Posts by tag: Desmodromic

Ducati March 31, 2020 posted by

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale

Ducati’s air-cooled 750SS might seem like an unlikely candidate for a racebike build. By 1993, a two-valve Desmo twin was antiquated technology, a quirky, charming curio by the sportbike standards of the day. But although competition duties had been handed off to the liquid-cooled, four-valve superbikes by the early 90s, it’s important to remember that versions of the lighter, simpler Desmodue were powering Ducati’s racebikes all the way back in 1981.

The first Ducati to use the then-new engine was the 500SL Pantah, first sold in 1980. The Pantah engine was developed by Fabio Taglioni as a follow up to the beautifully-engineered, but expensive to build and service bevel-drive v-twins. It had single overhead cams driven by toothed rubber belts, and two Desmo-actuated valves per air-cooled cylinder. Race bikes built from this platform were light and nimble, but were eventually outclassed in terms of outright power and were typically competitive in smaller classes.

Ultimately, larger variations of the Pantah engine found their way into Ducati’s second-tier sportbikes like the 900SS and the 750SS seen here. They were sold alongside the painfully expensive 851/888 and 916 that followed as a more affordable, easier-to-maintain alternative to those much more exotic machines. Power may not have been overwhelming, but the bones are good, and those Supersports machines provide excellent handling to go with their thumping Ducati charm.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Ducati 750SS Race Bike for Sale

1993 Ducati 750 Supersport vintage racing bike:

  • Kehin FCR 39 Carburetor Kit
  • Sparker TCI-p4 inductive programmable ignition unit
  • Carrillo rod set
  • Keihin FCR carburetor kit
  • GP Shift
  • Woodcraft stands and hand guard
  • Replaced “Marion Fairing Stay” with Stock Fairing Stay
  • Installed Monster Cowl
  • Replaced clutch reservoir and mount
  • Installed Race Tech Gold Valve Kit
  • Replaced shock and Fork Springs
  • Full Motor Service
  • Rebuilt front rear brake calipers
  • Replaced brake pads brake fluid
  • Installed 1/2” seat pad
  • Replaced stock muffler
  • Oury grips
  • Repaired fiberglass side panel, upper fairing and tail section
  • Powder-coated Frame, swing-arm and wheels
  • Prepped and painted bodywork
  • Installed smoke windscreen
  • Installed Vortex V2 fuel cap
  • Ohlins rear shock

Ducati 750SS Spare Engine Complete 750F1 Cafe Race CCS AHRMA ($3,400)
This motor was built by Chris Boy of Motor course Performance, Fort Lauderdale FL. It was designed as a low stress motor, built with high compression pistons, Carrillo rods, lightened crank and internal gears, straight cut gears, wet clutch. Heads have custom manifolds as shown set up for FCR 4`mm carbs modest porting, standard valves and Vee Two “Daytona” gind racing cams from Brook Henry ($1500) and fresh clutch pack. Currently set up as constant loss ignition and starter plate is blocked off for cart starting. It made 79.5 RWHP at the MCP Dyno. Motor has approximately 40 miles on the most recent tune up, including valve adjustment, new clutch pack. It is in excellent condition and is plug and play. 

The seller does include a long list of included parts, and this bike appears to have been properly put together. Developing a competitive package can be time-consuming and expensive, and this appears to be a legitimate race bike built to AHRMA specifications, but $12,000 is still a hefty chunk of change for an early 90s air-cooled Ducati. Now if the seller planned to include that spare engine [sold separately!], this might start to look like a better deal. I love the air-cooled Ducatis and have long thought a Supersport would make a great trackday ride, especially considering their values until recently, but the price here seems ambitious.

-tad

Turnkey Racebike: 1993 Ducati 750SS for Sale
Ducati January 29, 2020 posted by

More Than Skin Deep: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

We’ve been a little Ducati-heavy this week, but there’s no way I was going to skip this one: an Eraldo Ferracci-prepped and tuned Ducati 916 SPS. Sure, this might look like yet another boring 916, but the SPS is one of Ducati’s fire-breathing homologation specials, and this example has been endowed with a highly-tuned stroker motor from one of the era’s premier tuners.

