Search Results for “being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection”

BMW November 7, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

This is the fourth motorcycle being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

In the annals of modern motorcycle history, the Japanese have the technological might, the Italians have the performance artwork, and the Germans… well, the Germans had a more conservative approach. Much of that has changed in recent years (witness the HP2 Sport, the S1000RR), but it was with the iconic K1 that BMW proved it had the technological chops AND an artistic feel without abandoning the company soul or ethics. You see, BMW wanted (needed) younger riders to join the brand. But their staid approach of “the gentleman’s transport” didn’t cut it with the youth. They wanted speed. But BMW was constrained by the 100 bhp limit imposed on bikes sold in Germany. So how to get maximum speed within the imposed power listing? Technology. Namely, aerodynamics. Thus the design and style of the K1 was born of function, and has gone on to become a bit of a legend.

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1

The life of the K1 started with a standard K bike – in this case a K100. This was the “new” architecture for BMW; the inline four cylinder motor flopped on it’s side and mounted crosswise on the bike. This allowed for a low center of gravity; the crankshaft runs parallel with the bike on the right side and made for easy power takeoff for the shaft drive. From those bones, the K1 started ingesting technology. The standard K100 engine was upgraded with 16 valve heads, higher compression and lighter connecting rods for extended high RPM running. ABS was a standard feature for US-bound bikes, but optional in other markets. Wanting to achieve speeds in the range of 150 mph, the K1 entered the wind tunnel and was shaped with a vengeance. The wheelbase was extended for greater stability. Check out the streamlines of the front fender, and the aerodynamic – yet protective – main fairing. The integrated tail section even contained saddlebags, which provided function AND airflow resolution. In all, there are seven pieces to the main fairing to harness and define the aero elements. Colors offered were Teutonic interpretations of yin and yang: either fire engine red with yellow accents, or a turquoise blue with yellow accents. Love it or hate it, either color combination stands out.

From the seller:
41,000km’s / 25k mi. This is a fantastic example of the timeless “ketchup & mustard” 1990’s BMW design icon.

Fully restored to new condition in Europe in 2014, this K1 is absolutely beautiful in every respect, and runs/operates perfectly. Heated grips, ABS, 100hp 16v, Marzocchi forks, Brembo brakes – 6,900 examples ever produced. Included with the sale is a hard bound folio detailing the ownership (U.K. and Germany) and restoration details.

Probably the best non-original K1 on earth: $15,000

Despite the techno wizardry, the end result was a 520+ pound, long wheelbase motorcycle that excelled at what BMWs always excelled at: eating up the miles. And with a price tag higher than most available motorcycles (MSRP of over $13,000), this hardly targeted the youth. Instead, BMW created a showroom magnet that pulled interested viewers in – and then sold them a different K or R bike instead. Sales of the K1 were slow, and the bike was under appreciated during it’s stay on the dealer floor. Time has been kinder to the model, and cannot erase the sensationalism built up around this pivotal motorcycle – even if it did not set the world on fire. Today these are rare machines that still represent the change of attitude in BMW management, and finding one that does not exhibit the ravages of time (think large expanses of thin bodywork and the possibility for damage) or abuse should be celebrated.

Today’s 19991 BMW K1 comes to us courtesy of the Stuart Parr Collection, and shows as beautifully as a new bike. Drool over the high resolution photography, and tell me this isn’t the cleanest K1 you have seen in the wild. I mean, it just looks *perfect*. And this is no zero mile “never gonna be ridden” garage queen either; this wonderful example has 25,000 on the clocks. We all know the legendary longevity of a BMW, and to find a rare K1 in the cosmetic condition such as this should make you sit up and take notice. Asking price is $15,000 and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here. Good Luck!

MI

Featured Listing: 1992 BMW K1
Ducati November 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900 SD Darmah

This is the third of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

This 1977 Ducati 900 Darmah is an extremely early example of the bike that helped pull Ducati out of a slump in the mid-70s, and carries a roster of parts that is still enough to make sportbike lovers drool. By modern standards, it’s a bit of a minimalist, with bodywork kept scant and not much in the way of creature comforts — but in that simplicity lies its elegance.

Decked out with Campagnolo wheels, Ceriani forks and Marzocchi shocks out back, the Darmah’s chassis is a perfect match to its torquey 864cc square-case bevel-drive v-twin. Ducati’s signature air-cooled twin was given a mechanical going over in 2000 according to the seller, but its original lead engine seal has not been broken. The bike has just over 6,600 miles on the dial, which jibes with its untouched factory look.

From the seller:

By 1976, styling and fashion took precedence in the motorcycle world and dictated new features, such as market demand for higher levels of build quality and options – Ducati responded with the 900 Sport Darmah, the most advanced incarnation of the Bevel-twin yet. As with the 860GT (Giugiaro) Ducati decided to outsource the styling to longtime collaborator Leopoldo Tartarini, who had long associations designing for Ducati and Italjet.
This is a very early example – among the first production – and is a 6,600 mile original bike with factory Campagnolo wheels, Ceriani forks, Marzocchi shocks – considered the most desirable of the Darmah series.
The original lead engine case seal is intact, indicating original low mileage. The bike has non-standard, but period optional Conti tailpipes and K&N air filters.
Cosmetically and mechanically refreshed in circa 2000, the bike is in its second ownership and presents in beautiful overall condition today. A coveted Falloon report accompanies this bike and details every aspect of the machine thoroughly – it is summarized by Mr. Fallon as “One of the best I have seen”.
Please email with questions – no trades or purchase schemes please.

