Posts by tag: Pierre Terblanche

Ducati November 29, 2017 posted by

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale

Ducati built just 1,000 of the stunning MH900e in 2001 and 2,000 the following year, making this one obviously a bit interesting right out of the gate. It’s apparently a pre-production prototype, with some clear differences between it and the regular production version, although the original flat-black pre-production bodywork has been replaced with a set of very sexy carbon-fiber Ducati Performance parts as seen in the photos.

Pierre Terblanche’s redesign of Ducati’s 998 superbike may have been controversial, but he was on-point here with this Mike Hailwood tribute. The styling of the MH900e wraps a modern-ish two-valve v-twin powertrain, stiff trellis frame, and quality suspension in bodywork that manages to be both futuristic and retro at the same time. There are hints of NCR’s racebikes, the Ducati Pantah, Hailwood’s TT machine, and the undertail exhaust suggests the 998.

Power from the 904cc air and oil-cooled twin was modest, with a claimed 75hp at the rear wheel, although the engine’s flexibility and torque mean that there’s more performance on tap than meets the eye when pushing the 410lb machine. Ergonomics were pretty cruel and the seat very tall, but at least the tiny stock 2.2 gallon fuel tank meant plenty of chances to stretch when you pause to fill up: even allowing for the Ducati’s good fuel mileage, you’re still looking at just 90 miles or so between stops.

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Ducati MH900e Factory Prototype for Sale

For sale a unique, once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire the real factory prototype of the DUCATI MH900e.

Here below a little description of this particular model:

The MH900e began as a concept created by the Ducati designer Pierre Terblanche in homage to Mike Hailwood’s 1978 win of the Isle of Man TT. Giving way to the model designation “MH”.

In September 1998 the sketch was presented to the general public at the Intermot Show in Munich and met with rave reviews. Due to the enthusiastic response from the press and public, Ducati decided to post a questionnaire on their website to test the true interest of the MH900e fans. 300 Ducatisti responded positively. With this information, Federico Minoli and Massimo Bordi (General Manager of Ducati) decided to take the risk and produce a limited run of two thousand hand-built bikes. The first one thousand bikes would be produced in 2000 and the second thousand would be produced in 2001.

The sale of the MH900e was as unique as the bike itself. Ducati made the decision to sell the new bike directly to the consumer exclusively via the Internet in a form of e-commerce known as B-2-C (Business to Consumer). This was a first for any motorcycle manufacturer. It was a risky move, but the result could not have been any better

The Ducati website opened for orders on January 1, 2000 at 00:01am GMT at a price of 15,000. The first 1000 units were sold out in 31 short minutes. The remaining bikes were sold over the next few weeks. Individuals made purchases from 20 different countries. The estimated breakdown of the sales was 30% from Europe, 30% from the US and 39% from Japan.

This particular bike was used by Ducati Experience Department to control all assemblies, parts and components, to make sure everything was fitting and operating properly before production started. Many components are “one-off”, and many were pre-production pieces. the battery holding frame is unique, showing a different position of the battery with respect of the production bikes. also the front fairing frame is a bit different than production ones. All of these parts were carefully kept to maintain the originality of the bike, and to show the real spirit of this amazing prototype. like the top fork tee which was left raw instead of being polished like the production ones.

On the gas tank there are signatures and dates, possibly showing various stages of testing and different phases of assembly. every single piece on this bike is authentic and original Ducati for this model, nothing has been altered or manufactured to complete it.

The bike was acquired from Ducati with a non-production plastic body, painted flat black like the rest of the bike, including frame and swingarm. the exhaust was also custom-made, clearly an assembly try-out, yet perfectly working.

