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Author Archives: Mike

Honda August 13, 2018 posted by Mike

One-Eyed: 1985 Honda VF1000R Interceptor

Honda has always been like, well, Honda. Never content unless there was a more complicated engineering solution to an already solved problem, Honda obliterated norms and reached for new frontiers throughout the 1980s. This was clearly evident in today's bike, a beautiful VR1000R. You see, Honda already had the successful VF lineup in place, including the one liter VF1000F (alongside the 750 and 500 variants). But the "F" model was born and bred to be a streetbike (even though the 750 was transformed into a decent Superbike racer over time). Honda, being a racing company, wanted more than a mere streetbike and needed a platform to express ideas and homologate. Thus, the VF1000R was born.

1985 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

Straight off, the R model is far more striking, more racy, than the rather pedestrian F. The swooping bodywork gives it the look of a European endurance racer, which was strictly intentional. The bike retained the same block as the VF1000F, but valve actuation was converted to gear-drive instead of the F model's chain setup. Straight cut gears off the crank provide the trademark whine that these - and other Honda gear-driven valve train models - are so famous for. Hotter cams were fitted in re-worked heads that provided a higher compression ratio. In all, the completed the head work resulted in a slight bump in HP at the top end. It is true that gear-driven cams have an edge in precision and reliability for a race motor, but the weight, noise and complexity often outweigh the benefits. For the 9 extra ponies created, Honda added some 7 additional pounds to the engine alone.

Speaking of weight, Honda seemingly created the R bike by replacing adequate F model items with heavier pieces. Better front forks added stability - and weight. The cooling system needed to be altered to cope with the new fully-enclosed bodywork. Honda added a second radiator and two additional fans to cope with the heat - which also added weight. The exhaust system was modified to add a collector box and build up ground clearance; the additional pipes / ducting also added mass. While no single component was to blame for the 600+ lbs (wet) weight, you can see how all this added up. The net result was a striking motorcycle that stirred the visual senses. And while it was still a formidable weapon in the canyons, all of that weight (and much of it relatively high up) dulled the senses a bit. It wasn't all negative - thanks to that slippery bodywork the VF1000R briefly held the top speed title of fastest motorcycle in the world.

From the seller:
Pairing down my collection:

This is another of my collection lovingly restored. Many practically unobtainable pieces were installed on this bike to bring it back to like new condition. The fuel tank is brand new NOS! ( I have had amazing luck finding NOS tanks!). I also have a 1982 RM250 NOS tank if anyone is interested and 1984 VF750F NOS tank. The front panels were repainted to like new condition! The bike also has NOS side vents, (unobtainable!!), grips, right switch pod, all turn indicators and tank rubbers. Plus... NOS front forks, yes that is correct, new NOS forks. New petcock and new clutch. Hundreds of dollars worth of cooling system refurbishment. It has a brand new hagon rear shock. New brake and clutch levers plus the master cylinders were rebuilt. The bike is all original and runs perfectly. Again, the cost to restore this bike to its current condition is no where near the purchase price. This is a relative bargain at the opening bid. It can be stored as a museum piece or ridden reliably for fun. Your choice.

No warranty implied or given, (its is a 33 year old bike after all)
The bike is for sale locally so the auction could end at any time. It is a no reserve auction. The price is fair compared to what was spent on it. Good luck....

The VF1000R went through a few iterations, including the headlight configuration. Many will find the dual-headlight R model to be more desirable as it more properly mimics the euro-endurance look. Single headlamp bikes are US only models; managing a full technical program, numerous racing programs and rules AND satisfying the DOT regs were made simpler by this easy move. Dual lamps appeared in the 1986 model year, as US regulations relaxed slightly on this front. Hence, the 1985 model is only a one-eyed wonder. Still this is an awesome piece of kit, and yet another example of Honda flexing their engineering might. These bikes still make a statement today: they look fantastic, are reasonably comfortable, and are more reliable than most would expect. They are also a relative bargain. This particular bike has some nice restoration touches, and has an opening bid of $6500. No takers as of yet, but there is still time left on the auction. Check it out here, and good luck; not many bikes look this good well into their thirties. This is one that will continue to age well....and ride well.

