Posts by tag: Kerker

Suzuki March 6, 2018 posted by

Low Mile Lookalike – 1979 Suzuki GS1000E Wes Cooley

I had expected an “S” with the GS1000 badge on this sparkling Wes Cooley commemorative, but the differences between the -E are minor and hardly detract from the aggressive looks of this AMA Superbike commemorative.

1979 Suzuki GS100E Wes Cooley for sale on eBay

Suzuki and Yoshimura joined forces and were almost instantly successful on the AMA Superbike trail.  Lightness was given priority, which helped the air/oil-cooled four’s 90 hp move things in the right direction.  Pneumatic rear shocks were replaced with regular hydraulics on the -S, though forks remained air-charged.  The solid triple disks could handle the heat but not a light touch, squeaking around town.  Suzuki nailed the chassis geometry and came away with a quick-handling package that could accept a 1000cc engine’s power.

Not many miles has elapsed for this GS1000, replica paint still shines, and aluminum castings made before today’s miracle coatings look good.  Period Kerker is polished nicely.  Might be nice to try the rear quarter view without the luggage rack.  From the eBay auction:

Purchased in 2005, bike had approximately 5K miles on it

2005 – installed after market rack and rear tire; had front and rear tires rebalanced, and professional valve adjustment

2014 – new clutch and speedometer cable installed

2016 – new battery

No disappointments in running condition; bike runs as good as she looks! Bike has always been garaged and well maintained. This bike had the after-market Vance & Hines exhaust system (4 into 1) when I purchased it, so I do not have the original stock pipes.

Bike as you see it is exactly as I purchased it in 2005; has not been altered or repainted. The only addition / change I made to it was the after-market rack, rear tire and mechanical items (as mentioned above).

Lifting the bikini fairing from BMW’s R90/S gave designers the excuse to fit a lower handlebar, receiving a sporty riding position as part of the bargain, helping high speed stability.  Suzuki played a little catch-up with the -S, it was originally just offered in Europe, but stateside dealers clamored – after all, it was the AMA winner !  Which might explain the -E instead of -S, maybe a dealer-done special or early example.  A close look at the rear wheel might divulge, the -S had an 18-inch rear.  Maybe a knowledgeable reader will have the whole story, meantime we will just have to enjoy…

-donn

Low Mile Lookalike – 1979 Suzuki GS1000E Wes Cooley
Honda April 3, 2017 posted by

Modified Monday: 1980 Honda CB750F Replica Racer

From the Pacific Northwest comes this throwback vintage racer replica that pushes all the right buttons. RSBFS normally shies away from customs or heavily modded machinery, but this particular CB750-based bike is an exception. The build quality and detail is evident in the photos. This is a proper build, lovingly and artistically faithful to the Superbike era of the late 1970s and early 1980s. The seller has provided some crisp photos as well as the interesting history behind the bike. In fact, I’m going to let him tell the whole story. Read on.

1980 Honda CB750 Hot Rod for sale on eBay

From the seller:
This is a 1980’s period piece built by the 1st owner decades ago. One day the November, 1979 Cycle World issue arrived in his Seattle area mailbox. On the cover was Kazuo Yoshima of Ontario Moto Tech ripping a wheelie on his fire breathing custom modded CB750F.

The man was smitten by the article. He saved his pennies and on 4/4/80 bought a new 1980 Honda CB750F. Over the course of the next decade, he built the closest thing to a street legal HRC factory Superbike that he could.

More from the seller:
In 1990, after 10 years obsessing over this machine, it spit spark plug #4 out of the cylinder head as it was being ridden on the highway. The bike was towed home. Owner #1 never rode it again.

He still loved and cherished it though. It sat on the centerstand in his garage and received monthly wipe downs and polish jobs over the next 2 decades of inactivity. In 2009 I bought the bike. That makes me owner #2.

