Posts by tag: Keihin

Ducati August 2, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR Hot Rod

Update 8.2.2021: This bike has SOLD! Congratulations to buyer and seller! -dc

The Ducati Supersport line has been wildly successful for the Bologna manufacturer, and it is not difficult to see why. Based more on what is NOT there than what is, the Supersport is about agility and lightness. This is a bike that reduces riding to the raw level of man and machine, as opposed to man coddled by electro-mechanical machine. This is a booming, throbbing and visceral experience that is a class all unto its own. An amazing motorcycle because of what it isn’t, the Ducati Supersport remains a standout of the era, and a reminder of how good it is to get out and ride.

Featured Listing – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR Hot Rod

While the Supersport nomenclature had been around for decades in one form or another, it was the Pantah engine models that wear the “SS” designation. And rather thinking of the latter year Supersports as children of the bevel-era, old school Super Sport models, realize that this generation is much more closely related to the F1 and vaunted TT2 models – very good pedigree indeed. Out on the streets, riders quickly saw the potential for the “less is more” philosophy, and began to consider the 900 SS (especially the ’91-’98 models) as platforms to be enhanced and customized. The bare bones were very, very good…but the aftermarket could make them better. Enter today’s Featured Listing, a fantastic interpretation of the 900 SS/CR. I’ll let the seller pick it up from here:

From the seller:
I bought this girl off ebay about 4 years ago. Someone had done a crazy amount of work to her and then parked her. The family I bought it from said that the builder past away. When I got her she had the items listed below. The person who did the work did a GREAT job, everything was very well done. I also did a bunch of work over the years, see below. She basically needs nothing, she has fresh everything, ride her across the country if you’d like. She is fast, light (388 pounds with ½ tank of gas), fun and increasing in value.

More from the seller:
Build work done before I got her:
Black powder coated frame, swingarm, fairing bracket, valve covers and maybe the sides of the oil cooler.
Keihin FCR 39mm Flatslides
Hi-comp stock bore pistons
Light flywheel
Light clutch basket
Magnesium Marchesini 5 spoke wheels
Rear sets
Pi Research System 2 race dash and sensors that show, Oil Pressure, speed, voltage and RPM has a few other options not hooked up.
Modified and powder coated upper fairing bracket for dash.
Fresh brake pads.
Rare D&D Full 2 into 2 exhaust, carbon mufflers and hangers (very cool, light and plenty of clearance)
Fresh stainless lines for front and rear brakes
Custom breather filter.
Customized airbox.
Individual K&N filters
Custom inner fender
Very tiddy custom wiring for the upgrades.
Full CARBON tail (with factory seat), upper and front fender, paint is track quality, 6 out a 10

More from the seller:
What I’ve done in the last 4 years and 1200 miles of ownership:
Fresh fluids, oil changed 7/19, brake/clutch fluid changed 10/20
New plugs 7/19
Ultrasonically cleaned and rebuilt carbs
Belts changed 7/19
Replaced battery
Replaced windscreen
Replaced bar ends
Installed bar end mirrors in place of factory mirrors to keep the bike narrow
Valves adjusted 8/17
Ohlins rear shock
900SS/SP forks
Full floating Brembo iron front rotors
Lightened rear rotor

What she needs and flaws:
The race dash doesn’t have a odometer so I don’t know what the mileage is, it also has it’s own power switch so you have to turn it on and off.
The paint work has some bad touch ups and some flakey spots
That’s it, she is ready to go

More from the seller:
If I kept her I would…. Do nothing, just keep ridding her. It’s a great bike that flies between traffic, up mountains roads and commutes as well as my VFR. I’ve had over 12 900cc Ducati’s, I’m going to regret selling this one more than any other in the past.

Asking Price: $6000 obo

Today’s seller has listed several bikes on RSBFS in the past, and is a known entity. That always helps when considering a significant purchase. And from a cost standpoint, you could not build this hot rod at the price point being asked based on the parts installed and the cost of a suitable donor. That makes this a pretty good deal for a bike that has so much potential to please.

