Posts by tag: Unrestored

Featured Listing August 12, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1994 Kawasaki Ninja 600R (ZX600C)

It takes something special to stand out in the middleweight sportbike segment, especially in the used market when a goodly number join the fray each year.  The seller spotted this back-of-the-garage find a few years ago and returned it to the road with several major service items.  As delivered in period black and turquoise livery, this 600R is a great survivor and affordable classic.

1994 Kawasaki 600R ( GPX600 ) with just 6,900 miles !

Though there isn’t much radical engineering in this profitable corner of the showroom, the Ninja 600R does boast more than 100 hp per liter at 84, thanks to 11.71-to-1 compression on the twin-cam four.  Kawasaki’s Electronic Suspension Control ( ESCS ) compensated for front end dive under braking, and their Uni-Track with adjustable monoshock tamed the rear end.  The frame-mounted fairing cut a hole in the wind for rider, and vinyl tank panels offered good grip.

Likely purchased new by a fledgling rider, this 600R was parked soon afterward, and re-commissioned by the new owner after almost 20 years on the lam.  Since the drivetrain is pretty much bulletproof, the rehab involved all liquids, new rubber, carb rebuild and a thorough cleaning of the fuel system.  The seller has these comments about the bike and its return to service:

I acquired this bike back in 2016 with approximately 2,500 original miles and it was completely original down to the tires. It still has the original owner’s manual, tool kit, factory key, and is completely stock right down to the exhaust.

I replaced all the fluids, installed new spark plugs, a new UNI air filter, a new battery, and had new Bridgestone Battleax BT tires fitted. The tank has been removed and professionally cleaned, given a new petcock valve, and I had all four carburetors professionally rebuilt at the same shop that the tank was cleaned.

The bike has since been ridden 4,500 trouble-free miles over the past three years, and at the time of writing has about 7,000 miles, however, this number will go up every weekend as I like to ride it to keep the carbs in shape. Minor cosmetic blemishes include light scratches on the tank, two small scratches on the left rear cowl, mild corrosion on the coolant drain plug, and small bits of rust starting to surface on the exhaust.

You never see these anywhere anymore and this all original example is the best I’ve seen for sale in years. Even if you’re not a collector, this Ninja 600R is a fun, reliable survivor that gets attention from onlookers that know, and is a terrific and inexpensive way to enjoy a classic sportbike.

Asking price is $3,500 and offers are requested by text message at (757) 806-9296

Having served a generation of daily riders, The seller is right that they are rarely seen in this condition these days, and the best way to maintain a fuel system is to use it occasionally.  Maybe this all original model was your brother’s favorite bike, or a friend needs a down payment-sized entrée into the sporty side, either way this 600R looks ready to please a new owner.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1994 Kawasaki Ninja 600R (ZX600C)
Featured Listing August 8, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America

Update 8.8.2019: This seller has decided to upgrade to a Featured Listing and is also available on eBay. Thanks for supporting the site, Jamie, and good luck to buyers! -dc

The mid-seventies saw MV Agusta floundering after the founder’s death, and about to accept an offer they couldn’t refuse from the Italian government.  U.S. importers persuaded the company to try and revive their fortunes with a special 750, a monoposto bristling with premium parts.  This rare example returned to Italy for a mid-stream model upgrade before sale.

1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America for sale on eBay

Before almost every big bike was an inline four, MV Agusta had a history of air-cooled DOHC Grand Prix machines.  For the 750S, displacement was increased to 788cc’s, heads re-designed and 26mm Dell’Orto carburetors were specified.  Though the cams are driven by a gear train between cylinders two and three, the alternator is behind, resulting in a trim crankcase.  Shaft drive indicating its more GT purpose, most MV 750’s came with front discs and a drum rear brake.

