Posts by tag: trellis frame

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Bimota July 26, 2020 posted by

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

The Bimota DB2 is a bit of an odd duck [pun!]: the company’s claim to fame was building high-spec, light weight, race-inspired sportbikes powered by Japanese engines. Those engines came from bikes that were overbuilt and often significantly heavy, so Bimota found a significant performance increase by building motorcycles as much as a hundred pounds lighter than the original machines that donated their powerplants. But Ducati, with a few exceptions, has always had the whole handling thing pretty much nailed, and the DB2 isn’t much lighter than the Ducati 900SS that donated its engine to the endeavor.

Bimota’s naming system flies in the face of motorcycling convention. You’d probably think a Bimota SB6 would be powered by a 600cc engine. It’s not. Instead, it’s packing 1100cc of Suzuki heat. “SB6” means the bike in question is the sixth Suzuki-powered Bimota. The number has nothing to do with displacement. Because Italy. The original Ducati-powered DB1 proved to be a big seller and, at around 600 units, qualified as nearly volume production.

Luckily, the DB2 was a bit lighter than the 900SS at a claimed 373lbs dry. The one-piece tank shroud and tail section was held in place by a few fasteners, and was wrapped around a plastic fuel cell, all of which helped keep things simple as well as light. It was powered by Ducti’s 904cc air-cooled Desmodue v-twin from the 900SS that produced 86 claimed horsepower. That charismatic engine was suspended in a trellis frame similar to the original Supersport unit, matched to a sexy tubular swingarm, with stout Paioli forks and an adjustable Öhlins shock out back.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale

1993 Bimota DB2 VIN#ZES1DB21XPRZES018. 408 DB2s were manufactured and this is one of the 285 full-fairing models. I purchased this bike in 2014 and have put less than 1,000 miles on it since then. After picking it up it was fully serviced by DucPond (Ducati Winchester, VA) with valves, belts, fluids and a new clutch basket and plates. Most recently in Feb 2020 it was back for belts and fluids at DucPond. Bike has the air cooled Ducati 2 valve motor in it. This is a very light bike with remarkable handling and great brakes – only bike I have ridden with true floating front discs. Reliable, easy to work on and tons of options available for it. It runs strong and pulls very nicely.

Everything works on the bike. The low fuel level light comes on and off regardless of the fuel level – common to these bikes I think. If I was keeping it I would put fresh tires on it (the ones on it are past their shelf life); change the brake fluid again; and replace the blinker relay with an adjustable one (they blink too fast). Bike charges fine and has a newish battery in it. No warranty expressed or implied – it is 27 years old, but I would happily ride this bike anywhere. As a 27 year old bike it is not perfect and has a few flaws which I have tried to highlight in the pictures. The paint is probably as good as the factory, but has blemishes in it. Clear title in my name.

Not on the bike but included are the steering dampener and original airbox. It comes with two sets of keys and the original books. Separately I have a lot of spares for this bike, that are not included with the sale here but I will consider a good offer on them from the purchaser of the bike. Bike shows 1978 miles and if the below is correct, then total mileage would be about 5,000 miles.

Prior to my ownership what the previous owner stated (these are not my words). There is a letter in the paper work indicating acceptance of the bike as a gift.

“This motorcycle was completely restored in 2001 when it had approximately 3000 miles and donated to the Larz Anderson Transportation Museum in Boston, who elected to auction it to focus on their older collection of pre-war cars.

Enhancements performed in 2001:

“944cc big bore kit, stainless steel engine studs, carburetor jet kit, new timing belts, carbon fibre belt covers, braided brake lines, polished wheels, mufflers, intake manifolds, new chain and sprocket, adjustable brake and clutch levers, tinted windscreen, Euro headlight, new speedometer and tachometer, painted frame.”

Bike is located in Northern VA.

