Posts by tag: 1980

Yamaha May 4, 2017 posted by

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

I was almost hesitant to post this monster, concerned that our passionate but sometimes purity-obsessed readers would find it less of an object of desire and more an abomination. For sure, this Nico Bakker-framed Yamaha TZ750 is a mongrel, a beast. A chimera, if you will. The engine? A ferocious liquid-cooled two-stroke four-cylinder race engine and six-speed gearbox from the TZ750, which alone should be enough to at least give this thing a second look. The Bakker frame is from 1980, although it was purpose-built for the TZ to cure the bike’s notoriously sketchy handling. But then you’ve got mismatched 17″ wheels, modern-ish suspension and R6 bodywork. Hey, at least it’s almost all Yamaha-sourced!

And as a racing machine, the bike’s constant evolution is far more in keeping with the original intent than some perfectly preserved collectible. In a way, it’s even cooler than a period-correct TZ750: each and every one of those is a piece of history and should probably be cared for as such and ridden with kid gloves. This? It will handle better than folks like Kenny Roberts, who raced the TZ750 back when it was new, could ever have imagined and mere mortals can take it to the track and ride it in anger. And possibly not die.

When introduced in the 1970s, the TZ700 and TZ750 that followed became the bikes to beat on racetracks in Europe and in the United States, where they dominated AMA racing for years. This was a motorcycle from the era where engines were making rapid leaps in terms of raw performance, while suspension design, tire technology, and handling advanced more slowly: even the early bikes with just 90hp were shredding rear tires and trying to eject their pilots. By the time 1980 rolled around, the TZ was making much more like 140hp in a lightweight package that was good for 185mph top speed, with solid reliability.

Early machines used a frame with a twin-shock rear suspension that was later updated one with thicker tubing and a monoshock in 1975. Unfortunately, handling was never much more than “adequate,” with pilots hanging on for dear life as much actually riding them, which explains the Nico Bakker frame seen here, something the seller claims is just one of five made for the TZ. Nico Bakker is, of course, one of the most talented frame designers of all time, and his work has graced racebikes, low-volume specials, and even production roadbikes built by everyone from Suzuki to Laverda.

From the original eBay listing: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale

This is a 1980 Nikko Baker chassis TZ750. Number 5 of 5 that were built for the Big TZ. Yamaha used these aftermarket chassis to rectify the problems with their ill handling factory chassis. These frames were far superior to the stock units and Yamaha used them until they figured out a solution for their own. This bike has been modified with the correct pieces to keep it AHRMA and WERA legal. It is a weapon in any Vintage class you care to run it in. Nikko Baker used the Full Floater style rear suspension with a link and conventional type shock. As apposed to the limited adjustability of the stock mono shock modified backbone Moto Cross unit Yamaha was using. An Ohlins remote reservoir unit replaced that. Upgraded fork tubes ( conventional style ) from a late model Honda CBR900RR with adjustable internals from KPS suspension. Set up for a 180 lbs rider. A 17″ Honda 5 spoke 3.5, aluminum wheel is used up front with 310mm HRC rotors and 4 piston Nissan calipers for stopping power. A billet Yoshimura top triple tree and aftermarket billet clip ons. As for the rear wheel it has a 3 spoke 17″ Marvic 5.5 Magnesium wheel. Taking advantage of readily available, easy and inexpensive parts instead of the custom Nikko Bakers hand formed tank and tail section. A 2001 R6 tank was used along with a 2004 R1 race tail section. Fits excellently and can be aquired all over incase anything gets damage in a crash. We use the stock style fairing still. Nothing works as well or keeps the integrity of the original TZ like the stock unit. All the original body and engine parts that came on the unit go with the bike also. Like stock Yamaha forks and triple trees, Astrolite wheels ( 18″ x 5.0 rear and 18″ x 3.0 front ) Spondon front calipers, and hand formed aluminum fuel tank ect. Tank is about $2500 to $3000 and over a year wait time to get.

