Posts by tag: harley

Featured Listing October 10, 2018 posted by

Sponsored Listing: Zero-mile, 1-of-25 road-going 1994 Harley-Davidson VR1000!

Getting your hands on this bike will land you in a rarefied class normally reserved for the likes of the Barber Motorsports Museum and a few (very) well-heeled collectors. Once again, it comes from our friends at Iconic Motorbikes, whose collection of killer, historic bikes is both for sale and display. At present, though, this thing takes the cake as their premier offering. Even their perfect RC30 can't touch it.

This bike is a zero-mile example of a piece of race bike history that you just will not get another chance at. If you have the means, move quickly. If you haven't ... Well, join the club. Needless to say, it is entirely flawless, from the tacked on lights to the rough-edged sand cast engine cases and undisguised oil lines.

Harley made these things in an effort to find legitimacy as a roadracing manufacturer after their rebirth in the mid-1980s. Being that Harley-Davidson had been long absent from any sort of twisty-track competition, building a from-scratch competitive racer became something of a millstone. Eventually, the VR1000 was born, with a 1,000cc v-twin that was almost unrecognizable next to their normal fare, save its narrow-angle layout. It put down close to 150 horsepower by the time it saw a racetrack.

To be legal for AMA Superbike, the Harley needed to build at least 25 VRs and get them made legal somewhere in the world. Eventually, they got one plated in Germany, which satisfied the AMA. The rest were sold with factory paperwork and little else, with paint so thin the carbon weave showed through and lights and blinkers as an absolute afterthought. After all those years of effort, the bikes turned up to racetracks with about 10 fewer horsepower than the competition, which hadn't waited for them to catch up. Still, rider Miguel Duhamel declared the orange-and-black Milwaukee native to be the best handling race bike he had ridden. He switched to Honda in '95.

From the seller:

1994 Harley Davidson VR1000 – 1 of 25 street / 1 of 50 ever produced
We are over the moon to have this amazing, rare, Iconic Motorbike in our Dealership / Museum and up for sale.

Harley Davidson only made 50 of these amazing bikes in total and our research shows about half of them were equipped with headlights and such. This particular one has ZERO MILES!!!

The VR1000 is loaded with Carbon Fiber, Ohlins Forks, a dry clutch and when we’re rolling it around the museum, it feels incredibly light! Don’t miss this opportunity to add this gorgeous beast to your collection as you’ll NEVER find another!

Bike does not include a title but we do have the Official letter from Harley Davidson confirming the manufacturing of this particular bike. We can supply a bill of sale as well. We have the FULL FACTORY TOOL KIT which is brand new and packed from the factory.

These HD’s were built so that they could compete in World Superbike Homologation and as such were classified as off road machines, for that reason, MSO’s were not issued or made available.

You must come see this bike in person, you may not get another chance!

The asking price is $80,000. It's worth it. Even if you never ride it, which, given the bike we're talking about is advisable, this thing will cap any collection, and will make an incredible display piece for years to come.

Sponsored Listing: Zero-mile, 1-of-25 road-going 1994 Harley-Davidson VR1000!
Featured Listing September 13, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: Sorted Harley-Davidson XR750TT replica

9.13.2018: Now on eBay. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc

Looking at strange beasts like the 2019 Harley-Davidson FXDR, you'd be forgiven for forgetting that Harley ever had anything to do with road racing. Or turns in general, for that matter. Years and brand image have done much to erase the memory of the 1972 Harley-Davidson XR750TT, an honest-to-God, race-winning Milwaukee steed based around the firm's venerated 750cc flat track engine.

Harley built about 10 black and orange, fully faired examples of the XR750TT in '72, and in Cal Rayborn's hands they had a bunch of success in international match racing, despite putting out south of 100 horsepower, with most relying on front drum (!) brakes. The Lord works in mysterious ways, we guess.

Today's listing is a package:  The first bike is a turn-key replica of Rayborn's mount, albeit with some poetic license taken to tame some of the sketchiness of the original. For one thing, the builder stuck on a proper dual-disc brake setup. It also rides on a monoshock C&J frame and wears suspension from Ohlins and Forcella Italia. Beyond that, though, the bike is true to its roots, with a 1993 XR750 mill swaddled in lovely, delicate reproduction bodywork.

The second part of the package is a rolling chassis that is a nearly perfect replica of Rayborn's mount. The seller had intended to swap in the engine from the first bike to make a fairly faithful replica.

