yoshi exhaust, vintage Storz steering stabilizer, is properly jetted for the exhaust, original race sprocket was changed out for a more street friendly ride. ALL ORIGINAL PARTS INCLUDED and many extras including vintage riding apparel, period Corbin seat, parts, all manuals, period feature magazines, bike stand, cover and more

Motorcycle is for sale locally so I reserve the right to cancel the auction early if sold. I work during the day so evenings are my best time to answer any questions.

I would really like to see the bike end up in someone's collection that will really appreciate it. I will be happy to help the new owner with loading the machine and any other arrangements to make it a smooth transaction.

The FZR750RT is a historically significant machine that was incredibly trick when it was new, and I expect we're seeing a low point for values right now. As the seller mentions, this is no garage queen but condition is way more important than mileage if you actually plan to use a car or motorcycle, and this example has been serviced and is ready to go. It's not a museum piece, it's a living, breathing bit of sportbike history.

-tad

Featured Listing: 1987 Yamaha FZR750RT for Sale
Yamaha July 6, 2018 posted by

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Over in the comments sections of another post, we've been debating the relative merits and values of some of the priciest motorcycles, but it's still possible to find something cool, collectible, and very competent if you're on a limited budget. It's not one of Yamaha's fastest sportbikes, but this first-generation FZR1000 might be their most historically significant. At the moment, it's also one of the most unappreciated machines of the modern era: if the GSX-R was the first sportbike of the modern age, it can be argued that the FZR1000 actually codified the formula.

The original version of the FZR1000 built from 1987 through 1988 seen here was powered by a 989cc version of Yamaha's inline four. It did not feature their signature EXhaust Ultimate Power or "EXUP" valve in the exhaust system, but did use their "Genesis" heads with three intake and two exhaust valves. Five-valve technology proved more useful in theory than in practice, in spite of the fact that Yamaha stuck with it for a pretty long time. But, perhaps more importantly, the Genesis engine's characteristic steeply forward-canted cylinder head allowed the airbox to be located under the fuel tank instead of between the rider's knees.

However, the bike's defining feature was the aluminum beam "Deltabox" frame, the first time one had been used in a big bike like this. The contemporary GSX-R used an aluminum frame, but the square-tube construction was more of a cradle-type that looked backward towards past designs, while Yamaha's beefy Deltabox was a much more forward-thinking concept. The frame spars were positively massive for the time, but the thin-walls meant the structure was as light as it was strong, and while five-valve heads proved to be a bit of a fad, thick beam frames have stood the test of time.

Looking at the spec sheet, all you'd need to do is add a sixth gear to the box and you could be looking at something from just a few years ago: the aluminum beam frame, liquid cooling, under-tank airbox, and 17" wheels all sound very modern. It's obviously from a different generation and is both heavier and less powerful by far than current literbikes. But it was very much the complete package when new, and the five-speed gearbox speaks to the bike's seemingly bottomless well of torque and flexible midrange, qualities shared with the GSX-R1100, a bike that also lacked a sixth cog.

Ideally, if you're looking at an FZR1000 you'd probably want something just a little bit newer, as the thorough redesign for 1989 featured a slight bump in displacement and the addition of the EXUP valve, but this is the original, and looks very sophisticated in blue and white speedblock graphics.

From the original eBay listing: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale

Up for auction is my 1988 FZR1000.  It is titled in my name and is currently registered in  the state of California til October 2018.  It is a nice survivor.  It has various scratches and some cracks here and there but overall in very clean condition.  It has good tires, a new fuel pump, fuel filter, various fuel lines, carb cleaning and synchronization done Dec of last year, rebuilt fuel valves, battery new last year, new windshield, front brake master cylinder rebuilt and a couple other things I can't remember  now.  It comes with a tank bag, some spare parts and a service manual. It handles, runs, starts, brakes fine....although maybe it could use another carb cleaning as it has been sitting.  Still you could ride it right now.....it has  good  power.

Some things it would need is a new headlight.  Choke doesn't work but it still starts easy when cold. Return throttle cable not hooked on.  Fuel pump is controlled by a switch in the back  so you may want to hook up correctly.....and I'm sure a few other things I can't remember right now.

