Posts by tag: Triple

Honda September 14, 2015 posted by

Middleweight Two-Stroke: 1987 Honda NS400R for Sale

1987 Honda NS400R Faired

I have a contrary streak in me a mile wide and sometimes I like being different just to be different. I've owned Saabs and Alfa Romeos, both of which feature some really interesting design features that offer up alternatives to conventional thinking, although they don't always work as advertised... And to me, the Honda NS400R is a bit like that.

1987 Honda NS400R L Engine

A middleweight two-stroke with a liquid-cooled, 90° V3 that put 72hp through a six-speed transmission, one might reasonably ask, "Why a V3?" I'd assume it was marginally narrower than an inline triple for better aerodynamics: Honda isn't known for doing things "just because." But the truth is that I don't really care if it's actually better. I just want a two-stroke V3 motorcycle.

1987 Honda NS400R Dash

If you're looking for a typically wild, two-stroke ride, this might not actually be the droid you're looking for. Strangely, Honda did everything possible to un-stroke-ify the NS400R: water-jackets quieted the mechanical racket, and power-valves combined with bigger displacement to provide a modicum of midrange power.

1987 Honda NS400R L Rear

These were a bit of an odd duck when new: not as lightweight and visceral as the 250's, and certainly not as lethal as the big 500cc fours. But they were blessed with what some claimed was the best handling of the era, and if you're into weird engine configurations, I dare you to try and find another two-stroke V3 running around anywhere.

1987 Honda NS400R R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1987 Honda NS400R for Sale

1987 Honda NS400R, MC-19, 3 Cylinder, 2 stroke, 34,000 KM, Brand New Paint and Windshield, Runs Great, Clean Calif. Title and Registered. 

So there's a bit of a mystery here. Is that the same bike in the first photo? It looks a bit sharper and cleaner than the other pictures... And that front mudguard doesn't match. The seller claims that it "runs great" which is a good sign, considering these can be a bit of a pain to obtain parts for. But if it has "brand new paint" it might be a good idea to show some pictures of said paint. Or does it mean he has brand new paint in cans, not yet applied to the bike?

Questions like that don't appear to be discouraging potential buyers: bidding is up north of $3,000 with the Reserve Not Met. Fairing off, it looks pretty dusty and I'm wondering how much more this would sell for if they'd bothered to clean it off a bit before listing it...

-tad

1987 Honda NS400R R Rear

Middleweight Two-Stroke: 1987 Honda NS400R for Sale
Honda January 9, 2015 posted by

Some Assembly Required: 1986 Honda NS400R

1986 Honda NS400R R Side

Honda’s NSR400R was a snarling, two-stroke middleweight from an era of unprecedented experimentation; a three-cylinder, triple-piped sportbike with cutting-edge specifications. The 1980’s must have been a very discouraging time for European and Italian manufacturers. While they were barely hanging on by their fingernails, Japanese manufacturers were in the throes of an era of funky, experimental technologies, trying out new formulas, and nothing was off-limits: unusual engine configurations, turbos, and active suspension were all tried, with varying degrees of success.

1986 Honda NS400R R Rear Suspension

The NSR400R wasn’t lacking performance or technology: the rattling heart of the little monster was a liquid-cooled, 90° V3 that put 72hp through a six-speed transmission. Power-valve technology beefed up the midrange power while water-cooling increased power and kept mechanical noise to a minimum, although the snarl from the pipes is undeniably that of a two-stroke. Anti-dive forks and modular wheels wrapped in radial tires completed the package.

1986 Honda NS400R Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Honda NS400R for Sale

This is a rare Honda NS400R Rothman's edition 2-stroke. We got this jewel  from a retired motorcycle mechanic. Bike is not running and engine will need to be redone according to him. Honda appears to be complete with a couple of things missing like keys, exhaust, mirrors, gear shifter lever, kick start lever, and coil cover.  Paint and fairing is nice with some scratches. Mileage is really low at  4,741 Km. Bike has a small decal with Japanese writing and No. 301 If someone can tell me the year or more info please feel free to do so and I will update the auction.  BIKE IS SOLD WITH A BILL OF SALE BUT If winning bidder wants a title we can obtain it at additional cost  just contact us.

