Posts by tag: Kawasaki

Kawasaki June 15, 2022 posted by

Master of None – 2000 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600E

Image 4 - 2000 Kawasaki Ninja

2000 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600E

If you’re a regular RSBFS reader, you know we love to find 90s sport bikes. It was a decade of innovation and constant fill-in-the-blank measuring contests by the manufacturers. If you weren’t skinny, good-looking, or fast you were shit outta luck and the only reason people occasionally remember you is when they randomly see you pop up on Facebook. Weirdly, that sounds a lot like elementary and middle school for me. Anyways, while only the sportiest of offerings from that era are held in high regard today there are still many remnants of the decade that deserve attention.

**lights dim, enter ZX600E**

Image 01 - 2000 Kawasaki Ninja

With the only 9.1K miles on the clock, this bike is in very good shape. Paint and plastics look great and there is no visible corrosion on any of the metal surfaces.

Image 21 - 2000 Kawasaki Ninja

The side-profile of the ZX6 shows one of it’s best attributes. With higher bars and plenty of legroom the ZX6 could be used by all body types in commuter or canyon settings. Not really something that the collectors value but a desirable trait for those who ride their motorcycles. If the riding position doesn’t make you feel sporty enough, the aftermarket V&H exhaust should do the trick. Seller does not mention if it’s a slip-on or full system.

Image 11 - 2000 Kawasaki Ninja

When the ZX6 debuted in 1990, it had a crazy redline for the middleweight class. It also built power until the end and had plenty of torque to keep you busy throughout the rev range. Different sources list different power specs but you can expect ~100hp and ~45 lb/ft of torque. Not the fastest by any means but most of us still won’t be able to outride this bike on a twisty road.

Image 2 - 2000 Kawasaki Ninja

From the seller:

“Beautiful Candy Persimmon Red 2000 Kawasaki Ninja 600E. Originally purchased in New Jersey when new. Female owned until 2016 when my friend purchased it to learn to ride on. After only riding it twice around my neighborhood he decided he wasn’t really ready so the bike sat until this past year when I brought it back to my house to get it rideable again. Tank was rusted inside so it has been reconditioned and sealed with a clear epoxy liner. New Core Moto brake lines. New tires front and rear. Carburetors have been rebuilt. New battery. New chain. 

Clean Florida title in my name. Mileage will go up as I want to ride it to work a couple days to make sure everything is safe and working properly. But will not go over 10K miles any time soon. Buyer responsible for shipping if desired…”

The ZX6 was a fast bike that stirred the pot when it came out. However, it was quickly surpassed by many of it’s competitors and Kawasaki let it ride out next to the ZX6R until they cut it in 2004. A little heavy, a little slow (by modern standards), and a look that blended in with the rest but that doesn’t tell the whole story. All the specs actually point to this being an excellent street bike that doesn’t excel in any one category but is decent in all of them. While the ZX6 will likely never be a high-value classic, it can still offer a very similar and analog experience to the 90s classics at a fraction of the price.

Auction has 6 bids and is currently at $3,550.

-Norm

Master of None – 2000 Kawasaki Ninja ZX600E
Kawasaki June 1, 2022 posted by

Horse of a different color: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R

If a clean Eddie Lawson Replica is not rare enough for you, how about the albino, European cousin? Yes, the KZ1000R did indeed come in white, but only in limited countries and NOT in the US. So if a ELR is on your bucket list but green is not the color of your soul, you now know you have options! And if you are a stickler for nomenclature, only the earliest green models were ELRs – or true Eddie Lawson Replicas. Following years the green machines were known as Superbike replicas, although the non-greenies had no outward graphical indication of the AMA Superbike racing heritage.

1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R for sale on eBay

Starting life out as a regular KZ, the ELR model highlighted the Superbike exploits of Steady Eddie Lawson (who later went on to 500cc GP fame). Known originally as ELRs, then Superbike replicas, the non-US markets received largely the same spec of bike but non green examples were devoid of the Superbike graphics on the tank. Euro requirements resulted in slight changes to the lights and exhaust (no factory Kerker), but otherwise the KZ1000R remained true to form and intent, regardless of color.

