Posts by tag: TZR250

Yamaha July 7, 2017 posted by

Two-Stroke Hooligan: Cali-Titled 1989 Yamaha TDR250 for Sale

This bike got me excited because Practical Sportbikes has been doing a project Yamaha TDR250 over the past few months, and up until I saw it, I had no idea the bike even existed. You say it’s not a sportbike? I say if it’s in Practical Sportbikes, it qualifies! So what exactly is a TDR250? Well basically it’s the parallel-twin from the TZR250 in a supermoto-style machine, with different tuning to suit the bike’s new mission.

Weight was right in line with the TZR at just a shade north of 300lbs dry, and the claimed 50hp is pretty close as well, helped by the same Yamaha Power Valve System. The supermoto set up means you’d probably lose out to a TZR on track, but the TDR would probably be faster just about everywhere else. Certainly, the riding position would be a damn sight more comfortable than the racer-crouch required for the TZR…

This particular example has obviously been enthusiast-owned, and the listing includes details of recent engine work, updates to the suspension, wheels and brakes, although he doesn’t mention where he got that banana swingarm. It’s not really necessary here with the undertail pipes but it does look pretty cool. Maybe it came from the RS250 that donated the rear wheel? This TDR is not perfectly original or in pristine cosmetic condition, so it won’t be of much interest to anyone looking for a museum-quality collectible, but these really aren’t all that valuable yet anyway in the rest of the world. The main thing driving the price for this one is likely the novelty and that very desirable California title.

 

From the original eBay listing: Cali-titled 1989 Yamaha TDR250 for Sale

Engine is parallel twin TDR250 (TZ250)case induction 2-stroke 50+ hp.6-speed

  • Low mile bottom end (under 5k mi) pressure tested, excellent condition.
  • New pistons, rings, clutch plates, petcock, YPVS bushings, gaskets.
  • RZ500 cylinder barrels-standard bore (newly run in, just over 50 miles presently on new hone).
  • Relocated YPVS actuator to center RZ500 position with stock housing/adjustment.
  • RZ500 kick start arm
  • TDR250 head tuned by Stan Stephens in the UK.
  • Standard exhaust with black chrome powder coated guards and custom spigot covers.
  • Pre-mix injector pump installed,adjusted and in good working order,but currently 40:1 Motul racing synthetic, premixed as a personal preference.Easy to mix in and good insurance.

Chassis

  • Aprilia RS250 road racer front and rear wheels and complete rear Brembo brake caliper/mount.
  • GSX-R K6″limited” UD forks with black nitrided sliders/anodized caps and tuned springs
  • Machined and heat powder coated K6 Radial front brake caliper.
  • Custom Goodridge steel braided brake lines front and rear.
  • New non O-Ring gold chain (less drag).
  • New front and rear sealed wheel bearings.
  • New Michelin Pilots
  • Vintage Pro -Taper bars
  • Brembo front master cylinder.
  • NC30 tail light and rear fascia.
  • Extensive powder costing.
  • New yellow stock seat cover with Yamaha labeling included.
  • 2 spare rear sprockets (1 aluminum,1 stock steel) included.
  • Full work shop manual (copy) with original sales brochure included.

Body is standard in good condition as shown, showing minor decal issues (pictured) and some repairs on interiors from an older repaint. Rider quality. Bicycle speedometer is only fairly accurate but legal. Turn signals aren’t blinking. (I think the led fronts need bulb style) Finger actuation only for now! Suspension mods have stabilized high speed handling without sacrificing all important “flick ability”.

Bikes cylinders are freshly broken in, first kick every time, running great and ever improving, very strong pull with improved head by Stan Stephens.Perfect stock jetting, no plug fouling ever and runs cool, never past just center of coolant gauge even when in powerbaband getting flogged, clutch plates and synthetic oil for perfect “butter”shifting with no slippage. Quiet stock exhaust allows you to rev it with out to much undesirable attention. NO DISAPPOINTMENTS!

