Posts by tag: gear-driven cams

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Aprilia May 20, 2022 posted by

Colorfast – 2013 Aprilia Tuono V4R APRC

Twenty-teens naked superbikes are often a bit over the top, and the V4R Tuono shows that Aprilia got a head start.  Vegas-based Eurocycle offers this liter-sized V-4 with all the electronic wizardy, moderate miles, and a fairly relaxed riding position.

2013 Aprilia Tuono V4R APRC for sale on eBay

Aprilia’s game-changing V4 has a 65-degree splay, with the four pack of Dell’Orto throttle bodies which adjust length dynamically.  Four cams and four valves per cylinder are at the top of the 167 hp lump, which has been optimized for torque on the Tuono.  The alloy chassis takes advantage of the V-4’s naturally skinny width, and sports a little more wheelbase, rake and trail than the RSV4 Superbike.  That extra stability is complimented by the 43mm adjustable Sachs forks and piggyback reservoir monoshock.  A full suite of electronics helps keep the shiny side up, with three throttle maps plus selectable traction / wheelie / launch control.  The factory quick-shifter and slipper clutch are a bit more analogue.

Though no history is offered, this Tuono looks excellent for its 15,432 miles.  A few mods are shown, with shorty exhaust and levers, extended windscreen, tail tidy, bar end mirrors, and T-Rex frame sliders.  The listing states that the bike is on display at their Sonoma County location, so might be worth a call before pushing any buttons.  Some warranty time might be desirable with all those electronics and it would be something to ask about.  Some Aprilia marketing info from the eBay auction:

The performance and features of a superbike, the agility of a naked and the legacy of an innovative concept born in 2002 with the Tuono 1000 R – a bike that earned both critical acclaim and sales success – but with an extraordinary ace up its sleeve: the performance of a 65° V4 engine and the most advanced electronics available in a motorcycle today.

Like the original Tuono, the V4 is also immediately recognizable with its triple headlight fixed top fairing, the distinguishing trait of a bike which, like its twin cylinder predecessor, has the body and soul of its WSBK homologated sibling, but now – as well as having two world championships (the 2010 constructors’ and riders’ titles) under its belt – features two more cylinders and 41 horsepower more than before, while weighing over 22 pounds less. These astonishing figures are a testimony to the technological evolution that made this exciting model a reality. The bike is available in two colours: competition black, sunlit yellow.

Though the V4R’s appetite for straightaways might be insatiable, the thin and light package will make short work of the technical stuff, too.  The ask is a little more than half of the MSRP, seeming like a pretty good buy for the top of the line, and it’ll be a while before you see yourself going by.  Depending on how the APRC is set up, 4.5 gallons of dino juice might last all morning.

– donn

Colorfast – 2013 Aprilia Tuono V4R APRC
Honda March 27, 2022 posted by

In Round Numbers – 2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51

For the year 2000 Honda dialed in WSBK and AMA success and showroom clients were a clear beneficiary.  Today’s RC51 was wheeled to the back of a the warehouse with a hair over 2,000 miles and shows just a few marks for all the years on vaca.

2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51 for sale on eBay

Honda started with a fairly clean sheet of paper but a couple of Superbike rulebooks handy, and chose an L-twin in part for its inherent primary balance.  The big 100mm bore allowed four good-sized valves, and 40mm intakes with 34mm exhausts are controlled by gear-driven cams.  The resulting sound was rather unusual for a Honda, as were the side-rads and skinny missile shape.  HRC had plenty of input on the alloy chassis, with fresh air piped in around the headstock and Showa adjustable suspension.  A new gearbox reviewed as very smooth shifting, and 320mm Nissin brakes as some of the best ever fitted.

Just scrape here and a ding there differentiate this RC51 from a museum piece, and of course the missing front signals and mirrors.  The streamlined under-tail might suit – or if not, there are mountains of the factory parts someplace.  Can’t go wrong with CA title or informative notes from the eBay auction –

Only 2,007 original miles! Clean CA title – you will be the fourth person on the title.  Bike has had some modifications and very little use – here are a few things you should know:  1. The bike starts up and runs great. Recent fluid service.  2. Tires are original – therefore are not safe to ride on any longer.  3. Missing side mirrors  4. Missing turn signals – I have brand new OEM Honda orange turns signals if you want them.  5. There are marks on some areas of the bike. I have included pictures where there are marks but I could not get everything.  6. This bike is VERY clean.  7. I have video of the bike starting up that I can send to you if you are interested.  8. There are no other OEM parts available with the bike.  9. The underseat area and license plate are aftermarket – I do not have the original.

