Posts by tag: 1984

Yamaha February 6, 2017 posted by

Restored Replica: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 for Sale

If you live here in the US and have a hankering for a two-stroke sportbike the choices, assuming you don’t want to monkey about with a grey-market import, are few and far between. 70’s two-strokes were relatively light and nimble, but still limited by the suspension and frame technology of the time, and by the mid-1980s, they’d been legislated out of existence, leaving this Yamaha RZ350 to make a final stand against the inexorable tide of four-stroke motorcycles. With blacked-out engine and frame, that striking black and yellow “bumblebee” paint, bikini fairing, and the “Kenny Roberts” signature, the RZ350 represents the very last of the old guard before “sportbikes” were codified into the narrow, very focused form we see in today’s motorcycles.

Produced for a very short period between 1984 and 1985, the RZ350 was a follow up to Yamaha’s RD bikes. It was powered by a 347cc two-stroke parallel-twin that added liquid-cooling to the successful formula, along with the “Yamaha Power Valve System” or “YPVS.” Powerband is typically two-stroke-y, even with the benefit of the YPVS power-valve, but the additional displacement helps some, compared to the all-or-nothing 250s. Weighing in at just 370 pounds or so with gas in the tank, it will still shake a leg on spirited backroad rides and can surprise modern machines, although tire choices for the skinny 18″ wheels will limit ultimate grip…

The seller claims that the bike has been restored from top to bottom, including a full engine rebuild, and it also includes a full-fairing that appears to have been a popular period accessory, considering the number of RZ350s fitted with them that come up for sale.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 Kenny Roberts Replica for Sale

Here is a beautiful restored 1984 RZ350 Kenny Roberts. The numbers are matching with a clear title in my name. This bike has a low production number of 223.  I have owned this bike for 6 years and have hardly rode it. It sat getting looks more than riding so its time to turn it loose. This bike has been completely restored. The engine has been professionally rebuilt from top to bottom. It runs and rides beautiful. There is less than 500 miles on this bike since it has been redone. As you can see it has a full fairing kit. The engine is stock with DG pipes and mild carb jetting. This bike is a real head turner where ever I have taken it. Probably the nicest RZ350 you will come across. Take a look at the pictures.

Bidding is very active on this one, and up to just over $7,000 with about 24 hours left on the auction. It’s certainly possible to find an RZ350 for less but, unless you stumble across some pristine, low-mileage museum-piece that will probably need a full restoration if you plan to ride it regularly, you’re unlikely to find one nicer. Well-reviewed when new and very popular now, the RZ350 neatly straddles the modern and classic eras, with clearly vintage sportbike style, light weight, and a liquid-cooled two-stroke punch. If you’re looking for US-legal two-stroke performance, this is just about the only game in town, and this example looks to be one of the nicest around.

-tad

Restored Replica: 1984 Yamaha RZ350 for Sale
Yamaha August 9, 2016 posted by

Unfairly Overshadowed? 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Front

Many of the weird and wonderful bikes we like to feature on this site appear in time-capsule condition, as if Doc Brown put them in a trailer behind his time-traveling DeLorean and towed them from the distant year 1985 into… The future! Others are patched-up wrecks described as having “patina” with “90% tread left on tires.” This particular RZ500 falls somewhere in the middle, and looks like a nice, clean, bike with a reasonable asking price.

Crazy, right?

1984 Yamaha RZ500 L Front

Yamaha’s RZ500, also known as the RD500LC in some markets, was one of two 500cc race-replicas designed to ape the overall specification and style of the top-level two-stroke racebikes of the era. But unlike the Suzuki RG500 “Gamma,” the Yamaha pulled a bit of a Honda with their roadgoing exotic, taking a brilliant idea and then engineering the hell out of it, ending up with a bit of a muddle. The powerplant was a liquid-cooled 50° two-stroke V4 with twin cranks. So far, so good. A pair of YPVS power valves and oil-injection helped boost performance and make the bike a bit more practical. Seems like a smart choice. Sophisticated anti-dive forks and an unusually-mounted rear shock allowed for serious handling and tight packaging, respectively. Then a balance shaft was included to handle unwanted vibrations… In theory, this should have helped make the bike run smoother and make it more civilized while simultaneously allowing a lighter frame for improved performance, but it didn’t really work out that way. The resulting bike was both heavier and less powerful than the Gamma and although the RZ has its fans, reviewers and prices reflect the Gamma’s superior performance versus the RZ500’s more practical street bias. The upside is reasonable prices compared to the Suzuki, and that singular two-stroke sound and feel.