From the seller:
Extremely RARE WHITE 1983 KZ1000R, Eddie lawson, original condition. just serviced runs great, only 26K miles. Excellent condition for year. Original german import to Florida USA. Serious collectors & bidders please good luck.

It is possible that we have seen this bike before – check out this RSBFS post last year on a white example with the same mileage. That bike had a 1100cc mill retrofitted due to a problem with the original 1 liter unit. No such indicators from the seller on this particular bike, so it could be the same with the original engine, or it could be a completely different bike (the pictures are different than the previous auction). These are certainly rare enough that we take note when they come along!

Bidding has been non existent on this particular bike at time of writing. The opening ask is $12,500 on this Florida-based machine, which is $2k higher than the pricing on the last one we have seen. No takers yet, and there is a reserve in place – so the seller is obviously expecting more from this one. Do your homework, raid the kids’ college fund, then check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Horse of a different color: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R
Honda May 12, 2022 posted by

Instant Collection: Five 400cc sport bikes from the 1990s

The 400cc sport bike set has been a hot topic on the pages of RSBFS, and were in fact part of the early focus of the site when it was entirely dedicated to finding grey market listings for sport bikes not originally imported into the United States. From those humble beginnings RSBFS grew to encompass the best of the rare and exotic, while continuing to harbor a soft spot for imports. Today’s collection of five members the 400cc club – one from each of the Big Four (plus a bonus Honda)- is definitely worth a look, even if some of the details are sparse and the bikes are located far, far away from US shores. The lineup:

Five 400cc sport bikes from the 1990s for sale on eBay

Honda VFR400R

Honda CBR400RR

Kawasaki ZXR400

Yamaha FZR 400SP

Suzuki GSX-R400SP

From the seller:
Collection of all the 90s 400cc sportbikes. All bikes are registered Hungarian bikes, with clean history. Will be sold with all necessary papers to register elswhere!

It is a one time opportunity to buy a collection like this!

These bikes are listed in a package deal on eBay in a Buy It Now (or best offer) format for $19,500 USD. Details are sparse, but as RSBFS writer and collector William notes: “The bikes are appealing, the package is interesting at that price point and the pictures are solid…a deal is always worth exploring.” You must admit that this flock looks great together. And given that the US shores has seen scant appearances of 400cc serious bikes between the 1980s Fizzer 400 and the more recent Ninja/CBR/R3/KTM offerings in 300-400cc sizes, these are undeniably rare in the US of A. You can check out all of the details here. Good Luck!!

MI

Instant Collection: Five 400cc sport bikes from the 1990s
Kawasaki May 9, 2022 posted by

Fastest Production Motorcycle in the World: 1985 Kawasaki 750 Turbo

With the introduction of the Kawasaki 750 Turbo (also known as the ZX750E, and branded as GPz), hired gun Jay Gleason ripped off a 10.7 second quarter mile that proclaimed the Turbo not only the fastest production motorcycle in Kawasaki’s arsenal, but the fastest production motorcycle in the world, by any manufacturer, full stop. Puns intended, this boosted Kawasaki’s performance credibility immeasurably, and forced turbocharging onto the center stage of “next gen” motorcycle technologies.

1985 Kawasaki 750 Turbo for sale on eBay

While Honda started with a 500cc platform and Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki eventually settling in on 650cc designs, Kawasaki went for the jugular with a 750cc inline four configuration. The displacement alone was a significant factor in off-boost rideability, and on-boost the extra capacity provided for a 112 HP push out of the air-cooled, 2-valve mill with EFI fuel injection. This was old school meets high tech, and the confluence was as awesome as could be expected. Often considered “the best” of the factory turbocharged bikes – fastest in the quarter mile, highest top speed, most sporting, best real world power – the Kawasaki 750 Turbo was as rare as the rest of the puffers. Heavy at 500 lbs dry, expensive at nearly $5k in the showroom, and beyond the reach of most Kawasaki buyers in terms of price and performance, the blown GPz languished through a couple of years of mediocre sales. By 1985 all the partying had departed the turbo set, not to reappear for another 30+ years.

From the seller:
Very Rare 1985 Kawasaki 750 fuel injected turbocharged E2 model – Garage kept under cover for 30 years. Runs Excellent!!! 18,697 miles. Looks and Runs Excellent!! Collectors Bike! Serious Buyers Only!!

