Search Results for “rc45”

Honda February 14, 2020 posted by

Speak of the Devil: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

Speaking of the RC30… After the little-brother VFR400R we posted this week, we’ve now got the legendary Honda VFR750R here on RSBFS. The RC30 wasn’t especially light, or powerful, but it was beautifully made and was incredibly easy to ride, with intuitive handling. A true sportbike icon, it represents an unusual way to approach production racing.

Most of the time, homologation bikes are tweaked and upgraded versions of regular production machines. You take your basic sportbike platform, then add an adjustable steering head, or flat-slide carburetors, or titanium engine parts, or a different bore and stroke, then build enough examples incorporating those changes to qualify the resulting machine for whichever classes you intend to enter. Instead, Honda built a low-production superbike that was sold alongside its more conventional inline-four sportbikes like the CBR.

Honda’s belief in the the V4 has obviously been validated: the format is popular in MotoGP, and several modern hyperbikes use the format for all of the same reasons Honda felt it was a winning formula. A V4 is heavier and more complex than an inline four, since it has two cylinder heads and an additional set of camshafts. But the format contributes to mass-centralization and is much narrower than an inline four, which allows for better aerodynamics.

Honda’s V4 used a set of gears to drive the overhead cams, and a 360° crankshaft to improve rear-wheel traction. Build quality was incredibly high and, with the fairing removed, the RC30’s components are densely packed in between the thick aluminum frame spars. The V4 configuration is great for handling, but it also makes a bike generally complex and hard to work on. Perfect for a bike that was designed for homologation purposes.

I’m curious about the wheels on this bike: the seller mentions that it currently wears wheels from an RC45, which is an odd choice. The original RC30 wheels would be a 17″ front and an 18″ rear, which makes the fitment of modern sportbike tires problematic. The RC45 would have a 17″ rear, but went to a 16″ front. Again, making the fitment of modern sport tires difficult. An RC45 rear and an RC30 front would make the most sense to me, but the photos don’t clearly show what’s been done here.

From the original eBay listing: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale

If you are viewing this bike, you know exactly how influential the VFR750R/RC30 was to the motorcycle world.

  • With only 3,000 being produced, RC30’s with this mileage are extremely hard to find
  • 748cc V4 powerplant is pure bliss
  • Often referred to as a Homologation Special for HRC’s World Superbike Campaign
  • This bike is believed to have 4,754 unrestored original miles
  • The bike currently has RC45 wheels and a aftermarket exhaust
  • Factory Wheels, Exhaust, and Jetting goes along with the sale
  • Rear Stand is also included with the sale
  • This RC30 has spent the last 2 years in the Throttlestop Motorcycle Museum on Display
  • The bike runs and rides beautifully
  • Paint work is very nice, no dings or issues with the gas tank
  • Lower belly pan has normal wear, see pictures
  • All the hard to find pieces are on this bike and untouched

This was the pinnacle for Honda in the late 80’s/early 90’s and is extremely timeless. Here is your chance to own one of the most desirable Sport Bikes of this era!

Bidding is active, and up to $25,100 with several days left on the auction. This example isn’t perfect, but is low-mileage, unrestored, and looks very clean in the photos. And if the RC45 wheels aren’t to your liking, the original wheels and exhaust are included, so you can put it back to stock before you lock it up in your hermetically-sealed storage vault.

-tad

Speak of the Devil: 1990 Honda VFR750R RC30 for Sale
Kawasaki September 28, 2019 posted by

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

It came up recently in the comments section, but I got into motorcycles relatively late in life. I mean, I always thought they were cool, but they just seemed so dangerous, and I knew I’d never hear the end of it from my family and friends. They’re also of limited practical value in the northeastern US as primary transportation, unless you’re a masochist or have Yeti DNA. When I finally got one here in California, I used economics to justify it: just $500 got me a runner. And that still holds true: if you’re into motorsports and have a limited budget, just what kind of worthwhile car can you get for five to ten grand? And if you live in Southern California, where would you keep a fun hobby car anyway? But you can fit a small collection of bikes into a single parking spot. And a nice, classic superbike like this 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 can be had for that kind of money.