MI

One-Eyed:  1985 Honda VF1000R Interceptor
Featured Listing August 10, 2018 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna #222

The fanboys will tell you that the MV Agusta F4 created a warp in the sportbike space-time continuum. With serious power developed with the help of Ferrari racing engineers and overall design courtesy of the Cagiva Research Center and legendary artist Massimo Tamburini, the limited Senna edition created a rare and gorgeous motorcycle with performance and cache that stands out today. The haters simply called it a warmed over Ducati 916.

Featured Listing: 2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna #222

It is true that the rebirth of MV Agusta gave Tamburini a fresh canvas upon which to work - making the F4 the spiritual successor of the 916/996/998 lineup. The supermodel sexy bodywork is pure Tamburini, as was the single sided swingarm. But unlike Ducati twins, MV Agusta offered a clean sheet of engineering paper enroute to a 174 HP inline four cylinder screamer. Not-so-subtle touches like the four organ pipes poking out of the tail section give the F4 a character unlike any other bike.

From the seller:
This bike is like new. Always garaged and covered. No scratches. Number 222. I bought the bike 2 years ago when it had less than 100 miles. It was recommissioned with new fluids, tires, and the heavy duty water pump. Comes with original rear stand, cover and certificate. Ready to ride!

Another area where MV Agusta mimics Ducati is in the proliferation of Limited Edition models. There exist 5 exclusive variants of the F4 (each numbered and limited, naturally), not counting the mass production F4 1000S and 1000R models. The Senna takes its roots from the R model, but adds specific graphics on carbon panels, updated front (Marzzochi) and rear (Sachs) suspension, exclusive Marchesini wheels, and an upgrade to the already excellent Brembo brakes. Finally, the rider's perch was upgraded to alcantara. Notably all Senna editions (whether they be Ducati or MV Agusta) offered a percentage of the profits to support Ayrton Senna's charity looking after needy children in Brazil.

The F4 has oft been voted the most beautiful motorcycle ever developed. From the sharp front view to the flowing side panels, from the exposed rear wheel to the shotgun pipes, the F4 is a looker. And the Senna is, arguably, the best looking of the bunch. The carbon/graphite color scheme preserves the wonderful shape of the bike without the "look at me!" schemes of some of the other editions. While Senna was not known as a motorcycle racer, he was a consummate competitor with serious star power. And speaking of power, don't forget that you have 174 happy ponies on tap for the asking.

This particular bike looks to be what one would expect given the pedigree: very low miles and very well cared for. With but 526 miles on the digital clocks, this one-of-300 examples is looking for a new home. The opening ask is only $13k, with the BIN set at $16k. Those are very competitive numbers, with most Senna editions we have seen having sold in the $15k-$18k range. Check it out here before this exclusive rocket finds itself a new home. Good Luck!!

Featured Listing: 2007 MV Agusta F4 Senna #222
Ducati August 9, 2018 posted by Mike

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca

The 1980s were a period of gestation for Ducati, hitting their sportbike stride with the move from the bevel drive motors to the now-ubiquitous rubber belt-driven desmo valve train. And while Japan focused on technology such as four valves per cylinder, liquid cooling and a constantly changing array of multi-cylinder configurations, Ducati stuck to what they knew: a robust L-twin with simple (and light) air cooling, desmodronic valve actuation, and a steel trellis frame. The F1 lacked the refinement and outright power of the Japanese competition, but the magic was in what wasn't there; the F1 weighed less than the competition, and the narrow configuration of the twin made for a compact and very agile racer. Although time and technology left it behind, the F1 and its variants remain a significant era for the Cagiva-owned company.

1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca for sale on eBay

Sitting on the cusp of the next era (the legendary 851 was released this very same year), the F1 was becoming long in the tooth before its time. To bridge the gap to the next model and keep interest in the F1 alive, Ducati released three special editions: The Santamonica, the Montjuich and the Laguna Seca. These limited edition models consisted of unique paint schemes and minor changes (some cosmetic, some performance related). Power across the three remained identical, while some of the running gear changed based on markets and need. All of these special edition bikes run 16" wheels front and rear, and all have special cosmetic touches to highlight the fact that they are unique. The Laguna Seca utilizes a steel gas tank (unlike the aluminum model on the Montjuich), and the wheels, brakes and fender are Paso items. Yet despite the archaic configuration and Cagiva parts bin raiding, any of the F1 specials remain collectible high-points in Ducati model history.