I’m the second owner of this beauty. No accidents. Title in hand.

It’s been driven every year and runs as it did in 1985.

I have the original exhaust and center stand too. 530 Chain Conversion, Front Fork Brace, Steering Damper.

Also, will include racing center stand, fitted flannel motorcycle cover and an assortment of OEM parts that I purchased as spares.

Today’s Kawasaki Turbo looks to be in fantastic condition with bright paintwork and nice black engine chrome. The condition belies the fact that this boosted beast has over 18,000 miles on the odometer. The factory 4:2 exhaust has been replaced by a 4:1 D&D unit, but the seller notes that the stock exhaust is included in the sale. That is a WIN for anyone looking at this as a collector. There is a 530 chain conversion, which is never a bad thing on something with explosive power. The rear sprocket appears slightly larger than stock as well, which should really wake up low speed launches.

The Turbo era bikes are slowly becoming recognized for the rare technology missiles they are. Since all Turbos were all born inside of a span of 2-3 years, there are not a lot of examples and they have definitely suffered in the “niche” category. But bright lights are starting to shine into this interesting corner of motorcycling history, and we are seeing rising prices as the result. This beauty is being listed in a Buy It Now format for $17,500. That is far more steep than we would have seen a decade ago, but also not too far out of line for where things are going. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fastest Production Motorcycle in the World: 1985 Kawasaki 750 Turbo
Kawasaki May 2, 2022 posted by

Start Me Up: 1983 Kawasaki GPz1100

Up for grabs in it’s second trip around the eBay galaxy is a very pretty 1983 Kawasaki GPz1100. This was the mainstay of the Kawasaki big bore lineup – going toe to to with the likes of the Suzuki GS1100 and Katana – before being soundly replaced by the stunning “next gen” 900 Ninja. As rare bikes go, this is less rare than most, and not a model that was coveted for its exclusivity. But we have seen time and again that the condition of a bike has much to do with how coveted it is. And when it comes to 40 year old mass produced bikes that have been hooned, rashed and virtually disposed of, the better examples will always stand out.

1983 Kawasaki GPz1100 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
Rare 1983 Kawasaki GPZ 1100: Stored for many years in a California collection; original paint; excellent original condition. We purchased this bike along with a collection of rare cars and motorcycles. It has not been ridden in several years, needs a battery. All the cars and motorcycles in this collection were in nice condition as this one is a good example.

This bike has nearly 40 years and 28,000 miles to brag about. But it does so with some pretty vivid paint and amazingly shiny black chrome engine cases and exhaust. As most know, these are areas of this vintage Kawasaki that quickly show wear and corrosion. The plus side is that it all appears stock and in reasonable nick. The potential downside to that condition is that it was stored for many years (thereby saving it from possible weather-related damage), but has not been recommissioned. The seller states that it needs a battery, but nothing in the way of how it was stored. If it was drained of fuel and fogged, that may well be all that is needed to light the fires. If not, there may be a lot more work needed to make this big beast run in anger again.

The condition of this old-school GPz warrants inclusion on these pages, even if the collector value remains low. Prices are slowly increasing for models in excellent condition, and this particular bike was bid up over $4,100 in the previous auction (not meeting reserve). It has since been relisted here in a Buy It Now format with the price set at $7,995. Although the bike looks great, the price might be a bit too steep for the model and the level of interest. I think we all wish for this bike to find a loving new home and owner that will recommission it into a runner, as these older GPz1100s are rock solid reliable and a fantastic – if aging – platform. Check out all the pics and details, and Good Luck!!

MI

Start Me Up: 1983 Kawasaki GPz1100
Kawasaki April 14, 2022 posted by

Built, Not Bought: 1976 Kawasaki Powered Rickman CR900

Many of us are spoiled by the overwhelming availability of top tier performance motorcycles.  It is a simple stop into your local dealer and one can purchase a bike remarkably similar to ones actively being raced by the Factory.  These bikes come with much of the needed hardware to be competitive already installed.  Sure there is a price tag associated with them, but speed has never been a cheap hobby.  The 70s were a very different time for performance motorcycles.  The Japanese four were producing engines that produced unheard of power, but the frame technology was lagging behind.  In order to extract the most from these engines, upgraded frames were needed.  In stepped the Rickman brothers.

