Posts by tag: 4T

Ducati January 16, 2011 posted by

2001 Ducati 996R With 135 Total Miles

Here is another low-mileage 996R in fantastic condition!

Bike:  2001 Ducati 996R

Mileage:  135mi

Location:  Lincoln, Nebraska

Price:  $20,000 in stock form or $22,000 with extras

We’ve had several 996R’s on RSBFS and most have been fantastic, low mileage, examples.  This example here doesn’t disappoint either with only 135 miles total.

Here is what the seller says about additional parts with the bike:

DP carbon rear sets
DP carbon sprocket cover
Bucci carbon swing arm protector
MW corse carbon heel gaurds
Billet anodized black clip ons
1098 brake and clutch master cylinders. painted to match frame
Billet race style gas cap. anodized black
Custom carbon v guard with vents
999R carbon belt covers
DP carbon mirrors

Parts that I have but not installed

LED tail light strip. To mount under the tail
LED turn signals
DP neoprene/carbon seat
Magnesium vertical cylinder covers
Catalyst Upper fairing with RS intakes
RS intakes that fit stock air box
Smoked wind screen
Headlight assembly

The additional pieces aren’t too major and the bike should easily be returned to stock.  The seller states that this bike has also been recently serviced.  I would think it’d be the prudent move to buy this bike, completely stock, and use the additional $2k for a nice pedestal.

The seller isn’t 100% on selling this bike, but I’m sure if there is a genuine cash offer, he can be persuaded.  See the previous 996R’s we’ve posted here;  If you regret missing out on those, don’t make the same mistake twice and see the ad on Ducati.ms here.

AG

Honda January 11, 2011 posted by

1991 Honda VFR750F-M With 3,950 Original Miles Just Outside Of Seattle, Washington

A low mileage ’91 VFR750F in Washington state!

Bike:  1991 Honda VFR750F-M (RC36)

Location:  Bothell, Washington

Mileage:  3,950mi

Price:  $3,395USD

Honda marketing labeled the VFR as a “sportbike for all seasons” and “an entire garage full in one bike”.  These VFR’s were designed to be just as usable as a canyon carver, sport-tourer, and daily rider.  The bike retained race derived components such as the 16-valve V-4, Pro-Arm single sided swing-arm, twin piston brakes and a dual spar aluminum perimeter frame.

I find these earlier VFR’s–third and fourth generation–to be the best looking of the standard production VFR line.  The seller doesn’t state much other than that this bike is all original.  From the minuscule Craigslist photos, it looks to be in very good condition as I would expect for a bike of this mileage.  This bike does look to have bronze wheels.  While I’ve only seen these red examples with white wheels, this could be from the factory–anyone care to comment?  The price is higher than most for a second-gen’ VFR but considering mileage and condition, it isn’t too out of line.

See the bike on Craigslist here.

AG

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale January 9, 2011 posted by

1969 Honda CB750K Sandcast With Hardly Any Time Left On eBay

1969 Honda CB750 Sandcast

Location:  Appleton, Wisconsin

Mileage:  13,642 Miles

Price:  Currently $12,500USD with reserve not met.

“Just because something is rare, doesn’t make it valuable.”  This slogan is used by many to low-ball sellers, or to just tell sellers that what they have is actually pyrite, not the gold they believe it to be.  However, as the collectibility of Japanese motorcycles becomes more prevalent and focused, some bikes will become the most desirable and therefore the most valuable.  As far as the direction vintage, Japanese, street bikes appear to going in, the ’69 CB750 Sandcast appears to be one of the top performers.

The Honda CB750 was absolutely revolutionary when released in 1969.  As played out as it has become, the CB750 was a four-stroke race bike for the road, something the world had never seen, and also single-handedly ballooned the sales of cider in the West Midlands.  The CB750 of 1969 was revolutionary in it’s electric start, front disc, transverse mounted inline-four, and single overhead cam among other things.  Some of the most surprising attributes of the CB750 were it’s affordable price ($1469 USD in 1969) and the fact that it was actually dependable!  The last real CB750 was released in 1978, as that was the end of the SOHC, dry-sump, bikes that were what made it so special when released.  The bikes were relatively the same from ’69-78, but what makes the sandcast so special?

Speaking of Ferrari’s on a bike website isn’t the most popular move, but it’s going to be the easiest way to explain why the sandcast is the most expensive CB750.  In 1975, at the Paris Motor Show, Ferrari released the iconic 308; the 308GTB wasn’t released to the buying public until 1977 however and the first 712 cars feature fiberglass bodywork.  These ‘glass cars can easily be identified by the horizontal line at the top of the A-Pillar, which isn’t present on the steel bodied cars.  The fiberglass bodied 308GTB is the lightest of the 308 line, features a dry-sump oil system, least amount of government regulation items (bumpers, emissions), and is carbureted as opposed to fuel-injected.  Some of these features were carried on through the post ’77 cars but the most important feature of the first 712 is the fiberglass body.  It has been widely speculated why these early cars feature fiberglass bodywork as opposed to the steel of the cars only a year later.  The most widely accepted reason is that Scaglietti/Ferrari didn’t have the resources to immediately start production with the steel body tooling.  These fiberglass 308’s are generally valued in the $40-55k range, or more, dependent on condition while other carbureted 308s tend to lie within the $25-35k range.