MI

Featured Listing – 1995 Ducati 900 SS/CR Hot Rod
Triumph August 28, 2020 posted by

Thug in a Tux: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Big nakeds have finally come of age here in the US, with trick, high performance options from all of the major manufacturers. They’re the perfect bikes for affluent, middle-aged folks who can’t handle the crippling riding position of hard-core sportbikes, but still have a taste for speed and the skill to appreciate thoroughbred handling. But in the early to mid 1990s, things were just getting rolling for that market segment in North America, and the Ducati Monster and Triumph’s original T309 Speed Triple were at the forefront.

Both of those aforementioned bikes were designed with the same philosophy in mind and built using a similar formula: take an existing platform, in Triumph’s case a variation of their modular spine frame and their proven three-cylinder engine and transmission, fit a simple dash, stick a round headlight on the front, and roll it out the door. The original Speed Triple was a bit more retro-looking than the Ducati Monster, but it was popular and profitable, helped to keep the newly reestablished Triumph afloat, and remains a mainstay of their production.

A claimed 98hp came from a liquid-cooled, four-valve per cylinder 885cc triple was backed by a five-speed gearbox, and the bike had adjustable suspension at both ends and beefy six-piston brake calipers up front. Unfortunately, the bike’s modular origins meant weight was carried too high, and the bike wasn’t really much of a handler. It all makes for a pretty ripping streetbike though, with retro-cool looks and plenty of performance for the road.

The bike shows 17,769 miles, which should be no problem if the bike has been sympathetically maintained, since the burly Triumph engines of the era were pretty durable. The carbon fiber wheels should go a ways towards both lightening the bike and improving handling, and the flat-slides, while less forgiving than CV carbs, should improve power and add another layer to the triple’s characterful soundtrack that’s already been enhanced by the full aftermarket exhaust.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale

Fast, fun, and reliable speed triple. Well maintained with many upgrades. Dymag carbon fiber rims. Taylor Made carbon fiber engine covers. Carbon fiber fenders. Keihin flat slide carbs. Staintune stainless and carbon full exhaust system. New tires 4 months ago with plenty of tread left.

Unfortunately, although this one has some tasty period extras, it’s not cosmetically perfect: there’s some surface corrosion on the pipes, wear on the tank pad, and the carbon fiber is pretty faded, considering the bike’s $5,750 reserve price. From what we’ve seen, that’s a pretty ambitious asking price for a first-generation Speed Triple, although the cosmetics could be cleaned up and the paint still looks very shiny. The first-generation Speed Triple is a collectible in the making, but so far prices have remained low. That’s great for fans of bargain exotics, but not so much for ambitious sellers ahead of the curve.

-tad

Thug in a Tux: 1995 Triumph Speed Triple for Sale
Ducati June 25, 2020 posted by

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300

In the 1990’s, Ducati’s SuperSport could be all things to some people – before the Monster and ST2 arrived, it could be an ok commuter and passable sport tourer.  This Final Edition has had some choice upgrades and considering the mileage looks very good.

1998 Ducati 900SS/FE for sale on eBay

The FE used the 904cc L-twin that had inhabited the SuperSports throughout the 90’s, air-cooled with 84 hp but peak torque at just 6,400 rpm.  The inverted forks and alloy swingarm were suspended by Showa, with Brembo supplying their gold-line 320mm brakes and cast iron rotors.  FE’s had a re-designed body with scoops to help cool the rear cylinder, and all were monoposto’s with a seat fairing courtesy of the earlier Superlight.  A new charging system brought 520 watts via a three phase alternator, and exhausts were swept high.  Carbon mudguards complimented the black alloys, and the dash was carbon as well.