Bike is for sale locally, so l reserve option to end at anytime BEFORE reserve is met. Super Rare and desirable model in the U.S.Very collectible and appreciating. Please ask any and all questions, answered ASAP! Japanese and Canadian market bikes, never imported to the states, a lot have ended up in the United Kingdom where new parts and spares are readily available.

Bidding is up north of $5,000 with just about 48 hours left on the auction. In one of its home markets, I doubt it’d ever make near what it looks like it will sell for here, but I bet two-stroke junkies are leaping at the opportunity to pick up this very funky little machine, especially in California where little smokers have a pretty rabid following and road-legal grey market bikes from this era are hard to come by.

-tad

Two-Stroke Hooligan: Cali-Titled 1989 Yamaha TDR250 for Sale
Yamaha May 1, 2017 posted by

Grey Day: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA

It’s a “when it rains it pours” type of situation with TZRs here on RSBFS. Given last week’s 3MA model posting from a California location, here comes one from the other side of the US – Florida. Ironically, the seller claims that this one came from California a few years previous. In what small circles do rare bikes run!

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for sale on eBay

As staff writer Tad has captured in a previous post of this generation TZR: “The 3MA version of the TZR250 saw the head spun around 180° from what you might expect, with the carburetors at the front where they could gulp fresh air and the exhaust exiting out the rear. This helped solve some of the packaging issues involving the bulbous expansion chambers needed for two-stroke performance, keeping them tucked up inside the bodywork instead of having to route them under or around the engine.” The net effect is not more power – that is unchanged from a conventional head setup – but rather the ability to keep all the bits tidy from front to back. Do not underestimate the difficulty in fitting expansion chambers neatly inside the bodywork. The 3MA was Yamaha’s novel solution.

From the seller:
1989 Yamaha TZR250 Bought a few years ago from California. The bike dose not have a Title and is sold as is. It runs and rides. That said I have not ridden it in a few months. Its in good condition over all. Any questions or pictures just ask.

A no title two stroke is a roll of the dice in today’s world. If you are a US resident, you may or may not have a shot at registering something like this. Being that this bike is based in Florida, I would have thought that was about the best chance you had to obtain a license plate. As always, do your homework with your local DMV constabulary *before* plunking down big dollars. Otherwise, this looks like it would make a pretty sweet track day bike. You do engage in track days, don’t you??

That said, the opening ask for this one is $4,000 USD. The seller notes it has not been ridden in a few months, which means it likely has racked up few miles in the last year. That is a warning for engine seals and other goodies; smokers need to run in order to survive, and old engine seals are a quick trip to a seize and a high-side. Figure a mild refresh in your estimates to be on the safe side – until you know for sure. Only a few days left with no takers. Check it out here, and good luck!

MI

Yamaha April 26, 2017 posted by

Hat on Backwards: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Competition between the Japanese manufacturers in the 250cc sportbike class was fierce, with each trying for some small advantage in terms of performance, given the limited displacement and government-mandated power cap. On paper, they all seem to follow a pretty standard template: a compact two-stroke twin cylinder engine, power-valves of one sort or another, and an aluminum beam frame. But each manufacturer went their own way trying to maximize performance within those fairly narrow parameters. While development eventually led to the NSR, RGV, and TZR all using v-twins, there were a few experiments along the way, and today’s TZR250 3MA represents an interesting attempt to solve the packaging issues inherent in two-stroke design.

Obviously, two-stroke engines are very compact by nature: with no overhead-valves or cams, they’re short, simple, and very light. But while the exhaust expansion chambers required for a performance two-stroke may not weigh all that much, their bulging shape takes up valuable real estate in a motorcycle. The famous “gull arm” swingarms of the period were one solution to the problem and allowed the chambers to tuck in close to the centerline of the bike to maximize cornering clearance. But the 3MA version of the TZR250 went a different route by reversing the cylinders so that the carburetors were at the front, with the exhausts exiting directly out the rear of the bike instead of curving around the sides or underneath. The bulbous expansion chambers fitted neatly into the seat, with the exhaust exiting through the tail.