If you’re not familiar with Ferracci, he was an east coast Ducati tuner whose bikes won several World Superbike and AMA titles. He eventually opened a well known Ducati/MV Agusta dealership, and the company still sells high-performance Ducati parts on their site, although the brick-and-mortar dealership itself is closed.

The SPS or “Sport Production Special” was basically a way for Ducati to begin racing their stronger, larger-displacement 996cc v-twin before the 996 was introduced. As with all the bikes in the 916/996/998 series, it might look like a regular 916, but featured extensive, evolutionary upgrades to the Tamburini superbike that was introduced way back in 1994. It used the close-ratio box from the smaller 748, along with updated suspension that included an Öhlins shock and a lighter frame.

But of course, the heart of the matter was the updated 996cc engine that included titanium connecting rods for 1998. Ducati found that the functional limit for their original Desmoquattro was 955cc: any bigger, and the cases tended to crack under racing stress. The new engine was a comprehensive redesign that saw the inclusion of new heads, barrels, pistons, injectors, and a lighter crank.

Combined with the usual tuning tricks that didn’t make it over to the regular 996, the changes all added up to an engine that was more than the sum of its parts, with a savage and aggressive character. It was very expensive, but made testers at the time struggle to find enough superlatives to adequately describe the lust it inspired. The seller borrows a good chunk of his description from a very nice history of the SP/SPS Ducatis over at OddBike, and it’s worth a read if you’ve never checked that site out.

From the original eBay listing: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale

About This Motorcycle:

“The primary reason of building the 916 SPS was to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition but fortunately for bike fans, the installation of the 996 engine into the 916 setup produced a bike that was described as legendary, astonishingly good looking and a true Superbike. Only 404 examples were built with less than 50 of those imported into the States.

The SPS was released to homologate the new 996cc engine for Superbike competition. The previous 916 crankcases had been maxed out at 955cc, and had problems with cracking and stress fractures under racing conditions. So in 1997 Ducati tried again by taking their new 996 engine and putting it into the 916 frame. The result was the 916 Sport Production Special (SPS).

New reinforced crankcases were needed, and to accommodate a displacement closer to the 1000cc limit for twins in Superbike the case mouths needed wider openings and wider stud spacing to match. Thus the barrels and heads were new, made wider to match the new cylinder stud spacing. Bore was now up to 98mm, with the same 66mm stroke as before. The heads had larger combustion chambers and bigger valves. Compression ratio was now 11.5:1 inside a lighter crankshaft with tungsten plug balancing. The high pressure double injector fuel setup with P8 ECU was carried over from the SP.

Press reviews of the 996 powered SPS declared it to be something quite special, with some testers being able to crack 170 miles per hour with the Termignoni exhaust and ECU kit fitted, a pretty stunning speed for a twin with ‘only’ 120-odd horsepower. The new engine gave a much wider power delivery band but this together with neck-snapping torque was enough to push the limits of the chassis. The 916 models in general did not respond well to ham-fisted riders, so it is not surprising that the SPS and its significantly wider power band resulted in a bike that could be dangerous for even skilled riders.

Despite its somewhat dangerous reputation the SPS was still sexy as hell with a sound like the apocalypse, especially if the Termi pipes were installed. Price tag new was almost $25,000 USD, a significant amount above the $16,500 Biposto and nearly double the price of a 748 model. Most reviewers declared that despite its dangerous nature it was worth the extra investment and there was a lot of demand for the SPS but since these bikes were built for homolgation, just 404 examples were built and only a small number of those brought into the USA.”

Among these rare breed of motorcycles there is something even more special and quite possibly one of the most spectacular, modern era homologated Ducatis. Now that would be tough to believe except this is a FBF bike, but for those who know about Eraldo Ferracci and his relationship with Ducati will easily justify the aforementioned statement.

Speedart Motorsports acquired this motorbike few years back and it has been a highlight of our Ducati collection ever since.