What does this all mean for the CB750 shown here?  The sandcast CB750s were produced up to serial number 1007414, these bikes featured some identifiable features such as front fender, gas tank, chain guard, master cylinder, etc., and most importantly the sandcast engine.  The sandcast engine has no performance benefits over the later die-cast blocks.  Honda went with the sandcast motors early on simply because a cope & drag system is considerably cheaper and faster than fronting the money for a die-cast production line.  The sandcast CB’s routinely sell for $10-20k more than a later (pre-’79) CB750 of the same condition.  You don’t want to ask about RSC parts for a CB750…

I know, you’ve probably skipped the last few paragraphs and I’m fine with that; Here is the review of this particular CB for sale:  This bike is in very good condition for being forty-two years old.  This bike is supposedly original except for a missing side cover and having the top clap replaced at a Honda dealer in the 1980.  The SN of the engine does not match the SN of the frame.  I’m not versed well enough on sandcast CB750s to know if this is possibly the original engine or not.  If it is not however, whomever found the engine did a lot of leg work as the engine is only thirty-three numbers from the frame.  This bike is in very good, driver, condition and should be more than acceptable for a restorer or someone who wants to simply be the eccentric guy at bike nights who rides the “…sandcast ‘750!”.  This CB750 appears to be early production based on it’s left mounted horn which is in line with the early SN.  The mileage also appears to be consistent with the condition of the bike shown.

This bike is right for you if you have the money for a brand new CBR1000RR, but not the interest in one.  Or, if you prefer appreciation to depreciation…See the bike on eBay .  Learn more than you’ve ever wanted to at the Sandcast Only Owner’s Club here.  Find NOS parts or get your sandcast bike restored here.

AG

Bimota September 30, 2010 posted by

1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra S/N 000003 With 356 Original Miles

This is a very low mileage Bimota DB3 Mantra with a very low serial number!

Bike:  1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra

Location:  San Diego, California

Mileage:  356mi

The seller states this bike is completely original but doesn’t state much about any imperfections.  This comes to us from the same seller of the Bimota BB1 we just posted here.

This bike was Bimota’s first foray into the naked bike sector and, personally, doesn’t look so hot.  However, it is a true Bimota and features the power-plant from the Ducati 900SS.  There are very few changes throughout the production run and all of the later pieces are interchangeable with the earlier bikes.  The riding position, with low rear-sets and high clip-ons, is very similar to a standard riding position.  However, the bike is pretty light at 185kg (Wet), with a low CG thanks to the exhaust and dummy fuel tank.  The engine, suspension, braking, and general handling isn’t bad and this bike would be perfect for anyone who thinks a Duc’ Monster is too plain.  The imitation wood dash and carbon fiber should get some attention if the headlight surround doesn’t.  See the only Mantra we’ve ever posted on eBay .

AG

Bimota September 29, 2010 posted by

1995 Bimota BB1, One of 148, on eBay

This is an ultra rare Bimota BB1 on eBay!

Bike:  1995 Bimota BB1

Location:  San Diego, California

Mileage:  6,321km (3927mi)

The seller states that this bike is completely original and has always been stored inside.  The title is from Germany and will probably be a pain–or impossible–to register here in the U.S.  The pictures/video do show nicks, scratches, and oxidation on many surfaces, but the bike appears to be in generally good condition.  We’ve seen this seller before with some rare bikes and his videos are always easy to remember because the bikes are always in the same alley and he always makes sure to show that the charging system works.

The original idea sounds fantastic:  145kg (Dry), 650cc single, 46rwhp, BMW-Rotax sourced power-plant with tubular frame and clever insights such as repositioning the fuel tank to achieve optimum CG.  However, I’ve read, the actual finished product turned out to be crap.  Supposedly the bike has ridiculous vibration–Relative to singles!–terrible ergonomics, underpowered brakes and poor handling.  Here is a quote from a period test by Performance Bikes:

‘I expected the Bimota to be hot shit, but it’s turned out to be more of a luke-warm, fudgey stool. It’s nervous, skittish and sounds like the chain is about to leap off the sprockets’

Ah, OK then.  Performance Bikes isn’t the only unfavorable review, the internet only seems to have stories of poor experiences.  While the Ducati Supermono is extremely rare and held to a mythical status, the BB1 is also just as rare but regarded as something you never want to experience other than looking at.

That being said, this is still a very, very, rare Bimota with only 148 ever being produced.  This example isn’t perfect, but it’s not too far off either and you’ll be one of the few to own one.  There are a bunch of little cosmetic issues that will add up but once completed this should be a very nice show piece and, based on reviews, the German title shouldn’t be an issue because you wouldn’t want to ride the thing even if you could.  Anyone have first hand experience they’d like to share?

Bid, or see what this bike goes for, on eBay .