The late 1980s and 1990s were a golden period of superbike development. The basic formula was set, and the Japanese manufacturers were hard at work perfecting their creations. Only Ducati really went their own way with a v-twin: Suzuki, Kawasaki, Yamaha, and Honda all stuck with inline fours for their mass production machines, with the very limited-production RC30 and RC45 homologation machines from Honda being notable exceptions. Kawasaki’s ZX-7, known in other markets as the ZXR750, used a 748cc four that squeaked in under the 750cc limit for four-cylinder superbikes, a move that allowed the machine to be used in production-based racing series.

That engine was hung in a stiff aluminum frame, and backed by a six-speed gearbox. Power was rated at 105hp and the bike wasn’t especially lightweight at 450lbs dry, but there was the potential for more in the hands of skilled tuners, and the ZX-7 was famously terrific under braking and had excellent mid-corner stability. It might not have been the best bike on paper, but the Kawasaki found plenty of success in a variety of racing here in the US and abroad. This example isn’t perfect, or even stock, but looks like a sharp rider or a rolling restoration project. It’s not flawless, but has low miles and appears to have been sympathetically maintained.

From the original eBay listing: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale

1994 ZX-7 (ZX750L) with 9,812 original miles.

Original plastics – All VIN tags in place.

Engine/Frame/etc. all very clean.  No leaks.

New tires, fresh oil change (Mobil 1), new sprockets all this year.

Runs and Rides great (see video).

Light damage on left side from falling off lift while stationary.

Muzzy full system with correct jetting.

Original turn signals etc. will be included.

CLEAN NC TITLE IN HAND.

The seller has also helpfully included a nice, high-res video of the bike. So what’s to like here? The low miles, the likely reasonable final price, compared to a more exotic ZX-7RR, the period Muzzy pipe, and classic superbike looks. What’s not to like? The fact that it’s just a standard ZX-7 and the minor damage the seller mentions. The front and rear turn signals are also missing, along with the rear fender, although those shouldn’t be too hard to source if you want to switch things closer to stock. I doubt these will ever be worth crazy money, but it’s certainly a bike that should go up in value and you’ll be able to ride it in the meantime without worrying too much about either damaging an ultra-rare exotic or devaluing it by adding too many miles.

-tad

Survivor: 1994 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-7 for Sale
Sport Bikes For Sale August 27, 2019 posted by

Summer 2019 Featured Listing Report

I’d like to start this post with a HUGE THANK YOU to all the RSBFS faithful — with your following and support I am proud to report that we have published a record number of Featured Listings in 2019! Last year we had 80 Featured Listings, and this year we’re already over 120 with 4 months to go!

Readers and buyers recognize that our 11 years online have built a reputable, loyal, and enthusiastic following that is stronger than ever. With nearly one million individual viewers annually, we have a focused and dedicated viewership that read the website routinely to see the best sport bikes on the market being offered by fellow enthusiasts.

RSBFS was originally a blog that directed readers to interesting classifieds found online. Today we’ve become a marketplace in our own right as readers wanted to ensure their bikes were listed on our site, sometimes exclusively, and sometimes in conjunction with a listing elsewhere like eBay or Craigslist. The response has been overwhelming positive and RSBFS is busier than ever!

When we don’t have a “Featured Listing” to post on the site for a particular day, we still comb the internet for interesting finds. But for readers that want to ensure their enthusiast or collector quality bike is in front of our audience, we ask for a Featured Listing to be considered. The listing fee is 1% of your asking price or reserve, up to $125 each.

Here are a couple of recent testimonials that I’m especially pleased to share since we’ve implemented the new listing fee:

Jim on the recent sale of his Yamaha RZ350:

Found a buyer in California for this – he found out about it from your website. I appreciate your help in selling this. This site put my bike in front of the audience/fellow enthusiasts that I wanted to reach.

And this review just came in from Ryan on the recent sale of his Ducati Monster S4R:

When I decided to sell the Monster, I didn’t want to simply sell through cycle trader or the local classifieds. Your site has been a pleasure to read over the years since I discovered it. I’m a fan of how each bike is showcased and I leave an article knowing more about the bike’s features, specifications, and history.