From the seller:
This bike is a 1987 Ducati Laguna Seca, one of 200 produced to commemorate Ducati's victory at that California track. From ’86 to ’88 Ducati would release a trio of special edition F1’s in celebration of the machine’s various successes around the world – the Montjuich, Santa Monica, and Laguna Seca. The Laguna Seca spec commemorated Marco “Lucky” Lucchinelli winning the 1986 “Battle of the Twins” at the iconic, technical Northern-California circuit . In addition to wearing a Lucky Lucchinelli livery, the F1 Laguna Seca also boasts a decal of Lucchinelli’s signature on the tank of the limited edition Ducati. I purchased this machine in 1999 from the original owner's estate in Southampton, NY with 614 kilometers on the odometer.

Currently this bike is in excellent condition and has travelled a mere 848 kilometers since new. It has been made more streetable by the conversion to Mikuni carbs, but the original Dell'Ortos are included in the sale price. All other parts of the bike are original except for the tires. The original Pirelli MP7S tires are included as well. It has been started regularly and taken for occasional local rides. I believe this to be the 189th Laguna Seca produced as evidenced by the VIN ZDM3GA3M0HB750189. This is a classic, rare Ducati that is difficult to find in any condition and would make a great addition to any sophisticated collection of Italian motorcycles or a great weekend ride with sympathetic Ducatisti.

In the past these F1-based specials have generated strong interest and stronger prices. There has not been too much interest in this particular example, which is strange due to the low mileage and clean, excellent condition. The opening ask is $15k; and while not exactly pocket change it is far from the highest opening for one of these models. In fact, I would consider it right on the money based on history. The paintwork looks clean and where modifications have happened (i.e. carb replacement, new tires) the originals are included in the sale. That is important for a collector, but maybe less so for someone intending to ride this beast. And who wouldn't want to? I can practically hear the bark of the exhaust through the Conti pipe, feel the rumble of the L-twin loping just off idle, and imagine what my neighbors might think. Raw and crude in many respect, this relative relic is a riot riding on 16" rubber.

Unfortunately, this looks to be another low mile icon destined for a comfy parking space somewhere inside. One can always hope to see and hear it run in anger, but at this price that will likely be a rare occasion. Still, it is nice to see that this Laguna Seca example did rack up some mileage up to this point. It has also survived the ravages of time and corporate changes that befell Ducati. This is a wonderful and rare survivor that deserves a good home. And despite the fact that the historic track for which it was named has itself gone through some naming changes, the Ducati F1 Laguna Seca will remain a significant model for the brand and a major collectible for those with the means and taste. If you are among that group, be sure and check it out here. And then you can jump back to the comments and share your thoughts: which F1 model do you covet - if any? Good Luck!!

MI

Very Special Edition: 1987 Ducati F1 Laguna Seca
Aprilia July 30, 2018 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 2010 Aprilia RSV4 WSBK Racer!

In the motorcycling world there is the collectible category, the unobtanium performance category, and the pure bike porn category. Today's Featured Listing ticks all of those boxes - and so much more. Originally a 2010 Aprilia RSV4 WSBK offering, this particular example has been upgraded to a more current spec including a 2012 Aprilia Racing EV02 SBK engine with ZERO hours. The provenance comes direct from the source: Aprilia Racing. What you are looking at a supermodel with Olympian capabilities and a royal bloodline, ever sexy, ever willing and ever special.

Featured Listing: 2010 Aprilia RSV4 EV02 WSBK Racer!

Writing words about this special machine feels sacrilegious; it's like talking over an opera by Mozart, Puccini or Tchaikovsky. It's akin to diagramming artwork like the Mona Lisa in finger paint. So I'll stop and just let the pictures speak for themselves. Try not to get lost in the exquisite carbon fiber, rare alloys in the chassis, engine and exhaust, and the pristine packaging. Prepare to drool:

From the seller:
I bought this bike direct from Aprilia Racing in 2013 and motor has been rebuilt with zero hours.
Bike has not been ridden since 2014.

How about a spec sheet for this amazing bike? Read on!