Bidding is very active on this example, which is no surprise considering it hasn’t even cracked $10k yet. I have to be honest: the Bimota DB2 is one of my favorite Bimotas, but I’m not a huge fan of those graphics with their dripping paint/urban camo design. I’d happily live with them though, even in the garish white/purple [?!]/white scheme that was also available. It’s one of the purest expressions of Italian motorcycling, a light, nimble machine with striking looks and just enough power to be fun. The DB2 is easy to run as well, at least as far as the two-valve Ducati engine is concerned. Don’t be put off too much by the scary Italian reputation: a well cared-for Desmodue is good for 100,000 miles or more, and servicing isn’t all that expensive, or difficult for a handy home mechanic.

-tad

The Purist: 1993 Bimota DB2 for Sale
Suzuki October 2, 2018 posted by

Rolling Art – 1984 Bimota SB4S

Back on eBay with some new pictures after last year’s – RSBFS post – and auction which did not meet the reserve – Donn

Massimo Tamburrini was still at Bimota when the ground-pounding SB4S was introduced, using the 1,075cc Katana air/oil-cooled engine.  Though power is similar between the Suzuki GSX-1100S and the SB4S at around 112hp, Bimota holds a clear advantage in weight and top speed.  The northwest-based SB4S has recent maintenance and no apparent damage.

1984 Bimota SB4S for sale on eBay

Bimota’s artwork begins with the complex trellis frame, continues to the milled side connectors, and is covered by the full fairing and flowing tank/seat console.  With the tuner’s airbox and 4-into-2 exhaust, the overhead cams for Suzuki’s big four hulk behind the bodywork.  Classic Ceriani right-side-up forks and DeCarbon monoshock are adjustable and support 16″ Campagnolo wheels.  Not expected to be all that light as an unlimited GT, the SB4S is still 75 lbs. lighter than the Katana, and long gearing allows a top speed increase to 155 or so.

This SB4S’s kmh odometer translates to just under 10,000 miles, and provided the recent service included carburetor cleaning, appears to need nothing more than a spa day, and tires.  The pearl white fairings with red graphics look undamaged, and the rest looks complete and original.  From the eBay auction:

1984 Bimota SB4S.  Very rare full fairing, tube frame, one of 106 ever made, beautiful white pearl paint, new battery recent tune up and fluid change, bike runs perfect, no issues.  This is a pristine example of a early tube frame Bimota.  It’s a jewel.

At this stage in Bimota’s life the SB4 was also available as a kit, with the buyer supplying a GSX1100S for parts.  Seeing a home-built SB4 might be just as rare, but the factory-built SB4S is one of just a couple of hundred, rarer still with full fairing.  Not to mention cherry pearlescent paint.  The 16-inchers lend a funny look to the SB4S, but the fairing is roomy and can take the rider as far ( or farther ) than common sense allows…

-donn

Rolling Art – 1984 Bimota SB4S
Ducati July 22, 2017 posted by

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati 748R

Update 8.2.2017: SOLD!

Update 7.21.2017: Price dropped to $10,500 OBO. Additional pictures added in the gallery below. Thank you to Jay for supporting the site and good luck to potential buyers! -dc

The Ducati 748 was built from 1994-2002, in three variants – E, S, and R ( with factory racers identified as SP or SPS ).  Though the E can be a biposto, and the S a base model with upgraded components, the R is a single-seat homolagation special for World SuperSports racing, with parts the race team wanted to be able to use that year.  In the case of the 748, special parts include the frame, engine, suspension, airbox, and slipper clutch.  The 748 presented here has been lightly updated and very lightly used, and its time on display has left it looking excellent and ready to ride or display.

20160802 2001 ducati 748r left

20160802 2001 ducati 748r right front

Interestly, the desmoquattro engine as requested by the Cagiva brothers in 1985 was a mid-size 748cc’s, though Ducati’s bike had to wait until Tamburini had styled the 916 Superbike, with now-classic trellis frame and single-sided swingarm.

20160802 2001 ducati 748r left rear

20160802 2001 ducati 748r left engine unfaired  20160802 2001 ducati 748r underseat

The 748R has a much different engine than the base or S, 106 hp available thanks to high-lift cams, titanium connecting rods and valves, and fuel injectors centered in the 54 mm intake horns.  The frame was lightened and altered to accommodate the large carbon fiber airbox.  The suspension was up-spec’ed to Öhlins front and rear, 43mm front forks and fully adjustable.  Wheels are cast Marchesini 17’s.  The underseat exhaust has been upgraded to an Arrow system.