My buyers were shopping different models and the RSBFS article helped educate about model specifics, and she said that the 3rd party review of the bike from your site made my listing feel much more legitimate. I had no doubts personally about the condition and the maintenance history, but that’s difficult to convey to a buyer solely through an ad. After seeing the bike in person, and a short test ride the sale was a done deal. We definitely found the one right buyer for the bike and the rare sport bikes listing was well worth it.

I can always revisit your site to reminisce, and maybe get lost in some other rare motorcycles.

Thanks for your site, and it’s been a pleasure working with you.
-Ryan

I couldn’t be more proud of our community and the RSBFS contributors! Thank you all for your support and we look forward to helping you sell your collectible and enthusiast offerings this fall.

Sincerely,

Dan Crouch.

Check out all the current Featured Listings available on RSBFS:

Read the rest of this post.

Summer 2019 Featured Listing Report
Honda August 21, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F

Update 8.31.2019: This bike has SOLD to an RSBFS reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Even legends have parents. They don’t often get lauded for their offspring’s exploits, but their influence is indelible, and without their genes, what would our heroes be? The 1986 Honda VFR750F is a minor legend in its own right, but its offspring — the Honda RC30 and RC45, are the beasts everyone remembers. But in 1986, Honda was hungry to catapult itself past the other Japanese marques in the sportbike arms race, and to cure its new V4s reputation for weak valve trains.

The VFR750F delivered. Under Fred Merkel, Wayne Rainey and Bubba Shobert, the bikes cleaned up in AMA. And under a crew from Cycle World that included Nick Ienatsch and a motley crew of racers and journalists, blew the ’86 Suzuki GSXR750’s 24-hour speed record out of the water by nearly 20 mph. Follow the link to that story at the end of this writeup. You won’t regret it. The red-white-and-blue beasts achieved the feat thanks to an improved 105-horsepower 750cc V4 that represented a 20-horsepower gain over the Magnas and fixed reliability questions. The bikes were also something like 40 pounds lighter than the previous model.

Coupled with a roadrace-worthy suspension and wide, sticky tires, the VFR had the goods to take it to Yamaha and Suzuki.

This 1986 Honda VFR750F is in impeccable, low-mile shape, with a long list of recent mods and maintenance to make it even tastier. It sports a Yoshimura exhaust and an RC30-style front fender, among other improvements. Seller Joe spent a long time on his description, so we’ll let him take it away:

1986 Honda VFR750F

Honda collector for over 30 years. My recent focus has been V4 bikes of the 80s/90s, including both RC30/RC45. This is my second 1986 VFR750F, which I purchased in 2016. I bought this bike because of its low mileage and overall survivor condition. Plus, I really wanted one with a pipe. The videos don’t do the sound of this Yosh pipe justice. The bike has 11,357 miles. As you can see from the title, I’ve put less than 100 miles on the bike while freshening up a few things. I have over 20 bikes and like to work on them, but I don’t ride them enough, so it’s time for someone else to enjoy it.Upgrades – all done within the last 18 months: New Honda fuel pump (specific to this bike and $200 for part alone); New fuel filter; New choke cable; New Yuasa AGM battery; New Honda grips; New Metzeler rear tire (Metzeler front matches but older – see code); New DID x-ring chain with rivet; re-zinc’d rear sprocket; Cut down front fender to match race bikes/RC30, and painted to match (includes uncut stock front fender); Valve adjustment and carbs disassembled and ultrasonic cleaned and sync’d (see video – work done by Joe Nelson of VFR Dreams); Fresh oil and filter; New brake fluid front and rear; New clutch master fluid; Known blemishes: 20-25 tank “pimples”appeared over this last winter. Odd, because always stored in a heated garage. Scrapes on left rear cowl/tail. A few very small scratches on windscreen. Hairline crack on LH fairing (3/4”). Normal cracking on mirror arm. Clear title in my name. Includes factory shop manual. I do not have factory owners manual. 2 keys, including original stamped key and a Honda duplicate. Multiple videos show carb sync, cold start, fast idle, fast idle warm up with two other of my bikes. Asking $4000.