Sounds like this owner is a knowledgeable SuperSport fan, and this FE has some key updates and neat NOS parts.  The Keihin flat-slide set-up appears to pre-date the seller and is tuned for Santa Fe (6,500 ft.) so chances are the carbs will have to be re-jetted for the new owner.  A few marks over the 17,000 miles, which is hard to confirm since the dash is new.  From the eBay auction:

The fork seals have just been replaced. 
It has a new Oberon clutch slave as the original was leaking. Works great.
It has brand new (NOS) front brake discs. These are unobtainium and super expensive when found – around $900!
It has a new factory windshield. $$
 
The gauge needles were faded as many vintage 900SS do over time. While hunting for less faded gauges I found another bit of unobtainium in the form of a complete NOS dash complete with gauges specifically for the FE with the carbon surround. It’s beautiful. Unfortunately, I can’t find my original speedo – I was going to include it in the sale for mileage history. I’m worried it got sold last year when I was clearing house of old used parts. It was in the mid 17000 mile range.
 
The bike is original except for the Keihin FCR41 carb set-up. This is a very popular upgrade that transforms the performance of the bike.  It runs great! There is no choke on these carbs – so the choke lever has been disconnected but is still there. I live at 7000 feet and the carbs are jetted for our high altitude. It may run a bit lean if you are close to sea level. No way to tell until the bike reaches it’s final destination. It has an open top airbox meaning it has a aftermarket frame that holds the K&N filter in place. It really helps the bike at our altitude as well.
 
The high mount Termignonis are beautiful. Sound great and the best period correct option for these. These are pricey if you can even find a set.
 
The Battlax tires have plenty of tread left front and rear. The belts were replaced by the prior owner about a year before I bought the bike. They are now around two years old.
 
It has a new fuel level sender ($250!). I have not put fuel back in the tank since replacing it, figuring if I sell the bike as planned, some shippers prefer empty tanks.

The 904 SuperSports were made from 1991-98 so you have to pick your spots for rarity, but the later SuperLights and FE’s fit the bill.  Not sure that seat is an all-day affair, but the riding position got high marks from reviewers.  Unusual to see such limited production with so many special parts on a no reserve auction, and it’ll be interesting to see where this FE winds up.

-donn

Silver Bird – 1998 Ducati 900SS/FE #287 of 300
Triumph July 28, 2018 posted by

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

In the 90s, it was foolish to take the Japanese Big Four head on: they were on a roll, and if you wanted to compete, you needed to offer something else, something different. They had the high-tech theme down cold, but no one can be all things to all people, and there has always been room in the margins for players with something unusual to offer. And a reborn Triumph had just such a machine with the Daytona Super III.

Sheer economic necessity dictated the design. The bike’s spine frame meant versatility and the same basic component could be used as the foundation for a series of bikes with vastly different missions: sportbike, roadster, tourer, cruiser. But the downside was inherent compromise: that configuration carried weight high up and meant that the resulting bikes were generally heavier than more focused rivals.

Engines had the same issues: Triumph’s three and four-cylinder designs were versatile, but they could never be as light or as powerful as something designed for screaming revs and maximum aggression. But although inline fours are powerful, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha’s reliance on them to power sports motorcycles during this period made the whole class a bit same-y, which likely explains some of Ducati’s contrarian appeal.

Freed from the need to fit into displacement restrictions imposed by racing classes, Triumph was able to create a sportbike focused for the road. The Daytona came in two flavors originally, one powered by the three cylinder and one by the four. The triple was lighter and ultimately more popular, but was very outclassed in the performance stakes compared to Japanese rivals. So Triumph introduced the Super III to at least close the gap and make the bike a viable alternative to more focused sportbikes.

Cosworth tuning increased power from 98 to 115hp and gave the bike a 140mph top speed, along with six-piston brakes. Performance was at least within shouting distance of other sportbikes, but the Triumph offered that charismatic and torquey three-cylinder that had great midrange punch, stable handling, reasonable comfort, much higher build quality and paintwork, along with classic styling that was a complete 180°, compared to the wild graphics and lurid colors found on bikes like the GSX-R750.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Between 1992 and 1997 Triumph produced the much appreciated but ultimately underpowered 3 cylinder Daytona 900. This bike was a successor to the original Daytona 750 and boasted a more acceptable riding position designed to increase its sporting ability. But the power to weight ratio was still a problem, especially when compared to other bikes at the time such as the GSX-R and the ultra-light Fireblade/CBR. So for the 1994-96 model years Triumph produced the Daytona Super III, and exported a very limited production run of ~150 bikes to the USA (numbers are approx 1000 worldwide).

