Posts by tag: TZR250

Yamaha August 31, 2016 posted by

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Designed as a natural evolution of Yamaha’s RD two-stroke sportbikes, the TZR250 helped set the tone for the entire class, and the bike featured a lightweight aluminum beam frame, full bodywork, and liquid-cooling for the twin-cylinder powerplant that produced a claimed 50hp with the help of Yamahas YPVS power-valve. Until the introduction of the 3XV version of the bike in 1991, Yamaha used a parallel-twin configuration although rivals from Honda and Suzuki quickly moved to v-twin engines. The TZR was cutting-edge when introduced but was quickly eclipsed by the sportier offerings from Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Honda until the 3MA reverse-cylinder version was introduced, although that bike was never officially available outside Japan.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

Unlike some other small sportbikes of the 80s and 90s, including Yamaha’s own 3MA, the TZR250 came with 17” wheels front and rear. This could, in theory, could help with tire selection: there are lots of smaller “sportbike lite” Ninja 300s and CBR300s running around and certainly bikes like KTM’s RC390 cry out for sporty rubber in skinnier sizes. The single front disc and caliper probably won’t offer cutting-edge stopping power but, with good pads fitted, should pull the sub-300lb machine up well enough.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Clocks

This example is fresh off the boat from one of the regular eBay importers, and looks very striking in this unfamiliar color scheme. If you’re comfortable with DMV shenanigans in your home state, keep an eye on this one. It’s a little rough around the edges, with some scuffs and surface corrosion, but is complete and appears to run well.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. Very good running condition sharp response of 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are work fine. Electricals are all working. Has YAMAHA genuine fairings, but has hairline cracks and chips and scratches on fairings. Fuel tank has some scratches. Will needs new tires and fork seals too. Speedometer looks YAMAHA genuine parts and shows 11,900 km = about 7,400 mi, but actual mileage is unknown. Has an original key.

This is an over 30 years old used bike. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return.

1985 Yamaha TZR250 Engine

The seller also includes a video of the bike starting and running. The last TZR250 1KT we featured sold for $6,000 on the nose, so this one should probably fall somewhat lower given the recently imported status: the aforementioned bike actually had a NJ title. I happen to like the graphics on this one, although traditionalists may prefer the period’s seemingly more common red/white speedblock pattern, so I’m not sure how the color will affect interest in the bike.

Keep in mind that this is a no-reserve auction, so keep an eye on this little TZR as it might go for cheap.

-tad

1985 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Rear

Starting Small: 1985 Yamaha TZR250 1KT for Sale
Yamaha August 17, 2016 posted by

I Come In Pieces: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

If you’re looking to import a rare and unusual vehicle that was never intended for the US market into the country like today’s Yamaha TZR250, there are a few ways to go about it. Some of these desirable machines can be found in Canada, and others can be found already here in the US, imported at some point in the last 25 years by one means or another. These days, there are a number of people bringing in little smokers by the container-load, buying up bikes that are relatively ordinary in Japan and shipping them across the Pacific to two-stroke-starved US buyers. If all else fails, you can simply browse the internet and buy all the parts you’d need to build one in your own garage, one bit at a time. Which is what the seller of today’s bike appears to have done.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Rear

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Japanese Big Four were competing for sales in the hotly-contested 250 two-stroke class. Specifications were very similar on paper and performance advantages could be razor-thin, with the RGV, NSR, TZR, and the occasional KR all fighting for a slice of the pie. Early on, parallel-twins were the most common configuration, although later bikes shifted towards v-twins. Yamaha eventually followed suit with their TZR250 3XV but, for a couple of years, they experimented with an unconventional reverse-cylinder layout in their 3MA.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Reverse-cylinder engines claim a number of performance advantages, although the reality is that actual gains are very minimal. The main goal in the 3MA appears to have been packaging: two-stroke exhausts require bulging expansion chambers for optimal performance, and wrapping them around engines and behind fairings and underneath swingarms can be a packaging nightmare. In the TZR 3MA’s case, the expansion chambers are tucked up neatly under the rider to exit through the tail section, avoiding cornering clearance and swingarm fouling problems, in addition to saving some weight and any ram-air benefits the bike might have seen from mounting the carbs at the front of the engine.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

The 3MA TZR’s handling was supposedly excellent, and the little twin made good power compared to its rivals. Unfortunately, the bike quickly developed a reputation for being very unreliable compared to the RGV and NSR, although I’ve read comments in various two-stroke forum threads claiming that they’re no worse than any other bike in the class. There’s really nothing here an experienced two-stroke rider wouldn’t expect, so the main concern with the 3MA is limited parts availability, although eBay and Google can likely provide most of what you need if you have a little patience.