Not enough to be one of 500 or so, this MV was upgraded by the factory to an 850SS, which the factory did to just a few dozen leftover machines to make them more enticing.  A little history from the eBay auction:

“The Ferrari of Motorcycles”

Up for sale is a stunning 1977 MV Agusta 850SS. This is pretty much the quintessential late-70s Italian sport bike and the last, highest spec iteration of MV’s factory-built four cylinder sport bikes. Less than 500 Americas were made from 1975-77, and this 750S-to-850SS factory conversion is one of just 19 (or 27, or 35, or 42, depending on your source) total 850SSs made. Just to be clear, all MV Agusta 850SSs were conversions from 750S machines; some were done by the factory, some were done by dealers based on instructions from the factory.

The bike in question is a 2800-mile example in excellent overall condition. It features factory-optional cast wheels, Lafranconi exhaust, and its original suede covered seat. Frame and engine numbers match; not all do. There are a few nicks here and there, as you would expect from any 40+ year old machine, and the finish on the front edge of the instrument binnacle is separating (see photos), but the bike is whole and has obviously never seen any hard use. It has a wonderful, honest overall appearance. It starts, run, shifts, and stops, but with such low mileage and limited use in the last few years, it could probably benefit from a more fulsome recommissioning, including carb tuning/cleaning, before any serious road riding. A video of the bike in action can be sent upon request.

750S to 850SS conversion: Factory records during this period in MV history can be inconsistent, if they are available at all. 1977 was the final year of factory-produced MV Agusta motorcycles, and the factory was fast and loose with some things, including specifications from bike to bike. They were also having a hard time selling new 750S Americas in a crowded field of ever larger and more powerful Japanese machines, which could be had for a fraction of the MV’s $6500 sticker price. So, an uprated variant of the 750S, the 850SS, was cooked up as a way to move leftover or unsold 750S machines. In late 1976, MV recalled 19 unsold new 750S machines from distributor stock (including this bike) back to the factory in Italy for conversion to 850-spec. They also instructed dealers/distributors in how to convert other 750S machines to 850SS spec. Fortunately, this bike’s journey is well-described in both factory and distributor documents. The bike is first described in factory documents from 1975 and early 1976, as a “1976 model 750cc ‘S’ America”. Later documents from 1977 list it (by serial number) among 19 bikes that were recalled in late-1976 to the MV factory in Italy for conversion to “850S” specification. Additional documents from 1977 pertain to the re-importation of the bike by the US distributor, Garville, now as an “850S” with “86hp” (vs 75hp in standard 750S trim), and allocation to Champion Motorcycles in Costa Mesa, California. The bike has 750S sidecover emblems; these may have been left on the bike at the factory or re-installed later during a refinish (easily remedied by removal of the emblem and replacement with an “MV” decal, which is what the factory did on some 850SS machines). It has the factory optional and 850SS-correct EPM cast alloy wheels with triple disks and Brembo calipers. 850SSs typically used 27mm carbs unless bound for the US, like this one, which then used the standard 26mm Dellorto carbs of the 750S America.

All original documents relating to this bike are included in the sale, both when it was a “1976 750S” and after conversion to 1977 850SS (see pix), with the exception of the document listing this bike among the 19 recalled to the factory for 850SS conversion. That particular document belongs to the records of another of my MVs, but I will provide a copy/scan of that original document to the new owner as well. The sale also includes a commissioned hardcover photo-book of this particular machine, by Ian Falloon.

Values on these bikes are hard to pin down…but at much less than the price of a 1974 Ducati 750SS “Green Frame”, which was produced in significantly greater numbers than the MV 850SS and by a manufacturer of less racing pedigree than MV Agusta, values of the late-spec MV classics seem destined to close the gap to their Italian brethren. Imagine this red stunner in your garage/mancave/lair next to your 275GTB or 365 GTB/4 Daytona or 365BB! These bikes rarely come up for sale, outside of major auctions, where buyer and seller can be expected to pay as much as 12-20% in combined fees on top of the hammer price. Consider this bike instead.

42 years on, the 850SS shows no particular wear, but chips and aging paint and plating of a real classic.  Despite the outstanding components from Ceriani, Tomaselli, and Brembo, the factory thought having the LaFranconi mufflers black would be sporty.