Engine wise it has a complete rebuild on her and every go fast goodie made for the TZ750. New Renstar individual cylinders with reed cages, Renstar billet crank shafts, new transmission ( set up and cut by Paul Gast ) Lentz chambers with 10″ aftermarket aluminum silencers. Along with the 40mm Lectron high velocity power jet carburetors Magura 1/4 turn throttle and cables and Brembo radial master cylinder . It has all the best stuff to make an amazing Vintage liter bike slayer.  Bike comes with loads of spares too. Cylinders, heads, crankshafts, rod rebuild kits, pistons clutch parts, transmission, gearing and tons of spare Lectron tuning needles and parts. Also have the original factory round slide Mikuni carbs and cables. Plus more misc parts and gaskets.

I have only one issue. I couldn’t source out a new Ignition stator and box. So after unit was completed i sent it out to be gone thru as a precaution. It will be back and installed on unit by time of delivery.

Is it a pure collectible museum-piece? Absolutely not, not even close. Is it beautiful? Well, if pure function is your idea of beauty, then maybe it is. Keep in mind that if you’re a fan of originality and want something closer to the stock TZ750, the seller does mention that the original bodywork, wheels, and other parts will come with the bike, although I’d want to verify exactly what that includes before dropping money if that’s the direction I wanted to go. I’ve got no idea how to value something like this, but the seller obviously does: the Buy It Now price is set at $45,000. The comments section is open, so let me know what you guys think about this beast! And remember: keep it civil guys.

-tad

Track Weapon: Nico Bakker-Framed 1980 Yamaha TZ750 for Sale
Yamaha December 15, 2016 posted by

Even Lighter-Weight Racer: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale

Sure, it may be decades older than yesterday’s RS250, but the elemental simpicity of this 1980 Yamaha TZ125 and racing heritage visible at a glance, just as it was with that bike. The TZ125 was the successor to the earlier, air-cooled TA125 and was an over-the-counter racebike. Just add talent.

The tiny, liquid-cooled two-stroke put out 30hp, good given the displacement and even better considering the claimed 159lbs it needed to move. If I had one, I’d weigh more than the bike… With a more appropriately-sized jockey at the helm, speeds of nearly 130mph were possible. The rest of the package was pretty exotic as well, with a dry clutch, six-speed gearbox, and disc brakes both front and rear. This particular example even includes twenty-year-old safety-wiring…

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 Road Racer for Sale

Complete with Factory Spares Kit

This pristine example has never been run or raced and is a NOS bike.  The bike has been part of a private collection and has been stored in a climate controlled environment its entire life.

The bike comes with unmounted fairing, stand and a crate of factory spares.  The factory spares kit itself is impressive.

15 – cylinder gaskets
15 – piston rings
10 – side case gaskets
2 manifolds
14 – main jets (different sizes)
105 – various o-rings, seals & gaskets
10 – clutch friction plates
3 – countershaft sprockets
25 – circlips
6 – rear wheel sprockets
seat cushion
crank assy
2 – cylinders
cylinder head
5 – pistons
Misc other brake pads, throttle cable, bearings, etc.

Everything in the crate is NOS.

This is a racing motorcycle that has been sitting many years.  It is ready for display, but if you wish to race it, the bike will require a thorough inspection of all systems and critical parts.

Bidding is up to nearly $5,000 with the Buy It Now price set at $10,500. Unlike yesterday’s Honda RS250, this bike includes a comprehensive set of spares, and it sounds like you’ll need it if you plan to get it back on the road.

-tad

Even Lighter-Weight Racer: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale
Ducati September 29, 2016 posted by

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side

By the late 1970s, it was pretty obvious that Ducati needed to update their line: performance wasn’t really all that much of a problem, but their famous L-twin was very expensive to manufacture. So when the time came… They simply tossed the whole thing out the window and started over, with a parallel-twin that used simple springs to actuate its valves. On paper, it probably seemed like a great idea, as the new machine offered up improved packaging and was much cheaper to manufacture. In reality? It was a disaster, since the new 500GTL wasn’t especially good-looking, ate crankshafts for breakfast, and generally offended everyone. Luckily,  Fabio Taglioni had continued work on the belt-drive L-twin he’d wanted to build as a replacement all along and descendants of the Pantah 500 SL still power air-cooled Ducatis today.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-r-side