The first owner of this stunning example took delivery in November 1998 from Mr. Ferracci and he commissioned FBF on November, 11 to transform the SPS in to one of their 1,026 cc stroker fire-breathing monsters at an exorbitant cost.

The following is a partial list of the work performed by Eraldo Ferracci with an FBF serial number stamped on the case, further attesting to the pedigree of this extravagant Production Special.

  • Renthal quick change rear sprockets carrier
  • Ferracci billet lightweight flywheel
  • High pressure fuel regulator
  • Ported and polished heads
  • Stage-3 Eprom chip
  • Corse rearsets
  • 37mm Intake valves
  • 31mm Exhaust valves
  • 54mm Ferracci Forza full stainless system
  • Ohlins shock revalved
  • Hyperpro spring
  • Ferracci billet clip-on handlebars
  • 98mm 12:1 Compression piston Kit
  • FBF power crank 68mm stroke
  • Ducati Performance carbon fiber under-seat oil vent tank
  • MS Production carbon air intake runners
  • Stage-3 cams
  • Pankl Racing titanium rods
  • Carbon fiber MS Production swingarm cover

During our custodianship at Speedart Motorsports, further enhancements were performed including Dymag carbon fiber wheels, ultra-rare Ducati Corse RS slipper clutch with DP carbon cover, NCR sprocket carriers, Poggipolini titanium fasteners, Samco hoses, Spiegler cables with fittings and much more.

The sale of this legendary Ducati is accompanied by extensive documentation, owner’s manuals, all Ferracci build records including Dyno sheets, fastidious maintenance receipts, stands, cover, etc.

Speedart Motorsports invites all serious inquiries of what is believed to be the most extraordinary 916 Sport Production Special in captivity, freshly serviced, in spectacular form both cosmetically and mechanically.

The high-compression pistons match the original 98mm bore, but the new crank’s 68mm stroke is up 2mm from the original for a total of 1026cc, compared to the original 996. That might bother some collectors, but it looks like only the very best parts have been used to upgrade and tune this very special SPS. Other than the gold plugs that don’t match the frame paint, this is a very nice, very trick bike, and one of just 1058 built in 1998. A nice SPS will generally sell for much less than the $34,500 asking price seen here, but they usually haven’t had as much attention lavished on them.

-tad

More Than Skin Deep: 1998 Ducati 916 SPS for Sale
Ducati December 12, 2019 posted by

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Ducati’s instantly recognizable 916 series of superbikes remain surprisingly affordable, considering their pedigree and perceived rarity. But the same basic design was in production from 1994 to 2004 and Ducati made a shedload of them. Sure, the SPS and R bikes are extremely rare, but regular production bikes like this 996 Biposto aren’t too hard to find in good shape, although most have accumulated way more mileage than seen here…

The 996 debuted in 1999 as an evolution of the 916. It might look virtually identical, but featured a host of subtle upgrades to the original bike, including changes to the frame, fuel injection and, most notably, the engine. The original 916 cases started to fail under racing conditions when punched out beyond 955cc, a disadvantage when World Superbike rules allowed twins up to 1000cc. The revised engine was first seen in the 916SPS and the 996 used the same cases, although the rest of the engine was in a lower state of tune, with milder cams and injection tuning to match.

It was followed by the 998 in 2002 that saw the introduction of the “Testastretta” or “narrow-head” engine that offered significantly improved power, making the 998 the fastest version of the bike, although a torque-rich 112 horses meant that the 996 was considered to be plenty fast. An Öhlins shock is matched to a set of quality Showa forks, and I much prefer these later five-spoke wheels to the original 916’s three-spoke design.

Right now, it seems like the 996 is the value proposition of the group. The 916 is the original and desirable for that reason, and the 998 the most powerful and well-developed. It’s not the fastest, or the rarest, but if you want a 916-style bike, this 996 Biposto offers a blend of handling and power, along with marginal passenger accommodations if your significant other is both petite and brave. And yellow bodywork

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale

Yes, this bike only has 1806 original miles! Collect it or ride it? You choose. Sharp looking yellow 996 that GP Motorcycles just changed all the fluids on and just replaced the timing belts. Bike still has original tires so you would want to change those if you are going to ride the bike but other than that, this thing is ready to go. Don’t miss out on this classic Ducati Superbike.