The design was eventually replaced by the v-twin 3XV version introduced in 1991 after just two years, so the experiment can be considered a bit of a failure. But there’s nothing inherently wrong with the idea, and this is one of my favorite bikes of the era, at least in terms of looks and the weird factor: it’s my deep and not-so-secret shame that I haven’t ridden one yet, but here’s hoping that the stars will align and I’ll be able to find a decent California-titled example when the time is right. Scouting around the message boards, it seems that the bike’s reputation for poor reliability is exaggerated but, as these were not often seen anywhere outside of Japan, parts availability will prove difficult.

From the original eBay listing:  1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

The parallel twin reverse cylinder version. The bike is imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. This bike is sold without title. (NO TITLE) Start engine. Original Cowl. New Aftermarket Front fork innre tubes. Dragging brakes. Need to change tires (flat tire) and a battery. Some scratches and rust, so look carefully all pictures and video. This motorcycle is 28 years ago. Sold as is.

11271km (7003mile) LOW MILE. Sold as is with NO warranty NO refunds NO return. Buyer responsible for vehicle pick-up or shipping to your location. (ITEM AT CARSON NOW)

There’s also a helpful clip of the bike starting, running, and revving. The seller’s English is a bit limited, but it looks like the bike runs from the video and just needs a little TLC: a brake rebuild, new tires, and some minor cosmetic issues. Normally nothing you’d find shocking in a 28 year old motorcycle, but make sure you’re prepared to troll eBay and use Google Translate to track down parts to keep this running. It’s certainly not pristine and it’s not the cleanest example we’ve featured on this site, but if the price is right, it won’t take all that much to get this one on the road. Obviously, the usual titling issues apply, so I doubt this bike will remain in Southern California.

-tad

Hat on Backwards: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale
Yamaha March 5, 2017 posted by

Japanese Spec: 1986 Yamaha TZR250

After a brief interlude, welcome back to the meat and potatoes of RSBFS programming; a tasty two stroke import. This particular TZR250 is actually a pre-import – in that it is currently still located in Japan. The seller outlines the documentation and services they will provide with the sale below. Given that we have seen legally licensed imports for sale on these very pages (such as this Featured Listing), one would have to wonder if it is worth the effort to go through the trouble of importing rather than waiting for the right bike to come along stateside. Depending upon your state of residence and your willingness to do paperwork and play with the local DMV, this could be a good way to get that rare smoker that you want (but can’t find here).

1986 Yamaha TZR250 for sale on eBay

The TZR250 is a parallel twin, first introduced in 1986. There was a Japanese home market model (1KT) and a European model (2MA), the latter which differed primarily by road-going legalities such as headlight size, turn signal placement, etc. However the 2MA variant does have both a lower compression ration and more HP (50 vs 45), given that Japanese market bikes were restricted in output. The seller claims that this is a 1KT bike that has been upgrade to 2XT status, but it is not clear what exactly that entails. In the course of some research, I have seen 2MA (Euro) bikes listed as 2MA/2XT, so it could be as simple as regional updates. If you are in the know when it comes to TZRs, please chime in via the Comments Section. Your knowledge is always welcome.

From the seller:
Rare 2 stroke bike from Japan!!

YAMAHA TZR250 1KT

VIN: 1KT-012896
Year: 1986
Mileage:  15,132 km
Condition: Good condition and running very well. It is 2XT convert bike but VIN is 1KT model. Front brake cariper is Brembo 40mm. Body work has some scratches and tiny cracks. But still looks good.