The RC51 was an instant success on the racetrack, and actually won the World and AMA Superbikes in 2002.  But as Honda often does, they proved their point and shortly HRC saw a four-cylinder light at the end of the WSBK tunnel.  The RC51 was supported but there wasn’t a factory team in 2003, and the model left the showroom after 2006.  However the legacy and fan base are well established, and there’s certainly always room at the pumps for a really nice example.  20-large might be beyond the top of the SP1 range – but even without the Make Offer button, a conversation is waiting to be started.

-donn

In Round Numbers – 2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51
MV Agusta February 20, 2022 posted by

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale

Update 2.20.2022: We originally put this post together in Dec 2018 and it’s back on eBay with the same $75k opening bid. Links updated. -dc

I’m sure everyone who bought F4s, back when seemingly every version of that bike was a limited edition of one kind or another, was hoping to capture a bit of what  the MV Agusta 750S America offered: exclusivity, collectiblity, and ever-increasing values. It didn’t necessarily offer class leading performance because, while MV was famous for its racetrack successes, their roadbike was relatively tame: power was average and the bike was fairly heavy, with performance-sapping shaft-drive.

Shaft-drive was a viable, and far more reliable alternative to chain-and-sprocket setups back in the 1970s, and both the Moto Guzzi LeMans and BMW R90S managed to be competitive machines in spite of the performance handicap of shaft drive. But MV supposedly included shaft-drive on their roadbike specifically to limit performance, so privateers couldn’t simply buy a 750S and compete against MV’s factory efforts. The new bike really embodied a shift in the motorcycle market, away from the practical, small-displacement machines MV was producing for road use in the 1950s and towards more powerful, expensive four-cylinder machines exemplified by the Honda CB750 and Kawasaki Z1.

The complete 750S was relatively heavy and engine was designed to be durable, to suit the bike’s more grand touring mission statement. But its racing heritage shone through and the powerplant was pretty narrow, with gear-driven cams, exotic-looking sand-cast engine cases, and a complete lack of any filtration for the quartet of Dellorto carburetors. The original version displaced 742cc, made 69hp, and had drum brakes to haul the 560lbs wet machine down from the 130mph top speed. That sounds pretty unimpressive now, but was par for the course at the time among four-cylinder superbikes.

The 750S America that followed, known as the 800 Super America in parts of Europe, increased displacement to 787cc for a bump in horsepower and torque. It also moved the gearshift to the left-hand side in an effort to appeal to the US buyers, which makes sense considering it was marketed as the “America.” This later version was still burdened with that heavy driveshaft, but Arturo Magni, who worked with MV Agusta’s racing team during their heyday, manufactured a chain-drive conversion for the 750S. Magni is still in business, and maybe they can be persuaded to whip up another one for you, if you’re so inclined.

From the original eBay listing: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America

Most of you know the history of MV Agusta, with their 37 world championships with the likes of Read, Surtees and Agostini. The story of this bike is that it was conceived by the U.S. importer, Chris Garville, as a limited-edition (200 for the 1975 model year) sport bike for the American market based on the existing 750 Sport; that bike became known as the 750S America.

This 1975 750S America was one of the earliest models imported into the US, with engine number 221012 and frame number 221009.

First of only two owners was the importer, Garville Corporation, where it was used in displays, shows and magazine tests: as featured in Cycle, Big Bike and Motor Cycle World to name a few. Ownership was then transferred to Peter Garville (brother of importer Chris) in where it stayed in his possession until 1990.

Included with the motorcycle is a large collection of: Factory correspondence to support its provenance, magazine articles specific to this particular motorcycle, period brochures, and spare parts.

For further information please see the recently featured May/June 2018 edition of the American magazine Motorcycle Classics –

https://www.motorcycleclassics.com/classic-italian-motorcycles/classic-mv-agusta-motorcycles/1975-mv-agusta-750s-america-zmwz18mjzhur

As second owner, I acquired the bike from Garville in 1990 by way of famed restorer Perry Bushong (one of the first MV Agusta dealers in the US). Perry and I have had a life long friendship and working relationship. When he heard that this bike was coming up for sale he knew that this bike was for me. When I heard the sound of the 4 into 4 exhaust I was hooked and that is when it became mine. In 1994 I had the opportunity to meet John Surtees at Daytona and he was kind enough to autograph the fuel tank. After that the bike was ridden sporadically, mostly at bike events, rallys and shows until 2014 when I took it back to Perry to ask him to do the restoration, which was completed in the Fall of 2016. We added the curved racing exhaust built by Dave Kay in England, something I had always wanted to do as it looks fantastic and sounds like no other motorcycle on the road!