1986 Honda NS400R L Fairing

Just two days left on the auction, with bidding just over $3,000 and the reserve not met. While this bike isn't 100% complete, the bike is in cosmetically good shape, and the parts missing are fairly straightforward to replace. Those missing pipes might be difficult or possibly expensive to source... So why not go all-out and, since you're going to have to rebuild the engine anyway, just have someone whip up a set of pipes with custom expansion chambers, all out of titanium while you’re at it?

-tad

1986 Honda NS400R L Side

Some Assembly Required: 1986 Honda NS400R
Honda November 10, 2014 posted by

Two-Stroke Triple: 1985 Honda NS400R for Sale

1985 Honda NS400R R Side

This Honda NSR400R was up for sale recently, but did not find a buyer. Hopefully, it will sell this time around! After years of relatively conservative technology, where overhead cams were considered pretty cutting-edge, motorcycle design went into overdrive during the 1980’s and the Japanese, fueled by their 1970’s domination of the market, were at the forefront. An exciting new era of electronics and a futuristic mentality that sought to redefine what a motorcycle could be led to all kind of striking experiments in technology.

1985 Honda NS400R R Side Front

Their looks and electronically-actuated suspensions were just the tip of the iceberg: engine configurations also varied wildly. All of the major manufacturers experimented with turbos, and you could find inline four-cylinder cruisers, straight-six standards, and two-stroke V3 sportbikes, like this Honda NSR400R.

The NSR400R was powered by a liquid-cooled, two-stroke 90° V3 that put 72hp through a six-speed transmission. Water jackets quieted the stroker racket, displacement made for more torque, and Honda’s power-valve fattened the power curve for very smooth delivery and made for a very polished package. Combined with light weight and excellent suspension, it was one of the best-handling bikes of the period.

1985 Honda NS400R Dash

From the original eBay listing: 1985 Honda NSR400R for Sale

Original owner, bought new in '85 in the crate, all oem with exception of a increased capacity all aluminum radiator. This bike is ready to ride. Needs nothing new bridgestone battleax tires with less than 20 miles on them. I have clear FL title. Never wrecked or dropped, has no dents nor scratches. Has 25,550 kilometers which is around 15,870 miles. Please feel free to contact me with any questions

1985 Honda NS400R Rear

This bike looks to be in particularly good shape and there are four days left on the auction, with bidding up to $5,000 and the reserve not met. A very cool example from an era that is only just starting to be recognized for the innovations it inspired.

-tad

1985 Honda NS400R L Side

Two-Stroke Triple: 1985 Honda NS400R for Sale
Triumph August 28, 2014 posted by

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595

Fast, classy, and just a bit different, this Triumph Daytona T595 represented a huge change in thinking for the recently resurrected company. Early on in Triumph's John Bloor era, cost-cutting measures that didn’t compromise reliability or quality were in full-effect, and basically all of their bikes were based around a common frame and two engines, which gave plenty of versatility to create new models by simply swapping parts around. So a 900cc triple or a 1200cc four could be slotted in, with different bodywork and suspension fitted to create a range of motorcycles that eventually included a dual-sport, a sport bike, a sport touring bike, and a naked roadster.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Front

The resulting motorcycles were never be able to compete directly with more pure and focused designs: multi-purpose engines and frames were always going to be too heavy, and not optimized for specific tasks. But the designs were modern and significantly improved on the reliability and usability of the older Triumphs, helping pave the way for the Triumphs of today.