Located in Milwaukee, WI 53207

Shipping is solely the buyer’s responsibility. I can assist with the shipper of your choice. I have used Haulbikes.com and JJ Bagwell Shipping.

VFR750F 24-hour world record recap: https://www.motorcyclistonline.com/hondas-1986-vfr750f-interceptor/

While later sport-touring RC36 VFRs don’t command the same coin (somehow) as the earlier bikes, VFRs are still a bargain compared to a slab-side Gixxer in similar shape. For such a jewel of a machine in such gorgeous condition, the $4,000 asking price is almost a no-brainer.

Featured Listing: 1986 Honda VFR750F
Honda July 18, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

Update 7.28.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Dennis has 3 very low mileage bikes listed right now:

Thank you for supporting the site, Dennis, and good luck to buyers! -dc

Honda has always been an engineering company. Often times it would appear that Honda would release a new model with a new configuration just to prove to the world that it could. Sometimes it was difficult to determine why Honda decided to make a substantial change. But in the case of the RVT1000R – better known as the RC51 – the reason was clear. You see, Honda enjoyed tremendous success on the racetrack with their four-cylinder, 750cc RC30 and RC45 machines. But when rules changed in World Superbike racing to allow a displacement advantage to twins and Ducati started winning, Honda took notice. Casting the V-4 machines aside for a twin, Honda created the 1000cc V-twin RC51 – and picked right back up with their winning ways. And while in some ways overshadowed by the collector status of the RC30 and RC45, the RC51 was arguably more successful in the intended theater of the racetrack thanks to the efforts of Colin Edwards (WSBK) and Nicky Hayden (AMA Superbike).

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51

While badged as an RVT1000R, the RC51 actually displaces 999cc to allow it to squeak under the rule book cut off on swept volume. The Ducati killer’s short-stroke motor was built to rev, producing 133 HP . And while Honda copied Ducati in the use of the 90 degree vee configuration, they skipped on the desmo-drama and fitted the four-valve heads with conventional valve-train components. But don’t think that Honda simply phoned in a fake Duc replacement here; the aluminum perimeter beam chassis, the high-mount exhaust pipes, the aero bodywork complete with high-pressure intake, and the unique side-mounted radiators are all Honda tech. Built for the public at a fraction of the price of the Italian machine, the RC51 was a bit porkier in most dimensions (including weight). On the racetrack this was negated by minimum weight rules. On the street, the difference is negligible – until you sit in the cockpit. Unlike the Ducati- which demands rider conformity to a narrow, sharp and stretched position, the Honda is regarded as, well, comfortable. As a streetbike, the RC51 just works – and performs with the metronomic reliability you would expect from Big Red.

From the seller:
2001 Honda RC51 (RVT1000R) (PHX)
VIN: JH2SC45471M100004

Price: $9,000

I purchased this motorcycle in San Jose, CA, new in 2000 and rode it 286 miles and then parked it. I’m turning 80 years old in the next month and the time has come to find it a new, younger owner, hopefully someone that is a collector of motorcycles and that would appreciate the fact that it is 99.9% original (new batteries only and still on original tires), has been ridden 286 miles and has been in a climate-controlled environment from the very first day that it was bought and has had the best of care.

As always, RSBFS finds you the best of what is out there. And in this case, that means a basically NEW 2001 Honda RC51 with fewer than 300 miles. This bike is amazingly immaculate, and is completely original as new with the exception of a new battery. Drool over some of these pictures, and realize that the RC51 is the bike you really need, versus simply want. This is a do it all machine that can carve corners better than the best (unless you know better than Colin Edwards), has more than enough grunt to get most jobs done quickly, is comfortable enough to spend some time on, and has built-in legendary Honda reliability. Did I mention it sounds glorious? Seriously, what more could you want! Devoid of today’s game console electronic gadgetry, this is bike that expects you to ride it – and in exchange it will provide you with miles and miles of smiles.