Shipping : We’ll put it into the wooden crate and ship by surface.
We’ll enclose Japanese original title, and also Sales Certificate and Bill of Sales issued by us in English. Shipping cost: The bid price includes shipping cost to overseas, and it’s charged from our office in Japan to the nearest port to your address.

We expect you’d pick it up at the port and arrange the land transport to your address by yourself. The other cost, such as the handling cost, duty fee, tax, etc. which will be charged in your country, they’re not included there.

This bike shows all the hallmarks of a home market survivor: some corrosion is evident thanks to the proximity of the ocean air, there are bodywork nicks, scrapes and cracks no doubt obtained in close-quarter parking situations, and some road rash reminiscent of some youthful squidliness (don’t ask me how I know what that looks like). Otherwise it appears to be a solid survivor. The bike has 15k on the odometer, but being a Japanese spec machine that is in kilometers. The mileage equivalent would be approximately 9,400 miles. Be aware that bikes imported from Japan do not have a 17 digit VIN, which may be a problem come registration time.

The price of entry for this 250 is only $3,800 USD. The seller will also entertain offers. That price includes the cost to crate and ship the bike to your home port. That is not a lot of coin, but then again, you have to take the risk, do the legwork, and get (potentially) buried in red tape or paperwork. Any of the RSBFS faithful have experience in these matters? If so, let us know if it was a dream, a nightmare or something in between. Check out this TZR250 here, and then check back into the Comments Section and share your thoughts and knowledge. And smoke on!

MI

Japanese Spec: 1986 Yamaha TZR250
Yamaha January 20, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

Update 1.30.2017: The seller has notified me that this sale is now final on this bike after receiving serious interest just a day after listing. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Are you looking for an ’80s two-stroke to tear up the back roads in a cloud of blue smoke? Just move along: nothing to see here. Are you searching for a museum-quality Yamaha TZR250 2MA/1KT? Well we may just have what you’re looking for with today’s Featured Listing, a zero-mile example that may never have seen a tank of fuel in its life.

The very first TZR was a development of Yamaha’s RD series of motorcycles, and it helped to define the rapidly-evolving class: lightweight aluminum beam frame, fully-faired bodywork, and a liquid-cooled two-stroke parallel-twin backed by a six-speed gearbox and a set of 17″ wheels. Every bike in the quarter-liter class featured some sort of proprietary powervalve technology, and the TZR naturally used the Yamaha Power Valve System or “YPVS.” Triple discs quickly became the class standard, although early TZRs like this one made do with just a single disc and caliper at the front. With a good set of pads, this should still pull you up quickly, considering the sub-300 lb dry weight.

First-generation TZRs and NSRs generally seem to command less money than their later counterparts and I’m not really sure exactly why. I’m assuming it’s because early 250 two-strokes are nice, fun little sportbikes, while bikes like Honda’s NSR250 MC28 from the end of the line pack cutting-edge tech and some trick parts… But as far as historical significance and style go, these early bikes have both in spades.

From the Seller: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale

0 miles

Two stroke, not available in the United States, purchased in Canada. Extremely clean, near perfect condition. As far as I can tell, it’s never had gas through the gas tank. New battery, original keys. Metric and US speedometer. A great addition to someone’s collection.

The bike is located in Michigan to view and pick up. Not willing to ship but willing to assist with your shipper.

Price is $11,500.

As you can see from the photos, the seller even has the original service manual and a tool kit that obviously has seen minimal use. With zero miles on the odometer, it’d be a shame to put it on the road and wreck the pristine status, but if you’re looking for an early TZR to complete your Yamaha sportbike collection, you’re obviously very unlikely to find one in better cosmetic condition.