Sadly in 2017 both Perry and Mr. Surtees passed away within one week of each other.

The 750S was $6,500 when new, the equivalent of around $40,000 in today’s dollars. The starting bid for this one is $75,000 with no bids as yet, but plenty of time left on the auction. Fortunately, this machine has gracefully curved four-into-four exhaust pipes instead of the straight megaphones seen on earlier bikes that look good and sound better. There’s a reason Yamaha’s cross-plane crank has made such a big splash in recent years: traditional flat-plane crank inline fours are powerful, but can be a bit bland. But if you’re expecting the sanitary rustle of a modern four here, you’ll be shocked by the 750S America’s shrieking exhaust note and the bike has thoroughbred handling to match, in spite of the weight.

-tad

Classic Italian Superbike: 1975 MV Agusta 750S America for Sale
Honda October 17, 2021 posted by

Featured Listing – 1997 Honda VFR750F!

Update 10.17.2021: SOLD IN ONE DAY to an RSBFS Reader! Congratulations to buyer and seller!

Seller testimonial:

Hey Dan just wanted to let you know I got a bunch of guys (legitimate) called today 1st day on your site. Receiving a deposit shortly. People all over the country. I had somewhat little response on cycletrader for the week it’s been on there. Kudos! I’m relatively new to raresprtbikesforsale so I wasn’t sure how it would go but clearly you have a lot of followers. And you wrote the article up real nice too which helps. Thanks again.

If you have a bike for sale that would benefit from this kind of exposure, contact us for a Featured Listing. -dc

The Honda VFR750F is an icon. Through 10+ years of constant production, evolution and improvement, the VFR gained notoriety for doing everything well. This is not a bike that just ticks one of the “most” buckets; it is not the cheapest, it is not the lightest, it is not the most powerful, it is not the most race-like, it is not the fastest. But for those that actually prefer to ride, the VFR has been a constant companion offering good looks, great performance and legendary reliability. From the clean sheet beginnings way back in 1986, the VFR steadily improved to what can only be considered as close to motorcycling perfection as possible.

Featured Listing – 1997 Honda VFR750F

The VF line was born around the V-4 engine configuration. And while the earliest of the VFs utilized a timing chain to invoke the 4 valves per cylinder, the evolution quickly moved to uber-reliable gear driven cams such as are found on the RC30 and RC45 racers. The same goes for the race-bred single-sided swingarm, as well as the aluminum, twin-spar frame. And if you cannot see a profile resemblance to the famous NR750 perhaps you need to check your pulse. But the VFR is not a racer – it has all of the DNA necessary to become so, but it knows its place in the world as an incredibly capable all-rounder. Devoid of the “character” flaws of other exotics that require the rider to make concessions, the VFR can commute, canyon carve, rip it up at a track day, and take you to points far and away as a sport tourer. I challenge you to name any other platform that has this breadth of capability.

From the seller:
Mint condition, close to museum quality, vfr 750. Brand new Dunlop tires. 18,250 miles. Oil changed 3 months ago with amsoil full synthetic 10/40. Oil has about 800/1k miles on it as do the tires. Bone stock not a single thing modified. Only things not original are tires, battery and gold chain. Bike starts up instantly, choke works perfectly. The bike idles perfect. Runs strong as new. It’s apparent to me by the condition of the bike that it was well maintained in every way since new. Turn key bike that needs nothing. I ride the bike casually on nice days, miles may increase a little. Bike comes with a cover. Stored in my garage and not ever driven in bad weather. Please call if interested 856-405-7830. I’m not answering emails. The towel under the center stand is there to protect my new garage floor from being scraped. The bike has no leaks at all.