From the seller:

Harley Davidson XR750 Road Racer, C&J Frame Mono Shock, XR750 engine from 1993, Forcella Italia fork, Ohlins shock, Wire Wheels, complete Body Kit incl. fairing, partly new painted, new windshield, very good condition, runs great, race ready. Harley Davidson XR750TT Replika rolling chassis, complete except engine, Forcella Italia fork, Koni shocks, complete body kit, front wire wheel 18" and 16", many parts....

The Roadracer has been built in the late 90ies, based on a C&J Flattrack frame and a factory original 1993 XR750 engine.

Road racing fork Forcella Italia, Shock is Ohlins, brakes are high quality racing stuff. Equipped with the complete XRTT bodywork and Wire Wheels. This bike was raced by the pre owner in the late 90ies to middle 2000s at GrabtheFlag races and similar events in Europe.

The engine has been recently redone by the last owner and runs very good. I bought this bike 2 years ago and  rode this bike in 2017 only one day at a small race track for practice.

Additional there is a complete XRTT Replika Chassis with bodywork, only missing the engine. This bike was equipped with a XR1000 engine and was also raced in the late 90ies to early 2000s at european classic racing events. Fork is Forcella Italia, shocks are Koni, 16" and 18" front wheel.

My intention was to put the XR750 engine in the XRTT Replika Chassis, and ending up with a fine XRTT Replika, and buy a 90ies Sportster or Buell Engine for the C&J- Chassis and having a cool and powerfull Race Bike for Classic Races.

I would prefer selling as a package, for € 29000 OBO

Bikes are located in Berlin/ Germany.

Email: oldietech@t-online.de

The bike is across the Atlantic in Germany, but is very much worth the effort to import and turn into a once-in-a-while track day mount. With a full extra chassis waiting in the wings, there's little excuse to let it sit.

Featured Listing: Sorted Harley-Davidson XR750TT replica
Buell October 6, 2014 posted by

Featured Listing: Ready to Race 2007 Buell XBRR

Update 4.22.2015: This bike is heading to a new home. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Update 10.6.2014: Now on eBay, links added. -dc

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Certainly not the handsomest machine, Buell’s XBRR was a factory racebike based on their XB12 streetbike that featured Buell’s customary obsession with mass-centralization and weight-reduction. Both very good ideas, considering the powerplant was based on Harley-Davidson’s antediluvian 1200cc, pushrod v-twin, but de-stroked and bored-out to 1339cc. With huge 62mm throttle bodies, the race-spec engine puts out 150hp and 100lb/ft of torque. It has no real powerband and pulls from just off idle until you run headlong into the 8,000rpm limiter.

2007 Buell XBRR for sale on eBay

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But while the engine is the motorcycling equivalent of a big-block Chevy, the rest of the package definitely goes its own way. In classic Buell style, fuel is stored in the frame and oil in the swingarm, allowing a low center of gravity and providing good surface-area to keep things cool. The bike also features Buell’s signature Zero Torsion Load perimeter front brake, with a Nissin 8-piston caliper!

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While I realize that Buell’s eventual move to a Rotax-based powerplant was necessary for the bike to compete on the world stage, there’s something cool about their use of a lumpy, torquey all-American v-twin, and the XBRR is probably the very last word in fast Harleys. And it’s likely to be the last word for some time. Instead of capitalizing on their rich racing history, Harley seems very content to rest on their “bad to the bone” image to sell bikes. Which makes sense as racing would require them to actually make bikes that can win races...

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Normally, I like to fill in some blanks with the history of a bike in question, but in this case is our old buddies over at AutoMania have already done a fantastic job detailing this history of this machine.

From the AutomaniaGP website: 2007 Buell XBRR for Sale

My love of riding what I term “Anvils” has carried me on the frames of many older and what some people would refer to as “antiquated” rides. Most have been air-cooled BMW’s, some of which have genuinely surprised riders, others reacting with phrases such as “There goes a garage sale looking for a place to crash”. There is an extremely satisfying feeling of using an outdated Engine as a basis to build a quick and sometimes surprisingly fast motorcycle. With that that explanation, please do not think me out of plumb for lusting after this particular bike, the 2007 Buell XBRR Production Race Motorcycle we have here at the shop.

This bike was originally owned by Harley Davidson of Fredricksburg on the east coast of the US. They raced it during 2007 and it was the #2 bike for their racer Brian Bemisderfer. In 2010 it was bought by it’s present owner who was going to race it in the lightweight Twins class in Utah and also running it in Sounds of Thunder which is a AHMRA class. While on the Dyno at Harley Davidson in SLC the crankshaft let go. It had not even been to the track. Two sets of crankshaft parts were obtained and sent to John Hoban of Darkhorse Crankworks who built and balanced a new crank. The motor was then sent to Latus Harley Davidson in Portland Oregon and they rebuilt the engine.