Offered mainly in kit form, Rickman would sell all of the needed components to build a very special machine.  A machine that was lighter, faster and to many, much better looking.  These must have been a sight to see on the road in period as it was not something that someone would casually own.  The bar was higher because the owner needed to be passionate about performance and have the knowledge of how to get all the part to work together.  On top of that they needed the funds to build the bike because none of this was referred to as “affordable” at the time.  That process has helped to cement these into the collector space.

The example today is a beautiful shade of red and the nickel plated frame is sure to pop in the sunlight.  The seller lists a fair amount of recent freshening.  It appears to be a bike that the new owner can throw a leg over and start enjoying out on the road day one.  Listing makes mention of a period correct exhaust system, but leaves out the upgraded smoothbore carburetors.

From The Seller’s eBay Listing:

Rickman chassis kits were the go-to for all street and track racing motorcycles. Powered by the revered Kawasaki KZ900 motor — this frame, fairing, and engine combination is the pinnacle of any Kawasaki machine of the era.

This build has utilized the original wiring, gauges, tail light, battery box, etc. that would have been swapped over by the original donor bike in 1976.

This is a fresh and full cosmetic restoration. The body work, decals, wheels, trim, windscreen, and seat cover have all been refinished. The original ‘76 nickel plated frame shines nice and bright. We have installed a period correct Yoshimura exhaust system. The rear master brake cylinder, both of the front calipers, and the rear caliper have been rebuilt with fresh seals and fluid. We’ve also installed stainless steel brake lines. The clutch cable has been replaced. The motor now breathes through K&N pod filters. The tires are brand new Avon Roadriders. We’ve installed new handlebar switches for full functionality.

This bike would look great in any collection, and is a blast to ride.

Video prior to being put on display: https://youtu.be/G9GAgLRgPlw

Odometer: 7,965 miles

VIN: Z1F06458

The Buy It Now price of just under $16,000 is very attractive in the current market.  Interest is still strong in this era and specials like this rise to the top of the must have list of many collectors.  Service parts are inexpensive and available.  Both Rickman and Kawasaki have strong owners communities to lean on should there ever be an issue.  If you have any in period stories of these bikes, please feel free to share them in the comments section.

Built, Not Bought:  1976 Kawasaki Powered Rickman CR900
Rickman March 7, 2022 posted by

Totally Tubular: 1977 Rickman Kawasaki CR900

Brothers Don and Derek were definitely on to something. Starting in the 1960s with off road pursuits, their chassis building exploits brought them into the realm of road racers. By the early 1970s they were offering frame kits for British bikes (Triumph & BSA primarily), but it was the Kawasaki and Honda powered models that really put them on the map. Today’s example is a wonderful nickel-plated Metisse tube frame housing a Kawasaki Z1 engine and transmission, which was sold through a dealer in the United States.

1977 Rickman Kawasaki CR900 for sale on eBay

In the 1970s the Japanese firms had a pretty good handle on powerplant design and manufacturing. Bigger was better. More cylinders were even better yet. And the British twin – and English motorcycling industry as a whole – was unable to compete. But what they Japanese had in engine technology they lacked in frame design. Relatively little was understood regarding the importance of rigidity, packaging and balance – which opened the door for a number of boutique kit bike builders by the names of Harris, Spondon, Bimota and Rickman, to name a few. Using parts from a donor bike, a “new” motorcycle could be built that utilized the same engine and transmission and electrical components, but had vast performance improvements in the way of frame geometry, suspension, brakes and aerodynamics. The Rickman CR900 was such a kit, and by numbers the most successful of the Rickman models.