From the seller:
Aprilia Racing WSBK Full world SBK, from Aprilia Racing
Aprilia Racing EV02 SBK engine, cylinder heads, Billet Camshaft Retainers/holders. Oval Exhaust ports!
The motor is one of the last full spec WSBK before the engine reactions came in to place
WSBK engine, airbox etc retail cost over $65,000
Cam Shafts DLC coated (adjuatable inlet and exhaust,WSBK)
Carbon Fibre airbox
Billet Fuel rails, Top Injectors direct mount to theottle bodies
STM WSBK clutch
WSBK Akrapovic exhaust — Oval Header pipes
Aluminium Fuel Tank,
Billet WSBK FUEL Pump and internal rails
WSBK subframe and carbon under tray
Aprilia Racing Carbon Fibre WSBK fairings
Carbon Fibre seat tray
WSBK alloy front dash bracket
Aprilia Racing Billet Triple clamps
Ohlins SBK front forks (Oval outer tube, stiffer under brakes, more flex in corners)
Ohlins RSP rear shock (world SBK supplied only)
Brembo WSBK front and rear calipers
Brembo Billet WSBK master cylinder
Brembo 6mm WSBK front disc
Brembo full floating rear disc
Marchesini M7 Magnesium wheels
Aprilia Racing WSBK swingarm with billet WSBK linkage
APX-2 Aprilia Racing ECU, wire harness and dash
Aprilia Racing rear sets

This caliber of equipment, power and exclusivity does not come our way every day. And nobody ever accused WSBK machines of being cheap. But if you want the best of what is available, you might want to take a closer look. Thankfully, this seller has provided a significant number of high-quality photos.

From the seller:
Asking $80k Aussie dollars
Happy to organize freight at extra costs to anywhere In the world

Contact: jai@curtisconstruction.com.au

By today's conversion rates, the seller is asking just shy of $60,000 USD. That is well within the range of what we have seen for WSBK spec bikes in the past, if not marginally less. Technology will continue to evolve, speeds will always increase, and time will continue to march on - but this will ALWAYS be an Aprilia Racing WSBK machine, and the cachet that goes along with that is ageless. This beauty is eternal, whether you choose to show it or shag it at your favorite track day / exhibition event. Bikes of this caliber are few and far between, and rarely come up for sale. Serious parties should reach out to Jai Curtis directly before this amazing RSV4 WSBK-spec beast is gone.

MI

Featured Listing: 2010 Aprilia RSV4 WSBK Racer!
Featured Listing July 27, 2018 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1979 Suzuki GS1000E in Portland, Oregon

If you gaze upon modern motorcycles today and think that they are all starting to look alike, you're not alone. There is a certain #metoo movement in current motorcycle design. But cast your eye back a few short - like 40 - years ago and things looked a bit different. Take one glance at this awesome late 70s literbike; there is no mistaking it for anything but a large-cubic-inch rocket. No middleweight or lightweight offering of the era looked even close to it, and even family resemblance was fleeting. One look and you knew it meant business, and 40 years on it still looks that way. Even better, perhaps, is that it did not remain on a showroom floor collecting dust and rotting out. This wonderful monster from the cusp of the liquid-cooled, mono-shocked, four valved, fuel injected, big braked, big tire era carries with it the honor and patina of time and ownership. This isn't just a time capsule to take you back, this is a roadmap of where that was and how it came to be. The seller has provide some truly wonderful background on this bike, and I leave it to his words here:

From the seller:
I am selling my precious 1979 Suzuki GS1000, Suzuki's original superbike---this is your chance to own a restored and properly functioning piece of motorcycling history. If this thing could talk, it would have one doozy of a story to tell. It spent all its life in the Pacific Northwest, and in its own small way has become a recognizable vintage bike...regionally at least. I met the previous two owners at the Isle of Vashon TT in 2016, and they were overjoyed to see it being ridden again. One used to take it to track days at Laguna Seca in the early 80s, another had the fairing put on it.

