Posts by tag: Testastretta Evoluzione

Bimota October 27, 2018 posted by

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

Bimotas are unparalleled garage ornaments: blessed with exotic components, striking looks, and wild graphics, they're two-wheeled art and look every bit the barely-tamed racebikes they're purported to be. Unfortunately, they've also been pretty hit-or-miss when it came to the actual riding, often from bike to bike. Set up for any Bimota is key and, in spite of claimed advantages in terms of power, weight, and componentry, their bikes have sometimes struggled to even match the bikes they were built to supposedly outperform. But by the time of the company's rebirth in the early 2000s, they'd gotten their act together, and today's DB7 is one of the best bikes in the company's history.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The Ducati 1098-powered Bimota DB7's $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn't $10,000 better than the hot-rod Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the "lightweight" Bimota... But if you're fixated on something like that, you're missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they're not intended to make financial sense.

I love 90s Bimotas, but some of the details are a bit crude and they're a complete pain to work on: those gorgeous aluminum beam frames significantly limit access to the bike's oily bits, and the overall "kit-bike" quality meant the brand's reputation suffered. It didn't help that the major manufacturers had been honing their craft. When two motorcycles with the same engine have a 150lb weight difference, the lighter machine can't help but be faster. But by the late 1990s, bikes like Yamaha's R1 and the Suzuki GSX-R1000 offered the same level of performance as Bimota's creations, but with much better reliability, and at a third of the price. So Bimota focused on creating bikes like the DB7 that offered an incredible level of craftsmanship and detailing, even if they weren't any faster.

I'm not a huge fan of the stacked projector-beam headlamps, but this is the kind of machine that gets more an more impressive, the closer you get. The detailing is incredible, especially the heart of the beast, or maybe the skeleton if we're staying with the anatomical metaphor... Bimota doesn't generally build their own engines, and the bikes' claim to fame has always been their frames. They started experimenting with hybrid frames that combined multiple materials with the SB8R, the idea being to obtain different performance characteristics for different areas of the frame. In the SB8's case, it was designed to shift weight forward for better weight-distribution and handling. In the DB7, the frame is an evolution of the earlier DB5/6 that used a combination of trellis structures for the frame and swingarm, connected to stiff machined aluminum sideplates, a design similar to MV Agusta's modern roadbikes and their upcoming Moto2 machine. In the Bimota DB7, the tubular trellis is replaced by oval-section tubing, and the overall effect is similar, and the bike looks light and agile, even at rest.

Of course, improvements in performance and quality aside, we should still at least briefly touch on the elephant in the room: cost. The DB7's $35,000 asking price was in no way a good value. It definitely wasn't $10,000 better than the Ducati 1098R of the same year, a bike that made significantly more power and even weighed a couple pounds less than the "lightweight" Bimota... But if you're fixated on something like that, you're missing the entire point: Bimotas of this period are for well-heeled connoisseurs with money to burn, and they're not intended to make financial sense.

From the original eBay listing: 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale

The DB7 was Bimota's first superbike after their rebirth in 2003, and it featured Ducati’s 1098 Testastretta Evo engine. The engine isn’t the only impressive part–in addition to Bimota’s home-brew oval tube trellis frame, this bike is packed with top-shelf components like Marzocchi forks, Brembo Monobloc calipers, and the fully adjustable ExtremeTech rear shock. But what truly makes this bike stand out is the way this bike is made.

Ugh, I know what the seller means by "home-brew" but wow, is that the wrong phrase. Bimota literally made their name developing sophisticated frames that offered significant handling advantages, compared to machines from major manufacturers, and this one, while not necessarily better than the frame that forms the basis of the 1098, is a piece industrial art. The $21,000 starting bid is pretty steep, but these are some of the best bikes Bimota ever made. Sure, you could get a decent Panigale 1199S for that money, but those things are everywhere in Southern California...

-tad

Early-Production 2009 Bimota DB7 for Sale
Ducati August 26, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing – 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500

Troy Bayliss won the Superbike World Championship for Ducati three times between 2001 and 2008, on three different generations of desmoquattro superbike.  Ducati saluted his career with a great special edition -R in 2009, with his race number and Aussie flag livery.  Fittingly for a homologation special, number 106 of 500 has been improved for track use, but turned under 1,000 miles.

2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500

An major update for 2009 was the use of the testastretta "Evoluzione" engine, with a majority of titanium internals making 180 hp and 99 ft.-lbs. torque right off the showroom floor.  The archetypal trellis frame has been beefed up for the occasion, and components are the best that Öhlins, Brembo, and Marchesini had to offer.  Hidden in the carbon fairing are traction control with eight settings, and a data storage and analysis module.