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

I have for sale a 1989 Yamaha TZR250 with a 3MA20 engine, wiring harness and ECU but a 00 clutch and top end. We did NOT import this bike whole but spent about 5 yrs getting parts and pieces for from all over the world to make this a complete running/racing bike. This bike was not sold in the US but can be titled here for street use or raced in Vintage Roadracing classes through a number of organizations.

She is a two stroke streetbike that was issued in Japan for street use or roadracing. She is about 95% complete, starts and runs (have even tested it around the streets of Indy). Doghouse shown in pictures is the only new piece of freshly painted bodywork on the bike ~ I have everything else to install still but have not yet since she wasn’t completely built but could be tested this way and if anything happened, the new bodywork would still be pristine. I have a Japanese title and registration for her. I have the paperwork for Indiana BMV to assign a new VIN # to her and issue a Indiana title for her. Things still needing done ~ Rear brake caliper is leaking and needs replacing (I put in a rebuild kit and it still leaks ~  it needs replacing). Windscreen is not the proper one and too small for the bike ~ got tired of dealing with the supplier I was working with. Custom painted bodywork needs to be fitted to bike but have all pieces ~ front fender and doghouse already installed ~ seat, side panels and rears need to be installed. You can keep the old bodywork on her too. Wheels freshly powder coated white. New tires just put on last year.

Currently oil tank is not connected due to trying to keep the gas tank from rusting any further by using oil/fuel mixed in the fuel tank. A dust seal on LH Fork needed. Like I said, some minor things need finishing that I just can’t do or afford right now. Just one hell of a bike. I will try to post a video of her starting and running. Contact us with any questions. This is also listed locally on Craigslist. Whenever it sells, the ads will be removed from both Ebay and Craigslist.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Front
The seller also includes a video of the bike starting and running. It’s great that this TZR is here and I’ve developed a real fascination with this particular model. These reverse-cylinder bikes were a bit of a failure in practice, but they’re very cool and, for some insane reason I’ve put the 3MA on my wish list. But importing a bike in pieces seems to absolutely be the most difficult way to go about purchasing a TZR250. The question is: since these are being regularly imported these days from Japan and elsewhere, why go through the trouble to bring one in in pieces? A noble endeavor, but that’s a pretty big hassle. Did the seller begin the project before that was commonly done? Was he avoiding import taxes on a complete machine, or planning to title it as a “kit bike”? The seller does mention that he has Japanese paperwork for the bike, so I’d imagine it be just as easy, or just as difficult to get the bike registered, depending on where you live.

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 Fairing Panels

I Come In Pieces: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha August 15, 2016 posted by

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Front

Introduced in 1986, the Yamaha TZR250 was the follow up to their RD family of sportbikes. Yamaha’s first go at a quarter-liter TZR had middling success: it wasn’t especially competitive next to more focused rivals from Kawasaki and Suzuki on track, but it was a far better roadbike. The TZR followed the standard two-fiddy two-stroke formula of the period, with a lightweight aluminum frame and fully-faired bodywork surrounding a 249cc liquid-cooled parallel twin, and midrange courtesy of Yamaha’s YPVS power valve. They claimed 50hp from the motor, which made the 282lb dry machine capable of a top speed north of 120mph.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Fairing

17” wheels could be found at both ends, although tire sizes fall somewhere near bicycle width in the front and front tire at the rear… The single disc brake up front was adequate and pretty standard for lightweight sportbikes of the period, although twin front discs quickly became the norm for the 250cc class. Apparently a “blue spot” caliper from an R1 or R6 will bolt directly onto the stock front forks if you feel you need a bit more stopping power, a little restomod touch, or a splash of color.