GP Motorcycles down in San Diego is offering this very clean, very low-mileage 996 for $6,999.00. Aside from the corroded paint on the brake fluid cap and the fogged headlight lenses, it’s very clean and comes with a set of Arrow slip-ons that were a popular choice when the bike was new. They aren’t my favorite in terms of exhaust note, but easy to change if you don’t like them. If you’re looking for a very sharp collectible and can’t spring for one of the more exotic Ducatis, this would be a pretty low-priced way to pick up a pretty pristine example of Tamburini’s iconic superbike. Assuming you’re okay with yellow, instead of classic Ducati red.

-tad

Champagne Taste on a Beer Budget: 2001 Ducati 996 Biposto for Sale
Ducati April 18, 2018 posted by

1986 Ducati MHR Mille with 397 Miles !

Quite possibly the ultimate bevel-drive Ducati, the Mike Hailwood Replica started out as a lightweight homolagation special, but finished as a 973cc superbike.  This fine example has some shelf wear but has logged only a few hundred miles.

1986 Ducati MHR Mille for sale on eBay

The late MHR had 76 torquey hp, and the big fairing in commemorative red and green livery with monoposto seat.  Trellis frame peeks out behind beefy air-cooled cylinders.  The 40 mm Dell’Orto carbs, five-speed and smallish Brembo brakes made for a dynamic package.

Hidden away in Dixie, this MHR appears complete and original with just a single faux pas at the windshield and the deteriorated turn signal stalks.  A comprehensive going over will be required to return it to riding status or the show circuit.  From the eBay auction:

nice original paint bike, with only 397 miles on it. the clear windshield is cracked on the left (see pics) and the turn signal stems are made of some plastic that just crumbled from age, turn signals are included.

I put a battery and gas in it, and it started and ran fine. I didn’t try to ride it, as the brakes will need servicing, and the petcock leaks.

beautiful bike
as far as I can tell, its completely original.

feel free to ask any questions
all of these Ducati’s listed are being sold from an estate, and all have been sitting a few years.

Budget concerns ruled the day and Ducati wasn’t able to follow Hailwood’s 1978 TT victory with a win, but wins in IOM Formula II generated showroom interest that kept shoppers coming in until the new belt-drive desmodues were ready.  The model was continued as a tribute after Hailwood’s death in a road accident, and became the most popular bevel.  A short restoration and a long career behind the velvet ropes await this MHR…

-donn

1986 Ducati MHR Mille with 397 Miles !
Ducati March 3, 2018 posted by

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

I realize that I’m spoiled. I’m spoiled because my current riding group includes five or six MV Agustas that actually run, a pair of RSV4s, a few Ducatis, a couple Bimotas, and a KTM. I’m spoiled because I live in Southern California, and car and motorcycle exotica are everywhere: I’ve recently come across a few Arch Motorcycles, nearly every variety of 90s two-stroke, Confederate Fighters actually being ridden on the road, a slew of Bimotas, pretty much every vintage and modern sportbike you can possibly imagine, even a Gurney Alligator. Which is possibly why I’m surprisingly blase about the Ducati Desmosedici RR, one of the most exotic machines of the past twenty years.

It’s not fair to the Desmo. I should be incredibly impressed by it, but it probably doesn’t help that I’ve never really thought the Desmo was all that beautiful. It’s no doubt a very aggressive machine, with a leering, hungry-catfish face and a wild exhaust that exits through the top of the tailpiece, at least in stock form: there’s also a Ducati Performance system that vents two of the cylinders through the bellypan on the right side and the others through a more traditional underseat pipe. But although it lacks the slim-waisted purpose of a 916 or the sculptural elegance of an MV Agusta F4, the D16RR, meant to closely ape the look of Ducati’s 990cc MotoGP racebike, has an air of ruthlessness about it and looks like nothing else on the road.