From the seller:
Very rare Rickman CR900! This motorcycle was ordered new through Yamaha of Cleveland in 1977 and has had 1 owner its whole life. Originally it was fitted with a Turbo engine but that engine didn’t even last 1,000 miles and a new engine was installed. I do have a set of uncut side covers that I will include in the sale, they are a slightly lighter red though. The whole bike has 4,895 miles and was only ridden a few time a year up until 1994 when it was parked in the garage. Recently I have put in a new battery, changed the oil, cleaned the carburetors and flushed the brakes. The bike does run and ride but will need some more love before its roadworthy, the tires are from the 80’s. Buyer is ultimately responsible for shipping but I will assist in anyway I can. I do have a commercial location and normally that makes it a little cheaper. If you’re local and would like to come see the bike in person that can be arranged. Please feel free to reach out with any questions. Motorcycle is located in Felton California

Interestingly enough, today’s bike started life out as a Turbo. When that failed to survive (not surprising as this was before much was known about forced-induction motorcycle engines), a normally aspirated unit was fit in its place. Since these were kit bikes from the start, the concept of “numbers matching” is irrelevant. Each of these bikes were built by different shops, different owners, and with a different concept of what the finished product should be. They are a far cry from the identically mass-produced Japanese models that donated their guts to build these one-offs. Today’s bike looks to be a clean find, relatively unmolested after all of these years. A limited number of owners definitely helps here, as overall the bike looks quite well preserved. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Totally Tubular: 1977 Rickman Kawasaki CR900
Kawasaki February 18, 2022 posted by

Was (Not Was): 1985 Kawasaki GPz750

With apologies to David Weiss and Don Fagenson, it’s time to walk the dinosaur – the 1985 Kawasaki GPz750. The younger generation reading this – who did not grow up with cassette tapes, never had a mobile that didn’t have a camera, and has never watched ALF (no loss there, really) – probably won’t understand how cutting edge this bike was in the day. The older generation, who cut teeth on RDs and H2s realize that this was likely the last gasp of a particular era of sport bikes. And the numbers show that this was never rare then, and is still not in that collectible category today. But time wages its inexorable battle with elements, abuse and damage, dwindling the supply of good examples of everything, making even a very mass-produced Japanese sport bike rare by circumstance.

1985 Kawasaki GPz750 for sale on eBay

The 1985 model of the GPz was completely evolutionary, with DNA stretching back to the KZ models of the late 1970s, and even some hints of the great Z1. Bodywork grew from the original bikini fairing in 1982 to the larger main fairing with lowers as seen on this 1985 model. The inline four cylinder displaced an actual 738cc, was air cooled and breathed through two valve heads. Power was a modest 87 HP at the crank, utilizing a 5-speed transmission and chain final drive to propel the 530-ish pound (wet) GPz to a mid-12 second quarter mile time. But the GPz was no drag bike; this was a do it all, drag your knee on Sunday, commute to work on Monday motor scooter.

From the seller:
1985 Kawasaki GPZ 750 (ZX750A3)
USED item, near mint condition.

Clean title. 5,200 Miles.
Extremely low miles. All shown on pictures. Runs and drives great.

Around $1,000 spent on the carbs: fully disassembled, powder coated, reassembled, and synchronized.
Front and rear master cylinders rebuilt. The three calipers also rebuilt with new brake pads (EBC).

The GPz existed from 1982 – 1985. But by the time the 1985 model bowed, the revolutionary GPz900R Ninja obliterated the category of bigger bore sport bikes. This made the GPz750 outdated as it sat on the showroom floor. It became a victim of the very performance arms race it helped to create. Resale prices dropped, and most GPz examples were used, abused and sold, with rinse and repeat the order of the day. The bikes were reliable and robust, and held up well mechanically to these antics. But cosmetically the black chrome look did not hold up well to neglect, meaning that an old GPz usually looks like an old GPz.

Today’s example is a 5,200 mile specimen that looks amazing. We are talking about a 37 year old sport bike here, potentially older than many of our readers. That condition is what makes this bike worthy of the “rare” moniker, as despite the numbers of bikes produced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries during this time period, few remain in this sort of shape. So if you lived through this era and are mired in some serious nostalgia, this might just be the bike for you. New in showrooms the GPz750 was listed for approximately $5,600. This beauty is being listed for slightly more in a Buy It Now format, with the seller open to offers. Check out all of the details here, then grab that Swatch watch, jump into the DeLorean and head back to the future! You’ll be walking on sunshine. Thank you for your support!

MI

Was (Not Was): 1985 Kawasaki GPz750