Having been bitten by the Triumph triple bug, I searched for 2 years for a Super III and was ecstatic when I came across this extremely clean and well cared for example. Sadly, priorities have shifted and looking to thin the herd. This is not a divorce sale, baby sale, or other emergency sale. I’d like this to go to someone who will appreciate it as I have.  

Bike details: 8779.3 miles although that may go slightly up. 1 season old Michelin Pilot Power tires with less than 1k miles. Forks serviced at the end of last season with fresh oil, seals, and .95kg springs. Everything on the bike is OEM except for e-code halogen headlights for better night vision. All bodywork and paint is original. All factory carbon fiber parts are present, original, and unbroken.  

Extras: extremely rare Sprint Fox Fairing and custom made carbon fiber fill pieces. Comes with an extra fairing mount. Sudco FCR39 carbs (true triple carb setup for the 885, not a re-rack). Spare seat for re-upholstering. Can include some German basketweave vinyl (60’s Porsche restoration supply) if desired. It is very similar to the 60’s Triumph seat covers, albeit much higher quality.  

Very minor cons: small scratches on each muffler, less than 2″. Right side lower fairing has a few light scratches. Some chipping on fairing V behind front wheel.  

This is one of the lowest mileage original Triumph Super IIIs in existence. Extras worth $2,500 alone. Will not separate at this point.  

Japanese sportbikes of this era are old enough that the splashy graphics and DayGlo colors have become cool again, but the simple lines of this bright yellow Super III still appeal. These are very rare and certainly the most valuable of the early Daytonas, but still pretty affordable compared to other exotic machines. The $6,500 asking price is pretty high for a Super III, but the bike appears to be in superlative condition and has been enthusiast-owned, with low mileage, and comes with some very desirable extras. Speaking of: the seller mentions “Sudco” carbs, but I’m assuming they’re actually Keihin flat-slides, since Sudco doesn’t actually make carburetors, they just sell them.

-tad

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Honda April 3, 2017 posted by

Modified Monday: 1980 Honda CB750F Replica Racer

From the Pacific Northwest comes this throwback vintage racer replica that pushes all the right buttons. RSBFS normally shies away from customs or heavily modded machinery, but this particular CB750-based bike is an exception. The build quality and detail is evident in the photos. This is a proper build, lovingly and artistically faithful to the Superbike era of the late 1970s and early 1980s. The seller has provided some crisp photos as well as the interesting history behind the bike. In fact, I’m going to let him tell the whole story. Read on.

1980 Honda CB750 Hot Rod for sale on eBay

From the seller:
This is a 1980’s period piece built by the 1st owner decades ago. One day the November, 1979 Cycle World issue arrived in his Seattle area mailbox. On the cover was Kazuo Yoshima of Ontario Moto Tech ripping a wheelie on his fire breathing custom modded CB750F.

The man was smitten by the article. He saved his pennies and on 4/4/80 bought a new 1980 Honda CB750F. Over the course of the next decade, he built the closest thing to a street legal HRC factory Superbike that he could.

More from the seller:
In 1990, after 10 years obsessing over this machine, it spit spark plug #4 out of the cylinder head as it was being ridden on the highway. The bike was towed home. Owner #1 never rode it again.

He still loved and cherished it though. It sat on the centerstand in his garage and received monthly wipe downs and polish jobs over the next 2 decades of inactivity. In 2009 I bought the bike. That makes me owner #2.

More from the seller:
I immediately took it to see Walter Myers and George Dean who are local Seattle vintage Honda motorcycle gurus. At first it was thought the head would have to come off. However, they were able to repair the plug threads without doing that. The entire bike was gone through and made operable. A lot of time was spent on the carburetors, jetting and tuning.

A big service bill later, I had a period 80’s toy that pulls 93.8 rwhp on a modern dyno. It runs and “fuels” better than it ever did way back then thanks to modern equipment and very capable tuning professionals.