The original idea was to take Ducati’s V4-powered MotoGP racebike and detune it, then sell a few to well-heeled enthusiasts to use at trackdays or as living room ornamentation. While other “race replicas” of the period generally consisted of race bike colors, graphics, and even sponsors splashed across otherwise stock bikes, Ducati went and made a bike that had almost nothing in common with any of their production motorcycles. It even used an annoyingly-authentic 16″ rear wheel, something that must be pretty inconvenient when you’re trying to get street tires to shoe this thing.

Of course, the D16RR is obviously no “homologation special” since MotoGP is a prototype series and the bikes need share nothing except a badge with a company’s roadgoing offerings. Appearances and specifications to the contrary, the Desmo doesn’t actually use a detuned MotoGP powerplant: race engines in the premier class don’t factor longevity into the equation and, even detuned, don’t make useable or practical road bike powerplants, considering they lack things like a charging system or a starter…

Instead, Ducati basically whipped up an entirely new V4 engine for the bike that very, very closely mirrors the specifications and layout of the racebike while at the same time sharing almost no parts… So you still get a 989cc 90° V4 with gear-driven cams, Desmodromic valve actuation, and a “twin-pulse” firing order that gives it a bit of Ducati flavor compared to a “screamer” or “big-bang” configuration, along with a beefed-up cassette-style gearbox.

Considering the price tag, you could be forgiven for being unimpressed with the 170hp output and 425lb wet weight, but the numbers alone fail to capture the wild, track-bred character. And the Desmo is littered with top-shelf parts that help reign in the power, like the Öhlins FG353P gas-pressurized forks up front that are truly “race spec” and normally cost as much as a new GSX-R600…

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale

No compromise, Italian passion personified. The high water mark for street legal sportbikes.

#895 out of 1500.

1878 miles all street so far. May increase in the next few months I don’t think I can resist doing some track days on this bike as the weather improves.

Serviced by a Ducati Master Technician at 1814 miles.

Clean title in hand, all manuals, 2 keys, technical workshop DVD.

Here’s a good article detailing the specs and history of this bike: https://www.sportrider.com/sportbikes/ducati-desmosedici-rr-firebreather#page-4

The bike is in my living room right now, seems perfectly normal to me, but wife isn’t amused – please buy this so I can start sleeping in my bed again.

I’m willing to deliver or meet you within a 1000 mile radius of Salt Lake City for a small additional fee.  Please contact me for details.  Or haulbikes.com is a good option for shipping.

Bike is for sale locally also, I reserve the right to end this auction at any time.

This one appears to be nearly untouched, with under two thousand miles. Which makes sense because the seller claims it’s currently being used in lieu of a big-screen television or a painting of a ship being tossed on stormy seas to liven up their home. They may have chosen to get rid of the Desmo, but is that the real problem here? New, the bike retailed for $72,000 and the 1,500 built were quickly snapped up by collectors, although anyone looking to quickly flip their purchase for profit were severely disappointed: these can often be found for well under that, and certainly much less than today’s example with an $80,000 asking price. Have values jumped sharply, or is this seller simply ambitious?

-tad

Misplaced Priorities: 2008 Ducati Desmosedici RR for Sale
Ducati November 28, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

Update 3.6.2018: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Update 11.27.2017: The seller has renewed the Feature Listing for this very clean 748S and has dropped the price to $4,950. Thanks for helping to support the site Brett and good luck to potential buyers! -dc

2001 Ducati 748S R Side Glamour

America is the land of Golden Corral, the endless buffet, a place where “more is better” and we often shop by the pound. Do we really need an endless pizza buffet? Of course not, but wow, what a deal! And in that world, a bike like the Ducati 748 makes little sense. I mean, for just a couple grand more, wouldn’t you rather have the 916? If you finance it, it’s just like $40 more per month. But people who subscribe to that reasoning really will never understand the 748.