If anyone is interested but not local...PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE ask questions and request photos of any area of the bike you would like.  I REALLY PREFER SOMEONE LOCAL WHO COULD COME BY AND KICK THE TIRES AND INSPECT IN PERSON but if not please ask all the questions you want before bidding.  Although this bike is clean and a survivor it has not been in a box the last 30 years ridden only 50 miles so keep that in mind.  It currently has 20950 miles. I may make a couple trips up the mountain before it's gone so there may be a few more miles on it.

Here is a video of it running.  

I am selling because  with my back condition I cannot use it like I thought I could.  

If you have any questions please ask.  If you think I left something out please ask.  If you need better pictures please ask.  I want to be as honest and accurate as possible so please ask anything.  If the winning buyer comes to pick it up and dosent want to go through with the deal for any reason no worries.....I will cancel the transaction....no problem.  The previous owner named this bike Noah. I want to see this go to a good home.

The Yoshimura tri-oval exhaust obviously isn't stock, and isn't even trying to look period-correct, but I actually like it: stock exhausts of the era are often pretty heavy and very ugly. Overall, the bike has some usual chips and wear you'd expect on a bike this old, but it seems honest. And the seller includes a nice video of the bike starting and running, with some closeups. Slingshot Gixxers and other late 1980s sportbikes have been rising in value, but the Yamahas seem to have been lagging behind a bit, and while the later EXUP models will probably be a bit more desirable, this early machine is historically significant. And also pretty cool. There are several days left on the auction and no takers yet at the $2,150 opening bid. It may not be original, but this could be a hell of a do-it-all machine with style if you're on a budget and looking for something out of the ordinary.

-tad

Genesis Device: 1988 Yamaha FZR1000 for Sale
Bimota June 12, 2018 posted by

Naked Italian Supermodel: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Look, I'll get this out the way up front: the Bimota YB11 does not "look way cooler with the bodywork off." Since the missing bits appear to be included, I'm going to assume, for the purposes of this post, that a lack of taste is the actual reason the bodywork isn't currently in place. Don't get me wrong, I love Bimotas shorn of bodywork: the minimalist frame, the simplified construction, the elegance. But with that headlight and tail sections in place and the rest missing? It just looks unfinished. It might run cooler though... Anyway, differing aesthetic opinions aside, the YB11 is certainly an affordable way to get into quirky Italian exotica: we're obviously comparing apples and oranges here, but you can generally pick up 90s Bimotas for the price of a new Ducati Scrambler.

Stripped of much of its bodywork, this YB11 looks like it might have more in common with an Aprilia Tuono or a KTM Super Duke than a modern liter-class superbike. The 145 horsepower claimed by Bimota for their mildly-tuned version of Yamaha's five-valve Genesis inline four means the YB11 is closer to “supernaked” than “superbike” in terms of power, as well. Certainly, the 1002cc displacement means it isn’t eligible for superbike racing classes.

But just as bikes in the supernaked class are less powerful, but sometimes more fun than full-blown superbikes, top-end horsepower might impress when you’re comparing stat sheets over a beer, or railing at 10/10ths on a race track, but it doesn’t necessarily translate that well to the real world. Take a look at the YB11’s 80 lb-ft of torque and 400lb dry weight: the Genesis engine has a famously fierce midrange and the bike is claimed to start pulling savagely from below 4,000rpm. Modern superbikes do make much more top-end horsepower, but also weigh a bit more and produce very similar amounts of torque, so you can imagine that a YB11 will still make for a very exciting ride.

Obviously, this old-school superbike comes from a much simpler time, something that’s easy to see once the bodywork is removed. One look under the skin of a YB11 alongside something like Ducati’s new V4 Panigale and you can see just how complicated modern superbikes have become, since modules and wires and hoses pack every available nook and cranny. It's a good thing the new Panigale has a heavily truncated frame, since I'm not sure where you'd fit a regular one. So no, an old beast like this Bimota isn’t as good as something truly modern. But you also shouldn't worry too much about more modern bikes running away from you out on the road.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Bimota YB11 for Sale

A beautiful work of art that looks like it was designed by Michelangelo, this bike is super-light (Superleggera) + excellent handling with 51mm front fork tubes (largest ever put on a production cycle!) + Brembo brakes front +rear, carbon fiber everywhere/ high perf. ARROW exhaust system/ 145H.P. with 12:1 lightweight forged pistons in a 1002cc Thunderace Yamaha engine with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft. Bodywork is off presently cause it looks way cooler with it off, but I do have all the parts that go with the bike.