We did a “conservative” restoration on the bike, taking it completely apart, making sure every original bit and piece was kept and restored to obtain this amazing piece. we also decide to maintain the black look that sported when we got it, just upgraded it a bit with proper carbon body and custom-made graphics (Ducati made them for us).

the frame and swingarm are pre-production original and authentic DUCATI MH900E, with correct ZDM homologation number, properly and correctly stamped on the neck, with frame serial number being 0000001. everything legit and correct. fully documented with invoice showing frame and motor number.

Some minor parts like clutch, oil tank, and front brake tank aluminum holders, or the steering damper, are not installed but will be in a short time. Everything works perfectly as it should on this amazing piece. A solid investment for any collector or Ducati aficionados, this is the kind of bike that, few years down the line, will be popping up at auctions. Don’t loose the opportunity.

Shipping worldwide properly crated. Bike is located in Modena, Italy.

There are no takers yet at the $50,000 starting bid, but there’s plenty of time left on the listing. Regular production bikes already command prices of just under $20,000 or so, so I expect that the right collector would pay more for this museum piece. Certainly, it’d be criminal to run it on the road, considering its historical value, even if you could legally register it for road use…

-tad

Factory Prototype: 2000 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati September 7, 2017 posted by

Top Tier: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

Since the 916 series, Ducati superbike ownership has been about tiers. There’s generally a “base” model for the hoi polloi, although those still feature adjustable suspension front and rear and a fire-breathing four-valve v-twin. Above that is generally the “S” version, with some bolt-on carbon that saves a few ounces on a 400lb-plus machine, a couple additional horses, and some bling-y suspension that likely offers minimal improvement in handling for the thousands extra it costs. But if you’re serious about your Ducatis, it’s the “R” model you generally want, at least post-SP5, SPO, and SPS, and the reasons for that are abundantly clear when you look closely at bikes like today’s 999R.

Designed to compete in production-based AMA Superbike racing, the 999R was blessed with high-performance titanium valves and connecting rods, along with an entirely new cylinder head design. The internal dimensions are completely different compared to the standard and S models, with a bore and stroke of 104mm × 58.8mm versus the regular 999’s 100mm × 63.5mm. Interestingly, the 999R actually displaces exactly 999cc, whereas the regular 999 makes do with just 998…

A 12.5:1 compression ratio, titanium rods and valves and a knife-edged crankshaft inside sand-cast cases meant the R was good for 134hp measured at the rear wheel, with 76.6 lb-ft of torque to punch the bike out of corners. Keep in mind: in some cases, a bike with wildly different and very rare engine internals might require shorter maintenance intervals e and parts could prove to be much more expensive as well, so keep that in mind if you plan to actually pile the miles on your bit of Italian exotica.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

(Multiple collectors are interested but I’m looking for the best deal.)

Wikipedia regarding the 999S:  “2005 Ducati 999S won the Maxisport category for the prestigious international Masterbike 2005 … received critical acclaim … MCN … ‘simply the best V-Twin on the planet’… Motorbikestoday.com, … ‘the most desirable, most exciting roadbike on the planet’ in 2004. MotorcycleUSA.com … ‘stupendous’ … ‘the epitome of V-Twin power.’ Motorcyclist Online: “The 2005 Ducati 999, in particular, would represent the nameplate’s height of critical acclaim.”

This is not the 999S.  This is the superior, racing version, the 999R.

This is a piece of Motorcycle history.  Considered by some to be the finest bike EVER made.

The 2005 999R had a production run of 200 units.  That means there are only 200 of these bikes on the planet!  (The minimum number required to qualify the bike for use in production superbike races.)  This one has been kept in excellent condition by an experienced motorcycle enthusiast with multiple Ducatis.

The 999R model of the 2005 Ducati 999 has the most powerful Testastretta engine. It pumps out 150 horsepower and 86 lb-ft of torque; and it has larger intake valves, longer bore and shorter stroke. Each engine on the 2005 Ducati 999 is hooked up to a six-speed manual transmission. Due to its racing orientation, it is lighter than the other two models: 11 lbs. lighter, to be more precise. Each 2005 Triple Nine has a fuel tank that can hold up to 4.1 gallons (15.5 liters) with a 0.8-gallon (3-liter) reserve. With the 999S or 999R variants, the 2005 999 can go from zero to 62 miles per hour (mph) in under 3 seconds, and it can achieve a top speed of over 170 mph.