1986 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

The first TZRs were known as the 2MA or 1KT bikes, depending on the market in which they were sold. Later, the parallel twin saw its cylinders reversed in an effort to improve cornering clearance in the 3MA, before Yamaha switched to a v-twin for the final, 3XV version.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

86 TZR250, 9362 Kilometers.
Imported from Japan one year ago.
Super rare. Runs well.
Will ship at your expense.

Well that’s not exactly a ton of information, almost an eBay haiku, but at least the seller includes a number of nice pictures. Even with the recent influx of grey-market two-strokes, the Yamaha TZR is pretty rare, although at that $6,000 Buy It Now price seems on the high side. They’re claimed to be relatively easy to maintain which is appealing, considering parts will have to ship from overseas most likely.

Interestingly, this particular little smoker is hiding in New Jersey. See: some good things do come from Jersey! Besides me of course: I grew up there. Actually, I’ve never really understood all the hate heaped on Jersey. It’s like people fly into Newark International Airport and decide that the whole place must just be more of the same. Or they get their information from uppity New York residents… Anyway, the state may be best known for its Jersey Shore bro-culture and really good tomatoes, but it is most definitely not known for having a permissive DMV, so I’m wondering about the status of this TZR. Is it registered and titled? The listing doesn’t say. Maybe that’s why it’s being sold after only a year? Considering that these early 2MA bikes are supposed to be most at home on the road, it’d be a shame if this was for collectors and track-riders only.

-tad

1986 Yamaha TZR250 L Side

East Coast Smoker: 1986 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha August 3, 2016 posted by

Don’t Quote Me On This: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side

The TZR250 was Yamaha’s entry into the hotly-contested quarter-liter class wars that raged throughout the 80s and 90s. Early TZR250s were powered by a fairly conventional liquid-cooled parallel twin, and the last generation used a 90° v-twin like rivals from Suzuki and Honda. But in between, Yamaha experimented with an interesting solution to give the 3MA version of the bike a competitive advantage.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 Dash

All of these 250cc two strokes were very close in terms of specifications: weight, displacement, power were all nearly identical, so every little bit helped. The 3MA version of the TZR250 saw the cylinders spun around 180° from what you might expect, with the carburetors at the front where they could gulp fresh air and the exhaust exiting out the rear. This helped solve some of the packaging issues involving the bulbous expansion chambers needed for two-stroke performance, keeping them tucked up inside the bodywork instead of having to route them under or around the engine.

Overall, this particular TZR250 looks like a decent enough bike on the surface, but I’m betting the seller is aiming far too high with the starting bid. Under the bodywork, things look a bit iffy: anyone care to weigh in on exactly what is going on with the right side of the engine? Bodged repair? Cobbled-together block-off plate so the bike can run premix?

And is that the cover for the YPVS power-valve system missing?!

1989 Yamaha TZR250 R Side Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

The Yamaha TZR250 is a motorcycle manufactured and produced by the Japanese motorcycle manufacturer Yamaha between 1986 and 1996. Yamaha produced the road going two-stroke motorcycle, loosely based on the TZ250 Yamaha racing bike. Parallel-twin, reverse cylinder and finally V-twin variants were produced. It evolved as a natural replacement for the popular RD250/RD350 series of the 1980s. It has the Yamaha Power Valve System (YPVS) which raises and lowers the exhaust port depending on the rpm of the engine. The YPVS servo motor starts to open at about 6,000rpm. In standard form 50 bhp is claimed at 10,000rpm. Although mid 40s is more realistic, and will not rev much above 9,500rpm in standard trim, owing to the restrictive standard exhausts and ignition boxes.

Racing

Still raced in the Yamaha pasta masters race series with the British racing club – BMCRC. Racing engines currently claiming circa 56 bhp @ 11,000rpm. Racing fuel ratios typically 1:30. Standard exhausts are difficult to improve on in terms of power and torque, but they are very large and impede ground clearance. Jolly Moto exhausts are popular replacements as they are lighter, produce similar performance, allow better ground clearance. An F3 racing kit was produced for a few years which included ignition boxes, carbs and exh, helping increase maximum revs, power and torque.