The bike can be viewed and the seller contacted at the Stuart Parr Collection. With a Falloon report in hand, an early production sequence and some very tasteful period mods, this is early Ducati gold. Asking price is $18.5k and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

Featured Listing: 1977 Ducati 900 SD Darmah
Featured Listing November 5, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!

This is the second of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking very 80s, the Gilera Saturno Bialbero  could be mistaken for some sort of custom Ducati. But Gilera, of course, should be held in the highest regard by fans of this site, as they were the first company to slot an inline four into a frame transversely, solving in one fell swoop the difficult cooling issues that previously faced four-cylinder motorcycles. This bike has just one cylinder like the original Saturno and embodies the company’s racing ethos, stressing light-weight and handling.

In the 80s, Gilera was mostly producing a line of offroad-biased singles with a 350cc capacity that were obviously a far cry from their road-racing bikes of the 1950s. At the urging of a Japanese marketing company, they developed a retro-styled sportbike, and that updated Saturno sparked some minor interest worldwide.

In most markets, the Nuovo Saturno was motivated by a liquid-cooled, 491cc version of the company’s four-valve, dual-overhead cam single, although a smaller 350 was available in Japan. In fact, the “Bialbero” designation helps to differentiate the bike from the earlier Saturno and refers to the number of camshafts: two. That engine put out a seemingly unimpressive 44hp, but the complete trellis-framed machine weighted in at a claimed 302lbs dry. That’s 250cc two-stroke territory, with the same claimed peak output and a much broader powerband. Suspension was simple but modern, with 17” Marvic wheels front and rear and a set of Brembo brakes to slow things down. The ‘box has just five speeds, owing to the package’s off-road roots, but the torquey engine should make any gaps easy to ride around.

With just 72 kilometers on the clock, this may be the lowest-mileage Saturno on the planet, and you may be waiting a long time for an example this nice, regardless of miles: these very rarely come up for sale, as Gilera collectors aren’t flavor-of-the-week types. It helps that the Nuovo Saturno was intended for collectors in Japan, and only a few made it to other countries: in 1990, just 50 were imported to the UK.  However, in spite of their rarity, they don’t sell for huge money, making them a reasonable proposition for regular folks who want something out-of-the-ordinary.

From the seller:

Imported in 2016 from Germany. Comes with original German registration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection entry form (Form 7501). This one can be registered and ridden. It is in out of the crate perfect condition.

The Gilera Saturno Bialbero 500 is a motorcycle road made the motorcycle manufacturer Gilera and marketed between 1987 and 1991.

If you’re looking for something rare, affordable, and very fun: these are extremely nimble bikes that would make perfectly lightweight track or racing machines. Asking price is $20k and inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

-tad

Featured Listing: Pristine 1990 Gilera Saturno Bialbero with 72kms!
Ducati November 4, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah

This is the first of four motorcycles being offered from the Stuart Parr Collection. Thank you for supporting the site and good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Rare to the point where this might be the first 650SL to grace RSBFS, this 1984 model has been restored to museum condition and is ready for spotlights and close-up viewing.

1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah for sale

In an interesting turn of the rulebook, Ducati produced the 650SL to homologate the 61.5mm stroke for the planned 750cc race machine.  The extra torque provided by the lengthened stroke was a welcome addition to the originally 500cc engine, and claimed 63 hp at 8,500 rpm.  Still considered part of the first generation of Ducati belt-driven cam engines, the twin used dual 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors.  The model’s smaller-displacement origins are divulged by the 35mm Marzocchi forks and 260mm dual front disks.  The trellis frame with engine as a stressed member helped keep dry weight under 400 lbs., remarkable for the day.  The very trim monoposto fairing was retained from the 600SL, and finished in Ducati’s yellow over red race livery.

In private hands of Stuart Parr Collection, this 650SL was treated to a comprehensive restoration, and updated with a two-into-one Staintune exhaust.  Comments from the curator:

The 650 Pantah was built specifically to homologate Ducati’s TT1 750 engine which used a 61.5 mm stroke. Instead of producing a production 750 road bike, the 650SL was created with an 82mm bore and the required 61.5mm stroke, thus complying to the governing bodies homologation requirements. The 650’s bodywork is virtually identical to the 600, but it was painted in the now famous TT2 color scheme of red and yellow. Other minor differences were a different instrument layout and some other cosmetic minor changes, but it had far more torque, and that was a big improvement.

Only 288 650SL’s were ever produced; enthusiasts and collectors alike have doubled the 650’s value over the past half a decade alone, actions that have cemented this model’s security as being a sound investment for the future. This example has been restored to stunning condition with gorgeous paintwork and finishes throughout. A Staintune 2=1 exhaust system and corresponding jetting was utilized, otherwise a stock bike. Fresh tires and zero post-restoration mileage.

The 650SL can also be viewed on the collection’s website – here -.

The new two-valve desmo engine sparked the interest of the Castiglioni family, which took an ownership role at Ducati and likely saved the company.  Desmoquattro engines were just around the corner and a string of Superbike World Championships just over the horizon.  Significance and rarity off the scales, the 650SL is the Pantah for a knowledgeable fan.  The collection is selling to make way for new acquisitions, and asks $22,500 for this chapter of Ducati history.  Inquiries can be directed to Gregory Johnston on (631) 537-1486 or via email – here -.

Featured Listing – 1984 Ducati 650SL Pantah

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