The 999R uses titanium valves both on intake and exhaust, as well as titanium connecting rods, and requiring Ducati to use special valve seats and guides.  This saves considerable weight.  Numerous changes have been made to every part of the bike making this model lighter, faster, and more powerful.  Forged aluminum alloy wheels, more sophisticated engine ECU, and much more.  From Ducati’s press manual: “The Testastretta engine of the 999R [’05 because of the lighter weight]… MEP value… exceeds 14 bar.  Information is available for Serious Buyers.”

My 75 yr old father who can no longer ride it after surgery says “this model is a lot revvier because of the titanium, and shortly after this year, Ducati started increasing the engine displacement of their superbikes, so this is one of the last of the 1000cc series.”

I’m sure someone does consider the 999R the “finest bike EVER made” but that’s a very crowded field. Hey, there’s plenty of competition even if we’re just talking about the finest Ducati ever made. Hyperbole aside, the R is a pretty trick piece of kit, and after languishing in the suberbike bargain basement for years, values for the 999 are rising across the board. Have they risen to the point where the seller’s $24,000 asking price makes sense? We’ll have to wait and see if the bike actually sells. The style may be polarizing, but the 999 is an excellent motorcycle, and an improvement in almost every way over the 998 that preceded it.

-tad

Top Tier: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale
Ducati August 18, 2017 posted by

Coffee Table Bike: 2001 Ducati MH900e for Sale

One of the most strikingly-styled bikes of the modern era, the Ducati MH900e looked backwards and forwards at the same time, celebrating their racing history and interpreting classic design cues in a very modern way. Looking at it, it’s almost hard to tell exactly when it was first sketched by noted and occasionally infamous stylist Pierre Terblanche: the overall colors and shapes clearly recall the NCR racebikes of the 1980s and the chrome bezeled, white-faced gauge and the “Mike Hailwood” reference in the name are very 1970s, while the undertail exhausts, 17″ wheels, and swooping curves are much more 2000. But the bigger question is whether or not this is more an art object, or a functional motorcycle.

Obviously, looking at the heart of the MH900e, you could be forgiven for thinking it’s an actual motorcycle: that elegant tubular trellis frame surrounds one of the great street powerplants of the modern era: Ducati’s air-cooled, two-valve v-twin. It’s no powerhouse, with just 75hp at the rear wheel, but makes plenty of torque and sounds terrific, more emotive than Ducati’s four-valve, liquid-cooled engines. The suspension is top-shelf and the overall package is lightweight so the bike has excellent handling, should you ever decide to venture out on a racetrack or backroad on one.

But the riding position is brutal, and clearly dictated by style as opposed to function. It does handle well, but plenty of great-handling roadbikes have reasonably humane ergonomics. Perhaps it’s just as well then that the bike has an almost impossibly tiny gas tank that holds just 2.2 gallons. Oh you thought that huge thing behind the fairing held fuel? Surprise! It’s an airbox! A larger tank is available from California Cycleworks but, unless you’ve got one of those, the stock unit wasn’t good for much, even considering the twin’s relatively good fuel economy. Maybe take a page out of the Harley guys that run peanut tanks on their bikes and sling a bit of gas in a thermos over your shoulder in case you run out before reaching the next gas stop.

From the original eBay listing: 2001 Ducati MH900e for Sale

I purchased 0037/2000 five years ago and it has been on display in my office in Los Angeles for that entire time. My understanding is that the original owner lives in Colorado. The second owner lives in Florida and I believe he owned the bike for only a year or two and is the one that put the mileage on the bike. I am the third owner and bought the bike in 2012 with 1204 miles on the odometer. To the best of my knowledge this bike is complete, original and unmodified. Sale includes all manuals plus a workshop manual with binder, the boxed plaque, T-Shirt, and two keys with key code.