Already playing catch-up to the new Japanese imports, Agusta didn’t have the time or resources to engineer a new lightweight model.  At over 500 lbs. dry, the 750 and 850S reviewed as a better ride for moderate speeds but did so in style.  The factory wound down shortly and was offline for ten years before being revived by Cagiva.  Seeming more appropriate for a white glove auction than online, this 850S is a history lesson in 1970’s design and manufacturing.

-donn

Featured Listing: 1977 MV Agusta 750S / 850SS America
Suzuki June 10, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot

Update 7.23.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Presented in their alternate red and white livery, this K-variant GSX-R750 is ready to do battle at the next street cred concours. It has a careful 12,000 miles which is low, but more of a survivor than babied collector. Suzuki designed it with a laser focus on light weight and usable power, which made the GSX-R750 instantly popular.

1989 Suzuki GSX-R750 Slingshot for sale on eBay

Suzuki went seriously oversquare in the comprehensive 1988 revision, the 73mm bore and 44.7mm stroke allowing 13,000 rpm and 112 hp. Still air/oil cooled though, which eliminated weight and complexity. 36mm Mikuni carbs featured the asymmetrical slide hence the “Slingshot” name, beside the way it took off from the starting line. The alloy frame was updated, but continued with its lightweight and braced theme, carrying the engine lower than before. Cartridge forks were still right side up, and the Full Floater swingarm controlled the rear. Brakes were a more modern size with 310mm front disks. Without a spec sheet or caliper you can see the wheels are wider and noise is contained by a 4-into-1 exhaust.

The owner Scott’s comments:

If you’ve always wanted a really nice Slingshot here’s your chance. Red with white just under 12,000 original miles. This is a true survivor which is mostly stock other than the airbox and Supertrapp silencer. New battery just serviced all new fluids and carburetor cleaning/rebuild, new rear brake line, petcock, and cush drive. Everything including dash lights are in perfect working order, its ready to go for the new owner. It comes with a hard to find unpainted rear seat cowl along with a back of the gas tank bra. It’s a lot of fun to ride for a thirty-year-old bike. Rides very close to a modern bike and makes great sounds. It’s never been down to the best of my knowledge.

Here’s the back story, I bought it with the thought of turning it into a vintage race bike. When my friends saw it, particularly one that’s a GSXR nut, they convinced me it was too nice the convert. They were not willing to buy it but would not let me race it! So I found a Slab-side that was a better candidate. As I’m more of a track guy my street riding in next to zero nowadays so this has been sitting in my climate-controlled Man Town.

I like to sell bikes with no stories hence the recent service. I would rate this an 8 out of 10. It’s not a museum piece but a really nice original survivor that you will be proud to ride and turns heads wherever you go. There are a few stress cracks in the bodywork which is normal. There’s also a crack in the top right side of the fairing right underneath the throttle.

I’m a fifty plus year old you guy that collects bikes so I am quite picky and tend to understate a bikes condition. It’s registered in New Hampshire which does not title anything over fifteen years old, but I do have the previous owner’s title. I do not need to sell this bike so please don’t waste either of our times. I have a more pictures and happy to answer any questions. Thanks for looking!

1989 was the second year of the 2.0 GSX-R750, and small changes were made, mostly to increase available lean angle ! Otherwise it was a fitting second generation of a middleweight bred for the track, and a great value for the ante. Rather than a sheltered collector, this unrestored survivor could be enjoyed inside and out.

-donn

Featured Listing – 1989 GSX-R750 Slingshot
Kawasaki June 6, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1

6.26.2019: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Last seen on RSBFS in 2013 under the byline Kawgasm, the 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 is off the rarity scales.  This S1 was found in a storage container, cleaned and assembled but not restored, then taken to the Quail Motorcycle Gathering in May, this might be the silk purse from a sow’s ear story for spring 2019.