2001 Ducati 748S R Naked

It’s a situation where less really is more. Sure, the 916 came first, and the 996/998 are definitely more powerful. But the frame and suspension were identical, and the 748 came with a narrower rear tire that gave the bike sharper handling and better turn-in while that smaller engine was sweeter, revvier, and still made a solid 95hp. The bike needed to be worked just that much harder to get the most from it and, since the entire 916 series was a complete disaster when not being properly caned, it’s not like you’re really missing out on a relaxed experience the package never provided anyway.

2001 Ducati 748S Engine

Today’s featured listing isn’t some zero-mileage garage queen, and about 13,000 miles have rolled under the wheels since 2001. But while there may be examples out there with fewer miles on them, there aren’t too many that are cleaner. And even better, this one is yellow.  I realize that many purists will disagree, but I actually prefer yellow to the more traditional red. There aren’t too many motorcycles that look good in yellow, but this is one of them.

2001 Ducati 748 Rear Clutch

From the seller: 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale

While it may not be as collectable as a 748 ‘RS,’ or ‘R,’ – it is in excellent shape.  And the 748 S, while not sporting a number badge, is a series of Ducati that can be hard to find nowadays,  if you’re looking for a lower mileage, supremely clean, professionally maintained, and nearly OEM example.  There are plenty of monopostos out there, but not as many actual ‘S’ series – with the proper TiN Showa suspension, adjustable steering head, grey frame, and grey 5 spoke Marchesini wheel upgrades. 

The Termignoni exhaust is a professional repack and has under 500 miles – the canister carbon is in amazing shape.  A lot of the carbon on the Termis turned amber from years of heat.  Not this set.  These are now very hard to find in good shape.

Also: Carbon fiber clutch cover, cowl, and rear wheel hugger. 

Like the 749R that you provided the featured listing for, this cycle has been ridden constantly, about 850 miles per season. Never in the rain, never on a track. Dedicated mechanic. Kept in a heated garage. 

Timing belt replacement and complete tune and safety inspection less than 1000 miles ago by ECS in Middletown, NY.  Less than 500 miles on Michelin Power Pilots.  Cover and Pit Bull stand would go with the cycle.

2001 – 13,200 miles.

Asking price is $4,950.

2001 Ducati 748 Exhausts

As the seller mentions, the S model isn’t as collectible as the more desirable R, but you do get the very nice Showa suspension front and rear, including the titanium-nitride forks, along with very stylish five-spoke Marchesini wheels that I prefer to the earlier three-spoke items. And you can’t go wrong with the glorious noise generated by a classic set of carbon Termignoni cans.

Certainly, you can find a 748 for less than the seller is asking, but you probably won’t find one better and I think this represents a very good opportunity for fans of the Tamburini superbikes.

-tad

2001 Ducati 748S R Side

Featured Listing: Very Clean 2001 Ducati 748S for Sale
Ducati January 26, 2016 posted by

A Bit of Sunshine for Your Garage: Low Mileage 1997 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1997 Ducati 900SS R Front

A little something to brighten your day, this very yellow Ducati 900SS is pretty hard to miss: sell it to your significant other as a “safety feature” when trying to justify a purchase. Very few bikes look good in this color but I think the early to mid-1990s 900SS is one of them. In fact, I actually prefer it in yellow to the more traditional red, especially with a half-fairing fitted.

1997 Ducati 900SS L Side Detail

The SS was Ducati’s bread and butter during this era, keeping the lights on while the 851 and 916 stole headlines. This particular iteration of the SuperSport was built from 1991 through 1998 and powered by the belt-drive Pantah engine, versions of which live on in today’s air-cooled Ducatis. And honestly, considering the number of parts that swap between the air-cooled and early liquid-cooled bikes, I wonder how much Pantah DNA lives on in the Panigale…

1997 Ducati 900SS Dash

The two-valve Desmo v-twin may be safe to an indicated 9,000rpm, but that redline is largely decorative unless the engine’s been breathed on: with a power peak of 80hp claimed at a car-like 6,400rpm, these tend to have a strong midrange, but quickly run out of breath on top. Ironic for sure, considering that the desmodromic valvetrain’s claim to fame is a lack of springs that prevents high rpm float…