When I first got it, it was in fairly decent condition. It needed what old bikes usually need: o-rings, seals, gaskets here and there, carb work. After fixing one area, I'd move on to the next. After a few years, I started running out of things to fix. There were some original upgrades that were desirable back in the day and still look and function well today, like the Koni shocks, the Raask rearsets, and the oil cooler and associated plumbing. The fairing is from a Ducati 900SS, and the bike wears it beautifully. Also, this year of GS came stock with twin front discs. I upgraded those with modern calipers and rotors, which made a night and day difference in stopping power.

The extent of the work I've done is pretty exhaustive, and the common thread through all work was that it needed to be period-correct if possible and if safe, excluding suspension and brakes and tires, which have improved so much over the decades it would be silly and arguably unsafe to install original bits.

The seller has performed a significant amount of maintenance, upgrades and improvements to this bike, and the list is a long one. Again, back to his words:

More from the seller:
Nearly every box has been ticked on this bike. Here's what I've done:

Engine
-A full top end rebuild was done by Baisley Hi-Performance (Portland), and I've put about 2,000 miles on it since.
-New Kibblewhite black diamond exhaust and intake valves
-New OEM pistons
-New valve guides, springs, and oil seals, oil passage o-rings, and cylinder o-rings
-Cylinder head machined and lapped, cylinders honed
-New base and head gaskets, new cam cover gasket
-New manual cam chain tensioner
-New oil cooler/pressure sensor adapter plate
-New braided oil hoses and AN fittings
-Head, cylinders, and cam cover all bead blasted

More from the seller:
Carburetor/Fuel system
-Original Mikuni VM26 carbs
-New Pingel petcock
-Full carb rebuild including all rubber, all gaskets, pilot and main jets, by 2Wheel Dyno Works (Seattle)
-Full carb setup, tune, and balance by 2Wheel Dyno Works
-Two K&N oval air filters, one for the left two carbs, one for the right two. These are infinitely better than the single pods in terms of getting a reliable carb tune, not to mention how much easier it makes the carbs to remove.

More from the seller:
Ignition/Electrics
-New Dyna S electronic ignition, dyna s ignition coils, and dyna cables
-Full wire harness by SparckMoto (Albany), including getting rid of the infamous turn signal cancel box. New regulator/rectifier, signal relay
-New left and right control switches by SparckMoto
-Interstate AGM gel battery, reliably holds full charge and has been kept on a trickle charger
-New (super bright) led headlamp
-New OEM headlamp housing
-New tach cable and speedo cable
-New bulbs in the instrument cluster---the whole thing lights up!! Devil's in the details, folks.

More from the seller:
Drivetrain
-Front and rear sprockets by Sprocket Specialists
-DID x-ring 520 chain
-New clutch friction plates and springs
-New OEM clutch cable

Suspension
-Racetech springs and gold valve emulators in the front fork, and new seals (this made a huge difference)

Brakes
-Brembo master cylinder
-Upgrade to two (fairly ubiquitous) Tokico twin piston calipers, same calipers that have gone on many different ninjas and other bike makes and models for years
-Upgrade to two rotors from a Ducati 900SS, much larger. The result is a front brake that actually stops the bike, which is nice!
Stainless brake lines

More from the seller:
Wheels
-Original mag wheels
-Pirelli Sport Demon tires (one year old, plenty of wear left)
-New wheel bearings

Exhaust
-Full MotoGPwerks (California) stainless 4-1 exhaust system---a very sought-after system that you can only get when motogpwerks actually makes a run of them. (Satisfying throaty warble at idle, baleful howl when under load)
-New exhaust gaskets

More from the seller:
The tachometer says 60,000 miles, but only 2,000 since the top end was rebuilt. It starts immediately, reliably, rides beautifully, and pulls shockingly well.

The only cosmetic flaws are a few small paint scratches on the tank and various rock chips on the fairing. I have the original airbox and air filter assemblies, the exhaust it came with when I bought it, lots of redundant hardware, and even the old cylinder head and valves and shims if you want those for some reason.

