Posts by tag: six speed

Triumph September 8, 2018 posted by

Well-Aged British Beef – 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 with just 1,340 miles !

John Bloor’s new Triumph engineers had a modular solution for their line of of four-stroke engines – all had 76mm bores and strokes were 65 or 55mm depending on multiples of 250 or 300cc.  The big 1200 was their atom smasher and had two balance shafts in the crankcase to smooth things out.  This time machine was parked halfway to its first oil change and has been professionally re-commissioned.

1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 for sale on eBay

Hard to call a company that had been manufacturing motorcycles for more than a hundred years an upstart, but the re-constituted Triumph was just that – with their new road-pounding 1200, good for 147 hp and 85 ft.-lbs of torque.  More GT than sport, it was big in every sense, plenty of room and stability for two, massive 6-speed powertrain, adjustable Kayaba forks and monoshock, 310mm Nissin disk brakes.  The generous fairing carried dual headlights and allowed the rider to hide from the 160 mph wind.

 

Right up the road from upstate Albany, this Daytona begs to have its back story told.  How a machine perfect for the mostly suburban and rural area could have been parked so soon after riding it out of the dealership is a mystery, like the missing front signals.  The overall condition says back of the garage storage but thankfully missing the big tank dent and tipover that usually happen during nearly 25 years under a blanket.  From the eBay auction:

Super low mile, one owner  Daytona 1200. This Daytona was purchased back in 1995 from Berkshire Motor Works in Schenectady NY. I have all the original paperwork from when the bike was new. The bike is totally stock and has been ridden only 1300 miles from new!  The bike was taken to a local British bike specialist in Scotia and had a $900. Service. The carbs have been rebuilt, new air filter, new battery  and fresh oil change. The bike has never been down or crashed. Everything on the bike works as it should. I have new front turn signals on order.

 

The Daytona 1200 reviewed as very smooth, heavy without really feeling it, the relaxed riding position making for a nicer long trip.  Not destined to compete with sportier liters and 1100’s from Japan, the 1200 was more in line with the boutique Europeans.  It’s a lot of bike for the buy-it-now, but new rubber has to be factored in, and though the carbs have been cleaned, the condition of the tank should be determined.  As owners of black machines would tell you, after a serious detailing this Daytona will look really good – for about a half hour…

-donn

 

Well-Aged British Beef – 1995 Triumph Daytona 1200 with just 1,340 miles !
Moto Morini August 11, 2017 posted by

Quirky, Pint-Sized Italian: 1986 Moto Morini 350 K2 for Sale

The Moto Morini 350 K2 was, in theory at least, a contemporary of the Suzuki GSX-R750 and Kawasaki GPz900 in terms of cost and mission. In reality, it was light years behind those bikes in terms of outright performance. By the mid-1980s, the Italians were already unable to keep pace with the Japanese manufacturers’ relentless technological development and the Morini was a bike you bought because you were a fan, not because it made any practical sense.

That’s not to say that the little Italian twin was completely outclassed in every way: handling was always a strong point and the bike was light at just 330lbs dry. The 344cc 72º v-twin was air-cooled and used pushrods to actuate the valves, but was otherwise pretty sophisticated: the pushrods were driven by a toothed rubber belt and the engine featured “Heron” heads that helped gave great fuel economy and simplified manufacturing. Heron heads have a nearly flat surface, with small recesses for the valves and spark plugs, shifting the combustion chamber from the heads themselves to the dished top of the piston. The resulting 35hp and six-speed gearbox could push the little bike to more than 100mph, impressive for an air-cooled 350.

Styling is subjective, but the little K2 has origami good looks and simple graphics that give it a strong dose of 1980s class, and you’re certainly unlikely to mistake it for anything but an Italian bike. Earlier Moto Mornis’ classic looks always seemed at odds with the angular design of the powerplant, and this updated bodywork seems to gel better as a whole. I think I prefer the style of the older 3½ in general and yes, for some reason, Moto Morini called its 350cc machine a 3½…

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Moto Morini 350 K2 for Sale

This is my last Morini . I had this bike quite a while runs rides and handle like an Italian bike should this is a very collectable bike, just selling my collection. Probably less than 10 in the USA.  ASK questions there are a few small scratches in the paint. But I rode it hundreds of miles . It’s NOT new but it could be New to you. Clear Texas title in my name.Ship anywhere in the world at buyers cost.

Moto Morinis fell into the “cheap, but hard to find” category for a long time, but values in recent years have basically exploded, although that generally applies to the earlier, classic-style bikes. Miles are very low at 2,392 and it isn’t perfect but appears to be in very original condition, which is great because sourcing missing bits on a rare, relatively “affordable” classic can quickly erase any bargain pricing. Bidding on this example is up just north of $2,000 with the Reserve Not Met and very little time left on the auction.

-tad

Quirky, Pint-Sized Italian: 1986 Moto Morini 350 K2 for Sale