20160802 2001 ducati 748r right 20160802 2001 ducati 748r binnacle 20160802 2001 ducati 748r left rear wheel

Here are the owner’s comments :

This rare example is nearly stock with a full Arrow exhaust, Yoyodyne slave cylinder and a few carbon bits. I bought this bike about 13 months ago from a dealership in outside of San Francisco. Right before I bought her a major service including valves, belts, all fluids, chain, brake pads, tires and a few things I forgot were done (the bill was over $3000). I cleaned her up, rode her 100 miles then I drained the tank, pulled the battery and stuck her in my buddy’s office for a year. I pulled her out of the office a week ago, added some 100 octane to wake her up with a kick, installed a new battery and cleaned and polished every bit of her. she runs GREAT. She needs nothing, she is ready to be ridden or she can be display piece like she was for me.

20160802 2001 ducati 748r left front

20160802 2001 ducati 748r right muffler  20160802 2001 ducati 748r left front wheel unfaired

Number 817 of the required 1000, the 748R is a rare sight here since only 100 or so made it to the states.  Rare also that it hasn’t been raced or damaged, and has only 1796 miles on the clock.  After a long display career, the previous owner treated this bike to a full maintenance service.  The present owner added only 100 of those miles before draining the fuel and bringing the bike indoors again.

20160802 2001 ducati 748r office

748’s reviewed as diminutive knife-sharp handlers, and though the -S was said to be better for the road than the 996, the 748R may be better suited to the track.  Maybe your office manager will turn up their nose and your “new” 748R will have to live in the garage and drive on the street.  Or it could resume being a rare collector machine.  The owner asks $12,000 $10,500

-donn

Featured Listing – 2001 Ducati 748R
BMW June 2, 2017 posted by

Capitalist Tool – 1982 BMW-Krauser MKM 1000 #130

In the 1980’s, Michael Krauser was a leading manufacturer of motorcycle luggage and accessories, and ventured out on the slippery slope of motorcycle manufacture. Replacing the big-tube backbone frame of an R100RS with a Ph.D.-designed trellis saved 6 kg. and subsequently adding four-valve heads to the classic boxer liberated 12 hp. The result rode like a BMW but performed and was priced more like a Ferrari.

1982 BMW-Krauser MKM1000 for sale on eBay

With the bomb-proof boxer, five-speed, and shaft drive, the MKM1000 can certainly cope with the engine’s 70 hp.  Dual front disks and forward riding position keep the rider in the game.  The generous fairing makes a nice hole in the 138 mph breeze, and the sleek tank-seat fairing hides a metal fuel tank underneath.  Bespoke production and pricing more than double an R100RS insured exclusivity.

Coming out of California, this Krauser is recently restored and not registered in well, a while.  From the eBay auction:

Rare 1982 Krauser BMW MKM1000

Only 237 Bikes build by Race team Owner Krauser with an incredible Trellis frame.

This Bike is # 130.

No body knows how many still exist, most of bikes got exported to Japan . Only few to US.

This bike was sold new by San Jose BMW in 1982.

Completely restored to original condition with only OEM parts including Fairing decals which were pretty expensive.

Newly rebuilt motor, carbs and tranny with new clutch.

Tank reconditioned and sealed, new pet cocks.

Comes with original toolkit and little supplement OEM instruction booklet and other collected Literature.

The bike hasn’t been registered since 2000 and has current Non- Op status.

Bike runs and handles fantastic. Showed at the Quail Motorcycle Gathering.