-tad

 

Featured Listing: Zero-Mile 1987 Yamaha TZR250 for Sale
Yamaha November 6, 2016 posted by

Everybody Loves a Winner: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

1998-yamaha-tz250-r-side

Just so we’re clear: this 1998 Yamaha TZ250 is not to be confused with the road-going but also very cool TZR250. The TZ250 was Yamaha’s over-the-counter GP machine, a pure race bike. As such, “originality” is a relative thing, and these things have typically evolved over their racing careers with the goal of winning at any cost. This particular TZ250 has obviously been thoroughly developed, as it was the AMA 250 GP Championship winner in 1999…

1998-yamaha-tz250-l-side-naked

Like the later versions of the TZR250, the TZ250 was powered by a liquid-cooled two-stroke v-twin, backed by a six-speed gearbox, with a classic “banana” swingarm out back. The bike was designed to appeal to entry-level racers and is relatively reliable for a pure racing machine, but it will obviously need regular rebuilds and much more maintenance than a roadbike.

1998-yamaha-tz250-airbox

The 1998 TZ250 seen here featured revised plastics, including that tapered tail that looks a bit like the later Aprilia RS250. The new bodywork also featured a sealed airbox and a ram-air intake to feed the updated carburetors, along with a host of minor upgrades to the rest of the bike.

1998-yamaha-tz250-front-wheel

From the original eBay listing: AMA Championship-Winning 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale

You’ve heard of Barn Finds… Time Capsules…  Museum Liquidations….   well today, have I got one for you! This is THE 1999 AMA 250 GP Championship winning machine as piloted by Chuck Sorensen.  Exactly as it ran, with factory spares to boot!  It was, and possibly is still today- one of the fastest 250s in the country.

I purchased this in early 2003, directly from James Siddall- owner of World Sports Imports.  This was James’ trophy bike.  He mentioned that after it crossed the finish line, it went directly to his office to set behind his desk.  The only hands that have touched the motorcycle since purchase were those of Perry Melneciuc -who, if you know him- besides his being a Factory Mechanic for Ducati, Honda, Yamaha, AMA Race Teams- is considered the most correct, fastidious, compulsive Gran Prix mechanic alive.  All that, PLUS he was a World Sports’ team member/rider.  Perry went thru it from tip to tail and made certain everything was correct, fresh and set to their true running settings.  (Perry’s notes are included in the sale as to what World Sports ran and what it is set for now -including upper/lower, unleaded/leaded, head volume, deck height, squish, carb settings, transmission selections, etc.)
 
After Perry’s meticulous go-thru, fluids were drained and it went into storage/display.  Until now….
 
The motorcycle is completely outfitted with very rare and otherwise unobtainable parts.  Almost every single nut, bolt, axle and pivot is either titanium or aluminum.  Forks and shock are the state of the art (for the time) Ohlins.  Expansion chambers/pipes are factory “A” kit titanium.  Wheels, are five spoke Marvics.
 
The spares package is rich and thick:
 
*Complete set of later model Corbin  #1 body work (seat, two lowers, two uppers, tank (un-dented) (left over from the 2000 campaign)
*Extra set of Factory “A” kit steel expansion chambers
*Sprockets (front and rear) and carriers
*Clutch basket (inner, outer) rod, gear, bearings etc
*two cyclinders
*at least three sets of heads (8.1cc, 8.3cc w/ deto sensors, etc)
*2 Ohlins alternate shock springs
*alternate Ohlins fork springs
*throttle sleeve
*Stator/Rotor
*New side cover with new gasket in package
*TEN brand new matched pistons with rings, wristpins, etc.
*4DP-40 CDI (black box)
*one World Sports Imports Team Polo shirt!
*two (matched L/R set of brake rotors)
*19 spark plugs (11 in bag, used, 8 in holder used but entirely serviceable.
*foot pegs, clutch springs, etc
*electrical umbilical cord for exhaust valve setting
*spare battery, charger
*the SEVENTY-FIVE (not including the ones in the motorcycle) individual gears/alternate ratios that make up the UNOBTAINABLE FACTORY RACING TRANSMISSION KIT.
*tire warmers, f/r stands
*etc.
 