More from the seller:
I immediately took it to see Walter Myers and George Dean who are local Seattle vintage Honda motorcycle gurus. At first it was thought the head would have to come off. However, they were able to repair the plug threads without doing that. The entire bike was gone through and made operable. A lot of time was spent on the carburetors, jetting and tuning.

A big service bill later, I had a period 80’s toy that pulls 93.8 rwhp on a modern dyno. It runs and “fuels” better than it ever did way back then thanks to modern equipment and very capable tuning professionals.

5 years later (2014) I had Walter wake it up again. New tires, fluids, forks seals, a battery, etc. Since that wake-up call I’ve ridden the bike every once in a while to local events to keep the juices flowing.

More from the seller:
The paint and cosmetics are stunning. It looks like it was painted yesterday. Aki’s in Seattle/Ballard (they painted it in the 80’s) is still around. The actual painter is still there. Owner #1 was (and still is) a professional vehicle detailer at one of those wicked expensive places. The bike’s appearance reflects the labor of love that he put into it over 29 years of ownership.

To summarize, in the 80’s, the engine was sent to Ontario and punched out to 900cc. It has Keihin 31mm smoothbores. A Kerker pipe. A Cal-Fab swingarm. EPM Italian racing wheels. Hondaline rearset footpeg kit. Drilled and pinned swingarm bushings. Works Performance shocks. Trick/cool bits, nla parts and period touches everywhere.

A 1980 CB750F came with an 85mph speedometer as did every vehicle sold in the USA that model year. A different speedo unit from a 1979 CB750F that reads to 150mph was sourced and installed back then. The indicated mileage is 30k. The actual miles are conservatively estimated to be around 4000 and probably a fair bit less.

More from the seller:
This is a well sorted 1980’s hotrod Honda. It has been brought back to life and preserved in its original form to the best of my ability. It isn’t some unrideable bucking bronco. An enthusiast with an understanding and/or appreciation of vintage machinery can ride it around like a normal bike. It is an absolute hoot and looks/presents exactly like it did in the 80’s. I will add that it sounds really cool.

Includes a large amount of spares, service manual, valve shim chest of drawers, both factory keys, build sheets/notes, dyno sheet, etc.

This is a wicked-cool looking bike – with a “don’t mess with me” sort of muscular stance. This is everything a CB750 was NOT back in 1980, and still makes a powerful statement today. Pity that the noise this machine must make doesn’t come through via photographs. I can just imagine the lumpy, raspy, angry burble at idle. Heck, I’d consider buying this one just for the soundtrack! This isn’t setting eBay on fire at current, with the latest bid in at $1,775 and a reserve in place. Check it out here and let us know if our instincts are correct – does this type of build belong on RSBFS? Good Luck!!

MI

Modified Monday: 1980 Honda CB750F Replica Racer
Yamaha April 1, 2017 posted by

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400

April 1st has often been a day maligned by trickery. Even the hallowed pages of RSBFS have been besmirched by the occasional April Fools Day joke in past years. Not so this year. This year there are FAR too many excellent bikes available to waste time and web space on foolery. For example, 2017 seems to be the year of the FZR400 as evidenced by this fantastic find. This is a two-owner model that looks very clean and has obviously been well-loved. That is always good to see – especially with the Fizzers, as they are all too often raced, modded and generally abused.

1988 Yamaha FZR400 for sale on eBay

With an aluminum Delta Box frame wrapping itself tightly around the rev-happy Genesis inline four, the FZR400 emerged as the sweetest handling machine of the 1980s. Able to carry higher cornering speeds than comparable middleweights (or even open class bikes), the relative lack of power is more than made up for by conservation of forward motion. This is a bike that loves to be ridden, and rewards a smooth, committed rider most of all. The fact that it is also a very forgiving platform makes it all that much more approachable; you will be hard pressed to find negative reviews on this gem from Yamaha.

From the seller:
1988 Yamaha FZR 400. Owned since 2012 (2nd owner). Penske rear shock, Race Tech front suspension upgrades. Very good overall condition, blemishes represented in pictures. Kerker exhaust, Lockhart tank cover, 2009 swingarm, Includes original exhaust, Corbin seat, OEM service manual and many receipts from the original owner.