And even though the bikes were generally not focused enough to really compete against dedicated sportbikes from Japan, they had far more character, good looks, were sized for larger riders, and were uncommon enough for folks looking for something different than the usual shrieking fours. The original Daytona came in both four and triple flavors, although the added weight of the larger four cylinder moved it even further towards the sport-touring end of the spectrum.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Rear

The second generation of the Daytona was a big leap forward in terms of both style and performance. While the unfortunately-designated T595 sounds like it should be packing a 600cc motor, it’s got a big, meaty 955cc triple that pumps out 130hp. Like the earlier Daytona, the T595 was a bit too heavy for serious track duty, but as a road-weapon it was hard to beat, with a comfortable seating position, excellent brakes, and plenty of torque. Very much a GT, the perfect bike for folks who wanted to buy British but also wanted a completely modern machine.

Some minor low-production-volume quirks aside, the Daytona delivered.

1997 Triumph Daytona R Side

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Triumph Daytona for Sale

Check out this super cool and hard to find bike!! 1997 Triumph Daytona T595 in Strontium Yellow. A real classic sport bike. Lots of performance and great styling to boot. The 955cc in line three cylinder engine with 130 horses and 74 foot pounds of torque makes this baby boogie. With almost a five gallon fuel tank, a six speed transmission, and a low weight of only 435 pounds you can great range and travel on this bike.  This bike has super low miles for the year with only 11,280 clicks on the odometer the Daytona has only averaged about 660 miles a year. Very clean bike and freshly serviced. Priced right and ready to roll today.

These aren’t especially rare, but they’re pretty hard to find in such nice original condition. I loved the styling at the time, especially in silver, and I think it’s aged pretty well. Too curvy by far to look modern, the proportions are very nice and a lack of outrageous graphics favored by Japanese manufacturers keeps things simple and elegant. This is one of those bikes that, like the GSX-R 1100, I’d love an excuse to buy: a long highway commute, or as a weekend getaway machine.

1997 Triumph Daytona L Rear

It’s unfortunate that Triumph doesn’t make a big-bore Daytona today: just take a Speed Triple and fit a fairing. It wouldn’t be competitive in  any eligible race classes, but neither was the old one. In today’s market, where “win on Sunday, sell on Monday” seems to be less and less of a concern and bikes with oddball-displacements like Kawi’s 636 and Ducati’s 899 offer additional choice and high performance in a very sporty package, it seems a no-brainer, especially considering the success and popularity of Triumph's 675 Daytona.

-tad

1997 Triumph Daytona L Side

1990’s Budget Britbike: 1997 Triumph Daytona T595
Benelli July 16, 2014 posted by

Featured Listing: 2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 for sale in Georgia

I've been keeping my eyes open for a nice Benelli Tornado to write up for a while now. These represent a reasonably successful attempt to resurrect the storied Italian brand and they're supposedly still producing variations of this bike, although the company was bought by the Chinese Group Qianjiang and are currently being built there.

Modern Benellis were showing up with decent regularity as untitled holdovers or low-mileage speculator bikes until recently, but have since become scarce. Have sellers given up or have they been snapped up and squirreled away?

2008 Benelli Tornado Tre 1130 for sale on eBay

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 R Side

Originally developed as a three cylinder, 900cc machine that was teased at the 1999 Milan motorcycle show, displacement for production bikes was upped when it became clear this would be a streetbike and displacement limits for racing could be safely ignored. Think of this as the big-displacement Daytona that Triumph never built.

Reviews at the time flattered the style [duh] and the bike featured some very interesting design features, including a radiator tucked up into the tail section that kept the weight of the engine as far forward as possible. A cool design feature emphasized by brightly-colored fans to help pull air across it, but I wonder what that’s like for riders and potential pillion passengers…

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 Tail

Power, especially for the 900cc version, was not top-of-the-class, but it was very smooth and characterful. Although early models had somewhat iffy fueling at lower revs, this got better over time and is relatively easy to fix.