To further document things, the photos should take over from here.  I tried to photograph all the spares so you can paw thru them…  but one photo got missed -showing the two alternate rate Ohlins shock springs. The only thing that has happened to the bike in the years on display is the right aluminum clip-on split due fatigue/time under load.  (You can actually see it in photo #6, right clip on…  a small white line, about 3/4″).
 
Outside of that- the motorcycles’ internals are fresh and as set by Perry.  With fluids, tires, battery and a proper set up for you- the bike is ready to ride.
1998-yamaha-tz250-expansion-chamber
There are no takers yet at the $17,500 starting bid. The listing includes a huge amount of spares as described by the seller, something that can make or break the deal on a bike like this, unless you’re just planning to simply display it. Two-strokes, especially highly-strung, tuned-to-within-an-inch-of-their-lives racing two-strokes consume parts regularly. Folks racing on a budget are likely familiar with that and comfortable wrenching but, when you’re running a nearly twenty-year-old, limited-production motorcycle with parts you likely could never have simply picked up on the shelves of your local dealer, the chances of finding what you need are vanishingly small.
1998-yamaha-tz250-dash
And not only are maintenance parts included, but go-fast bits are in the mix. I can’t imagine there’s a track in the world you couldn’t configure those seventy-five gears to tackle, which is probably the whole point, and I have no idea what the trick front end and shock would be worth on the open market. $17,500+ is a lot of money, but considering the race-winning history and the fact that it’s basically a complete race-bike kit in a box (just add rider) that suddenly starts to seem pretty reasonable.
-tad
1998-yamaha-tz250-l-side
Everybody Loves a Winner: 1998 Yamaha TZ250 for Sale
Yamaha October 14, 2016 posted by

Fresh Off the Boat: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-l-frontToday’s Yamaha TZR250 has a couple interesting things going for it. In addition to the unusual, reversed-cylinder configuration of this Japanese market 3MA, it’s also available in this interesting black/grey/red color scheme: almost all the 3MAs we’ve featured on this site have been white with red speed-block graphics.

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-r-rear

Earlier TZR250s from 1986-1988 used a conventional liquid-cooled parallel-twin engine. The 3MA version available between 1989-1990 had the cylinders spun around 180° with the carburetors on the front of the engine, and the exhausts facing the rear of the bike, tucked up under the seat and exiting through the tail, Desmosedici-style. This helped significantly with packaging issues common to two-strokes: those bulky expansion chambers need to go somewhere, and most other manufacturers needed to introduce “gull-arm” curved swingarms to allow the exhausts to tuck in close for maximum cornering clearance.

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-l-rear

As with the other 250cc two-strokes of the era, the engine was backed by a six-speed gearbox and the frame was lightweight aluminum, Yamaha’s “Deltabox” design here. Power was restricted by government mandate to 45hp and weight was in line with the class as well, at just over 300lbs wet.

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-r-side

From the original eBay listing: 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

The bike is just imported from Japan. Not registered yet in the U.S. Overall clean bike. Very good running condition sharp response of the 2-stroke engine is still well. Can shift all gears very smooth. Brakes are work fine. Electricals are all working, aside from right side direction indicator. Has Yamaha genuine fairings. But has hairline cracks and chips and scratches on fairings. Fuel tank has some dents. Used motorcycle with wear more than 25 years old, so look carefully all pictures and video.

Speedometer looks like a Yamaha genuine part and shows 18,900 km = about 11,800 miles, but actual mileage is unknown.

Will needs new tires and fork seals too.

Again, this bike is sold without title.