1984 Yamaha RZ500 Tank

So what’s the big deal with the rising popularity of these two-stroke sportbikes? A bit of nostalgia and a bit of performance. These tinny-sounding streetbikes began to disappear after the mid-1980s here in the USA where ever-tightening emissions laws strangled the smoky little beasts into an early grave. Top-level racing of the era saw two-stroke machines competing exclusively and that link to race-bred machinery is a powerful thing in the minds of motorcycle enthusiasts. There’s also the axiom made popular by Colin Chapman, founder of Lotus: “Simplify, then add lightness.” And two strokes are both of those things: with fewer moving parts, they’re simpler and lighter, while theoretically making twice as much power as a four-stroke of equivalent displacement. So while a 500cc two-stroke might make similar power compared to a 1000cc four-stroke, the resulting package is much lighter, meaning the bike will turn quicker, brake better, and generally offer more feedback to the rider. Two-strokes require more maintenance, which isn’t a problem for race bikes or committed enthusiasts, and they also produce more pollution, which is something many motorcycle fans are happy to… Ahem. Overlook.

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Side Detail

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale

In great condition. Runs after one kick. Never downed. Never raced, 8700 Miles. Tuned by Lance Gamma

Engine: 499 cc liquid-cooled V4 two stroke Power: 64.2 kW (88 PS) @9,500 rpm Torque: 65.4 N·m @8,500 rpm Transmission 6 speed Weight 205 kg/452 lb (dry)

1984 Yamaha RZ500 R Side

There’s a $9,000 opening bid with no takers as yet and a $10,000 Buy It Now price for this bit of two-stroke history. This example isn’t cosmetically perfect, with a little bit of surface rust here and there on the steel frame, but appears complete and mechanically well cared-for: “tuned by Lance Gamma” certainly adds some value. Although as always, I wish these sellers would include more details about the bike’s history and exactly what “tuned” means: did he adjust the carburetors, or do a performance rebuild of the motor and set up the suspension? Having been under the care of a well-known and regarded tuner is great, but a bit more detail might help the bike sell…

-tad

1984 Yamaha RZ500 L Fairing

Unfairly Overshadowed? 1984 Yamaha RZ500 for Sale
Kawasaki July 29, 2016 posted by

Vivid Green Oddity: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale

1984 Kawasaki KR250 L Side Front

Well here’s a real curiosity, another bike from the era of experimental engine configurations. Prior to the introduction of the KR-1 featured earlier this week, Kawasaki’s quarter-liter two-stroke sportbike reputation was upheld by this bike, the KR250. Although it’s powered by what is technically a parallel twin, the Kawasaki KR250’s engine is configured more like half of a square four. It’s basically a pair of singles, one behind the other, with separate cranks, and the design is referred to as a “tandem-twin” to differentiate it from more conventional parallel-twins.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Side

Although it complicates construction a bit, it likely helps the bike remain very narrow and improves packaging, as exhaust routing and expansion chambers no longer have to run underneath the engine as they do on most parallel-twin engines. In this case, they both exit on the right side of the bike: one down low, the other partly through the tailpiece in flamboyant 1980s style. The round taillamp set into the kicked-up tail and those bolt-on-overfender-styled hand-fairings are a nice touch. And that stepped seat appears to be a factory part!

1984 Kawasaki KR250 Dash

That unusual engine was backed by a six-speed gearbox and put out 45hp, good for 112mph when pushing the sub-300lb machine. Like other two-strokes of the period, it was lightweight, reasonably quick, and handled well. Later versions added the KVSS “Kawasaki Exhaust Valve Sycronization System” to help with the typically flat two-stroke midrange. They apparently could be difficult to get started, even when new, but are otherwise no more difficult to own than any other smoker of the period. The KR250 isn’t worth all that much in other markets but is extremely rare here in the US, which counts for a lot if you’re a fan of the weird.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Rear

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale

Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are working fine. Electricals are all working. Has Kawasaki genuine fairings but repainted by previous owner. Has hairline cracks and chips on fairings, so look carefully all pictures and video. Fuel tank has some small dents. Used motorcycle with scratches and wear as this is 32 years old. Speedometer looks KAWASAKI genuine parts and shows 36,300km = about 22,600 miles, but actual mileage is unknown. Will needs new tires and fork seals.