I'm not clear from the seller's description whether the "12:1 lightweight forged pistons... with lightened quick-rev. crankshaft" are components from some sort of engine rebuild or if he's suggesting they were included in the original YB11. I'm pretty sure that Bimota made no internal changes to the stock powerplant and if the engine was rebuilt or otherwise modified, I'd love some more detail regarding what was included and why it was done. Bidding is active with a few days left on the auction, but only up to a bit more than $4,000 at this point. Aside from the missing bodywork [it is included in the sale as you can see below], this bike does look like it's in very nice shape, but Bimotas of this vintage are still a tough sell, so someone still might get a good bargain.

-tad

Bimota May 1, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

I've mentioned this before, but everything just sounds cooler in Italian. If you want to intimidate someone, just shout gibberish at them in German: anything you say sounds clipped and military and very, very serious. But yell at someone in Italian, and it just sounds like you're trying to very emphatically seduce them. I mean, Italian car and motorcycle manufacturers don't even have to try, they just basically describe the thing, and it still sounds cool, exotic, and expensive. A Maserati Quatroporte? You mean a Maserati "Four-Door"? And bikes are even lazier: Testastretta is just "Narrow Head" and Desmosedici sounds plenty exotic, but it's just "Desmo Sixteen [Valves]." Today's Featured Listing Bimota YB10 Dieci might be the worst offender though. In English, it's just the "Yamaha-Bimota #10 Ten."

While giving your bike a simple, two-digit number for a name may not be all that creative, it suits Bimota's pragmatic approach to making impractical motorcycles. Seeing the potential in the powerful, efficient, and reliable engines being churned out by the Japanese manufacturers packaged into overweight, overbuilt, and under-suspended roadbikes, they took that performance and stuffed it into machines as much as a hundred pounds lighter. Spared any need to be affordable or practical, Bimota was free to experiment with exotic, weight-saving materials, the newest ideas in frame design, and the best suspension components available at both ends. Bimota's creations might not have been very versatile, but they were pretty good at the one thing they were supposed to be good at, which was going fast and looking cool. Okay, I guess that's really two things...

Of course, the fact that they were freed from any need to be practical also means that they can be a real pain to service. The stiff, light aluminum beam frame that was Bimota's signature during this period was wrapped tightly around the engine to keep weight down and centralize mass, so many of their bikes need to be pretty much completely disassembled before you can perform basic maintenance. Thankfully, they were also designed with body panels that are easily removed with a minimum of fuss. Seriously: look closely at those plastics and note how few seams and mounting points are visible: the tank cover, seat, and tail section are all one piece.

Of course, there's a downside to that simplicity as well: drop a modern sportbike and you might just have to replace a couple sections of fairing or a side panel or two. But when your bodywork consists of just four or five separate pieces and only 224 machines were ever produced... Well let's just say that if I owned a Bimota Dieci and planned to ride it regularly, I'd order a set of Airtech fairings and have them painted up to look like the original parts, then hang the stock bodywork on my livingroom wall.

I'm not sure exactly what changes were made between the 1987 YB4 and the 1991 YB10, but the bodywork and frame look suspiciously similar. That's no bad thing, as Italian vehicles always do seem to get better with each successive generation as the kinks are worked out, right up until they finally get it right and then promptly discontinue the model. Similar-looking Yamaha-engined Bimotas were powered by 750 and 400cc versions of their five-valve Genesis liquid-cooled inline four, but this is the big daddy, motivated by a nearly stock 1002cc engine and five-speed gearbox from the FZR1000 that produced 145hp. With a claimed weight of 407lbs, nearly 70 less than the donor bike, the slippery superbike could hit a tested top speed of 172mph, with stability provided by the fully adjustable 42mm Marzocchi upside-down forks up front and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back, which the seller has helpfully photographed for prospective buyers.