The following items are included but are not attached to the bike: mirrors, kick-stand, and steering damper all of which are in excellent condition (see photos).

The bike is now 16 years old; rubber and some plastic parts are beginning to deteriorate (as they do on all vehicles). Several small plastic wire clips are missing. As a display bike I did not get any service work done and was reluctant to start it for fear of the timing belt breaking or other such issues. The cylinders have been oiled with a spray and the engine rotates freely.  If you are planning on riding 0037 it is going to need comprehensive service and new tires.

The final four photos show the flaws. A leak at the petcock allowed gas to seep down the cylinder and on to the engine cases. The gas stained the paint and in trying to remove the stain I removed some paint (see photo). I have read on several forums that there are products that will remove these stains. Small dark spots show on the bottom castings. Since taking the shots I have able to remove or lighten most of them. The foam piece on the rear shock rod is broken. And finally the rear tire has been cut in places. I have no idea when or how this happened. This may have gone unnoticed when I took delivery of the bike. The stand is also badly scratched from raising and lowering the bike over the years and owners.

The batteries were removed and will need to be replaced. Clear California Title.

It’s a shame all that the available performance is wasted in this case, since the bike hasn’t turned a wheel in years, but not really a surprise, since many of these limited-production machines were snapped up by collectors and are only occasionally ridden. If you do plan to ride your investment, this will obviously need some work, but the hard parts of the MH900e should be simple to restore, since that same engine found its way into plenty of Monsters and SuperSports and parts to maintain, repair, or upgrade them are readily available. Or maybe even track down one of those larger fuel tanks, fit a later 1100cc DualSpark engine to create a faster, more usable machine, and put the original engine on display in your office!

-tad

Coffee Table Bike: 2001 Ducati MH900e for Sale
Ducati June 17, 2016 posted by

Bit of an odd Duc: 2003? Ducati 999R FILA edition

Hmmm…the seller lists this one as a 2003 Ducati 999R FILA edition but a few things seem odd, including the year listed and the graphics.   Perhaps someone with more direct experience can advise in the comments section…?

fil3

2003 Ducati 999R FILA edition on ebay

First a bit of history; back in the early 2000’s it seemed like every new Ducati sportbike had a minimum of 3 different versions plus a commemorative edition. There would be a basic/strada street version, a mid-level bike S bike with some upgrades still intended for street riders and finally a top level R bike that, while still street legal, included lots of track oriented tech.  Any commemorative editions would typically be based on either the S or R level bikes, although occasionally they were even done at the standard/strada level (I’m-looking-at-you-Nieman-marcus-edition-Ducati-749).

The Ducati FILA editions were based on the top level 999″R” and were introduced in 2004 to celebrate Ducati’s 200th win in the World Superbike Championship (note: there was also a James Toseland FILA edition in 2005).  The FILA editions came with carbon-fibre bodywork, lighter engine internals, upgraded injectors, a lighter front and rear sub-frame and Ohlins front and rear suspension.   The changes added added up to about another 40HP from the basic/strada 999.

The FILA edition also had another advantage over the strada and S versions; it looked much better.  When the 999 was launched many people found the design to be a step back from the predecessor 998 (which was an evolution of the Tamburini penned 916).   To many people the initial versions of the 999 looked unbalanced, with full fairings on the front but an exposed trellis frame and odd small rear fairing.   Fortunately versions such as the S based Parts Unlimited and R version FILA and XEROX editions met with much more approval.

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This particular bike is listed as a 2003 Ducati FILA edition and at it looks clean with no indication of having been abused ordown.  The only non-stock items I noticed were the chain and wheel stripes (which might be decals) and possibly the license plate hanger/tail unit.

However a closer review did raise a few questions, including why is bike listed as a 2003 FILA edition? From what I remembered and what I found on the web, the FILA edition was offered from 2004-2006 but not in 2003.  Also the decals on the front fairing/windscreen area and gas tank do not seem to match to the standard FILA edition decal layout and what have seen on previous 999R FILA editions here on RSBFS.   Its possible they were removed by a previous owner but since there was also a general 999R in 2003 so its also possible this bike has undergone a bodywork and/or wheel change by a previous/current owner who didn’t like the look of the standard bike.

fila4

Some general service info about the bike is included in the auction listing as are lots of good pictures.  Here is what the seller has to say:

  • 11,745 miles
  • Never been dropped but very small nicks in paint on lower fairing.
  • Less than normal wear and tear for bike this age and mileage
  • New battery, Pirelli tires in good condition
  • Always serviced by Ducati dealers only and stored in climate controlled area
  • Completely stock with no upgrades
  • Comes with spare key and owners manual

fil2

fil7

So what is the 2003 Ducati 999R FILA-badged beauty worth?  Well it certainly looks to be in very good condition and the current bid price is about $5,400 USD with 3 days to run (reserve is not met at this time).  Prices for a Ducati 999R FILA editions seem to be hovering between 12k-15k USD (which is about 1/2 of their original asking price) and for this one I would expect reserve to be right in the middle of that range given the mileage and condition, provided it can be confirmed to be an actual FILA edition.

Overall this appears to a good Rare Sportbike but I am not sure it will appreciate over time.  Also any serious collector would need to contact the seller regarding whats going on with the fairing decals and perhaps perform a VIN check?

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

Bit of an odd Duc:  2003? Ducati 999R FILA edition
Ducati June 29, 2015 posted by

Italian Twin for Road or Track: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

1991 Ducati 851 R Side FrontWhile Ducati’s MHE and 900SS may be collectible and iconic now, they were seriously long in the tooth by the time they were discontinued, and even the Pantah-engined SS didn’t exactly offer cutting-edge performance when new. In order to keep their racing heritage alive in any meaningful sense, Ducati needed a top-shelf sportbike like the 851 that could compete successfully on track with the best bikes from Japan.

1991 Ducati 851 L SideIn 1987, Ducati released the 851, which took the proven foundation of the air-cooled two-valve 90° v-twin motor and added liquid-cooling and brand new four-valve heads for a serious performance upgrade. With chunky styling from Pierre Terblanche, the new Desmoquattro thumped out 93hp to the rear wheel along with a wave of torque when compared to the screaming fours favored by the Japanese manufacturers.

1991 Ducati 851 Tank DetailAnd it worked: the 851 paved the way for the 916 and helped return Ducati to the spotlight in World Superbike competition and showed that the Italian brand had value beyond nostalgia and “character.”

1991 Ducati 851 L Side RearThis particular bike walks a nice middle-ground between “time-capsule original” and “race bike.” If you’re interested, the seller also includes a comprehensive list of the upgrades made to the bike. From the original eBay listing: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

Excellent Condition – Well Maintained – Ready to Ride or Vintage Race

I bought this Ducati about five years ago from a local neighbor that had taken it, and a mid seventies Corvette, in part exchange for his services, at the time it had approximately 5,800 miles.  The bike had been garaged in Westchester County, New York and had not been ridden for quite a while, but was in very nice original condition.

I had always admired the 851’s and thought it would make a great vintage road racer, so I went through the bike with that goal in mind.  The following was done to the bike: new fuel pump, had the gas tank restored (the paint is beautiful), belts replaced, valves adjusted, throttle bodies synched, Ferraci race chip installed (all work was done by Razee’s in Rhode Island), sent the forks to RaceTech for a re-valve and spring upgrade, upgraded the front wheel to the later model, larger diameter front axle, installed Pirelli Supercorsa tires, Sharkskinz solo seat.

Upon completion I rode the bike at a couple of track days, did the VRRA vintage festival at Mosport in Canada (it was a real treat to ride this Ducati on such a famous track), did the USCRA Vintage Festival at Loudon, New Hampshire and the AMA Vintage Festival at Mid-Ohio.  About a year ago, I decided to put the bike back on the street and registered it as a vintage motorcycle.  Since putting it on the street I have only ridden it less than 100 miles.  So all total, I would say I’ve really only put about 500 miles on the bike.

This Ducati is a blast to ride, looks great and always gets a lot of compliments.  The speedometer is not working as I needed to replace the metal tang in the front wheel and the front brake light is not connected.  It’s probably one of the cleanest 851’s you’ll see and will not dissappoint.  All of the original 1991 body work is included, seat, side panels etc…  The 851’s are now becoming sought after collectibles and are eligible for vintage racing with organizations such as AHRMA, VRRA, USCRA and the AMA.

There are plenty of 851’s out there, but this one is particularly appealing to me, featuring a combination of thoughtful, real-world upgrades [as well as the original parts] designed for performance, not wow-factor or the typical Ducati bling you find on more recent bikes: this one is made to run, but is well cared for as well.

1991 Ducati 851 R Side Rear With all the hype surrounding the 916, the 851 and 888 definitely have been overlooked for a long time. Although there have been some hints that might change, we’re still looking at a starting bid of $5,000 you could be looking at a collectible modern classic that offers track-day thrills for a reasonable price.

-tad

1991 Ducati 851 L Front - Copy

Italian Twin for Road or Track: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati June 11, 2015 posted by

Under the Skin: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

2005 Ducati 999R L Side

Enough ink has been spilled complaining about the design of the Ducati 999, but two things are clear: it is a far more practical, useable motorcycle than the classic 916, with ergonomics that at least took actual human physiology into account and the controversial looks of the bike are aging well. To be honest, as much as people fawn over the 1098 as “the bike that should have followed the 916,” I find its styling way too derivative. I love the headlamps and nose, but overall, it just looks like a bike designed by someone terrified to screw up, rather than a bold new statement. The 999 may never be considered beautiful in the way that the 916 was, but function has a beauty all its own, and you’d never mistake it for anything else.

2005 Ducati 999R R Side Naked

But beauty is more than skin deep, and while a 999S is really just a 999 with some bells and whistles, the 999R is another beast entirely and was intended to meet requirements for Ducati’s assault on the AMA Supberbike class. Internally, the R shares little with its less-aggressive stablemates: it features a completely different bore and stroke, 104mm × 58.8mm vs.100mm × 63.5mm. The 999R actually displaces exactly 999cc, whereas the regular 999 has 998…

2005 Ducati 999R Fairing

With 12.5:1 compression, titanium rods and valves and a knife-edged crankshaft spinning in sand-cast cases, the R was good for a legitimate 150hp at the crank, a big number for a twin in an era before all the electronic trickery found on today’s top-tier sportbikes.

2005 Ducati 999R Tank Detail

Today’s example shows just why it’s so great to be bike fan shopping for a used Ducati: extremely low mileage, fastidious care by an enthusiast owner, and only the best quality components thrown at it. And while the price won’t be cheap, the 999R is certainly one of the most desirable models of the period.

From the original eBay listing: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale

VERY RARE Ducati 999R, unlike NO other! sold to me as a trophy bike by eBay seller “lambo19752009” Bought as an investment not to ride. However, as a Ducatista she called me to ride. Current milage is 4758- I will stop before 4999. I have had a 999 before, the 999R is a different world! Research the 999R. Condition is excellent. Minor road wear is now visible. Nothing has happened in my care other than ADULT driven 434 miles so far. Tires tell the story no abuse. Why sell? I have another Duc and need to free up cashflow…my loss your gain. From the photos to reality you will see pegs & kickstand paint wear plus a spot of gold 3M wrinkled on the engine cover. Otherwise drop dead gorgeous. Handle bars just adjusted by Dunbar Ducati, will not go to lock but are perfect alignment. Grips are black not gold as in some photos.

2005 Ducati 999R L Front

Pop on over to eBay if you want to see the laundry list of bolt-on moto-bling that’s been thrown at this bike. Honestly, I’d sell off half of it and get the bike back a little closer to stock-looking: I love Rizoma as much as the next guy, but these things start to look like they’ve got some gold-anodized skin condition when people throw the whole catalog at them. And apparently, other people are using the term “Rizoma’d” as well. I met a guy over the weekend who was mourning the loss of his 848 Streetfighter that was “all Rizoma’d out.”

In any event, this is a very low mileage, apparently pampered bike that’d be easy to get back to stock condition if you prefer. And while some Special Edition Ducatis are just “paint and tape” jobs with some upmarket suspension that offers questionable improvement over the stock setup, the 999R is the real deal: a true homologation special.

-tad

2005 Ducati 999R R Side

Under the Skin: 2005 Ducati 999R for Sale
Ducati May 21, 2015 posted by

Four-Valve Founding Father: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

1991 Ducati 851 R Front

Introduced in 1987, the 851 was a huge leap forward for Ducati, adding four-valve heads, liquid-cooling, and fuel-injection to their 90° v-twin. The resulting engine was good for a claimed 93hp at the rear wheel and was dubbed the “Desmoquattro” for obvious reasons. The new bike allowed Ducati to again be competitive in racing, and was followed by a bored-out 888cc version known, shockingly as the “888.” 1991 Ducati 851 Tank

Interestingly, the new superbike was styled by Pierre Terblanche. For all of the controversy surrounding his tenure at Ducati, people often forget that he also designed the Supermono and the restyled Pantah-engined 900SS as well as the 999/749. The 851 isn’t pretty in the same way as the 916, or as aggressive as the new Panigale, but it looks simple and purposeful in a way that some of his other designs were not, and has definitely aged well. 1991 Ducati 851 Dash

It’s not completely clear, but I’m assuming this bike is based on the Strada version of the bike, not the higher-spec SP. Those front calipers, while not original, should provide plenty of stopping power. And the Giacomoto Spagetti exhaust is more than just a pair of slip-ons and should provide enough boom to annoy neighbors two towns over and help produce some legitimate power gains.

1991 Ducati 851 Front Brake

The add doesn’t mention if he has the original parts, other than the pictured original wheels, but that information would just be a quick email away.

From the original eBay listing: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale

The bike is 24 years old, I have had it almost 24 years. It has a few scratches and the front of the forks have some marks from the salt air [I live and ride on the coast] it is a beautiful bike and it shows very well. The registration shows it as a 90 sold in 91, I believe it to be a 91.

  1. 903cc
  2. high compression pistons
  3. SPS cams
  4. light flywheel
  5. Barnett Clutch
  6. magnesium side case
  7. single seat tail [aluminum subframe]
  8. ISR Calipers
  9. Brembo GP brake and clutch masters
  10. floating rotors
  11. Brembo 4 piston rear caliper [probably from a small cc gp bike]
  12. Giacomoto spagetti exhaust
  13. magnesium wheels [original white wheels included]
  14. Sato adjustable clip ons
  15. tool kit and steering damper [not shown]  

I have had the bike for about 20 years, I believe I am the third owner. Engine work done by Evoluzione, runs great, do not ride much,I am 72. I will be selling my other Italian bikes. If this add seems a little lame, its my first attempt on Ebay Motors. Any questions please ask. $1000.00 to my paypal account on completion of sale, the rest wire transfer to my bank. The mileage is approximate, the magnesium wheels do not have a speedo pickup. Once again, clear title, registration is current.   

1991 Ducati 851 R Side

This isn’t completely perfect, low mileage, or original, but that shouldn’t deter buyers: the updates are all appropriate, although the ISR brakes might cause some controversy, and the bike has obviously been owned by an enthusiast.

1991 Ducati 851 Rear Brake

19,000 miles shouldn’t scare anyone off: Ducati engines are generally very durable when properly maintained and this one appears to have been shown plenty of love. It’s hard to see the exact condition of the paint from the photos, but it looks very clean and well looked-after.

-tad

1991 Ducati 851 Wheels

 

Four-Valve Founding Father: 1991 Ducati 851 for Sale
Ducati June 8, 2014 posted by

Zero-Mile 1994 Ducati Supermono for Sale

This Ducati Supermono is the bike I wish Ducati would try to build these days. Do we really need more bikes so lethal that they will literally crawl in through your window at night with a knife in between their teeth, like the 1199 Panigale that seems to scare even professional moto-journalists? Or a road-going V4 Moto GP bike with 240hp? I mean, Ducati has a rich tradition of 250, 350, and 450cc single-cylinder performance bikes they could tap into.

KTM’s RC 390 is headed in the right direction [please come to the US, please come to the US], a small-displacement bike for experienced riders, a high-spec bike that designed to provide real thrills, not overwhelm with power.

1994 Ducati Supermono for sale on eBay

1994 Ducati Supermono Dash

What’s interesting is how this trend is relatively recent. The horsepower wars have been raging since they were won and lost by actual horses, but it’s only recently that there’s been such a dearth of legitimate sporting machines with little engines. If you’re a fan of classic sport bikes, you’ll be aware that there was a whole raft of machines that handled and stopped and were built with top-shelf components, not designed as some starter-bike for a teenager who plans to buy a Hayabusa as soon as he can figure out what color Mohawk he wants to stick on his helmet.

The Supermono may only have one cylinder, but it is one of the most valuable and collectible Ducatis of the modern era. And while the Supermono may lack in displacement somewhat when compared to what we’re used to seeing these days, it’s a heart-attack serious machine. With a dry weight of only 267 pounds and suspended with the best kit money could buy, including brakes from the 888, a much heavier machine. And those funny, army-green top triple clamp and the engine cases? They’re magnesium of course. And at the heart of it all, a 549cc single that started out making 65bhp at 10,500rpm.

1994 Ducati Supermono L Trans

Keep in mind that this was in the era before balance shafts, and a 10,000 rpm single this size was basically unheard-of. Big singles vibrate, and single-cylinder sportbikes like Bimota’s BB1 can be a numbing affair. But the Supermono had a trick up its four-valve Desmodromic sleeve: a dummy connecting rod that allowed the bike to rev as smoothly as a v-twin.

This is a seller of few words, but the bike speaks for itself: 1994 Ducati Supermono for Sale

Never used Ducati Supermono motorcycle. New fluids, radiator now dry, #33,1 of 67 built, stored in heated/air conditioned garage, perfect condition, one private owner, flawless, probably the most perfect supermono. 

1994 Ducati Supermono R Front Wheel

Styled by the controversial Pierre Terblanche, you can see echoes of his later 900SS in the jutting lower fairing. In spite of customer requests for a roadgoing example, the Ducati Supermono was a pure racebike and only 65 were ever made over the course of two years, with production ending in 1995. Designed to compete in the “Sound of Singles” race series, they epitomize what people love best about Ducati. It’s light, innovative, simple, and exotic.

And this one has exactly 0 miles.

Maybe there’s another out there that hasn’t turned a wheel, but I’d bet not as the Supermono was built to race. This would represent the most awful temptation for me. It’s a perfect machine. A giant, candy-like red button just begging to be pressed…

Hey, what’s that in the background of some of those shots? Besides the dog. Huh, looks like a Bimota DB1. I wonder if it’s for sale too…

-tad

1994 Ducati Supermono R Rear

Zero-Mile 1994 Ducati Supermono for Sale