5 years later (2014) I had Walter wake it up again. New tires, fluids, forks seals, a battery, etc. Since that wake-up call I’ve ridden the bike every once in a while to local events to keep the juices flowing.

More from the seller:
The paint and cosmetics are stunning. It looks like it was painted yesterday. Aki’s in Seattle/Ballard (they painted it in the 80’s) is still around. The actual painter is still there. Owner #1 was (and still is) a professional vehicle detailer at one of those wicked expensive places. The bike’s appearance reflects the labor of love that he put into it over 29 years of ownership.

To summarize, in the 80’s, the engine was sent to Ontario and punched out to 900cc. It has Keihin 31mm smoothbores. A Kerker pipe. A Cal-Fab swingarm. EPM Italian racing wheels. Hondaline rearset footpeg kit. Drilled and pinned swingarm bushings. Works Performance shocks. Trick/cool bits, nla parts and period touches everywhere.

A 1980 CB750F came with an 85mph speedometer as did every vehicle sold in the USA that model year. A different speedo unit from a 1979 CB750F that reads to 150mph was sourced and installed back then. The indicated mileage is 30k. The actual miles are conservatively estimated to be around 4000 and probably a fair bit less.

More from the seller:
This is a well sorted 1980’s hotrod Honda. It has been brought back to life and preserved in its original form to the best of my ability. It isn’t some unrideable bucking bronco. An enthusiast with an understanding and/or appreciation of vintage machinery can ride it around like a normal bike. It is an absolute hoot and looks/presents exactly like it did in the 80’s. I will add that it sounds really cool.

Includes a large amount of spares, service manual, valve shim chest of drawers, both factory keys, build sheets/notes, dyno sheet, etc.

This is a wicked-cool looking bike – with a “don’t mess with me” sort of muscular stance. This is everything a CB750 was NOT back in 1980, and still makes a powerful statement today. Pity that the noise this machine must make doesn’t come through via photographs. I can just imagine the lumpy, raspy, angry burble at idle. Heck, I’d consider buying this one just for the soundtrack! This isn’t setting eBay on fire at current, with the latest bid in at $1,775 and a reserve in place. Check it out here and let us know if our instincts are correct – does this type of build belong on RSBFS? Good Luck!!

MI

Modified Monday: 1980 Honda CB750F Replica Racer
Ducati December 29, 2014 posted by

Practical Exotic: 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore for Sale

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore L Front

Bimota could be thought of as an Italian alternative to Harris, Metisse, or Egli, companies that took the refined engines and transmissions from established industry giants, and then provided frames and new bodywork to create desirable exotics you could service at a local dealer… Although at this point, only Bimota is still building complete motorcycles.

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Tank

The most successful bikes in Bimota’s sometimes spotty history have been the result of their ongoing collaboration with Ducati. The DB4 that followed the DB2 and DB3 Mantra was powered by a dead stock 904cc air/oil cooled engine and 6-speed transmission, but replaced Ducati’s trellis frame made from tubular steel with one made from oval-section aluminum. Bodywork was much simpler and more elegant than the controversial Pierre Terblanche restyle of the 900SS that donated its powertrain, although the available paint schemes were pretty loud…

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore R Side Detail

The philosophy behind the DB4 is basically “keep it simple, stupid,” with light weight, aggressive geometry, quality suspension, and a flexible, entertaining engine wrapped up in distinctive bodywork. It’s not the fastest thing on the road, but the complete package allows skilled riders to revel in the quality components and exploit what limited power there is. And anyway, didn’t anyone ever tell you: it’s more fun to ride a slow motorcycle fast than it is to ride a fast motorcycle slow…

From the original eBay listing: 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore for Sale

800 Miles! Very Rare 2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore w/Factory Race Kit
This motorcycle is a very nice and very original 2000 Bimota DB4 with factory Tri-Colore paint scheme –
my favorite model and paint scheme that Bimota has ever made. It is equipped with the rare Factory
Race Kit which includes Keihin FCR Carbs (no choke), a special Bimota gas tank to clear the carbs, Corse
titanium exhaust, and an Ohlins rear shock. The bike is from my personal collection and is one of 3 I own.