1997 Ducati 900SS Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1997 Ducati 900 SS Low Miles only 9980 Miles
New head gasket, new lines, oil flush, battery.
Factory Standard Equipment Includes:
Aftermarket Racing Carburetor
Marzocchi Suspension
Brembo Brakes
Single Shock Absorber
Tubular Trellis Frame
Brambo Wheels

The seller also helpfully posted a cold start and walk-around video on YouTube, which features a good shot of the top yoke and the plaque that indicates this is a genuine “SP” version of the bike.

1997 Ducati 900SS Fairing

I’m really not sure if an “aftermarket racing carburetor” can also be classified as “factory standard equipment” or what that really means: when new, these were fitted with a pair of 38mm Mikuni carburetors. Generally thought to be jetted very lean to comply with emissions requirements, it’s very common to install a jet kit to richen things up a bit. Many folks also install a pair of 39 or 41mm FCR flat-slide carbs, depending on the bike’s state of tune. A pricey option for sure but, aside from the loss of a choke lever, the flat-slide carbs offer up a noticeable performance improvement. I’m not sure which option is in place but here, since the bike appears otherwise stock, I’d assume he’s simply referring to the original “high performance” items…

1997 Ducati 900SS Side Engine

This bike isn’t absolutely pristine, with some scuffing and dents on the exhaust and some grit and grime and a bit of faded carbon fiber. But these have been very affordable for a long time now and they offer humane ergonomics, good wind-protection, and can be very reliable when properly cared for, so it’s getting difficult to find them with such low mileage. This one has enough mileage on it to guarantee it’s not just been sitting in a shed its whole life, and those cosmetic issues should be easy to rectify with a quick trip to eBay. Or just put the old, worn bits in a box for the next guy, and slap on a set of Staintune pipes and some fresh carbon bits, then go riding! Honestly, for the prices these currently command, they really do represent a real bargain and an ideal way to affordable Ducati ownership.

-tad

1997 Ducati 900SS R Side

A Bit of Sunshine for Your Garage: Low Mileage 1997 Ducati 900SS for Sale
Ducati November 6, 2015 posted by

Double Desmo: Multiple 2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR

Today’s post is for two Ducati Desmosedici, a bike which I think is the most lustworthy Ducati of the last 20 years, even more so than the 916/996/998.  One is a truly incredible Casey Stoner homage and the other appears to a pristine “team version” edition.

A true “racebike-for-the-streets”, the Desmosedici was a limited production, road-legal version of the racebike that Casey Stoner rode to MotoGP glory and thereby helped to restore Ducati to the pinnacle of the motorcycle world.  Ducati made 1500 Desmosedici for public purchase and offered them for an eye-popping 72,500 USD and even in the midst of the 2006-2008 financial crisis, all 1500 units that were produced were pre-sold.

desmo4

2008 Ducati Desmosedici Casey Stoner replica on ebay

Before digging into the the details of this particular Desmosedici, I think its important to take a moment and explain the impact that Casey Stoner’s success on the Ducati Desmosedici had on motorcycling.  Consider the following excerpt;

Ducati had stopped participating in the top tier/”Grand Prix” racing class in 1972 when 2 stroke motors became dominant. The company did continue to participate in four-stroke production model race classes such as TT1, TT2 and World Superbike but it was only in the 1990’s when MotoGP rule changes gave priority to four-stroke machinery that the company decided to re-enter the world’s premier racing class/Moto GP.  

At the time Ducati re-entered MotoGP, no European manufacturer had won the top tier championship since MV Agusta in 1973, a span of almost 30 years.  

The Desmosedici began in 2003 as a design effort by a group of young Moto Corse engineers (average age of 28) and was built around a brand-new V-4 engine that incorporating Ducati’s traditional 90-degree cylinder layout and a 16 valve engine with desmodromic control.  The engine was designed for one thing-racing.  