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. This bike is sold without title, as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

The seller also helpfully includes this short video of the bike sounding very fierce. This is another no-reserve auction and bidding is very active so far, but it apparently started at $0 and is creeping up by inches. Currently, it’s at around $1,200 with a couple days left. The seller mentions that the bike has been repainted by a previous owner and I can’t vouch for the originality of that color scheme, but I think that red and green paint looks terrific. Like Christmas on two wheels, if Christmas was a heavy smoker with a nasal voice who just showed up in a shipping container from Japan.

1984 Kawasaki KR250 R Side Front

Parts will obviously be challenging, getting it worked on difficult, and this definitely won’t provide the performance of a modern sportbike, but I bet it’d be hard to find something that will generate more discussion at your local bike night short of a Bimota Tesi.

-tad

1984 Kawasaki KR250 L Side

Vivid Green Oddity: 1984 Kawasaki KR250 for Sale
Ducati July 2, 2016 posted by

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 L Front

What looks good doesn’t always work well: some of the most beautiful cars ever built were created by eye, without the aid of modern aerodynamics. Sleek machines like the Jaguar E-Type and the Corvette Stingray may look impossibly fast, but often try to leave the road at elevated speeds… Racing machines on the other hand are often strange and awkward-looking, designed to perform ahead of all other considerations. The Ducati TT1 may not be the prettiest bike ever built by the company, but you can’t argue with its performance.

1984 Ducati TT1 L Engine
Although the earlier TT2 machine was more successful in terms of race results, the bigger-engine TT1 seen here still has some serious competition credentials and was successful in endurance racing as well. The bike was powered by a bigger 748cc version of the Desmo Pantah engine that used toothed belts to drive the overhead cams instead of the bevel-drive engine’s tower-shaft arrangement. A front-mounted oil-cooler behind the fairing kept temperatures under control, with holes drilled in front to allow sufficient airflow.

1984 Ducati TT1 Dash
This package eventually evolved into the air/oil-cooled L-twin Ducatisti still know and love today, although in this case it was still carbureted, with the rear head rotated 180° from more modern configurations: later bikes had intake for both in the center of the “V,” allowing Cagiva to fit the engine with an automotive-style carburetor in the Paso. The frame was an extremely lightweight, stiff, sculptural masterpiece by Verlicchi and a 16” and 18” wheel combo meant riders could exploit the bike’s extreme lightweight and agility.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale

Unimpeachable provenance and beautiful patina

One of three ex-works 1984-season European endurance race bikes, then bought from the factory direct by American enthusiast Dale Newton for AMA BoTT racing in the USA

Frame no. 6 (on steering head), engine no. DM600L*702481*

Sold on a Bill of Sale. Five miles approx. since restoration.

This well documented TT1 is the rarest of the rare. Three chassis were taken from the production run of 50 600 TT2s and built as endurance racers for the 1984 European championship. Essentially two of the three – this is one of the two – were replicas of Tony Rutter’s factory team TT1. Based on the belt-drive, desmo Pantah, the TT1 had a 88mm bore and a 61.5mm stroke for a capacity of 748cc, with a factory quoted 80 horsepower. At under 300 pounds dry, they were built with Italy’s finest contemporary components such as Marzocchi magnesium forks, wider aluminum (extrusion) cantilever swing arm (with strengthening rub running along the bottom) – one of only two bikes known to have this feature – and Brembo brakes all round. The compact TT1 was both ground breaking fast and exquisitely handsome. It features a unique lower mounting point for the engine vapor catch tank on the right side. As a new bike it attended the Imola test day. The engine has the “Ascension” kit installed that upgraded the TT2 motor to full race 750. The bike retains its endurance racing quick-release rear wheel kit.

American Ducatisti patron Dale Newton (he owned the Phil Schilling/Cook Neilson “California HotRod” Daytona superbike, too) bought the bike from the factory at the ’84 season’s end (still with its headlamp sockets etc. intact; Dale removed the lights as the AMA rules did not require them) and proceeded to run the bike in the USA and was the last bike he restored before his untimely death. Dale’s goal was to beat east coaster Jimmy Adamo in BoTT.