Not appearing to be a 4-valve model, the engine in this MKM1000 will last much longer than the envelope-pushing arrangement of two valves per rocker arm.  Though this machine will likely spend most of its time on the display stand, it’s good to know ( and some concours require ) it’s operational.  Most went to Japan, and – one – owned by a certain financial magnate even made it to RSBFS, but only a few over two hundred were ever made.  With shapes and colors pushing forty, the Krauser is a thrilling opportunity for a collector, but for more fans, a vingette into a previous era, a look at how exciting the early days could be…

-donn

Capitalist Tool – 1982 BMW-Krauser MKM 1000 #130
Ducati February 26, 2017 posted by

Not Particularly – 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS

With a boatload of compromises made to accommodate the 998 cc Superbike engine, the list of things that the Monster S4RS isn’t is longer than those it is.  All a matter of priorities, as the water-cooled testastretta with top of the line components has a way of re-aligning priorities toward the moment.  This example from Colorado has been comprehensively farkled and looks ready to try and stop time.

2007 Ducati Monster S4RS

Not easy to show everything a water-cooled engine needs and have it look good.  Things that are normally hidden are polished, dressed, aligned, and straightened, with an occasional carbon fiber guard.  The SR4S sports the deep-V sump and curved radiators required by the 130 ponies, and has twin cooling fans that even the superbike didn’t get. The red paint of the trellis frame captures the eye and is complemented by the red racing stripe, but the tubular single-sided swingarm was left black.  Forged Marchesini snowflakes in white beckon the microfiber towel and cleaner wax.

The previous owners have been all over this Monster, and customized or updated nearly everything.  Euro-3 emissions required a catalyzer, but that was binned in favor of the Termignoni system.  Rizoma and DucaBike upgrades are everywhere, with SpeedyMoto, Samco, ASV, and assorted carbon accents.   With the exception of holes left from the rear blinkers, it hangs together pretty well, and almost gets a red, white, and blue theme going here and there.  From the eBay auction:

Up for sale is a 2 owner Ducati Monster in perfect condition. It has over 20k in upgrades. New tires less than -100 miles.
Full Termignoni Exhaust 
Termignoni ECU
Open Airbox
Extra gas tank
Speedy Moto bar risers
Rizoma bars 
Rizoma grips
Speedymoto clutch slave cylinder
CRG lanespltter mirrors 
Smoked windshield
Rizoma front blinkers
Integrated rear tailight 
Carbon Fiber front fender
Carbon Fiber rear fender
Carbon Fiber tail fender
Carbon Fiber chain cover 
Carbon Fiber cam belt covers
Carbon Fiber heel guards
Ducabike oil plug
Ducabike front sprocket cover
Ducabike rear sprocket carrier
Ducabike timing cover
Quick change lightweight rear sprocket
Gold DID chain
Re-geared front sprocket
Samco coolant hoses
Rebuilt front forks less than 200 miles ago
Cox radiator guard
Cox oil cooler guard
Rizoma clutch cover
Rizoma clutch pressure plate
Rizoma clutch springs & retainers
Motovation Frame sliders
Clutch & brake reservoir caps 
ASV clutch and brake levers
Blue Anodized adjustable fork dampers

The S4RS isn’t a racking up the miles type of bike, and this one has some nice rides in store before the next major service.  Seems like a pro detail would be worth it, though this level of color and carbon will attract attention no matter what.  While other bikes better suited to long hauls and track days, the testastretta Monster is a pretty extreme choice for hacking around.  The quality components, factory and aftermarket, will be beneficial whether you’re going across town or for the whole afternoon…

-donn

Not Particularly – 2007 Ducati Monster S4RS
MV Agusta September 14, 2016 posted by

Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

After Cagiva’s purchase of MV Agusta’s storied name in 1999, the company decided to enter the boutique naked-sport market and developed the Brutale 750.  The model has been the subject of several limited production factory customs, and further evolution brought the Brutale 910S.  Though it will never have the utility or daily ridership of a Monster or SV, the Brutale is one of the very sportiest of naked sports.