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-gauges

The seller also helpfully includes a link to a video of the bike being started, along with a link to plenty of additional photos. Obviously, the usual issues apply here regarding that lack of a title. But if you live in a state where getting paperwork for a bike like this isn’t impossible, that just means you’ll pay less for the privilege: in spite of the handling and performance on par with its contemporaries, 3MA TZRs currently cost far less than an equivalent NSR or RGV. Parts will prove to be more difficult to obtain, but you probably won’t be finding parts for any of these 25-year-old, Japanese-market two-stroke sport bikes your local dealer…

-tad

1989-yamaha-tzr250-black-r-rear-naked

Yamaha September 2, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing: CA-Titled 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale

Update 9.4.2016: I’ve received word that this bike is now sold. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

This Featured Listing is part of a set from the sellers for a VFR400, TZR250, and an NSR250. They are available for purchase as a group or individually. The sellers are available this labor day weekend for personal inspections in Southern California. -dc

unnamed

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Front

Here in the USA, the 80s and 90s saw intense competition between the Japanese Big Four in the 600cc and 750cc classes, with the bikes seeing almost yearly updates to the roadbikes and fierce rivalries on track. Oveseas, the same sort of knife-fight-in-a-phone-booth competition was happening in the quarter-liter sportbike class, with little two-strokes like this TZR250 looking for any performance advantage to edge out its rivals.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Rear

Earlier bikes in the class were mostly parallel-twins, although Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha were all running v-twins by the late 90s, all in an effort to maximize the slim performance benefits available. All featured cutting-edge technology, with lightweight aluminum beam frames, top-spec brakes, power valves, “banana” swingarms designed to maximize cornering clearance, and bulging expansion chambers. Later bikes even featured some seriously cutting-edge electronics, with Honda’s PGM-III creating a three-dimensional ignition map for each cylinder, based on throttle-position, revs, and gear. The bikes all made similar power and weighed in at around 300lbs, with narrow powerbands and razor-sharp handling.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Tank

Before moving to a v-twin with the 3XV, Yamaha experimented with the 3MA version of their TZR250 that used a parallel-twin configuration with the cylinders reversed so the carburetors were up front and the exhausts faced to the rear. This mainly seems to have been a way to efficiently package the bike’s exhausts: two-strokes rely on bulbous expansion chambers to make competitive power, and routing them under and around the engine and past the swingarm was challenging. Aside from some slightly bulging side-panels, the reverse-cylinder 3MA solved that problem, and the stinger tips poking through the tail look very trick.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Fairing

The 3MA is a pretty exotic little bike and pretty rare outside Japan. Reliability is claimed to be no worse than any other 250cc two-stroke, but parts availability for this Japanese-market-only bike can be tricky. Looking for performance parts for your NSR250? Tyga’s got a whole website worth of exhausts, engine kits, rearsets, and bodywork. The 3MA? Better brush up on your Japanese and get ready for long waits as parts ship from the other side of the world.

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA L Rear

From the seller: 1989 TZR250 3MA for Sale

7,614km Original owner, purchased new from EMI, CA titled & registration (currently on non-op), this TZR is basically stock except for custom ceramic coated expansion chambers with jetting to match, braided steel brake lines, rear fender eliminated, and has full tread Bridgestone Battlax BT014 tires. Oil injection intact. Rear lower corner of left side fairing damaged, not too visible, but needs repair. Has not been started in a while, but fuel system is dry, petcock recently rebuilt.

Spares & extras: Gearbox cassette, steering damper, & a few bits.

Comes with Pit Bull rear stand, fresh Yuasa battery and trickle charger, parts catalog, service manual, and more documentation. Pit Bull front stand is available.

$5900

In case you don’t feel like doing math this morning, 7,614km works out to just 4,731 miles. The price is on the high side for a 3MA, but not by very much, and the bike’s legal status and very low miles more than make up for it: I hear that it’s possible to register these in California, but it can be expensive and difficult. This one saves you the trouble, and includes some spares to boot. It’s not absolutely perfect cosmetically, but unless you’re looking for a museum piece, this looks like a great example. I don’t have the money or the space for another bike right now, but this one’s making me wish I did.

-tad

1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA R Seat

Featured Listing: CA-Titled 1989 Yamaha TZR250 3MA for Sale