Brian Dietz purchased the bike from the Newton estate in September 1999 selling it on to Ralf Stechow in November 2008. It was acquired by the (private) seller shortly thereafter.

The Newton Ducatis were raced by legendary riders such as Tony Rutter, Kevin Schwantz and John Williams and were featured in Cycle magazine on several occasions. Next is a listing of the articles; January 1984 “Messenger in Red: Ducati TT2 600”; October 1984 “Ducati Pantah TT1”; April 1985 “Aboard Sunday’s Child: Ducati 750 TT1”; April 1985 “Desmo-Ships on a Time Belt: Ducati 750SS and TT1 750 F1”. “Dale Newton’s ex-factory TT-F1 (this bike) is representative of Ducati 750 potential, and on the Axtell dyno it generated 83-86 horsepower.” Kevin Cameron, February 1990.

This bike has also been featured in two of Ian Falloon’s books. “… the diminutive TT2 and TT1 were among the finest of all catalog Ducatis…they epitomized Taglioni’s philosophy of maximum performance through light weight and simplicity.”- Standard Catalog of Ducati Motorcycles, and Ducati Racers. And in Alan Cathcart’s Ducati, the Untold Story.

1984 Ducati TT1 R Engine

This TT1 is from a very limited run of competition-only Ducatis and has a well-documented owner history, the bike is in beautiful cosmetic condition for a race bike and is certainly very rare and valuable, although there’s been no real bidding activity so far and the auction is almost over. The more desirable TT2 might be worth six figures, but it’s pretty clear from the limited interest that the seller is aiming a bit high here.

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 R Side

#becauseracebike: 1984 Ducati 750 TT1 for Sale
Ducati June 10, 2016 posted by

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front2

Although the mid-1980s 750 F1 may not have represented the very best from Ducati, the TT2 and later TT1 race bikes that inspired them certainly did. Lightweight, perfectly formed, and highly effective, they epitomize Ducati’s racing ethos of the period. The original TT2 displaced 587cc and used the belt-drive Pantah motor, with the later TT1 punched out to something closer to 750cc. Both bikes did well in competition, although the earlier 600 was far more successful.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side

The beautiful and very lightweight [at a claimed 16lbs] frame by Verlicchi and the bodywork with perforations to allow airflow to a front-mounted oil-cooler are distinctive characteristics of the TT, and those huge headlights speak to the bike’s obvious endurance-racing intent. The front three-quarter view also highlights the 16” front and 18” rear wheel/tire combo that contributed to the bike’s agility.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike R Side Engine
Although this one may have racing provenance and should probably be on display somewhere in a collection or museum, but it’s battle-ready and scuffed appearance almost demand that it be put into track-ready condition and campaigned in vintage events.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale

Ducati TT2/TT1 750, model year 1984, VIN 22

This is a GENUINE TT2 factory bike, VIN 22 upgraded to TT1 750cc specs to compete in that class in the Endurance series. Jean Moto Team was a small but very “aggressive” team competing in endurance racing and TT’s during the 1980’s

A real piece of mid 80’s Ducati history this bike finished 6th overall at the 1984 Bol d’Or, first of all Ducatis so in front of works Ducati machines! It’s totally preserved as it finished the last race but the engine was completely overhauled by factory ex-mechanic Giorgio Grimandi.

Forget stocks and shares invest in a true piece of motorcycling history! It comes with documentation (original period magazine etc). Race, parade and collect! Bulletproof investment.

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Side

Bidding is up to around $6,500 with the reserve not met and several days left on the auction. That’s no surprise, considering that real TT race bike should be at least a $30,000 machine. I’m not sure why there hasn’t been more interest. Perhaps the bike’s mongrel TT1/TT2 history? That seems very much in keeping with a racebike’s mission, and only bikes that have spent their lives on display would be lacking period upgrades to keep them competitive…

-tad

1984 Ducati TT1 Race Bike L Front

Piece of History: 1984 Ducati TT2/TT1 Race Bike for Sale
Laverda March 2, 2016 posted by