This particular machine has had some interesting mods. The suspension upgrades are non-destructive and warranted; technology has come a long way in 30 years, and some refresh/upgrades are definitely in order for a bike that has seen some use. Pipes and jetting are common to extract the maximum from what small displacement is available, and the original exhaust is available with the bike (nice!). The Corbin seat is another common mod. The swingarm update is curious; this is normally a cure for the limited tire selections due to the wheel size – but no mention is made of any changes there. Interested buyers might want to find out more. There is nothing inherently negative about this change, but there may be more to the story.

The market remains curiously soft on these smaller machines. In the US, there seems to be a general lack of interest in anything below 750cc. Of course the production numbers don’t help the supply/demand equation either, as this was a mass-produced Japanese machine. Still, these hold their value much better than a comparable middleweight (say, a FZR600), and with parts growing scarce we may see an elevation in status for these underrated canyon carvers. Check it out here, and enjoy the glut of FZR400s this year – it may not last!

MI

No Fooling: 1988 Yamaha FZR400
Kawasaki May 23, 2013 posted by

The best way to go green: 1983 Kawasaki KZ1000R ELR

ELR_1

Forget your Prius, electric car, recycling, composting and general conservatism. This is the REAL way to go green: a 1983 Kawasaki ELR model. Built to commemorate Eddie Lawson’s Superbike titles with Kawasaki, the ELR shows off its cutting edge race-spec stuff, including twin piggy-back shocks, and a mighty 1000cc air cooled inline four.

ELR_8

But let’s face it: what really sets ELR models apart is the brilliant green finish. Look beyond that and you will start to notice the GPz-like bikini fairing, the cast alloy wheels, triple disk brakes, fork brace, factory Kerker exhaust and more. This is no simple KZ; this was the top of the Big K heap in 1983.

ELR_12

From the seller:
I am selling my 1983 Eddie Lawson Replica (R2) with 22, 377 miles, which is in excellent running order and in very good overall condition. The frame and engine do not match. The original engine was heavily modified for a Cycle Magazine article and the engine was subsequently damaged beyond repair (over rev’ed). It was replaced with a Police 1000J engine.

The bike has new Dunlop tires, a new clutch cable, and new front shock seals installed with less than 2,000 miles. The brakes, battery, chain, and original seat are in very good condition. All of the electrical works (with the exception of intermittent flashing to the oil pressure warning light). All of the turn signals, hazard lights, and the “hi and low beams” of the headlight are working.

This bike comes with: Works rear shocks, a “newish” Kerker exhaust, tuned Mikuni flatside carbs w/ 4 High flow air filters, and an “aftermarket” Dyna electronic adjustable ignition.

Bike has been repainted…but there are a few chips and scrapes. Paint scheme is the “S1 Racing” scheme. Stickers can be removed…no scratches underneath.

Spare parts: stock front and back turn signals, racing oil cooler, stock air box, and the black chromed grab rail that fits around the rear of the seat.

Purchase includes the original Owner’s Manual (pristine condition), the Service Manual, and the Cycle Magazine article + 2 framed photos.

ELR_7

The ELR models we have posted here in the past have been in varying condition. Some have been absolutely concours condition and destined for museums, while others were riders or slightly worse. This bike looks to be a bit cleaner than most of the riders we have seen, but is far from stock or original. Will that matter to buyers? Given that pristine examples run in the $12k and above ranges, the BIN for this bike is set for a more reasonable $8,000. The opening ask is $6,500, with a reserve in place.

ELR_16

Will the bidders turn out for this one? If this was the actual magazine testing bike (and documented), that could make it an interesting find. I would love to know more of the back story on that one; could the historical aspect of this bike have any bearing on the final sale price? Click the link to jump over to the auction and check it out. Going green is easy on an ELR!

MI