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-left

2008 MV Agusta Brutale 910S

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-right

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-right-rear

The 910S is powered by an inline four with MV Agusta’s excellent four-valve heads, pretty high compression at 13:1 and making 134 hp.  The rather sculptural trellis frame surrounds the engine and terminates in large cast swingarm connectors.  The front suspension is a pair of rather massive 50mm inverted Marzocchi forks, and a Sachs-damped single-sided swingarm is found under the seat.  Nissin supplies the 6-piston front calipers over 310mm rotors, with a single 210mm rear brake.  It’s unfaired except for the radiator shroud, though the double parabolic headlight looks aerodynamic enough.  Behind the teardrop instrument binnacle, a split level seat and low European handlebars complete the cockpit.

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-right-front

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-left-tank

This Colorado Brutale has less than 2,000 miles, and looks excellent.  Apparently the only mod, the HP Corsa exhaust is a lot shorter and likely quite a bit lighter than the factory dual mufflers.  From the eBay auction:

This bike only has 2,000 miles on it.  It runs and looks like it just rolled off the showroom floor. It only has one small crack in the paint in the tank, which is very difficult to see in the light.  I used a flashlight to take a picture and make it more visible for the ad.  You won’t find a nicer, lower mileage 2008 Brutale anywhere.  This bike has a custom exhaust that gives it an awesome look.

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-right-rear-wheel

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-left

The 910S reviewed as a nice handling standard with ergonomics favoring the smaller rider.  The low bars and nearly rear-set pegs make for an aggressive posture, the narrow seat helping the rider move around a bit.  The trademark star alloys identify it as an MV Agusta, and the fuel tank’s wings give you almost another gallon.  A distinctive and thoroughly modern take on the naked sport, the Brutale 910S uses Agusta’s potent transverse four, but otherwise makes its own road…

-donn

20160914-2008-mv-agusta-brutale-910s-cockpit

Et tu – 2008 MV Agusta  Brutale 910S
Ducati September 4, 2016 posted by

One Owner, Low Mile -1988 Ducati 750F1

Pushing 30, the Ducati 750 F1B should almost be over on Classic Sport Bikes for Sale, but as such a quintessential desmodue, it belongs with its later sportbike progeny.  Built as a very racey road-going update of the championship-winning 600 TT2, the 750 F1 was also raced but enjoyed only occasional success.  With under 4,000 one-owner miles, this outstanding 750 F1 scores high for collectibility.

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 left

1988 Ducati 750 F1 for sale on eBay

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 right front

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 right rear

With single overhead cams driven by new-fangled belts, the F1 looked toward the future, but its 76 hp had only a very minimal sportbike to push around.  The steel trellis frame supported the engine from above and the fuel tank rested on top, fuel flowing into 36mm Dell’Orto carburetors.  Right-side-up 40mm forks are up front, with single monoshock behind.  Brakes are single piston calipers with 300mm front disks, and 280 mm rear.  Super light before it was a trademark, the fiberglass endurance fairing and seat console are wrapped in the tricolore.

 

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 left front

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 right engine

Offered by an eBay store that has a few bikes but appears to concentrate on motoring collectibles, this 750 F1 looks the part.  It looks super-clean and substantially correct, though sharper eyes will find more than the missing side cover and modern grips and mirrors that caught my eye.  The seller doesn’t offer much history but says this in the eBay auction:

We are delighted to offer this special Ducati 750 F1

Just ONE OWNER with 3972 miles!

Rare to begin with: Where on earth can you find a reference quality example like this?

Much more exotic and exclusive than any Japanese bike of this era.

The F1 series are now getting the recognition they deserve for the super bikes they are. They do represent a good value in today’s collector world….not yet, are they at the inflated prices of the 750 SS and 900 SS.

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 right grip

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 left rear wheel

Though Ducati was in the middle of a rough patch when the 750 F1 was designed, they pulled through and went on to bigger and better desmos.  Without anything not required for the sportbike mission ( fun ! ) on board, the limited horsepower, handling, and braking were plenty.  Though the company did inevitably get dragged into the features and specifications arms race, the 750 F1 is revered for its attention to the basics.  And while it might get to a surprisingly high price before the reserve is met, this example appears to stay on message perfectly

-donn

20160904 1988 ducati 750 f1 rear

One Owner, Low Mile -1988 Ducati 750F1
Bimota July 18, 2016 posted by

Featured Listing – 1984 Bimota KB3

Update 7.28.2016: The seller has informed me this bike is now sold. Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