Including twin overhead camshafts, the engine was mounted in a tubular steel frame with the engine as a stressed member.  The rear suspension and aluminium swing-arm were bolted directly to the engine, the front forks were top shelf Öhlins, power was transferred via a six-speed cassette-type gearbox, shifts were via a multi-plate slipper clutch, and noted F1 aerodynamics expert Alan Jenkins designed the all-enveloping bodywork.  All the pieces were combined to produce a machine that produced over 220 horsepower at 16,000 rpm. 

The Desmosedeci effort was successful from 2003-2007, with multiple podium finishes and Ducati finishing second in the constructor championship but the top level championship remained elusive.  This was despite the efforts of riders such as Carlos Checca, Loris Capirossi, and Sete Gibernau.  In 2007 the maximum engine capacity for MotoGp was reduced to 800 cc and evolutionary changes to bike were made, including a change to the firing order.  The changes, combined with the promotion of former fourth Ducati rider Casey Stoner of Australia to the number one rider spot resulted in astonishing results.  Stoner stomped the competition at the opening race at Qatar, setting the fastest lap of the race on his final lap and roaring past Valentino Rossi on the back straight to finish ahead by almost three seconds.  Stoner and the Ducati dominated the motogp season, winning an astonishing 10 MotoGp races and Ducati finally succeeded in its attempt to reach the upper echelon of motorcycle manufacturers.

Perhaps the most significant impact of the Desmosedici success was that it helped persuade other european manufacturers to rejoin the large displacement sportbike segment for both the street and racing.  Within a few years companies such as KTM and BMW were launching large displacement sportbike development efforts, resulting in bikes such as the RC8 and S1000 respectively.  

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This particular Desmosedici is #456 and the seller indicates they are the second owner. The seller has also gone to a great amount of effort to replicate the Casey Stoner graphics package on the bike, and perhaps most importantly, indicates that all major recalls have been done.

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Here is some of what the seller has to say

  • Brand New OEM Ducati Bridgestone tires were just mounted with 0 miles.
  • New Battery.
  • Only added items are an OEM Ducati carbon fiber rear fender and an OEM Ducati carbon fiber gas cap.
  • All recalls have been completed on the bike except for the recall that requires you to cut the rear carbon tail section if you use the “street” silencer.  This bike has the race silencer on it.
  • Bike has been in Monterey California for the past year with “John” at Finishing Touch Custom Paint, who paints and installs graphics on all the most custom race bikes and has an awesome relationship with Ducati USA.  We worked together on this bike for the last year .  We scrutinized over every detail including getting graphics like the “Advantage” logo right on the top of the upper fairing.  To make it true Factory Ducati, we ended up painting the blue as to fade it like the factory bike and placing the decal over it.  All of the graphics are under the clear coat, ls were created, sized and printed custom for this bike.  You will not find decals like the “Enel” on the tail, an example of how detailed we needed to be to create this masterpiece.
  • As close to perfect as a motorcycle can be, not even a scratch under the swing arm where bikes typically get dinged when you put it on its rear stand.

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Is this Ducati worth the $50,000 USD Buy-It-Now asking price?  To be honest, I do think its worth that and maybe even a bit more.  Standard Desmosedici’s with higher mileage and no evidence of recalls seem to go for about 42-48,000 USD.  The condition of this Desmosedici and the graphics package plus recalls and recent fresh service make me think the price is spot on. Since the actual Casey Stoner MotoGP bikes are commanding bonkers prices at auction, this is probably as close to a Casey Stoner replica as most mere mortals will ever have an opportunity to own.

To me this Desmosedici is a true halo bike, a bike which could be the crown jewel of a collection. I am personally tempted to make an offer for this lovely beastie so..erm…move along now…nothing to see here.

 

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

NOTE:  While writing this post a second Desmosedici came up for sale on eBay, so if you are looking for one but don’t fancy the Stoner tribute graphics package, maybe check it out here.  Interestingly, the price is right inline with this Stoner replica.

Double Desmo:  Multiple 2008 Ducati Desmosedici D16RR