Asking Price: $4,500
For more information contact Ethan at: ethan.cirmo@gmail.com

This bike really looks the business. The four-into-header gives it a mean look, and I'm sure an even meaner growl. Nobody will confuse with with a more modern platic-cycle ride when you rumble by on this baby, and yet it still looks like it could yank your arms out of their sockets should you twist the throttle too far. This era of motorcycling is gone for good - and in many measurable categories that could be a good thing. But it is more than nostalgia that brings you back to this monster. It does everything a motorcycle should do, but with an intimidating presence missing from motorcycles today. This is not just a survivor of the era, but rather a good strong look at all that was great about the time, and all that is great about motorcycling. If you want a basket-case project bike, there is nothing to see here. But if you want a well-kept, well maintained beast from the apex of another time, you might want to give Ethan a shout - this big Suzuki won't hang out long. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1979 Suzuki GS1000E in Portland, Oregon
Kawasaki May 11, 2018 posted by Mike

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R or 1990 Kawasaki KR-1R – buyer’s choice!

Update 5.11.2018: Based on his latest eBay listing, the 1989 is still available. Our original write up from November is shown below. Good luck to buyers and seller! -dc


When RSBFS last listed this 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R on our pages, we considered it to be a bit of a world exclusive. That should tell you the rarity of what we are talking about. But how do you describe TWO KR-1Rs in the same collection? Unicorn doesn't quite cut it. You are looking at two examples of what has to be the rarest of the 250cc two stroke set, both in amazing condition. Utah collector Gary has certainly amassed himself a magnificent cadre of bikes - and RSBFS has been honored to help him list many of those bikes on these pages. But this particular event takes the cake: pony up $20,000 USD and take your pick of either one of the amazing R bikes listed here.

The KR lineup is a bit of a dark horse in the quarter liter sport bike world. Never as popular as the NSR/RG/TZR set, the Kawasaki offering provided a solid chassis and a very powerful parallel twin. In fact, a KR series bike held the 250cc land speed record at Bonneville thanks to that Kawasaki power. Outside of Japan, the KR is relatively unknown, although it was exported to the UK and AUS/NZ in limited numbers. Even the aficionados who are aware of the KR-1/KR-1S/KR-1R family have likely never seen one in person. And while some will be quick to point out that the KR-1R model is really just a 1S with slightly bigger carbs and more power, the value of the model has evolved well beyond the cost of the parts. These are rare, coveted machines and will remain at the sharp end of the collector scale for the foreseeable future.


1989 Kawasaki KR-1R D1 for sale on eBay

From the seller:
The bike came from a Kawasaki collector in Japan. Motor is all stock. Stock carbs,
stock airbox, stock heads, ect all confirmed OEM Kawasaki. Fairings 100% OEM.
Windshield appears to be OEM. Two Keys.

Previous collector has cosmetically customized this KR-1R with Kawasaki OEM green
front fender, Beet rear sets and Beet exhaust and mufflers. Some suspension
components have been polished.


1990 Kawasaki KR-1R D2 SOLD

From the seller:
This 1990 KR250-D2 is completely stock and has the black front fender. It has had the rear cowling and the lower cowling professionally re-sprayed. The upper and the tank and all other components are original. New tires, fork seals, braided front brake lines and chain complete the refresh. Comes with Utah title. Runs and idles like new. Bike has been tuned and has new engine fluids. 25,290km’s on the odometer. Bike came from a Kawasaki bike collector in Japan. It is very solid and runs surprisingly well for the mileage.


More details:

Price: $20,000 gives you the choice of one bike

Contact: rmurangemasters@aol.com


In case you have not noticed, it is not 1989/1990 anymore. The KR-1R - already rare when it was first introduced - has become a very exclusive tile in the two stroke collector mosaic. These were built by Kawasaki as sports production racers, and as such many (most?) were thrashed and cast aside. Those that survived often fell victim to sea air and corrosion common to the Japanese home market. In short, a clean and loved KR-1R is a rare survivor of a rare species. Here at RSBFS we always recommend that if you are in the market you should seek out the best example of a collector model that you can find - but how often can you find more than one example to compare? Today you can find TWO of these remarkable KR-1R models in pristine condition in one place - all you need to do is pick the one you want. Kawasaki isn't building any more of these, and the world's supply is low and getting lower. Resto mods and parts bikes may be available sporadically in the future, but you are not going to find bikes in this condition often. If a KR-1R is on your bucket list, you might want to act before these jewels appreciate even more. Contact Gary at rmurangemasters@aol.com to seal the deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1989 Kawasaki KR-1R or 1990 Kawasaki KR-1R – buyer’s choice!