Orange Whip: 1984 Laverda RGA Jota for Sale

1984 Laverda RGS R Side

With early Laverdas like the Jota and SFC headed into the stratosphere in terms of prices, and even bikes from the tail-end of triple production starting to command five-digit prices, it’s no surprise to see this very clean but not as well-known Laverda RGA Jota sitting north of $12,000…

1984 Laverda RGS L Tank

By the early 1980s, Laverda was in trouble. They lacked the financial depth to compete against modern bikes and, although they had moved on to updated, fully-faired styling with the RGS, they were the same old machines under the skin. Not that that was necessarily a terrible thing: the 981cc, dual overhead cam triple was famous for its power and charisma. Fitted with the smoother 120° crank, Laverda’s offerings of the 1980s were certainly not lacking performance, but they were still hard work and not nearly as refined as Japanese offerings. And they were expensive.

1984 Laverda RGS R Fairing

In fact, the RGA was a bike specifically intended to address the pricing issue. The RGS’ fully-enclosed bodywork was of very high quality, but added significantly to the bike’s cost. The RGA swapped that out for a lantern-jawed bikini fairing, a tank-mounted filler cap, and handlebars to replace the clip-ons.

1984 Laverda RGS Gauges

It’s not really clear from the listing whether this is a lower-spec RGA fitted with different bodywork, or an RGS stripped of the full bodywork and fitted with a Sprint half-fairing. Or is it the RGA Jota, that came with clip-on bars, orange paint, and blacked-out mufflers? It’s listed as an RGS, so I’d assume that to start, but it might be worth an email to the seller, since it really looks to be an RGA Jota and is claimed to be original. Performance-wise there’s no difference and no matter how you slice it, this is a very rare bike.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Laverda RGA Jota for Sale

1984 Laverda Jota RGS/RGA. Rare bike with low miles. Bike is original and is not restored. Bike was imported from the U.K. into the U.S.A. when new. I believe it came from Slater Bros. in England where they were modified after arriving from Italy.

I have owned the bike for about four years and am the third owner. It starts, runs, and rides great. I only repaired what needed to be done after a long period of storage, so paint and decals are original. It has a Super-Trap exhaust system since new and carbs were jetted to match when new.

Here is what I did to the bike to make it road-worthy when I found it, bear in mind this work was completed a few years ago now:

Rebuilt the brake hydraulics.

Rebuilt the clutch hydraulics.

New clutch, as the old one liked to stick after use.

Rebuilt the carbs, new petcocks, flush tank.

New windscreen, as old one was cracked.

New battery.

New tires.

Real head-turner with a very unique look and sound, only one like this I have every seen…

1984 Laverda RGS R Side Rear

Interestingly, we featured a similar-looking RGA on ClassicSportBikesforSale.com a while back. That bike was very nice vintage blue, but it’s hard to argue with an orange Laverda. It may not have the cachet of a Jota, but these are very rare in the US and have all charm of more classic bikes, with improved function compared to earlier Laverda triples.

Like many older machines, these are relatively maintenance-intensive if you’re used to modern designs, but they’re fundamentally durable and well-built. That dual-headlight half fairing should provide good wind protection and the two-up seat decent passenger accommodation. Find yourself a set of fitted luggage and head out for a long weekend ride!

-tad

1984 Laverda RGS L Side

Orange Whip: 1984 Laverda RGA Jota for Sale
Laverda October 4, 2015 posted by

Throw Back Sunday: 1984 Laverda RGS 1000 for Sale

1984 Laverda RGS1000 L Side

A bit of a hulking dinosaur, even when new, this Laverda RGS 1000 lives at the transition point between the old and the new, as the European manufacturers were being eclipsed by the Japanese when it came to sports motorcycles. For a long time, they’d hung on by being able to out-handle the upstarts from Japan, but bikes like the GSX-R750 brought power, handling, and contemporary racing style to the table at a bargain price.

1984 Laverda RGS1000 Dash

Look at the RGS compared to something like Honda’s NSR400R, a bike that was more sophisticated in just about every single way, but with the same cylinder count: two-stroke, six-speed gearbox, fancy anti-dive forks, and significantly lighter weight and some of the best handling of the period. How could Laverda hope to compete with that? Well they did, for a time, recasting their big, bruiser of a triple as a classic GT, a “gentleman’s express” with hand-built quality, character, and a timeless design.