From the Seller: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale

VIN: ZESS8YA23MRZES041 In 1991 the first of 224 (total production) YB10 Dieci machines were produced with many of the best bits from previous models. Named Dieci (ten) in recognition of the 10th collaboration between Bimota and Yamaha, the YB10 represents the evolution of the series YB6 and YB8 with a 4 cylinder 1000cc Bimota tuned Yamaha engine. Pierluigi Marconi used inverted Marzocchi forks, super strong lightweight aluminum beam frame, redesigned aero, larger high-flow carbureted intake and more comfortable riding position. Dieci is the perfect name for the final development of the YB line. Weighing in at 407lbs (65lbs down on the stock Yamaha FZR) with 145BHP on tap, gives the rider power with a comfortable and balanced ride. Great brakes were a must so Marconi used a pair of 320mm front discs plus a single rear 230, combined with Brembo calipers. Whilst this Dieci is 25 years old and shows just over 12000 miles it doesn’t appear tired or dated. It has been well preserved and restored where necessary. The bodywork is less rounded than current trends but the ‘stealth’ look still works well, especially with its silver over red combination. Overall the body panels are well preserved and in very good condition. Recent performance and service includes Ohlin rear shock, new Pirelli Corsa tires, Termignoni carbon muffler, new chain and sprocket, new braided lines and new battery. The Dieci was originally sold and serviced by Bob Steinbugler at Bimota Spirit. Needs nothing, ready to ride. $10,500. Contact Matt with your interest: mattshaw@comcast.net

The $10,500 the seller is asking is right in line with the asking prices we've seen for similar Bimotas recently, and is pretty much chump change for such a rare, exotic, and good looking machine that can still show many modern sportbikes a clean pair of heels. You might have to work a bit harder, and avoid pissing matches with modern literbikes, but your buddy on an R6 or GSX-R is going to be very shocked to see those two big, round, endurance-style headlamps in his rear-view mirrors on a brisk Sunday morning ride...

-tad

Featured Listing: 1991 Bimota YB10 Dieci for Sale
Bimota April 9, 2018 posted by

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Bimota's formula for success involved plentiful, reliable engines supplied by outside manufacturers, top-shelf braking and suspension components, frames designed with pure performance in mind, all wrapped in sleek, often wildly-styled bodywork. The use of well-developed and widely available engines meant they managed to survive much longer than most other boutique motorcycle manufacturers and their style and performance mean they're pretty striking motorcycles in the flesh, and I'm sure you'd get tons of questions about a Bimota YB11 like this one anywhere you parked it.

The YB11 is obviously an old-school analog motorcycle, with a torquey engine and a peak power figure that is unimpressive by today's standards. But keep in mind that the only thing letting modern motorcycles get away with their outrageous power figures are the very sophisticated electronics that keep riders with less than professional skill levels from crashing into the nearest hedge. This was a full-blown exotic superbike in its day, and the 145hp available from the YB11's five-valve Genesis engine is plenty to have fun with for even an experienced rider, considering the bike's 400lb dry weight and 170mph potential. There's no digital safety net here, and every single horse is present and accounted for, and happy to do the bidding of your right hand. Just make sure you know exactly what you're asking them to do before you twist that throttle...

I'd read that the YB11 has an "odd" riding position and can confirm: the legs are weirdly cramped and there's a long reach to the bars. Maybe it makes more sense on the move, or with time you just get used to it, but by comparison, the SB6R parked next to the one I sat on seemed surprisingly comfortable... Like every other Bimota, maintenance is an issue here. Parts for the Yamaha engine and transmission may be relatively plentiful, but the beam frames of the YB and SB series are wrapped tightly around them, making access difficult with the bodywork or even the engine in place. Great for the experienced home mechanic, as you're basically looking at a lot of labor instead of expensive parts, but still a pain if you don't like disassembling your motorcycle every time you want to adjust the carburetors or valves...