History

Production started in June 1986. At a cost of around $6,000 new on release it was seen as an expensive bike for a 250 cc, but given that places such as Japan, Italy and Australia had 250 licensing laws in place one can imagine the stir that something that could hassle 750s on a track caused. The parallel twin 2MA variant being the UK variant and the 1KT model being the domestic Japanese variant. Variations between these two models being minimal, e.g. wording on the brake master cylinder in English or Japanese. Lighting arrangements were also different, to comply with UK type approval regulations, particularly the indicators were mounted on stalks rather than faired into the bodywork.

In 1989, the parallel twin reverse cylinder version, 3MA arrived. If you wanted a lightweight backroad weapon decorated with speedblock graphics in the late 80s and early 90s, your choice was clear: YAMAHA TZR250 3MA. In between, Yamaha’s 1989-1990 3MA version of the TZR used an unusual reversed-head configuration that had the carburetors mounted on the front of the engine, giving the exhausts a clear shot up under the seat and out the tail-section, avoiding expansion-chamber clearance issues. Backed by a six-speed gearbox and mounted in a classic Deltabox frame, the complete package made 50hp, depending on tune and weighed in at 308lbs wet.

This particular example has been well-used, with 20900 km on the clock, and does have some minor wear-and-tear, but is extremely clean with the fairings off.

What’s interesting here is that the entire end of the seller’s description “If you wanted a lightweight backroad weapon…” is actually a quote by me from this post. So it’s me quoting him quoting me. What happens when someone quotes this post for a book on the TZR250, and then I end up using that book as a resource? Will the world explode? My head certainly will. Will time and space as we know it end? One day, I hope to find out.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 L Side Engine

In any event, the only thing more mind-blowing than the fact that I’m quoting myself being quoted in this post is the $9,900 starting bid. That’s just huge money for what is a very cool [I really want one of these] but ultimately unsuccessful bike. The theory makes sense, but in practice there were other, better ways to skin this two-stroke cat and it was only made for a couple years, before Yamaha switched to a v-twin like rivals from Honda and Suzuki. Unless prices have jumped suddenly, this is crazy money for the 3MA since recent examples have sold for between $4,000 and $5,000. Later TZR250 3XV are generally more valuable, but I think the price would be unrealistic, even then.

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 Rear

Don’t Quote Me On This: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale
Yamaha April 10, 2016 posted by

No Titles, No Problem: Pair of Race 1991 Yamaha TZ250Bs for Sale

1991 Yamaha TZ250B R Front

Looking to start your own vintage race team? Well today’s brace of 1991 Yamaha TZ250s and a whole raft of included spare parts is ready to help you do just that, just add trailer.

And talent.

Sports two-strokes from the 80s ands 90s are very rare and desirable these days, with fresh imports from Japan making their way here regularly. And as always, the issue of titling them comes up. In some states, it’s easy to get grey-market bikes titled. In others, particularly California, it’s very difficult without spending years gathering incriminating information about prominent politicians or spending a small fortune to bribe public officials.

Fortunately, today’s pair of TZ250Bs solves that problem for us nicely by being pure racebikes that never had titles in the first place. Obviously, there are some rough similarities between the TZR250 and TZ250, but the TZR was a sporty roadbike meant to ape the real-deal, “closed-course only” TZ.

1991 Yamaha TZ250B L Front

Powered by what was basically half of a V4 from the TZ500, the 1991 TZ250B was the first v-twin powered TZ250: earlier bikes used a parallel-twin configuration, long after competitors from Honda and Suzuki had switched to v-twin engines. The B also featured upside-down forks for the first time and a distinctive banana swingarm to clear the right-side expansion chambers, something that wasn’t required on the “reverse-head” parallel-twin TZs from 1988-1990.

1991 Yamaha TZ250B L Side Rear

From the original eBay listing: Pair of 1991 Yamaha TZ250Bs for Sale

Rare opportunity: for sale two very nice Yamaha 250B’s, VIN#3YL000397 and 3YL000409. Both bikes are race ready and have two races on new top ends.

I do not know the miles on either bikes’ cranks but when I did the top ends they checked OK.

I have approximately $10,000 in spares, mostly new, not a bunch of junk. I will provide an inventory list upon request and I have included photos of them.

The bikes are sold on a BOS, there were no titles for these bikes. I had to put something in the eBay listing for title condition and miles.  