1984 Laverda RGS1000 Dash

Powered by a revised version of their 981cc three-cylinder with a revised, 120° crankshaft to smooth out the famously raucous engine, the RGS featured a full fairing, comprehensive, if sometimes fickle instrumentation, and reasonably comfortable passenger accommodations. Fitted luggage was even available.

But the original three cylinder bikes were big, butch sportbikes and saw plenty of time on racetracks, so the RGS is no old-man touring bike. While it’s no lightweight at 550lbs full of fluids and ready to run, it’s pretty par for the course when compared to other big sportbikes of the period and offers up big speed and stable handling for mile-crushing sport-touring.

1984 Laverda RGS1000 Front Wheel Detail

I almost passed on posting this bike, as the photography is less-than-stellar. But Laverda RGS is very rare here in the US, with just 250 imported, and this looks like a very nice example. Those upgraded ISR six-piston calipers should provide serious stopping power, although the stock parts work very well.

From the original eBay listing: 1984 Laverda RGS 1000 for Sale

This is an opportunity to own a very rare piece of motorcycling history.  This is a 1984 Laverda RGS 1000.  It is in excellent cosmetic condition and is complete.  The plastics are not broken or cracked.  It is currently on display so I can only take pictures of the one side, but the other side is in the same condition as the pictured side.  I have owned the Laverda for 30 years, but it has been in storage for the last 25 years.  It will need to have the carbs gone through, new tires, new brake and fork fluids, and battery at the minimum to have it in running condition.  

The Laverda has the following modifications:

  • Corsa high compression pistons
  • Port and polished head
  • Carbs bored to 34mm
  • Moto Witt ignition
  • Astro Lite wheels
  • Slater 3 into 1 exhaust
  • 38mm M1R Marzocchi front forks
  • Werks rear shocks
  • ISR 6 piston front calipers
  • 320 full floating front discs

I have the following stock parts that will go with the Laverda:

  • exhaust
  • front rim
  • forks

Mileage isn’t listed, but shouldn’t be of much concern, assuming it’s been properly cared for: these are seriously overbuilt bikes, with top-shelf electrical components. But, like everything else Italian, it’s the maintenance that can get you: there’s no oil filter, so regular changes are a must, and shim-under-bucket valve adjustment means a major headache when the time comes for that.

Cherished by owners, these rarely come up for sale and at the $11,500 Buy It Now price seems very fair, although I’d recommend the photographer spend some time making sure his or her pictures are in-focus if the bike doesn’t sell this time around…

-tad

1984 Laverda RGS1000 Engine

Throw Back Sunday: 1984 Laverda RGS 1000 for Sale
Honda September 15, 2015 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1984 Honda VF700F and 2007 VFR800 Interceptors for Sale

Update 9.21.2015: RSBFS readers do it again! This pair and two others from the seller’s collection sold in just 24 hours! Contact me if you have a special bike that needs to be sold with a Featured Listing. Just $59!

Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

1984 VF700F Interceptor R Front

Honda’s V4 sportbikes have gained an enviable reputation as sophisticated, do-it-all motorcycles, and it all started in 1983 with the VF750F. Although it was originally designed to compete in AMA Superbike racing’s 750cc format, it offered up cutting-edge technology and handling while managing to be a very usable, comfortable motorcycle.

1984 VF700F Interceptor L Rear

The chain-driven 90° V4 engine layout eliminated primary vibration and was very compact. The slightly smaller VF700F tax-beater size put out 81 claimed horsepower, down just 5 from its bigger brother. Visually, the only difference between the two bikes was a lack of any mention of the smaller bike’s engine size in the graphics. Internally, it used a shorter stroke to reduce displacement and had different cams and ignition timing. Both the 750 and the 700 featured an early slipper clutch design to help keep the rear wheel in contact with the track on high-rpm downshifts, although the gearbox had just five speeds, compared to the six of earlier shaft-drive V4s.

1984 VF700F Interceptor R Rear

Suspension was state-of-the-art, with a 16″ front wheel for razor-sharp steering and the typical 18″ rear, fashionable air-assisted shock and forks, and fully-adjustable suspension. The VF even had an effective anti-dive system at the front, a relative rarity in an era of gimmicky technology of dubious value.