Since then the bike has set in an office on static display. It is fully race prepped and starts immediately and runs nicely. It has not been to the track. It is modified with: Burns race muffler, STM Slipper clutch, Brembo master cylinder and a Penske rear shock. It was fitted with a starter motor and lightweight lithium battery but also comes with the hand held remote starter. Included are e 3 or 4 different rear sprockets and a 1 tooth smaller front sprocket, a new primary chain and one or two cylinder head temperature sensors. Included also is all of the data acquisition tools and CD’s, receipts for parts and labor for recent work and some minor spares. The bike has never been registered, having been issued an MSO by Buell when sold new originally. The MSO will be supplied to the new owner or an Oregon title created, which ever is desired.

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Just 50 were planned, although 56 were rumored to have been produced. The XBRR was almost $31,000 when new, and the bike competed in AMA racing in the Formula Xtreme class. Its inclusion in that class was very controversial at the time, since it was intended for “production-based machines” and some of the other teams argued that the XBRR was anything but.

This example features a very desirable slipper-clutch, something the bike desperately needs that was not originally included. And the traditional Harley black-and-orange paint definitely looks better than the stock yellow!

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At $20,000 this could be a great way to go racing for a reasonable price, and although bodywork might be a bit hard to come by, tuning parts for the engine should be obtainable. Plus, how hilarious would it be, passing riders on a bike with a non-unit gearbox? Not to mention the noise! The noise!

-tad

Featured Listing: Ready to Race 2007 Buell XBRR
Harley Davidson March 18, 2011 posted by

American Racing History: Harley-Davidson 750 XRTT

American Racing History:  Harley-Davidson 750 XRTT

I did not expect to find less information on a Harley than I did on the Derbi I wrote up but that is exactly what happened when I sat down at the plush RSBFS offices to begin my search for info.  This post will be filled with, "I think", "I don't know" and "maybe".  If you are an knowledgeable on the XRTT post away in the comments section.

 

If you are like me you just see another big, heavy HD V twin and can't get past that.  It sounds like the though, the XRTT was quite the bike back in the day.  One Cal Rayborn had some success with the bike.  By the way, his XRTT sold for $175,000.

 

One of the major upgrades to the XR series was the introduction of aluminum heads in 1972.  Horsepower is in the mid 70's (another site said 100hp)  and they rev up to 8200rpm.  Descendeants of this engine have been powering Harley to dirt track wins ever since.

What I'm interested in but can't find info on is the value of these bikes.  Do they have to have a race history to be valuable or is just finding one a battle?    I could not find any solid production numbers but I come across this from hi-speedmotorcyles.com to save my skin:

There were 10 original factory XRTT’s made. They were raced for several years and then interest went away on them. At that time, they were just a road race bike that the factory put out. These were not really considered a production racer. The 10 factory riders used them just as they would any other race bike. The H-D race department would build and tune their bikes.
There were quite a few other XRTT frames that became available to privateers. These came in the form of a kit; frame, wheels, forks, glass, everything but the motor.
Back in the 1970’s racers would compete on a TT course, dirt track course and a road race course. Riders that wanted a lot of points would compete on the road race circuit when they weren’t dirt tracking. This meant they had to take the TT rolling chassis along with their dirt track bikes. They would pull the dirt track motor, refine the gearing and put the motor in the road race chassis. Few were lucky enough to have a spare motor to put in their TT chassis.Over the years these XRTT’s were just parked around the country and never given much consideration. When vintage racing began and collectors realized that the XRTT was an extremely rare bike, everyone wanted one.The original factory race bikes were raced, modified, disassembled and the parts were scattered throughout the country. There may be an original out there somewhere but I have yet to see it.

There wasn't a whole lot of concrete info from the auction (seller wasn't even sure of the year), so let's jump to the video the seller posted:

Looks much sleeker from the rear.

Why didn't Harley stick with it?  Why bury your head in the sand and only race dirt track?  I just don't understand why this company will not embrace technology and move on with the times.  Is there a law somewhere that says they can't keep the cruisers if you they build sport bikes?  Obviously things aren't changing since they chased Buell out of the building.

What's it worth?  I'm taking a pass on this one.  I'm just making the assumption this one of the kitted privateer type bikes but even so I would just be throwing out a number.  Bidding looks to be pretty active so get on over there if you are interested.  I just find the whole thing a bit depressing that we have a (once?) great American company and we have to go back to the 70's to find a bike with some road racing glory.  .

And here's a video of the bike for sale:

Ian