1991 Yamaha TZ250B Parts

These are very nice machines, I love the color scheme, and a big box of spares to keep a pair of obsolete racebikes running sounds like a peach of a deal… But at $30,000 Buy It Now for the pair, you’re looking at a lot of cheddar for this package.

-tad

1991 Yamaha TZ250B L Side

No Titles, No Problem: Pair of Race 1991 Yamaha TZ250Bs for Sale
Yamaha February 11, 2016 posted by

Forbidden Fruit in Cali: 1992 Yamaha TZR250 3XV for Sale

1992 Yamaha TRZ250 R Side2

Fans of lightweight machines that favor handling over outright power hold a special place in their hearts for bikes like this Yamaha TZR250 3XV. Following on the heels of Yamaha’s popular RD bikes of the early 80s, the TZR was a road-legal sportbike intended to evoke the company’s pure racing motorcycles.

1992 Yamaha TRZ250 Clocks

Like their predecessors, they were lightweight, two-stroke sports machines that were originally powered by liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel-twins, although the 3XV version seen here and introduced in 1991 used a 90° v-twin like the competition from Honda and Suzuki, mated to a six-speed gearbox. The entire package weighed in at under 300lbs dry and featured Yamaha’s signature “Deltabox” frame along with a YPVS power valve designed to give the little two-stroke a more usable powerband.

1992 Yamaha TRZ250 L Side

From the original Craigslist post: 1992 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

I have a 1992 TZR-250 3XV-4 with a wet clutch. This is a R model. I completely restored this bike with new OEM parts. The engine is completely rebuilt, all new transmission bearings, seals, gaskets. Cylinders replated with pistons and crankshaft rebuilt by Roland Cushway. New OEM manifolds and reeds, carbs were also rebuilt, front forks rebuilt and rear shock is a Nitron from the UK. All cables were replaced and brakes rebuilt. Tires are Bridgestone S-20 front and rear. The body work is high quality fiberglass from Japan. The chassis and engine have less than 200 miles on it. I have tons of extras and spare OEM parts. Also front and rear stands. I have over $17,000.00 invested in this bike.

$12,000.00 Firm, No Offers Please.
Serious buyers only.
This is a rare bike. There maybe only 10 of these in the United States

1992 Yamaha TRZ250 Parts

Commenters often express concern about sourcing parts for these two-strokes, but that shouldn’t be too much of a problem here: a number of shots are included of the extras and it looks like you should be able to to keep this bike on the road for a long time to come, including clutch plates, rings, gaskets, sprockets, levers, and what looks like a whole case of NGK spark plugs. The bike is in Northern California and does have the road equipment fitted, but the listing doesn’t specifically mention whether or not it’s actually titled. I’m assuming it does for that $12,000 asking price.

That’s a ton of money to part with for a TZR, but this looks like one of the nicest we’ve seen in a while.

-tad

1992 Yamaha TRZ250 R Side

Forbidden Fruit in Cali: 1992 Yamaha TZR250 3XV for Sale
Yamaha October 27, 2015 posted by

More JDM Madness: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Side Rear

With many lightweight sportbikes now flirting with the edge of 25-year import rules, I expect we’ll see more and more bikes like this Yamaha TZR250 up for sale in the next couple of years. Road and track weapons designed to keep pace with Honda, Suzuki, and Kawasaki in the viciously-competitive 250cc class, the 1989-1990 TZR250 featured an interesting reversed-cylinder two-stroke parallel-twin, with the carburetors mounted on the front of the engine. This gave them easy access to cool, dense air and, more importantly, gave the exhausts a clear shot out the tail of the bike. The expansion chambers required for two-stroke performance create significant packaging challenges, and this design meant the bike didn’t need to route them under or around the engine.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Side

As expected, the TZR250 made bang-on the Japanese government-mandated 45hp limit, with plenty of extra available once de-restricted. With just 308lbs to haul around, including fluids, these are seriously nimble machines that require rider involvement and reward skill in a way that bigger bikes can’t hope to match.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA Carbs

These 3MA parallel-twins do have a bit of a reputation for being unreliable. But owners forums claim that’s mostly a myth, and that they’re just as reliable, or unreliable, as other two-stroke sportbikes of the period. As to why this particular design didn’t last, it’s not necessarily that the design didn’t work, it’s that the layout ultimately didn’t have enough of a benefit to continue development, and Yamaha switched to a v-twin in 1991 to keep pace with Honda and Suzuki.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA Gauges

 

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Up for sale is “1989 YAMAHA TZR250 3MA” rare 2stroke sports!!