The new engine swapped the complicated and expensive tower-shaft and bevel-drive arrangement for a simple set of rubber belts to operate the cams, and the Desmo system that was formerly reserved for the most sporting Ducatis was made standard across the board. The changes made for a quieter engine that was less expensive to build, but meant that owners were stuck with pricey and frequent maintenance requirements unless they planned to do the work themselves. It was the first Ducati to use their signature trellis frame and the engine as a stressed member. In spite of the modest displacement, these have the usual Ducati sound and flexible powerband, and handling is generally considered to be exemplary.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-dash

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale

This ground-breaking 500 twin established the pattern which Ducati would follow for the next 20 years and on. 

Ducati’s foray into the world of vertical parallel twins in the mid-1970s proved to be a horrid experience, so designer Fabio Taglioni called a halt to those 350 and 500s and went back to the drawing board. The result was the Pantah 500 SL which first appeared in Milan in 1979 and went on to spawn entire subsequent generations of belt-driven, OHC, 90-degree V (or L) Ducati twins.The first Pantah used the engine dimensions from the Grand Prix racer of 1973 at 74mm by 58mm to give 499cc. Apart from the bore and stroke dimensions, this was an entirely new design of air-cooled engine although the five-speed gearbox was a development from earlier machines. Running 9.5:1 compression, the Pantah output 50bhp at 8500rpm, which was measured as an impressive 46bhp at the rear wheel and equated to a top speed of around 115mph. Weighing just 180kg, the Pantah was nimble and peppy and it impressed the test riders of the time. ‘The handling and roadholding are quite exceptional,’ said Bike magazine. ‘There’s nothing like a thoroughbred Italian for finding out how a motorcycle should really handle.’

This example has been garage stored for the last two years, and was in running condition when placed into storage. In need of battery and carb job. Brake lines, fuel lines, tires replaced in 2013. Bike has traveled less than 100 miles since then. The bike is complete and will make a fine ride for a luck rider.

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-front

With under 10,000 miles on the odometer, this bike obviously needs a bit of cosmetic work and the battery and carburetor rebuild the seller mentions, but appears very complete, aside from the popular but non-standard two-into-one exhaust. These were languishing at the bottom of the Ducati heap for a while there, but prices have been steadily rising in the past few years.

-tad

1980-ducati-pantah-500sl-l-side2

In the Beginning… 1980 Ducati Pantah 500 SL for Sale
Ducati September 9, 2016 posted by

Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale

1980-ducati-900ss-r-side

This very classic black-and-gold Ducati 900SS represents the polar opposite of the little two-strokes that have been cropping up on our site lately. Both are motivated by v-twin engines, but that’s where the similarities end. One was a product of ruthless and very close competition between arch rivals and used cutting-edge technology to eke out the barest advantages over competing machines. The other is a slightly long-in-the-tooth thug that uses thumping big cylinders, past glories, and oodles of Latin charm to win friends and influence people. Guess which one is which?

1980-ducati-900ss-r-side-engine

Powered by the restyled “square case” motor that was introduced in 1975, Ducati’s 900SS actually displaced 864cc. The evolutionary 900SS also came with improved or modified features to improve performance and make the bike more palatable to US buyers, including quieter stock mufflers and a shift mechanism meant to improve on the the version available on previous models that crudely relocated the lever to the left side of the bike.