Unrestored 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1 For Sale on eBay

The Kawi S1 is pictured in Webster’s next to the word unobtanium, and you would’ve had to know somebody in the motorcycle business then, and perhaps finance now to procure one. The race engine was quite different from an ELR with dual plugs, magneto drive on the right end of the crank, a bank of Keihin CR carburetors and a mammoth oil cooler under the steering head. The fabricated swingarm is supported by remote reservoir Works Performance shocks. Lockheed racing brakes made the solid 330mm disks, looking downright oversized even these days.

Evidently the original owner was a machinist and cooked up some beautiful light alloy parts for his new machine. The oil cooler brackets are bombproof but the brake rotor and caliper mounts have a serious look. Comments accompanying the before pictures:

n October, 2014, a friend of mine told me about a guy that was interested in selling his 1982 Kawasaki 1000. He said he bought it new in 1983. His wife said that he was getting on in age and if he passed away, she wouldn’t know what to do with it. He asked me to come by and see it. When he opened the storage container door, stuffed in the back was a green bike. I assumed it was a 1983 ELR. There was no lighting in the container and you could hardly move inside. I was able to get some pictures and realized it was truly an S1. I told him I was interested and he said he’d get back to me. It took him 5 years to get back to me. It took us 6 hours to move a machine and many boxes in order to get to it. But finally, it was extracted. Here’s a chance to own the Holy Grail of 80’s sport bikes.

A careful inventory and cleaning was in order, but you can’t call it a restoration. The original CR carbs were in a box and re-fitted. They still have yet to experience dino juice. The condition and documentation defies belief, and the owners’ restraint in the presence of a “new” S1 indicates this isn’t their first barn find.

1 of 29 produced. Frame #0080 Motor#030330. Arizona Titled. This bike was sold new in Tucson,Az.
Bike was originally shipped to Hill Kawasaki in Orlando, Florida

Then Transferred to Kawasaki of Tucson on 10/21/1983

Sold on 10/31/1983 by Kawasaki of Tucson

Never any track time. This one owner bike was played with on the street for less than 3 months and then stored away until January 2019. It was removed from storage and is now for sale. Unrestored and like new. A true “barn find”. Documentation includes the Predelivery (PDI) Form. The dealer information sheet from Kawasaki Motor Company regarding these bikes. The Dealer transfer form with pricing and serial numbers. The warranty forms filled out, even though there was no warranty. The Factory Chassis and Engine manuals. The Chassis and Engine parts pricing books. The Factory race stand . The original carbs were never run on the bike. The owner opted for 33mm smooth bore Mikunis. The original Keihin CR carbs were reinstalled at the time the bike was removed from storage. They are new and have never had fuel run through them. The owner was a machinist and made billet oil cooler mounts, billet caliper hangers and billet front brake rotor carriers. The original steel kerker muffler was replaced with an aluminum one. The slicks were replaced with street Dunlop’s in 1983. The condition of this bike is unbelievable. Unrestored !

Around thirty S1’s are reputed to exist, along with a substantial number of replicas in various states of correctness.  As the real deal, the fuel tank and carbs of this one will likely remain dry, some old slicks sourced, and some velvet ropes strung to keep it out of arm’s reach.  .

-donn

Featured Listing – 1982 Kawasaki KZ1000 S1
Yamaha May 11, 2019 posted by

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo

Someone bought-it-now Friday afternoon – a reader ?   -donn

It was a short bandwagon but early 1980’s was the time for early turbo systems, and Yamaha developed the XJ-650 Turbo but resisted the urge to break the bank.  This Phoenix example is quite clean with just a couple of foibles and barely 10,000 miles.

1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo for sale on eBay

Using a relatively low-tech two valve four as a base, the blown 650 used carburetors instead of injection and was rated for 90 hp and 60 ft-lbs. torque.  The YICS intake control system capitalized on the speed of the charge air to improve combustion.  Air cooling limited boost to 7.7 lbs., adding a gentler push than some of the competition.  Exhaust is simplified with one muffler dedicated to the wastegate, emissions kept quieter in the other single muffler.  Despite the higher speeds and weight of the turbo bike, brakes weren’t upgraded from the normally aspirated model.  Styling was one area where the Seca Turbo excelled, with and integrated fairing with a sport touring windscreen and locking glove boxes.