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 Dash

Parts availability could be iffy moving forward, as the dealer network was never much to write home about and is likely much, much worse now. FastBikes magazine has been running one as a long-termer and back issues might make a great resource for tuning, parts, and substitutions that could be made to work. That end-can would be the first thing to go if I bought one, and I'll bet any number of other parts could be modified to fit: a stubby little low-mount can from Arrow would probably clean up the rear nicely.

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 Tail Section

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Benelli Tornado for Sale

Light scratches, possibly dings or dents, might be missing a nut or bolt.
Comes from the factory loaded with all kinds of premium parts that beg to be ogled.
It would be prudent to have a fair amount of exotic experience to own this beast.
The riding design and eccentricities of the bike will demand a strong confident hand,
otherwise you will end up on the pavement along with a hefty repair bill.
Its design is something to behold. The ram air intakes run the entire inner length
of the bike to the rear section where it forces the air onto the radiator concealed within
the rear cowling.
To add to the impressive looks, there are two fully functioning fans in the rear that kick on to pull air over the radiator when it hits a certain temperature.
The bike comes with a cd copy of the service manual and a few spare parts.

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 Tank

This is one of those bikes I'd love to have in my fantasy garage. There are faster bikes for less money, and parts may be a pain. But the styling is distinctive and very pretty, and the bike is fast enough to challenge all but the very fastest riders. Although with bodywork like that, this probably isn’t the best bike for hard-core track days…

When you can ride something as rare and elegant, I think the trade offs are worth it.

-tad

2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 Front

 

Featured Listing: 2008 Benelli Tornado 1130 for sale in Georgia
Triumph June 27, 2014 posted by

Out of the Ashes: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III

This was really where the modern Triumph began. Basically a mix-and-match of triples and fours stuck into a modular, steel spine-framed chassis that allowed the reborn British company maximum versatility to create different bikes on a common platform at a relatively minimal cost. The 900 in the Daytona was a three-cylinder and the same basic engine also powered the Thunderbird, Trident, Sprint, Tiger, Trophy, and Speed Triple.

1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for sale on eBay

1995 Triumph Daytona III Front Rear

Unfortunately, this modularity came at the price of increased weight. Handling isn’t ideal, and the bikes weren’t competitive in terms of ultimate performance when compared to the Japanese machines of the time. But they exuded character, were reasonably reliable, and allowed Anglophiles to “fly the flag” with pride.

1995 Triumph Daytona III Rear Speedo

While the bike as a whole may have been a bit heavy and slow-steering, the engine was, as the Brits say, “a corker.” Powerful, smooth, and relaxed, it would pull from low and wind out to redline, whichever struck your fancy. Too heavy for track work, it’s an excellent GT. A road-destroying tool for fast street riding, with a protective fairing and reasonable comfort, stable handling, combined with strong brakes and that peach of an engine.

1995 Triumph Daytona III R Front Wheel Engine

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona Limited Edition Super III

Bike is always garaged. It is a solid 9.5 out of 10. There is 1 tiny blemish a half an inch long on the tank but barely noticeable. The bike is one of 150 world wide. Special features include carbon fiber fender and sub-fender,flat side mikuni carbs, 6 pot calipers, and seat cowling. The motor is a 900cc triple, tuned by Cosworth (of rally car fame). The bike was fully serviced 30 days ago. It is started periodically but not driven to ensure the battery and motor stay in good working order. Tires are fairly new with 95% tread remaining. Though the bike retains all stock pieces (exhaust cans as well) with sale, some tasteful upgrades were made. Micron carbon pipes, handlebar risers, throttle meister cruise control and a beautiful Corbin seat. This is a rare bike in an important time in Triumph's rebirth. It is sure to appreciate, and I will miss it.

I think the styling on these early Bloor-era Triumphs has aged particularly well. Like the Ducati 900SS, they comfortably straddle eras, with design cues both vintage and modern. I prefer the first-gen Speed Triple, but this bike looks great in yellow and would make an excellent get-out-of-town bike for long weekend rides.

-tad

1995 Triumph Daytona III R Tank

Out of the Ashes: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III