I'm a fan of 90s Bimotas in general, mostly because they're both extremely exotic and currently extremely affordable, and they epitomize all that's stereotypically good and bad about Italian motorcycles: sophisticated materials, high-end components, striking looks, and sharp handling, combined with indifferent build-quality, incomplete development, and unreliable electrical systems. In terms of style, I don't think the YB11 is one of their best efforts, but it's still great-looking motorcycle and parts for the engine at least should be no trouble. You're on your own if you need fork seals or bodywork though. Still interested? The asking price for this Italian exotic is just $6,700, although there is an issue with the mileage...

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Specialized Motors is proud to offer this Bimota YB11 . This bike was bought to put into our motorcycle in 2003 with 5800 miles since then this bike has been cared for and stored in our Museum, as of now the gauge pack is inop - MILEAGE AND TEMP ARE NOT WORKING, this seems to be a common issue with these Bimota motorcycle. We estimate 500-1000 additional miles BUT WE CAN NOT LIST MILES , BIKE WILL BE SOLD AS IS . Bike is in excellent condition never down starts and runs perfect . Bike will be sold mileage exempt ot TMU (true mileage unknown)

Speaking of "unreliable Italian electrical components..." Well, there are many good aftermarket options these days, and ones that look much better than the stock gauges and include everything you could possibly want to know about your motorcycle. As far as I'm concerned, the 11,000 miles indicated are a good thing for a bike as finicky as a Bimota: it means it's been functional often enough to actually be ridden regularly! Plus, inactivity seems to kill vehicles, especially Italian vehicles. It's like they're sitting there, angry at not being used, slowly corroding, drying out, crumbling...

-tad

Old School Superbike: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
MZ March 22, 2018 posted by

Simple Pleasures: 1995 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale

MZ's history is more significant than the average enthusiast realizes, especially if you're a fan of this site and/or grey market two-stroke sportbikes. "Why is that?" You might ask. Or more likely, "Who is that?" MZ, formerly MuZ was an East German manufacturer of two stroke motorcycles. Engineer Walter Kaaden actually pioneered the use of expansion chambers while working for Motorrad und Zweiradwerk to tune and increase performance of the dirty little smokers. But after factory rider Ernst Denger fled to the West, taking the company's secrets with him in a move to Suzuki [technically the East then] MZ's dominance ended and the company faded into the background. Later, they built a range of simple, very Soviet-looking bikes based around a Rotax single, but it wasn't until their mid-90s revival with bikes like this MZ Skorpion Sport that they really looked like a modern alternative to anything.

Like an East German version of Triumph's 1990s lineup, MZ's entire range was built around a common frame, and all the bikes used Yamaha's five-valve XT660 single backed by a five-speed gearbox. The frame was less top-heavy than Triumph's spine design, but the big thumper meant modern sportbike fans weaned on Japanese inline-fours were... confused, to say the least. The package made sense for the Mastiff supermoto or the Baghira adventure bike, but wasn't the ideal choice for the Traveller [guess what that one was supposed to be for] and the Sport, along with its Cup and Replica variants, and the bikes were never all that popular.

All the better for the rest of us! The Skorpion wasn't scorchingly fast in a straight line, but throw it into a set of corners and the bike was in its element: Motorcycleonline.com referred to the limited-production WP-suspended Skorpion Replica as one of the best handling bikes they'd ever tested. The lower-spec Sport seen here might not handle quite as well right out of the box, but the basic components are there and the bike just a cartridge kit and an updated shock away from similar results. There's a good reason people like to use them as the basis for affordable track and racebikes.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale

Rare and nifty sport single! Yamaha, 5-valve, 660cc, liquid cooled, electric-start engine as used in Yamaha 660cc ATV's Quads. Chassis is unique English design and great handling! Manufactured in (formerly) East Germany. Stock except for Holeshot muffler. Clear title. Runs well, stops great and steers amazing! Please look at photos and ask questions. Local pickup or you handle shipping. Thanks!

At 26,000 miles, this is no garage queen, but it looks like it's in good cosmetic condition and the XT660 powerplant isn't exactly rare, so basic maintenance should be easy. Considering the bidding starts at just $1,799 with no takers yet, this should be on the short list of anyone looking to graduate from track days to racing, fans of affordable exotica, and basically anyone that's a lover of fun, honest, practical motorcycles.

-tad

Simple Pleasures: 1995 MZ Skorpion Sport for Sale