If you are thinking that the latter SP-2 variant of the RC51 in Nicky Hayden livery is the most collectible of the lot, you wouldn’t be wrong. But when pen hits paper, it is what you can find that means the most. And in a model like this, where the “rarer” bike is essentially a sticker kit, the differences are not great. It is the difference in the condition of the bike that will contribute the most to the overall value in the near term, and likely well beyond that. And I would challenge you to find a cleaner, low mileage RC51 on the market today. Jump quickly before this twin-cylinder rocket is gone in a booming howl. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 2001 Honda RC51
Honda July 18, 2019 posted by

Plated in the Golden State: 1995 Honda RVF400 NC35

The Honda NC35 is one of those sweetheart machines that should be in every garage. Reasonably rare in the US thanks to the lack of official importation, great looks thanks to the DNA shared with the RC45, great sound thanks to that marvelous V-4 with gear-driven cams, and fantastic handling thanks to the smaller size and lower weight when compared to the bigger bikes. Collect it. Ride it. Show it off. This is a bike that is capable of checking off many, many boxes. And with typical Honda build quality, this is a bike that will last for the ages.

1995 Honda RVF400 NC35 for sale on eBay

The light middleweight classes have always been grounds for serious competition outside of the US. It is true that we yanks have started to see a small bike resurgence of sorts, but even the evolution of the 400cc baby Ninja and the newer Yamaha R3 the current crop of small bikes feel entry-level when compared to the hardware in a NC35. Where are the multi cylinders (i.e. more than one or two)? Where is the single-sided swing arm? Where is the identity that makes one more attractive than the other? Stray away from the “me too” sameness of the current crop and you KNOW what this NC35 is when you see it. Well, you might. You would be forgiven for mistaking it for the bigger RC45, on which it is clearly based. Paint a R3 lime green and it instantly transforms into a Ninja. Dare to paint this NC35 lime green and it instantly transforms into a NC35 with a funny paint job (and lost valuation).

From the seller:
This bike has been registered in CA nearly 20 years, I have a clean and clear CA title in my name and it is currently non-op with DMV right now and NO back fee’s. Bike has original 11 digit VIN. 19,750 miles. If you take this out of state, good luck getting it reg’d in CA again.

Since this RVF has been in the states since the 90’s it does not suffer from the usual Japanese corrosion. I have owned this bike about 5 years but am clearing out most of bikes as I am planning a move at the end of this year.

This is a very nice original RVF that has not been tracked or raced, not beat up and former owner before I got it for over 10 years was a female! Bike has some small bodywork flaws and everything is pointed out in the photos. Please email me if you have ANY QUESTIONS or need MORE PICTURES!!!

More from the seller:
I have recently done a complete full service on the bike front to back.
Brand new Bridgestone tires.
Forks just rebuilt with oem Honda Seals and fluid
Fresh oil and filter
Fresh coolant and brake fluid
Brand new battery
Carbs cleaned

Bike starts, runs and rides as it should. I cleaned the carbs but did not rebuild them, starts and runs and idles well but the bike sat for sometime before I did this work. It is fine now, but from past experience the carbs might need new seals in the not too distant future…same with the petcock…not leaking now, but my experience with them is that they all seem to fail pretty regularly. Or I am just really unlucky with 30/35 carbs and petcocks!!

More from the seller:
I had the right side lower cowls repainted because of some scuffs and marks on them from previous owner. All other bodywork is original and OEM. The small rubber o-ring around the trunk lock is missing. There is a small chunk missing from the tail T piece, some discoloration on the left lower and some fogging in the headlight. Minor ding/depression on left front of tank. All other bodywork and cosmetics are really pretty nice considering the age and mileage.

Bike has a nice Two Brothers Slip on exhaust, braided brake lines front and rear, mechanically otherwise stock. The front blinkers are aftermarket and should be replaced as one has a short I believe and they obviously dont’ look correct on the bike…I will leave that up to the new owner.