Averaging nearly 20 years for each of its two owners, this XJ650 Turbo has been only occasionally ridden, and looks very good.  The undamaged fairings, pipes, and cases far outweigh the worn stitching and tired trim shown in the owner’s video – here –.  Comments from the eBay auction:

I’m selling my 1982 Yamaha XJ650LJ Seca Turbo.  Low Miles, 10,100  Miles.  Excellent Condition.  2nd owner.  This is the same type used in the James Bond Movie never say never.  Recently serviced.  Runs great!  I also created a video of it running and  a walk around.

James Bond’s stunt double shredded a Turbo in a chase scene early in 1983’s – Never Say Never Again – but the real Seca had a less sporty rep.  The turbo era fizzled shortly afterward, along with a drop in fuel prices.  But each solution had their good points – Yamaha’s showed how 25% more power could be achieved with relative simplicity.  As presented, it’s a lot of bike for the fan, and for the buy-it-now.

-donn

Never Say Never – 1982 Yamaha XJ650 Seca Turbo
Honda April 16, 2019 posted by

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F

This Florida owner shows a few other classic -80’s machines behind, but this unrestored CB1000F might be the one to cut away from the herd !

1983 Honda CB1100F for sale on eBay

Honda’s was looking deep into the corner and the vee-four 750 was brand new, but before the carburetted inline four left the sport category, displacement was increased to 1,062 cc’s and 38mm carbs delivered 110 hp.  Just oversquare 69mm stroke kept torque up there at 72 ft.-lbs.  Though still a typical twin-downtube, the chassis was beefed up and sported 39mm forks and a box-section swingarm.  Dampers were premium with air-adjustable anti-dive forks and adjustable twin rear shocks.  More UJM than sport, the 18-inch front and 17-inch rear wheel kept seat height low.  Brakes reflected the 543 lbs. dry weight with three 296mm disks.

Obviously a fan from the looks of the garage, this owner has taken nice care of his reference CB1100F.  The preservation of the deep blue paint and black engine finish is as rare as the factory black chrome exhaust.  Just a few rubs tell of its 21,000 miles.  The owner is correct that at this age, most have been disassembled, restored, and altered.  From the eBay auction:

Original bodywork with original paint and factory original 4-2 black chrome exhaust. All in excellent condition with only minor imperfections. Tank is dent free with no trace of rust inside original key opens all the locks, tool kit and original owners manual included,  seat is perfect, no nicks or anything. I put 3000 miles on it last year, just put on new tires, all carburetor O-rings have been changed, then carbs synced, only ethanol free gas used. new o-ring chain, old one was fine, but old is all, This bike is 100% ready to ride and enjoy, no modifications, just stock and original.

As you can see in the pictures, this bike is in excellent condition. hard to find one that has not been apart, repainted or screwed with especially in the awesome blue paint scheme. one minor scuff on right fairing, hard to get to show up in pics some oxidation under aluminum clear coat in spots as well, but a really nice bike, always get compliments. Tires are new Dunlops in original factory sizes.

Honda tweaked the CB1100F until it did pretty much everything well – it got high marks for usable power, stable handling, and comfortable cockpit.  Answering the escalating power competition, it ran a quarter in just over 11 seconds, and Honda quality insured popularity.  Starting out at a reasonable $4,900, this example should do better – last January a red one with less miles brought $9,350 at Mecum in Vegas.  Sure to be a hit at a show or cruise night, this CB1100F marks a sweet spot in Honda history and owner care.

-donn

De-Stabilization – 1983 Honda CB1000F
Yamaha March 3, 2019 posted by

Engine Contract – 1985 Yamaha RZ500

Sold before we went to press, still worth a look –  Donn

Like buyers of a Gulfstream business jet refer to their Pratt & Whitney engine maintenance agreement that just happened to come with an airplane, the Yamaha RZ500 was built around their smashing V-4 two-stroke.  This one has some miles but looks to be in special condition.