Always intended for the track, the owner Chris has made a few choice mods but fewer miles.  Recent heavy maintenance was done on time not miles, either way ready for a new rider.  Kyle Racing suspension upgrades are advertised as more linear for the monoshock and adjustable for the triple-trees.  Most take-off parts and limited edition swag are included, and an aftermarket set of track bodywork could be negotiated.  Chris's description:

Basics: 983 mi, single owner purchased from Ducati Winchester. #106/500. Waiting on paper title from DMV. Major service was done last year (belts/fluids/etc) and has 25mi since. New Supercorsa front and rear installed at that time.

Mods:
-Dan Kyle triples, rear linkage, and revalved shock w/spring rated for 185# if i remember correctly
-Vortex rearsets
-Clutch cover is aftermarket but I don't remember who made it
-Race exhaust and ecu have always been on the bike
-1/4 turn throttle installed

Stock parts included:
-rearsets
-DDA module but no associated CD or manual
-standard exhaust and ecu
-clutch cover
-Bayliss LE plaque and bike cover
-rear shock w/linkage and triples

Bad:
-nick and small scratches on tank in seat area
-tank has expanded slightly, making contact with the factory steering stabilizer
-belly pan has 1/4" crack on brake side

Though all 1098's are better suited for the track than the road, #106 with Chris's set-up might be even more so.  Most 1098's have low mileage, and -R's even less, but despite a nick here and there, this example's condition is remarkable.  The 1098R is a high plateau in the superbike landscape, the Bayliss commemorative a peak, and this particular LE a great combination of more and less - power to weight, mods to originality, collectibility to miles.  Chris asks $24,500 and can be reached by email - here -.

Featured Listing – 2009 Ducati 1098R Bayliss Limited Edition #106/500
Ducati August 11, 2018 posted by

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

After the relative failure of the 999 series of superbikes, Ducati needed a win, badly, and they got one with the 1098. The design was much more conservative than the Terblanche-penned 999, but it shared stylistic elements with the 916 and had a recognizable “face.” But for serious riders, the changes under the skin were more important, and today’s Featured Listing 1098R is one of the rawest ways to experience Ducati’s two-cylinder fury.

It’s not that the Panigale that followed the 1098 and 1198 wasn’t even lighter, more aggressive, and more powerful. It obviously was. But the 1098 and especially the 1098R came at the tail end of the era of the truly analog sportbike. In fact, the 1098R is significant in that it represents an actual bridge between the pure, undiluted sportbikes and the proliferation of multi-level traction control, anti-wheelie systems, cornering ABS, and ride-by-wire.

Many of Ducati’s pre-Pani superbikes have power outputs that seem… tame. The famously beastly SPS? Just 124hp. Of course, those earlier bikes were still deceptively fast, and had huge torque figures and fat midranges, compared to inline fours. But by the time of the 1098R, you were still seeing a peak of nearly 190hp and 99ft-lbs of torque with the included race ECU and exhaust. That's a terrifying prospect in a bike that has only the most primitive form of electronic traction control.

And the R was a landmark bike in that it was the first roadbike to include a traction control system designed to allow the rider go faster, to help the rider tame the nearly race-bike levels of performance for both increased safety and better lap times. The DTC was deactivated on the bike as delivered, but installation of the included race ECU and Termignoni exhaust switched it on. Not that anyone would do that on the road, of course... The Testastretta Evoluzione v-twin fitted to the 1098R had the usual raft of titanium engine parts to save weight and help the bike spin up quicker, and the 1198.4cc was at the very limit for WSBK homologation purposes. A factory slipper clutch and the Öhlins TTX36 twin-tube shock helped keep things under control at the rear of the bike, and top-spec Öhlins forks and Brembo brakes did the same up front.

From the original eBay listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale

Race ECU and full Termignoni exhaust. No modifications. Always garaged. Not ridden in rain. Super clean. Maintenance up to date. Tires have plenty of tread left. Selling this and a couple others to make room for older bikes. I bought this 1098R from original owner/collector in 2012 when it had 1062 miles. Just relisted. Lower reserve. Lower Buy it Now price. Clear title in hand.

I believe all of the 1098Rs shipped with the Race ECU and Termi exhaust, but they weren't installed because, [cough, cough] they were "intended for offroad use only" and weren't anywhere near legal. Having heard one of these up close, I'd say it's pretty clear they didn't even bother trying to make the Termignoni exhaust meet noise standards... Anyway, mileage is low on this one, and the Buy It Now price of $17,700 is right in the ball park, if not a teeny bit on the low-side.

-tad

Featured Listing: 2008 Ducati 1098R for Sale