With over 19,000 miles on the all-metric clocks, this particular NC35 is not new. But for many, a rider is the ultimate expression of bike collecting, and this one is definitely used to that. Condition is not perfect, but appears to be original for the most part. If the mishaps noted by the seller are it – and there are no mechanical demons lurking – this no reserve auction might be a good way to pick up a 400cc slice of nirvana. This auction is going on right now with several bids but the price has not yet crossed over $2k. I would expect that to climb very rapidly as the auction end nears, so perhaps you should add yourself to the list of watchers (there are a lot of them). We don’t see NC35s in the US all that often, and this one goes over and above by offering the vaunted California title, registration and license plate. That addition is usually worth about a grand for smokers – or anything with a less than 17-digit VIN or a lack of Federalization papers. Time will tell what this will run up to, but it offers some unique attributes that make it worth checking out. Good Luck!!

MI

Honda June 25, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 2000 Honda RVF400 NC35

Honda’s second generation small V-4 took the successes of the VFR-400R / NC30 and modernized them for the late 1990’s.  Having never been sold new here, all are gray market imports with metric speedos.  RSBFS reader Jae has this super-clean example tuned for the high country.

Sticking with the winning formula, Honda made evolutionary changes for the NC35’s 1994 introduction.  Carburettors were updated to a 30mm semi-flatslide design, with velocity stacks aimed down the intake.  Rake and trail were unchanged but the frame was re-designed.  Inverted forks were installed, and the single-sided swingarm recieved a major update.  17″ wheels are found front and rear, easing tire choices for the future.  The styling templates the iconic RC45, and the riding position is more relaxed than some other small sports.

With just under 11,000 miles, Jae and the previous owner have been careful custodians of this NC35 if not long distance riders.  Most of the mods are deep under the fairings:

– Current and clean Colorado title and registration (registered & titled as a “2000 Honda NC35”.
– VIN is: NC351103563
– 17,400 km (10,800 miles)
– Motor has fresh oil, oem air filter, recent valve adjustment
– Bigger capacity upper radiator
– new Samco radiator hoses (fresh coolant last summer)
– Penske shock (emulsion version with ride height adjustment)
– 5.5″ Kosman widened rear wheel (fresh new tire)
– Dymag magnesium front wheel (new tire)
– JHA shotgun full exhaust system from Japan (with new exhaust gaskets)
– Tyga steering damper (sorry, stuck on a few Ohlins stickers but no real Ohlins parts…)
– Solo rear cowl (stock passenger seat included)
– new gold chain, rear sprocket (520)
– Titanium nuts/bolts sprinkled throughout (rear spindle pincher, rotor bolts)
– Braided steel brake lines front & back (newer RC51 gold Nissin front calipers w/HRC pads)
– Magura HC1 radial brake master cylinder
– Jetted for Colorado elevation
– As far as I know, I am the 2nd owner in the states. Previous owner (~2008) was a Porsche mechanic from Denver)
– misc small box of spares (passenger pegs, oem brake master, original rad, etc)
– I can throw in a spare set of oem wheels (powercoaded white) if full price is paid
– shipping (or pickup) will be have to be paid/arranged by buyer…

* Needs nothing to ride as is, perfect to start the summer!

Jae asks $10,000 USD and can be contacted – here –

Originally presented as a junior sportbike in markets with progressive licensing, the RVF-400R’s wide powerband, crisp handling, and distinctive engine sound gained the attention of cognoscenti worldwide, and it’s a sought after track day machine.  Thankfully Jae’s hasn’t been subjected to that, it’s been nicely updated and maintained.  Not to mention being an RC45 lookalike without the vacation-home pricetag !

-donn

Featured Listing – 2000 Honda RVF400 NC35
Ducati June 14, 2019 posted by

Sixteen Candles: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR

The introduction of the Desmosedici was a typical Ducati bombshell to the world. Over the top in a manner than only a MotoGP bike for the street can be, the D16RR was exotic and wild, beautiful and dangerous, and horribly, horribly expensive. This limited production (1,500 units total, world wide) model saw the introduction of the V-4, with the nickname Desmosedici (sixteen in Italian) and D16RR referring to this new arrangement. The bike was as MotoGP as possible for a Federalized streetbike, and retained some interesting features inherited directly from the racing lineage.