The bike is imported from Japan and without title now, but I can get it with Extra charge.

Good running condition but needs carb setting from 5000rpm more up.

I’m guessing main jets or needles are too big so too rich.

Can through all gears.

Bike has new battery.

Electrics all work.

Brakes are work well.

Used motorcycle with scratches and wear as 26 ages.

Have hairline cracks and chips on cowls, so look carefully all pictures and video.

And then, feel free email me for more info on this bike!

Speedo meter is looks original but actual mile is unknown.

Doesn’t have Air Cleaners.

Will needs new tires.

Sold as is no warranty.

Thank you for looking!!

Well hey man, if you think it’s running rich, maybe fitting those missing air cleaners might be a good idea? The seller also includes the usual start up and walk around video, which is always appreciated. Also, note the tach that doesn’t even bother with numbers below 3,000rpm…

Like so many of these little two-strokes that have shown up recently, this is no display piece, but appears to be in very nice physical condition. And while I’d worry about sourcing body panels and non-consumable parts, piston kits and the like are still available for these, so keeping them running shouldn’t be impossible with a bit of patience and effort. After making sure that the factory airbox and filter are present and accounted for, obviously…

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Side Rear

If you happen to live somewhere a bike like this can be titled and ridden on the road, it would make a very fun addition to your stable and sure to start conversations every time you stop to top off! Which, considering the fairly dismal mileage these get, should be pretty often…

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Side Unfaired

More JDM Madness: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale
Yamaha October 12, 2015 posted by

Rare Middle-Child: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

1989 TZR250 R Side

If you wanted a lightweight backroad weapon decorated with speedblock graphics in the late 80s and early 90s, your choice was clear: a Yamaha TZR250. The first TZR was powered by a liquid-cooled parallel twin and the last had the familiar 90° v-twin layout shared with Aprilia, Suzuki, and Honda.

1989 TZR250 L Side Rear

In between, Yamaha’s 1989-1990 3MA version of the TZR used an unusual reversed-cylinder configuration that had the carburetors mounted on the front of the engine, giving the exhausts a clear shot up under the seat and out the tail-section, avoiding expansion-chamber clearance issues. As can be seen from the photos, this left the airbox mounted low behind the front wheel.

1989 TZR250 L Side Bare

Backed by a six-speed gearbox and mounted in a classic Deltabox frame, the complete package made 50hp, depending on tune and weighed in at 308lbs wet.

1989 TZR250 R Side Front

This particular example has been well-used, with 16,000 miles on the clock, and does have some minor wear-and-tear, but is extremely clean with the fairings off, as can be seen from the photos.

1989 TZR250 R Side Bare

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA

It’s raining really hard today but I wanted to get some pics anyway. I rode it to a nearby park and got some shots.

Brake calipers need to be rebuilt, wheels could use new paint, some cracks in the plastics, need tires and a battery. The gas tank is almost perfect inside and out, titled in my name in Washington. I sell my bikes the way I want to buy bikes. With all the original parts weather they’re in need of repair or not. I do not like to swap out parts unless they are NOS and for the exact model. They’re only original once and once a bunch of things have been changed they no longer have value to me.

Please look closely at the pictures for condition. Bikes runs great but it’s a two stroke with 16,000 miles on it so I do not put any guarantee of any type on it.

1989 TZR250 Clocks

The seller also includes a short video of the bike being started and a quick walk-around. As you can see, the bike has some scuffs from use, but it otherwise looks very nice, and most importantly, it looks ready to run.

1989 TZR250 R Side Rear

With a Buy It Now of $5,000 and a street-legal title, this is a pretty cool opportunity to pick up an unusual little road-ripper for pretty cheap. Sourcing parts for this unusual middle-child TZR could prove a bit of a pain, but well worth the effort.

-tad

1989 TZR250 L Side

Rare Middle-Child: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale