Posts by tag: Paioli

Bimota August 29, 2018 posted by

Nice Price: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

It seems like most of the Bimotas that come up for sale these days aren’t really for sale. I mean, if people wanted to actually sell them, the asking prices would probably be a bit lower… Bottom line: the Bimota YB11 is a cool bike and still pretty fast, even compared to modern bikes. But prices for 90s Bimotas in particular are at a low point right now. Honestly, I’d be very surprised if this continued indefinitely but, for the time being, these represent some pretty great bang for your collecting buck. Even if you end up not being able to source fork seals for the beefy, right-way-up Paioli forks on your Bimota YB11, you can always park this thing in your livingroom and no one will wonder why… Even if they think you’re crazy for replacing your flat-screen with an Italian motorcycle.

The YB11 is pretty classic Bimota: the engine is from Yamaha’s YZF1000R and basically unchanged, aside from being slotted into Bimota’s own aluminum frame that hugs the Genesis engine closely. Perhaps too closely: more on that later. The lightweight bodywork is swoopy and dramatic, the riding position pretty odd, and the bike actually was available with pillion accommodations, although this one is missing the rear pegs.

They’re elegant, exotic and, at least in terms of finding engine parts, pretty simple to keep running. Tales abound of strange little quirks that can keep them from being enjoyable: the weird, twin six-volt batteries in the nose of the SB6, the frames that block access to carburetors and prevent adjustment while they’re on the bike or the engine is in the frame, iffy fuel pumps, and so on. But for a person who wants something truly different, these Bimotas are pretty hard to beat.

From the original eBay listing: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale

Emilia Motors is happy to offer this 1997 Bimota YB11, these Bimotas really show the attention to detail that the Italian motorcycle builders put into the design and suspension of the bikes they build. The Bimota is truly a handcrafted work of art and are a must for any real motorcycle collection, plus the beauty and design are second to none. This bike has new tires, battery and starts and runs top notch. Manuals, rear stand and Bimota cover are included. Please feel free to call with any questions thanks Anthony 954-540-8495

So what is the seller asking for this one? $9,000 or $10,000? Nope. Just $6,799 buys you a slick, low-mileage Italian exotic a mechanically competent enthusiast could keep running for peanuts. Just don’t drop it: a whole new engine won’t be hard to find or expensive to rebuild, but that bodywork will be pricey if you drop it. Which is why I’m hoping this one doesn’t have damage on the right side, since the photographer couldn’t be arsed to turn the bike around for some additional pics…

-tad

Nice Price: 1997 Bimota YB11 for Sale
Bimota August 17, 2018 posted by

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

Bimota’s stock-in-trade has always been aggressive, lightweight racebikes for the road but, every once in a while, they throw us a curveball. Or even the occasional knuckleball like this DB3 Mantra. An unapologetically road-biased machine, Bimota’s third Ducati-powered special featured upright ergonomics, an oval-section trellis frame shared with the later DB4, a roto-molded fuel tank that included a storage cubby at the back in an ill-advised nod to practicality, and styling could be called “wild” if you were feeling gracious.

It was polarizing then and now, but if you like the looks, you shouldn’t let anything discourage you from buying one: the hard parts are all easy to service, reliable, and pretty entertaining. Ducati’s air and oil-cooled two-valve v-twin has been around forever, and is relatively simple to service and parts are readily available to maintain them. Yeah, the regular belt-changes are kind of annoying, but easy to do if you know your way around an engine, and the valves generally aren’t too much of a problem either. And if the bike’s 85 claimed horses from the 904cc twin don’t adequately blow your hair back, you can build yourself a high-compression, 944cc monster that should do a pretty good job of stretching your arms.

The styling was slightly insane, but the bike handled very well, with a 43mm Paioli fork out front and an adjustable Paioli shock out back. The oval-section trellis frame was stiff and very light: just 11 pounds. Basically, it was a lighter, weirder, much more expensive Monster with better suspension. Like all Bimotas, it makes no sense from a financial perspective, as performance advantages over a Monster that cost half as much were minimal. But 454 Mantras found buyers, which makes the bike pretty much volume production for Bimota.

This example is a second-generation Mantra, with updated styling at the front, tubular handlebars instead of raised clip-ons, and Antera wheels to replace the earlier Marchesini hoops. I have a soft spot for these, as it was one of the first bikes that, as a non-rider, really caught my eye when it was new. Weird as they are, I still kind of dig the DB3 and would have one in a collection if I could afford to:

A: Have that plastic, burl-wood dash replaced with something stupid, like genuine wood or some nice carbon fiber.
B: Replace the horrible four exhaust pipes and the ludicrously-styled hangars with something much simpler.

Remove the taller screen, fit some simple bar-end mirrors and have fun.

From the original eBay listing: 1993 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale

This is an excellent example of a DB3. 400+ made, 23 in red. Very few in the US. Very low mileage at under 9200. Ducati 900 engine just has been serviced with new belts, oil and plugs. New AGM battery. New Conti tires. Previous owner removed the complicated fuel pump system and now it is just gravity fed.

Here are the 3 issues. Without a choke cable, it is a little hard starting until fuel gets in the carbs. With a cable, I imagine it would go on the first try. Once started, restarts fine. Tach works 50% if the time, loose connection? Lastly has a slight whistle noise at an exact rpm. Ducati said it is caused by lack of the factory air box. It hurts nothing, just the flow of air… These are 3 minute things, but I go for full transparency. The bike is in great shape. Very unique Italian styling.

“Very unique Italian styling” might be the epitome of understatement in this case. But the bones are good and the DB3 should make a pretty great weekend roadster for cruising, carving up traffic, and shocking onlookers. “What is that?” is something I’d expect you’ll hear pretty often, riding the Mantra. So what’s it worth? Well the Bimota pedigree and rarity certainly makes it more valuable than an equivalent 900SS or Monster powered by the same engine, with similar performance. But by how much? Values for 90s Bimotas are currently at a bit of a low-ebb, although I doubt that can continue forever. Bidding on this one is very active and up to just about $5,000 with another day left on the auction.

-tad

Styling Exercise: 1998 Bimota DB3 Mantra for Sale
Laverda May 6, 2018 posted by

Alternative Twin: 1999 Laverda Formula 750 for Sale

It’s a shame that the second incarnation of Laverda was gone by the end of the 1990s, before the recent interest in classic styles and older nameplates. I can imagine that a modern take on their big, burly triples would have gone over pretty well if they’d survived into the present. Apparently, a new triple was developed for Laverda, but it was ultimately used to power Benelli’s Tornado and TNT instead. The new triple never happened for them, so Laverda’s “Zane era” really culminated with this Laverda 750 Formula.

Saved from the ashes of their 1980s collapse, Laverda needed a new sportbike to draw attention to the reborn company. As always, the small Italian factory was working with a severely limited development budget, and that meant they couldn’t design a brand new engine to compete against the class benchmark, Ducati’s 748. The air-cooled, 668cc parallel-twin intially used in the new machines was actually an evolution of the old, 500cc unit from the 1970s Alpino, but Laverda injected new life by fitting… fuel injection, bigger pistons, and eventually a radiator, although you can still see the engine’s cooling fins leftover from its earlier incarnation. Or you would be able to see them, if the seller had included any decent pics of the bike with the fairing off…

It may have been intended as a competitor for the Ducati 748 but the engine was less refined and the bike was not as fast in a straight line. Where it really excelled was in the handling department, and the Formula took the already superlative Nico Bakker-designed aluminum beam frame and added excellent Paioli suspension and lightweight wheels to the package. You’ll notice that the “gas tank” is no such thing, as there’s no fuel filler there. The fuel door is actually a hinged panel on top of the tail, and the cell itself is more centrally-mounted for better balance. The result was a bike period reviewers found frustrating, as the bike would have been truly world-class but for that agricultural powerplant.

I’m not really that big on the regular 750S in solid red, yellow, or black but somehow I love it in the Formula’s garish, Halloween-looking combination. Yeah, that dual headlamp makes it look like an Italian take on a late 1980s GSX-R, but I’m a huge fan anyway. I’d prefer some higher-resolution images of this particular bike, since it’s really hard to see what kind of cosmetic condition we’re really dealing with, but it looks pretty good from what you can tell from the included photos.

From the original eBay listing: 1999 Laverda Formula 750 for Sale

Laverda built this bike as direct competition to Ducati. In doing so, it built it with the highest quality components it could find. For starters, it went to Nico Bakker to design the twin spar aluminum frame. Laverda increased the displacement of the 668cc engine to 750, added water cooling in addition to oil and tune it to develop 93HP. To handle all that power, Laverda added Paioli fully adjustable upside-down forks, rear shock, Marchesini wheels, and Brembo brakes. All wrapped in FRP bodywork to keep it as lightweight as possible. The result is a machine that can handle with the best of them.

Not many of these were imported into the US and fewer still are available for sale. Here is one with 1,668 kilometers (about 1000 miles). This bike is in an amazing condition and it is ready for it’s new custodian. The motorcycle can be seen at our dealership in Bellevue, WA

As much as I like Laverda’s 750 Formula, there’s really no question that the Ducati 748 is a better-looking, more iconic machine. Of course, rarity counts in the collector bike world and, while you can still pick up a good 748 for relative peanuts, these have gotten steadily more expensive. Is the Formula a good bike? Well the handling is exceptional, power is adequate for the class, reliability is decent, and looks are… subjective. Is it a better bike than the 748 it was pitched against? No, but if you’re a Laverda fan and want something reasonably modern to ride, or have an aversion to trellis frames, a 750S or Formula are basically your only choices! Or I guess you could buy one of those aforementioned Benellis and just stick some Laverda badges on it.

-tad

Alternative Twin: 1999 Laverda Formula 750 for Sale
Bimota May 7, 2017 posted by

California Dreaming: 1997 Bimota YB11

In the wonderful world of Bimota, the first letter of the bike designation always represents the manufacturer of the engine. In the case of this YB11, it is Yamaha. This is the 11th model of Yamaha-powered Bimotas, one of the most potent bikes Bimota has developed, and the last of the Yamaha-Bimota series ever produced. In the world of Bimota, the Yamaha dials go up to 11, but not to 12.

1997 Bimota YB11 for sale on eBay!

The Yamaha in question is the powerful 1,000cc, five valve per cylinder Genesis evolution. You can expect on the order of 145 HP from this magnificent lump, which has earned Yamaha all sorts of accolades for tractability, reliability and longevity. It’s not often that you can heap “power” and “works well for a long time” in the same sentence referring to the same motor, but that is really how good this unit is. Bimota took all that was right with the Thunder Ace power plant, and shaved a significant amount of weight from the similarly powered YZF1000R – some 40 odd pounds wet(!). With an aluminum twin-spar frame derived from the successful YB6, multi-adjustable Paioli-supplied suspension front and rear, Brembo brakes all around, a custom ram-air intake and bespoke four into one exhaust, the performance of the YB11 obliterated the original donor bike from Yamaha by a good margin.

From the seller:
1997 BIMOTA YB11 , NEAR MINT CONDITION ,RUNS EXCELLENT ,EVERYTHING WORKS ,CLEAN CALIFORNIA TITLE ,RECENT SERVICE AND NEW BATTERY

Bimotas of this era are hand-built and lovingly assembled. They are lightweight and horrendously impractical by most standards. The hand-laid fiberglass is impossibly thin and prone to cracking; the move to carbon helps significantly in this area. Access to engine and components for maintenance purposes is marginal at best, tortuous in any case. The riding position is uncompromising and decidedly lacking in the thick padded seat department. But who really cares about that useless stuff? This is the most potent Yamaha-powered liter bike you are going to find from this era; it begs to be ridden hard. The most difficult aspect of owning a bike like this is wiping the smile off of your face every time you ride it, park it, wash it, or simply look at it.

This bike is available in California, where it also happens to be titled. Woo Hoo – score one for the most restrictive DMV state! It has a fair amount of miles on the clock (more so than we normally see for a Bimota), but that is not a problem at all for the running gear. If the bodywork and ancillaries check out, this one is good to go for a long, long time …. and it will probably begin to appreciate in value along the way. Check it out here, and then jump back to the comments and share your thoughts on either the Yamaha five valve motor, or the YB series of Bimotas. Good Luck!!

MI

California Dreaming: 1997 Bimota YB11
Laverda February 12, 2017 posted by

Formula for Success: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula

While there is no guaranteed formula for success in the motorcycling business, there are some pretty basic tenets worth following. The first is to start with a decent brand name and reputation. Laverda – building performance motorcycles since 1949 – fits that bill perfectly. The second rule is that the bike has to look good; as we all know, style sells. The Formula edition of the 750S offers full bodywork rivaling the best Italy has to offer (Bimota and Ducati included). Rule number three is to engineer the heck out of it to ensure a solid platform. Laverda rang up legendary framemeister Nico Bakker who created the robust chassis. The next step is to ensure adequate power – Laverda punched out their 650cc parallel twin to 750cc and the Formula edition provided uprated cams, revised fuel-injection settings and carbon-fibre Termignoni silencers to boost top-end power to aclaimed figure of 92bhp. The last step is to drizzle liberally with the best components money can buy, which Laverda did with Termi exhaust, Brembo binders, Paioli suspension front and rear, Marchesini wheels and Weber-Marelli electrics. What emerged as the 750S Formula was a handsome, potent machine that totally failed to turn the tides of Laverda’s fortune. The company went under for good a few short years later.

1999 Laverda 750S Formula for sale on eBay

There is much to like about the 750S Formula. The parallel twin loves to rev, giving it a completely different character than the primary Italian competition, the Ducati 748. Handling is reported to be extremely nimble, with the combination of Nico Bakker chassis and Paioli suspension working well together. This is a proper sport bike with serious potential, but sadly with few real-world credentials. These were simply not produced in enough numbers to make a dent in the market, or in Laverda’s finances.

From the seller:
1999 LAVERDA 750S FORMULA ,RARE 1 OWNER MOTORCYCLE ,NO ISSUES ,RUNS FANTASTIC ,PERFOMANCE CHIP INSTALLED AT DEALER STOCK CHIP INCLUDED ,VERY BEAUTIFUL AND RARE WITHFULL FAIRING AND TERMIGNONI EXHAUST ,NEW BATTERY ,ALL MANUALS ,CLEAN TITLE

Located in sunny California, this 750S Formula is listed with 26,672 miles on the clock. In addition to the numerous performance mods from the factory, this one also sports an aftermarket ECU chip (the stock chip is included in the sale). Overall the bike looks to be in good condition. The left side Termi shows some scratching, which could signal a kickstand incident (these bikes are known to sit rather high on their side stands). It doesn’t look major, but worth investigating. As with all bikes from defunct manufacturers, replacement parts are going to be an issue – but may not be an immediate concern for well-cared for machines. Check it out here, and enjoy the last gasp from this storied Italian marque. If you’ve got experience with these models, please share your thoughts in our Comments section. Good Luck!!

MI

Formula for Success: 1999 Laverda 750S Formula
Bimota June 21, 2016 posted by

Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

1995 Bimota SB6 R Side

Aside from the disastrous VDue, Bimota’s stock-in-trade was wrapping lightweight frames and fantastically exotic bodywork around reliable powertrains from established manufacturers. The magical formula that led to bikes like the Bimota SB6 seems so simple, it’s a wonder it took so long for other manufacturers to catch on: wrap too much engine in too little motorcycle, fit quality suspension, profit. But it’s obviously more difficult than it looks to make that formula work, and the Japanese tendency to overbuild was clearly blunting the otherwise very butch GSX-R1100’s performance: the SB6 made virtually the same power, but weighed a stunning 90lbs less than the donor Suzuki.

1995 Bimota SB6 Cockpit

With 1,700 built, the SB6 was one of Bimota’s most successful models, and that means that prices are relatively low for this Suzuki-powered blaster. It’s not a cutting-edge performer anymore but, with almost 150hp from the 1074cc inline four, huge midrange, and light weight, a well-ridden SB6 will certainly keep up with modern machines.

1995 Bimota SB6 Front

There are some very minor blemishes on this example, just some small chips around fairing fasteners. But aside from that awful touring seat pad that’d be in the garbage before I even got the bike home, the bike is pretty much immaculate and looks great in the very Italian tri-colore paintwork on the swoopy body panels. I personally prefer the look of the later SB6R, but there’s no doubt this is a very striking motorcycle.

1995 Bimota SB6 Tank

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale

9809 miles
excellent condition
72 year old owner can no longer ride
Well, that’s not all that much to go on, but considering the low mileage and the condition evident from the photos, maybe it’s all we need. This is a new listing, and there are no takers yet at the $4,800 starting bid. From what I’ve seen in the past couple years, an SB6 could be a very nice way to get a fast, relatively reliable motorcycle with exotic credentials, distinctive looks, and big, four-cylinder power. Keep in mind that, although the Suzuki powertrain should be easy to service, at least once you get access to it, some other parts like bodywork, electricals, and suspension parts could be hard to come by. It’s a real bummer when your beautiful Italian exotic is sidelined by unobtainable seals for those snazzy Paioli forks… So you’d never want one as your only ride but, considering what these Bimotas are going for, they’re looking very, very tempting at the moment.
-tad
1995 Bimota SB6 L Side
Affordable Exotic: 1995 Bimota SB6 for Sale
Bimota January 5, 2013 posted by

Featured: 1999 Bimota DB4

Update 1.5.2013: Now available on eBay for $9899. Links updated. -dc

It’s been a while since we posted a Bimota on these pages. The search for the rare and the magnificent is a feast or famine affair. Fortunately the Bimota famine appears to be over with this very nice DB4. Offered by the same seller as this 851 racebike today’s DB4 sports the very tasty Corse kit bits (flatside carbs and Ti exhaust) but is otherwise stock.

The Bimota DB recipe utilizes a a trestle frame made up of ovid tubes (think Bimota Mantra) to wrap up a Ducati Supersport engine (air-cooled, two valve, Desmo). Par for the course with Bimota the rest of the bits are top notch, including 320mm Brembo brakes and Paioli forks up front. The resulting package is light (under 365 pounds), flickable and torquey.

From the seller:
This is a great example of light weight engineering at it’s best. Take a great tractable powerplant, and plug it into a state of the art lightweight platform, and you have the recipe for success.. the Bimota DB4. This particular unit comes with some extra goodies that make a great product even better: Corse kit, which includes a full Titanium exhaust, and FCR Flat slide carbs, which when combined really let this engine sing! The Bimota DB4 is the new model of the very fortunate DB series, that is the series of Bimota motorcycles powered by Ducati engine (the TESI models represent a series apart in the Bimota story) .

The philosophy of the Bimota DB4 is to evoke the styling and the charm of the first model of the series, the legendary DB1 which, in 1985, became very popular on the worldwide market as an extremely innovative motorcycle, both for styling and technique. In the respect of the tradition of the previous versions, the Bimota DB4 is a very light and compact model, with the unmistakable, but always original, look of the DB series. The Bimota DB4 is a real sports bike and offers unrivalled performance in terms of handling and roadholding thanks to extraordinary technical features like the wheelbase of only 1370 mm and the dry weight of 165 Kg (363lbs).

If you are looking for that exotic bike that will thrill you when you are riding it, look great wherever it is parked and be servicable in most areas, this might be opportunity knocking on your door. DB4s are pretty popular when they float our way, and this one looks sharp and has low miles on the clock. Minor stress cracks are the norm with the light and thin Bimota hand laid ‘glass (see pictures), and the rest seems to be an solid and honest DB4 – with the cool Corse kit added on. The price is a market reasonable $9,995. Jump direct to the seller for this one and make sure you tell ’em you found it on RSBFS!

MI

Laverda April 6, 2012 posted by

Ghost from the past: 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike

For Sale: 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike

Located in the occasionally sunny state of Washington, this 1998 Laverda Ghost Strike is really the ghost of Christmas past. The historic Laverda name, now owned by Piaggio, is no longer being used on any current machinery. It is a poorly kept secret that Piaggio is looking for a buyer for the name, so hope springs eternal that the Laverda brand will once again rise up from the ashes.

The Ghost Strike aluminum beam chassis was developed under the control of legendary designer Nico Bakker. The components bolted on have similar pedigree: 40mm upside-down Paioli forks, a matching Paioli damper at the rear, requisite 320mm front discs clamped down with 4 piston Brembo calipers and a reported 70 HP from the air/oil cooled, fuel injected parallel twin. This particular example shows approximately 7,600 miles on the clock.

From the seller:
This bike is in excellent original condition, with the exception of custom F-4 SS 2 into 1 tuned exhaust, remapped FI and quality billet barend mirrors. Fun, fast, great handling bike with worlds best components available when manufactured. Easy to maintain, with parts available in North America and world wide. Bike runs like a top and was just serviced by Moto International of Sea. WA.

This bike is a really cool alternative to a Ducati Monster, Triumph Street Triple, or your basic Japanese naked bike. You will certainly not see your self on the road, and you will be secure in the knowledge that you are riding a legendary nameplate. Parts are (apparently) still available for these bikes, although I would plan for obsolescence at some point.

So what does a rare model of a now defunct brand go for on the open market? Well this auction has show only light interest, and the current bid is up to $2,038 with reserve still in place. $3,900 will put it in your garage, so the price of rarity is actually pretty low. To preserve history and add a legendary name plate to your collection, click the link to jump over to the auction. Good luck!!

MI