1980-ducati-900ss-dash
Ducati’s 900SS was far from cutting-edge technology by the time the 1980s rolled around: twins were pretty passe in the new era of inline-four superbikes from Japan. And Ducati’s famous desmodromic valve-actuation was probably no real advantage for a twin with a redline of 8,500rpm. But European bikes still represented the pinnacle of handling at this point, and although the bevel-drive, Desmo twin probably had just an insignificant performance advantage over comparable rivals, the Swiss watch-like arrangement of shafts and gears and cam lobes used to open and close the bike’s four valves seems like engineering overkill. Not practical, but inherently cool.
From the original eBay listing: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
I bought this bike brand new in late 1979, and have owned and maintained it this entire time.   This bike is unrestored, so the decals show cracking (typical), and the bike has it’s share of minor scuffs (see pics).   This 900SS was delivered with 36mm carbs and Silentium pipes, which were exchanged for the Delloro 40s and authentic Contis you see in the pictures a few years into it’s life.   I also put on the factory solo seat at the same time.    Other modifications (all typical) are SS brakelines, WORKS suspension front and rear from BevelHeaven, longer clutch actuation arm (you really want this!), V-Two Gear Gazer, and Dyna Coils.  All original parts come with the bike, except for the Silentiums (they were typically tossed in the trash) and the wimpy 36mm Dellortos. 
Mechanically the bike is excellent.   It’s starts easily, idles at about 1,500rpm (good for a 900SS with 40s and Contis), and pulls strong.  The carbs and ignition are very well sorted.  Inside, it’s had new rings and clutch some years back, refreshed pickup wires (they all need this eventually), and MBR collets on the last valve adjustment (totally worth it).  Common for the period, the low dogs on the 1st gear slider were removed in it’s first year or so.  Since I’ve owned this bike it’s entire life, I have (nearly all) the maintenance records from new, which are available on request. 
Motorcycle Classics did a nice feature article on this bike about 8 years ago:   search “motorcycle classics moto-guzzi-le-mans-versus-ducati-900-ss”
Hit me with any questions.   I have mixed feelings about selling this bike, but over the last 8 years it’s only been out once or twice a year, so time for someone else to enjoy it.

His asking price is $39,000 for this very nice example, although bidding is up to just over $15,000, with the reserve not met. The 900SS was produced in much greater numbers than the preceding “round case” 750SS, but values are still going through the roof for all bevel-drive Ducatis, and even the much-maligned 860GT has been increasing in price steadily in recent years. While the blue-and-silver paint on other examples may have a stronger link to Ducati’s racing success, you can’t argue with the black with gold striping seen here and, for all the grief Giorgetto Giugiaro got for his styling on the 860GT, he also designed that classic Ducati logo.

-tad

1980-ducati-900ss-l-side

Old School Class: 1980 Ducati 900SS for Sale
Yamaha April 18, 2016 posted by

Jewel-Like Race Bike: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ125G R Side

The Yamaha TZ125 was an evolution of the company’s TA125, a privateer GP machine in miniature. It might look like a glorified scooter but, although the TZ’s displacement was small, it came with sophisticated specification to match much bigger machines: liquid cooling, dry clutch, disc brakes, and a six-speed gearbox.

1980 Yamaha TZ125G L Fairing

The highly-strung engine made a claimed 30bhp at a screaming 12,000rpm and the entire package weighed in at a featherweight 159 lbs meaning that, if I bought one, I’d weigh more than the bike. With a power-to-weight ratio of something like a modern, air-cooled Ducati, the TZ125 could reach almost 130mph, no joke considering that some lawn mowers pack more displacement…

1980 Yamaha TZ125G Dash

Today’s example might present a bit of a dilemma to potential buyers: although it has been built to run, it’s almost too perfect to beat up in wheel-to-wheel competition.

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale

I obtained this 125cc Yamaha production race bike about 12 years ago from a Suzuki factory team race mechanic who used it for track days. According to him, it had never been raced and by all appearances this was true. There was no evidence that it had ever been crashed, abused, or even tipped over. The brake rotors showed minimal wear. Much of the original factory spares kit was included.

Nevertheless, I did an extensive restoration to bring it up to like-new standards. I disassembled everything but the wheels and the engine/trans bottom end.  The frame, swing arm, triple clamp, and fairing mounts were powder coated. The fairing, seat, and tank were professionally painted to original, and a new Gustafson windscreen was installed. All of the polished aluminum parts were repolished. New Avon vintage-style racing tires were mounted (not yet balanced). The top end of the engine was rebuilt with new parts and the cooling system re-done. New clutch plates were installed. The brakes and master cylinders were rebuilt and now use silicone fluid. Most of the external rubber parts were replaced, as were the fork seals and fluid.