Update 7.18.2016: This KB3 has been relisted and now has a buy-it-now of $14,995. Links updated. Good luck to buyers and seller. -dc

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left

Several years after its original 1984 build, Motorcyclist and SportRider magazine writer Nick Ienatsch purchased a crashed basket-case and rebuilt it into the iconic 1980’s sportbike it was – even more so as he upgraded the engine to 1,260 cc’s.  Due to the ergonomic realities of riding a 1980’s sportbike with a 1950’s body, this KB3 is again available to be the most extreme road machine in the gallery or on the vintage ride.

1984 Bimota KB3 for sale on eBay

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right front

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left engine unfaired  20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right front wheel

Bimota’s early perimeter frame design is executed in chromoly steel and cradles the sides of the big Kawi four cylinder.  Billet frame connectors hold the rear sub-frame and swingarm pivot, which is directly in line between the rear axle and primary sprocket.  Ienatsch took the rebuilder’s opportunity to install a dream engine, a 1260cc engine built by Gatlin Racing with dual-plugged and ported heads with oversize intake valves, Webcam cams, MTC cylinders, Wiseco pistons, and Falicon crank.  With 38mm Mikuni smooth bore flat slide carbs, the engine claims 140 hp, rarified air for a two-valve per cylinder engine.

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 dash

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right grip  20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left peg

Chassis design being Bimota’s specialty, the KB3 uses offset triple clamps to help control fork compression under braking.  The 40 mm Ceriani forks have magnesium tubes and 8 settings.  The De Carbon gas monoshock supports the chromoly swingarm with a rocker arm and pushrod arrangement.  The subsystems are beautifully mounted on mostly billet brackets, from the brake calipers to footpegs, clutch slave to rear axle eccentric adjusters.  The lightweight wheels are upgraded PM wheels as noted in the ad – 17” front and 18” rear. The KB3 carries a supersport’s 3/4 fairing with roomy windscreen, and one of the sweetest integrations of the tank, side covers, and seat fairing ever.

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 front

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right rear wheel  20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left steering head unfaired

In that era Bimota sold chassis kits and completed bikes, and the KB3 frame could also be a Suzuki-powered SB4 with different engine mounts, which was how this particular bike started life.  The owner rides this bike occasionally and has brought maintenance up to date for the next caretaker, as he says in the eBay auction:

The bike was serviced about 500 miles ago with an oil change, brake and clutch fluid change and valve adjustment.  I just installed (mid-May ‘16) a new Duracell AGM battery that has a two year full replacement warranty.  The engine starts easily and runs well and the bike is a blast to ride.  (I just did a 2-½ hour ride on it this past week.)  Whenever the bike was going to sit more than a couple of weeks, I always drained the gas tank and carburetor float bowls to prevent any corrosion issues.  It is air/oil cooled and easy to work on with easy top end access from above given the wrap around frame (see pics), and it is carbureted so you can work on it easily without a computer – not that I’ve had to do anything major – it is a well dialed in motorcycle.  The custom exhaust with Supertrapp muffler sounds wonderful, and I don’t think there has ever been a more beautiful Bimota made!  I prefer limited electronic gadgetry, and this bike fits the bill perfectly.

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left from unfaired

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right peg  20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left rear wheel

The final Kawasaki-engined Bimota, the KB3 was built for only two years and a total of 112 machines.  Rarity assured, and the superb condition is a lot better than more neglected super specials, even as shown unfaired.  The tricolore harlequin might be a leap of faith for some, but they will never be able to say they didn’t see you coming.  As featured in Motorcyclist magazine’s Heavy Artillery series, it certainly qualifies – the big bore motor work, Bimota’s heavyweight chassis engineering, and concours preparation.

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 right rear

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left seat  20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left rear

The auction has 9 days left to run with a buy-it-now of $18,995.  The Phoenix-based owner requests questions via his eBay listing.

-donn

20160602 1983 bimota kb3 left cockpit

Featured Listing – 1984 Bimota KB3