AG

Update: This posting is pretty outdated. Check out some of these current listings on eBay for bikes and parts right now!

[AffomaticEbay]Bimota[/AffomaticEbay]

Sport Bikes For Sale September 28, 2010 posted by

1992 Yamaha FZR600 Vance & Hines Edition #476 with 2,620 Original Miles

This a very nice, low mileage, Vance & Hines Edition FZR600.

Bike:  1992 Yamaha FZR600 V&H

Location:  Mountain Lakes, New Jersey

Mileage:  2,620mi

The seller states that this bike is “…perfect without a scratch.”  It was recently tuned and supposedly runs like a champ.  This bike looks to be perfectly stock (except for the windscreen) and in fantastic condition as the seller states.  We’ve had a few V&H Edition FZR’s in the past and none had this low of mileage or were in as original condition.  See the other FZR600s we’ve posted here.

The Vance & Hines Edition wasn’t special other than the commemorative scheme and V&H exhaust system.  1992 was also the last year for the square headlight design which only lasted for two years before Yamaha reverted back to the earlier, dual headlight, design that was so popular.  If you’re a Yamaha collector, you should have one of these and this is probably one of the best examples out there.  See the bike on eBay .

AG

Classic Sport Bikes For Sale September 21, 2010 posted by

1987 Honda CBR600F Hurricane With 8K Original Miles

This is a nice looking, first year, CBR600F Hurricane about to end on eBay.

Bike:  1987 Honda CBR600F Hurricane

Location:  Bradley, Illinois

Mileage:  8,101mi

The seller states that this bike is a one owner example, in showroom new condition.  The bike has been modified with a K&N filter (And probably a drilled air-box cover), an F1 exhaust system, a larger rear sprocket and the passenger pegs have been modified.  The only claimed cosmetic imperfection is the small crack in the front fender.  The carb’s were gone through earlier this year and new, Pro-line, fuel lines were also installed.

The bike does look very good in the pictures.  I don’t doubt that it is fantastically clean in person but there may be some small issues the seller may have missed but, I’m pretty sure they know the bike quite well after 23 years.

Sadly, the only issue this bike may have is the price:  I don’t see this bike going for $3,500 and the seller has a reserve in place.  Heading into fall, I’d probably assume this bike would go in the $2.5k-2.8k range.  There are collectors for these early CBR’s but, they seem to not be willing to pay a premium because they know no one else will.

This was the first production 600cc bike to crack the quarter mile in under 12 seconds with a time of 11.7 @ 113mph.  These early CBR’s are quite fun if you realize they are 23yo technology.  Parts are prevalent and nothing is really difficult other than the valve service–just like any inline four within a confined frame.  The only major drawback is the rim widths.  While the rims are 17″ front & rear, they are quite narrow and were originally fitted with bias-ply’s leaving the current tire choices limited–but, still better than for an FZR.

Although I wouldn’t spring for this bike at this price, I believe these aren’t a bad choice if you’re looking for a budget collectible.  While the F2 & F3 bikes may have had more aftermarket parts during their time, the Hurricane will always be the first generation of the, ongoing, iconic CBR.  See this bike on eBay .

AG

Here are some other Honda Hurricane’s and parts for sale right now:

[AffomaticEbay]Honda Hurricane[/AffomaticEbay]

Sport Bikes For Sale September 9, 2010 posted by

1989 Yamaha FZR750R OW01 In Mexico

This is a real FZR750R OW01 available in Mexico!

Bike:  1989 Yamaha FZR750R

Location:  Mexico City, Mexico

Mileage:  5,148km

The listing has really no information other than that the bike only comes with the Japanese title, doesn’t have a 17 digit VIN, cosmetically it has some small nicks and there is a video that shows the tach works.  The photos do show that the fairings are pretty rough (For a collector OW01) and there appears to be some surface corrosion.

On from that, I’ll refresh your memory on the OW01.  The FZR750R was created to compete against the RC30 in World SuperBike racing.  The OW01 shares very little with the standard FZR750 and a little more in common with the FZR1000.  The short stroke motor breathes through four 38mm flat-side Mikuni’s, five valves, hand finished porting, lightweight pistons, titanium connecting rods mated to a close ratio transmission.  This results in 108RWHP at 12,500RPM.

The OW01 also features an aluminum Deltabox frame and swingarm with fully adjustable Ohlins units front & rear with Nissin four-pot calipers mated to 320mm discs in the front.

This bike is a result of Yamaha’s need to get a competitive bike Homologated for World SuperBike;  Yamaha only needed to produce 500 example for Homologation making the OW01 very scarce then, as well as now.

If you want a bike that an RC30 owner will cross the street for, a FZR750R should do it.  The trouble with this bike will be importing it.  If you’d like to bring this into the U.S. it will probably be difficult or nigh-impossible.  The easiest way would be to bring it in as a race bike but, it has to obviously be a race bike.  If you don’t know where to start, I would do some research or find an informed confidant and wait for the next one to pop up.  See the other OW01’s we’ve had here.  See this current bike on eBay .

AG