2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR for sale on eBay

Essentially two L-twin motors placed side-by-side and firing together in a twin pulse manner, the D16RR was really an homage to the GP racer. Power from the 990cc mill was knocking on the 200 HP door, with 197 and change reported. As expected, RPM limits were raised over that of the twins, with max power occurring near the 14k mark. But it is not just about raw power. The Desmosedici remains pretty faithful to the racer with frame geometry, and top level Ohlins suspension and radial mount Brembo braking components (sorry, no carbon-carbon brakes for the street). The comprehensive electronics package even includes a data logger to help you develop as a rider. What isn’t metal on this bike is all carbon fiber. What isn’t carbon fiber is either aluminum (frame, cases, swing arm), magnesium (heads and wheels) or titanium (connecting rods, intake and exhaust valves). The frame is minimal, and hangs the rear suspension off in a stressed-member format. The seat and underlying structure is also cantilevered off of the rear of the engine.

From the seller:
2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR, #457/1500, 8076 miles. Second owner motorcycle with all service records. Original bodywork has never been used on the bike, was packaged by original owner/dealer when new and replaced with Catalyst Composites street kit. This bike comes complete with the ‘Race Kit’ exhaust, ECU, cloth cover and rear stand.

Notable mentions:
– New original bodywork, never used
– Extra gas tank
– Street and ‘Race’ upper fairings
– Matching rear Marchesini Genesi M7RR 17″ rear wheel
– Extra 17″ rear wheel modified for proper width, from 999
– Original rear 16″ wheel
– Race Kit Exhaust, ECU and cloth cover
– Ducati Data Analyzer
– Braketech iron rotors (with spacers, not installed)
– Original rear display stand (never used)
– New Pirelli Rosso Corsa II tires
– 1 new, 2 used Bridgestone BT-01 rear tire for original wheel use, 1 used front BT-01 (all in good, usable condition)
– Catalyst bodywork was recently repainted to get rid of rock chips around the leading edge of the side panels and mask
– All service records available

*Bike is up to date on its services. Most recent service, 7500 mile service completed at 7353 miles, by Moto Italiano in Santa Cruz, California. Also completed at this time was K&N air filter, new clutch and basket, LOF, fluid exchanges, valve check and adjustment,

** There are a couple of small (very small) chips in the left side of the gas tank, noted in last picture.

The fly in the ointment with race replicas is that they are NOT simply the race bike with lights. Because racers don’t have the electrical loads required by lights, horn and signals, they can often get away with a minimalist electrical structure that offers just enough juice to power the ECU and fuel injection – or even run total loss with no charging system at all. That doesn’t work on the street, where bikes need electric start, headlights which are on all the time, a working tail light and turn signals. The bigger alternator and battery takes space. The race bikes run dry sump lubrication, but again, that is less useful on the street and requires valuable space that could be utilized for the upgraded cooling system, the upgrade charging system or the emissions controls. And while you cannot simply take a MotoGP bike and call it a street bike, Ducati went through a tremendous effort to produce something like a GP bike. And if you were lucky enough to be close enough to the front of the line to get one, it would only cost you $72k.

If I’m to be honest, it was really the background bikes in the photos that originally caught my attention in this advert. The 916 is classic, and I love the RC45. But the NR750? That is even more over the top. And that just might be the problem with the D16RR. While a phenomenal achievement by a relatively small manufacturer – and certainly very, very exclusive – it somehow lacks the “OMG Wow” impact that such a high dollar amount warrants. These are truly amazing motorcycles in many, many ways, yet they seem to fail to ignite the interest and the curiosity of our readers. Meanwhile, this beautiful 8,000 mile machine (let that sink in – somebody actually rode this beauty a respectable number of miles!) comes with all of the “race only” parts and spares and has a complete service history. The BIN is set for $64k, but the opening ask on the auction portion is a mere $56k with reserve in place. Check it out here. I’d love to hear your thoughts in our Comments section about the Desmosedici, and if you drool over these the same way we look at smokers or other homologation machines. Good Luck!!

MI

Sixteen Candles:  2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR

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