1984 VF700F Interceptor Dash

Unfortunately, Honda’s usually stellar reputation was marred by problems with cam wear in the early V4s. The problem was eventually traced to excessive clearance in the camshaft bearings and these should present no problems if the original bits have been updated appropriately as the rest of the bike was up to Honda’s high standards. This scandal ultimately led to the heavily-revised and overbuilt VFR that cemented the bike’s reputation as an impossibly durable sports motorcycle.

1984 VF700F Interceptor Engine

Today, we have a matched bookend pair of bikes from the VF’s history, one from the beginning, and one from the modern era, both in nearly crate-fresh condition

From the Seller: 1984 Honda VF700F and 2007 VFR800 for Sale

For sale are my two matching Interceptors. My 1984 VF700F with only 54 original miles and the 2007 Honda VFR800 25th Anniversary model with ZERO miles on it that matches it. This is extremely rare to have both the original 1984 and the matching 2007. PLEASE see the 282 photos link for the entire two year build. Bought the 1984 with 28 miles (see original title scan in photo link) , reconditioned it piece by piece, drove it to the current 54 miles and professionally and properly stored the bike. Bought the 2007 new in the crate, built it last year for display, it has never been started or even had the battery hooked up. It IS a new bike period !

Here is the photo link to almost 300 hi-res photos: http://s1185.photobucket.com/user/shabbabear/library/1984%20HONDA%20VF700F?sort=6&page=1

Both bikes have never seen direct sunlight, never rain and both kept in my climate and humidity controlled, carpeted garage or my carpeted den. Both bikes fogged and professionally serviced before storage. all fluids replaced or renewed if needed. Both gas tanks FLAWLESS and untouched inside. VF700 was originally in flawless RED and has been painted with FACTORY OEM Honda paints to convert to the BLUE model as it matches the 2007 VFR800 25th Anniversary model. Have the paint cans. This is shown in insane details in the almost 300 photos. I am a 54 year old serious collector and a certified Harley-Davidson and Honda Motorcycle Master Tech of 20+ years. I have been employed in the motorcycle industry from 1975 through 2014.

Have all keys, OEM manuals, parts, etc…absolutely everything is MINT, IMMACULATE, FLAWLESS, PERFECT. My ebay feedback is 100% perfect and reflects my sales of over 80 motorcycles and cars since 1999 to include my Ferrari’s, Porsches, Acura NSX’s, Vipers and on and on.

I am a former PCNA [Porsche Club North America] Concours Level Judge and fully understand what a 100 point PERFECT motorcycle is…these are it. Not one nick, cut, dent , scratch, lint, dust, rub, smear, mark, nothing PERIOD…NO excuses and NO stories…these are better than museum condition and run as new. 2007 has easily removed red Tapeworks wheel tape and fender eliminator kit. all OEM stock parts [pegs, rear fender, etc still new with all stickers]. only the gas tank, tail and side covers were painted on the 1984 VF700F, everything else is still factory FLAWLESS and cleaned and polished to absolute perfection.

On the 1984 VF700F; even the OEM tires are still flawless with no dry rot or separation. Brake pads are new, even the engine gaskets are still green and all fluids flawless. All stickers, chain same as when new from Honda.

Selling as a matched set for $10,500 for the pair. Have over $20,000 invested in these two collectibles. Will also sell separately at $5000 (VF700F) and $6000 (VFR800) each. Open to offers, so please call, as we (wife and I of 30 years) are selling off part of my collection to buy land to retire on. Happy to answer any questions. Call with your offers as we are going to closing in about 35 days.

Bill

The seller mentions that he is looking for $5,000 for VF700F by itself, which is fair money for one of these — and you are unlikely to ever find one in this kind of shape or with this kind of mileage again.

1984 VF700F Interceptor L Seat

The 2007 VFR has not yet achieved collector-bike status and purists seem to scoff at the VTEC bikes, but it looks great in HRC colors and is a pretty cool bookend for the earlier bike.

Obviously, this matched pair is meant more for collectors than for riders: there are plenty of well-maintained examples of these out there if you’re looking for something to put miles on. But if you’re looking for the perfect bikes to complete your V4 Honda set and sit alongside a VF1000R and an RC30, your search is over.

-tad

2007 Honda VFR800 Interceptor

Featured Listing: Pristine 1984 Honda VF700F and 2007 VFR800 Interceptors for Sale