I started the bike and ran it briefly to make sure that it ran strongly and shifted properly. Everything was as it should be. I shut it off, drained its fuel and coolant, and have used it only for shows and display in my collection since then. Now it’s ready for its next owner, whether you want to race it in AHRMA vintage events, use it for track days, or display it proudly. It has won a number of show trophies.

Included are much of the NOS parts from the original factory spares kit (Yamaha packing list included) and many used parts in excellent condition. This comprises about 90 part numbers. I would guess that there is about $3,000 worth of these parts. Additional items include a custom-made rear axle stand, the original owners manual (sadly, missing its cover), the parts microfiche and a hard-copy printout of the parts list.

1980 Yamaha TZ125G Rear Suspension

Those spindly, bicycle-looking tires give the TZ125 a look that’s more “vintage” than the actual age would suggest. These are very rare bikes, but interestingly Airtech does produce replacement fairings if you happen to want to actually race it as God and Yamaha intended. 

Bidding is up north of $4,400 with the Reserve Not Met and just a couple days left on the auction, so fans of skinny little racebikes should move quickly if you want to add this to your garage!

-tad

1980 Yamaha TZ125G L Side

Jewel-Like Race Bike: 1980 Yamaha TZ125G for Sale
Yamaha January 15, 2016 posted by

Fast Flyweight: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 G for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ125 Bodywork

In an era where 200bhp, 200mph superbikes with MotoGP electronics packages can be had for less than the cost of a Honda Civic, this little Yamaha TZ125 might seem a bit like a joke, not much more than a racy moped. A moped with a dry clutch, a six-speed gearbox, and a pair of disc brakes!

1980 Yamaha TZ125 L Engine

But the TZ125’s 30bhp motivates a claimed 159lbs and can push the bike to almost 130mph, with no rider aids other than your right wrist, so while power is seemingly modest, that makes this bike more of a scalpel and less of a butter knife.

1980 Yamaha TZ125 R Engine2

The TZ125 was the liquid-cooled follow up to the air-cooled TA125, an over-the-counter privateer racebike with cutting-edge technology: check out the top mount for the rear shock right behind the steering head. This one has a metric ton of patina, as it’s basically a time-capsule racebike in miniature, complete with period safety-wiring!

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ 125 G with the factory spares kit in it’s wooden crate. It’s being made available for sale after being displayed in a collection from the time it was purchased new at the Yamaha dealership and the Certificate of Origin will be given to the new owner. This bike has never been ridden and only started after assembly at the factory and before being shipped to the U.S.  This is an absolute museum quality factory built race bike that you can actually own.  A rare and unique opportunity and investment with a modest reserve price, so bid to own it, you won’t be sorry.  Good luck!

1980 Yamaha TZ125 L Front

So obviously, with zero miles on it and the original packing crate included, this bike will probably appeal more to collectors than lightweight speed freaks and aspiring racers. Unfortunately, bidding is pretty slow so far, with the reserve not met at $9,000. That’s not really a huge surprise: this is a race bike with no actual racing history and, while a production run in the neighborhood of 3,000 makes this relatively uncommon by roadbike standards, that’s a pretty big number for a race bike.

-tad

1980 Yamaha TZ125 R Front Bare

Fast Flyweight: 1980 Yamaha TZ125 G for Sale
Honda December 15, 2015 posted by

Retro Corner: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale in Australia

1980 Honda CB1100R R Side Fairing

Today’s classic and very striking Honda CB1100R was based on the CB900F and built to homologate Honda’s big-bore sportbike for endurance racing. It was powered by a 1062cc version of their air-cooled four that featured plenty of exotic go-fast bits, made 115hp, and motivated a claimed 520lbs dry. That figure sounds pretty portly by today’s standards, but it was pretty par for the course in the early 1980s.

1980 Honda CB1100R L Side

A beefed-up frame helped keep all that power and mass in check, and the resulting bike had the traditional Japanese superbike qualities of speed and supreme stability. Honda’s first use of dual-piston calipers helped the heavy machine stop as well, and it was pretty successful in taking the fight to rivals from Kawasaki and Suzuki.

1980 Honda CB1100R Gauges

This bike is listed as a 1980 model, I’d understood that these were built between 1981-1983. Regardless, just 1,050 of the first-year “RB” models were sold, with a mere 1,500 built in ’82 and then another 1,500 in ’83, so these are rare birds no matter what year is listed on the title.