1985 Yamaha RZ500 for sale on eBay

Yamaha had some very good years in the 500cc MotoGP days, and the RZ500 ( known elsewhere as the RD500LC ) used a lot of race-derived ideas.  The engine is a masterpiece with the clutch gear-driven from twin crankshafts.  The Yamaha Power Valve System tailors exhaust port position electronically, helping widen the power band and lower emissions on the way to 88 hp.  The airbox surrounds the engine feeding four side-draft Mikunis, and water cooling is used to stabilize temperatures and limit noise.

The race bikes had gone to an aluminum DeltaBox frame, but the RZ kept the steel chassis, with semi-adjustable suspension on both ends, even anti-dive forks.  Strong tire stagger of 16-inch front and 18-inch rear should make turning in just a thought exercise.  A pillion is offered, but likely the painted cover doesn’t get removed often.  Starting is kick only, engaging the rider right off the bat.

Appearing pretty stock, there’s no readily apparent damage, but with the 1999 registration sticker inactivity might be an issue.  The ask is up there but in the middle of recent sales.  The senior rider from Michigan gives a few thoughts in the eBay auction:

All original. Never messed with. Been in my collection, stored inside with all fuel drained. Miles are 22,691, odometer as you know reads kilometers as these were never imported into the U.S. due to the EPA. She’s a great ride and gets lots of attention. Time to let her go as I am turning 70 soon and have been letting a few of my prized bikes go. Tires are great.

After being built for only a few years and selectively marketed, the RZ has an outsized reputation and a has had nice amount of import activity.  Yamaha stayed with the 500 two-stroke racer until 2002 when the FIM made them an offer they couldn’t refuse.  It would’ve been nice to see more years of development in the street machine as well.

-donn

Engine Contract – 1985 Yamaha RZ500
Ducati March 1, 2019 posted by

Barn Bevel – 1982 Ducati 900SS

Toward the left side of the sportbike diorama you’ll find the Ducati Super Sports, with bevel-gear drive desmodue and long tubular frame.  This example is one of the last before belt-driven cams arrived, and appears to be a special order with nickel plated chassis.

1982 Ducati 900 SS for sale on eBay

Close enough to be called a 900, the 864cc L-twin pushed 65 ponies with twin Dell’Orto 32mm carbs.  Giorgetto Guigiaro and Ital Design had been enlisted to pen the mid-70’s 860GT, and the bevel’s crankcases have the angular shape then in vogue.  The twin downtube frame used the engine to transfer loads to the swingarm connector, with Marzocchi dampers front and rear.  Brakes were triple solid discs of 280mm diameter.  The tank became more rounded than the GT, along with frame mounted fairing derived from the early -70’s racing bikes.

The El Paso dealer who offers this SS doesn’t delve into the history, but with just 7,500 miles it’s been accumulating barn dust for a while.  The clear bevel-drive covers show that there was a fan in the list of previous owners.  A vignette of Berliner Imports is in the auction, maybe they ordered it with the nickel plated frame as a display.  Some selective cleaning has been done, but there’s more.  From the eBay auction:

VERY RARE NICKEL PLATED FRAME LESS THAN 5 KNOWN TO EXIST WORLD WIDE HAS 7434 MILES GREAT CONDITION. BARN FIND WITH TEXAS TITLE. SEE PICTURES. BUY AS IS. GREAT CONDITION. 

The bevels lost fans as other supersports caught up, but the bike reviewed as a stable high-speed platform, appropriately carburretted for the road.  Ducati got busy with the MHR’s, and not so many Supersports were built in 1981-82.  This one has great potential, maybe not monetarily with the buy-it-now, but maybe down the road.  When sold for a little less and restored to perfection, this interesting 900SS might be the hit of an early sportbike show.

-donn

Barn Bevel – 1982 Ducati 900SS