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Exhaust

The single exhaust can on this bike is a definite improvement over the “shotgun” style original paired units. I actually have a set of Keihin FCR 41 carburetors on my Ducati Monster and they really do transform the bike’s character, although the lack of a choke does make starts on cold mornings a bit of a pain… I believe some people also fit FCR 39’s and the seller doesn’t indicate which are fitted to this bike. I am also a little curious about the “special Bimota gas tank” since the Keihin carbs are quite a bit more compact than the original 38mm Mikuni items and take up less space when installed. Anyone have any experience with this? Did the “race kit” actually include a different tank as well?

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore Tail

The “Buy It Now” is pretty steep at $20,000 although the ridiculously low miles may go some way to justifying that price… Someone please rescue this wonderfully rideable motorcycle and put some miles on it already!

-tad

2000 Bimota DB4 Tricolore R Side

Bimota April 29, 2011 posted by

Collector alert! ZERO miles 1999 Bimota DB4 up for grabs!

ZERO – as in not turned a wheel, nada, zilch, Z-E-E-R-O, miles 1999 Bimota DB4 with performance kit for sale in Michigan!

*update: as Joel and fellow RSBFS contributor Mike pointed out, the bike has 23 miles on the odometer, so strictly speaking it’s not a zero mile bike.  Aside from the factory performance kit it has also an aftermarket clutch slave and a tinted windscreen.

While both these points do not detract the bike from what is it – a desirable and collectible, almost new Bimota DB4 – it is nevertheless not truly zero miles and not 100% original.*

From the same collector that brought you the zero miles Bimota DB1Bimota Laser TT KB2, and a 1977 Ducati 900SS (on ebay now!) here’s another yet another zero miles Bimota from his amazing collection:

Up for auction is a 1999 Bimota DB4. This is a Brand New Zero Mile motorcycle that I am selling for my Dad who is selling his collection.

The condition of the bike is fantastic and is like new. It has been upgraded with the performance kit which is a Corse Exhaust and Kehin CR special Carburetors installed (the stock parts have been saved and will come with the bike). It does come with the original tool kit and literature. It also has a free and clear title in the sellers name.

Please take a look at the large pictures to get a better idea of condition and email me if you have any questions.

** Visit this link to see higher resolution pictures http://imageevent.com/joejo20/1999bimotadb4 **

Really, what’s there to say about ANY zero miles Bimota? It’s very desirable and collectible for sure, but I’d be too afraid to ride it.  I like to ride my bikes and I guess I’m not a serious enough collector to have separate bikes for riding and for static display. $16,900 for a DB4 is a lot of money for sure, but how do you put a value on the fact that it’s zero miles?!  Plus, if you are into that sort of thing, this is a low serial number bike (003) so may be worth just THAT much more…

This guy is a serious collector (just check out some of the other bikes in the background – Ducati NCR New Blue, Desmosedici, Ducati TT F1…) and I would love to see what else he will be listing for sale.  My only question would be – if my dad has such an amazing collection, why would I sell it?!

If you like having a brand new 1999 Bimota DB4 for display in your collection (and who doesn’t?), .

ph

Honda March 31, 2010 posted by

2004 Honda CBR150R Titled In California

We’ve seen this CBR150R but, it’s available again from a different seller.  Located in San Jose, California is a 2004 CBR150R with 5,173 miles–that actually might be km as that is what the previous owner stated the mileage in.  This bike has been fitted with Keihin 28mm carb, K&N filter, Endurance full exhaust system, CDI, and since being in new ownership, adjustable levers and Bridgestone BT16’s with 50 miles.  This bike is the four stroke replacement for the NSR150 that was very popular.  The asking price hasn’t changed on this bike even with the addition of the new tires and levers.  See the original posting here.  See the current ad on BayAreaRidersForum.com here.

AG