1980 Honda CB1100R Rear Suspension

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale

I have for sale a genuine Honda CB1100RB that has not been restored, never raced, tampered with, and has genuine 1617 km on the bike.

This model is one of the first 130 bikes ever made and sent too Australia for sale. A lot of the early model bikes were used in the Castrol 6 hour production race. 

The early bikes all arrived from Japan Without fairings as did this one but I later purchased the genuine Honda fairing for this model when they arrived .

The total number of bikes produced was 1050 world wide in which many of them were raced and or crashed beyond repair.

Whoever purchases this investment will not be disappointed. 

1980 Honda CB1100R L Rear

This bike appears to be in very nice condition and, although CB1100Rs straddle the vintage and modern eras, they can go for $20,000 or more on the rare occasion one does come up for sale. It’s a shame I’m unlikely to see one here in the states: they were never sold here and this particular bike is available in Balgowlah, Australia, which sounds like an awesome city to be from. I’ve never been there, so I’ll just pretend it’s wild place, full of dangerous local fauna, although it’s more likely just a quiet suburb of northern Sydney…

-tad

1980 Honda CB1100R R Side

Retro Corner: 1980 Honda CB1100R for Sale in Australia
Yamaha October 20, 2014 posted by

Smoking Smoker: 1980 Yamaha TZ350 with Nico Bakker Frame for Sale

1980 Yamaha TZ350 R Side

I seem to be headed backwards in time with my recent posts… This Yamaha TZ350 is a little bit older than I’d normally write about here, but was too cool to pass up.

Yamaha’s water-cooled TZ bikes were pure production roadrace motorcycles with no direct street versions. Weighing in at about 250 pounds [dry] with about 65hp, they were produced between 1973 and 1981. The TZ350 went through a number of iterations, coded “A” through “H,” with constant improvements to keep them competitive.

In 1976, the first major revisions to the frame appeared, and used a monoshock rear suspension that replaced the early dual-shock version. This particular bike, however, does away with the factory frame and substitutes a very cool piece from Danish specialist Nicco Bakker.

1980 Yamaha TZ350 R Side Unfaired

Interesting, while the Nico Bakker frame is a rare, high-performance accessory, it may also have been necessary: the “F” and “G” model TZ350’s apparently had a tendency to fail around the headstock, due to the thinner-gauge tubing used, requiring reinforcement or replacement.

In either case, Nico Bakker is well-known for his racing efforts, although he had a hand in developing the Zane-era Laverda roadbike frames as well, and while those bikes do have their flaws, the frame is definitely not one of them.

1980 Yamaha TZ350 L Side Unfaired

From the original eBay listing: 1980 Yamaha TZ350 with Nico Bakker Frame for Sale

This bike won the Latino American Championship 1980 Rider Eduardo Aleman
Special frame “Nico Bakker” Holland-made, the best aftermarket complete frame for TZ250/350 in this years.
Special Yamaha TZ350 engine, very fast, 6 transfers [a reference to the 6-port cylinders that were introduced on the 1979 model? -td]
Special Krober ignition and Krober electronic tachometer
Special Yamaha big radiator for better cooling and more power
Special 18” magnesium wheels “Campagnolo and 3 aluminum Zanzani floating disc brakes with Yamaha magnesium calipers and Brembo front radial pump.
Special pipes.
Very light bike: 75% Poggipolini titanium and ergal bolts.
This bike was rebuilt with new seals, bearings, rings, etc. Ready to race.
We also have other same bike and frame, no speical parts $13,999USD+ shipping worldwide

I normally try to reprint the original eBay listing as posted, but the editor in me couldn’t keep from making some updates/translation to make it readable…

There are a few days left on the listing, and the bike is being offered at $15,999. If you’re looking for a classic racer to actually ride, this might be the ticket: with just enough racing history to be cool, and lots of cool go-fast bits.

-tad

1980 Yamaha TZ350 L Side

Smoking Smoker: 1980 Yamaha TZ350 with Nico Bakker Frame for Sale