Asking Price: $5,500

For just a touch over 8 grand the 1997 you could walk into a showroom and ride out on what is arguably the best motorcycle of all time (don’t take my word for it – check out how often the Interceptor has shown up on annual “best of” lists). But given its less rare status as a mass-marketed UJM, the market has yet to come back around to equalizing value for money. That makes the last era of the VFR750F – such as today’s Featured Listing – an outright bargain in the used bike market. This is really the pinnacle of Honda engineering and quality, at a price well below that of comparable bikes. With the capabilities of more modern bikes without the confusing and annoying electronic gadgetry, this is as pure as riding can get.

Today’s 1997 Honda VFR750F Featured Listing is a pristine example of the breed. Obviously well cared for, this bike has traveled fewer than 800 miles per year on average. And it looks the part. Check out how clean this bike appears, despite the 24 years that have passed since it first sat in a showroom. Stone stock the way Honda intended, the plastics look flawless. There is no corrosion on the wheels, the forks, or the brake/clutch master cylinder reservoirs (common areas to show weather-induced flaws). No fender hack here, no Pep Boys shorty turn signals, no superfluous stickers, no color-tinted windscreen, no flashy loud pipe – nothing that the engineers and assembly line personnel at Honda did not fit to the bike. That is clearly worth the price of admission, as finding these models in this sort of condition is not easy. If you are looking for a neo classic – a bike that will age gracefully, ride comfortably and last forever, make a deal. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing – 1997 Honda VFR750F!
Honda May 13, 2021 posted by

Operational – 2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51

Honda studied the V-twin superbike rulebook carefully, and took the RC51 right to the podium.  Today’s example has seen under 1,000 miles per year, and looks excellent.

2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51 for sale on eBay

The chassis department took quite a bit of the workload on the RC51, creating a massive-looking twin spar alloy affair, which used the V-twin as a stiffener and worked ram-air ports around the steering head.  The engine designers penned a 90-degree vee slightly more oversquare than the competition, and claimed thirteen more hp at 136.  PGM_FI electronics controlled two injectors per cylinder, and cams were gear driven.  Showa brought their best adjustable suspension to the program, and a steering damper was not required.  With classic dual exhausts cruising by the heavily braced swingarm, running gear was rounded out by Nissin brakes and 17-inch wheels.  The full fairing had the latest cat’s eye headlights and side radiators to reduce frontal area.

This Texan RC51 has some nice mods – conformal turn signals, well done frame sliders, Sargent seat, and an interesting 2-1-2 exhaust.  And the compulsory rear fender elimination.  Super clean with just short of 19,000 miles, decent tires and seemingly no paintwork.  Comments from the eBay auction:

A surviving example of the Honda’s racing heritage in the Superbike World Championship. It’s an absolute blast to ride with its V-Twin liquid cooled motor. While this bike has been enjoyed it is still in great shape and will remain a collectable item seen by many for years to come. This bike does have a few after market accessories. It has the under tail with led brake lights with integrated turn signals and a license plate light to pass your state’s inspection. While maintaining the factory look, a set of frame sliders were installed. The factory exhaust was replaced with a set of high rise exhaust on one side that was developed by Honda’s racing team. Bike has been recently detailed and is fully operational and ready to be enjoyed.

The red and even redder bikes traded championships until Honda, as they regularly do in competition situations, decided they’d proved their point and pooled their resources for the next conquest.  The RC51 stayed in production until 1996 and is quietly making its way toward legend.  Several bidders are interested in this one, though the reserve might be double the current bid.  Looking forward  to the last half hour !

-donn

 

Operational – 2001 Honda RVT1000R / RC51
Honda April 13, 2021 posted by

Well Ridden: 1989 Honda VFR400R NC30

Pardon the title of this post. To be fair, I don’t know if this bike was well ridden, or ridden well. But I can tell you that it was ridden a lot. To the tune of nearly 28,000 miles, that is. That is not a problem for your typically over-engineered Honda motorcycle, but it is surprising to find such a rare gem as a NC30 to have been so heavily used. It is certainly a testament to the joy these 400cc machines bring to the table, and kudos are in order for an owner willing to get out there and ride.

1989 Honda VFR400R NC30 for sale on eBay

Like its bigger brother the RC30, the NC30 is powered by a liquid-cooled V-4 that has valve actuation driven by gears rather than chains, belts or pushrods. The result is more precise valve actuation – especially at high RPM – and the characteristic gear whine for which these these bikes are known. Couple that sweet, 60 HP V-4 with the big beam aluminum chassis, throw on some 41mm upside down forks and a rising rate single shock in the rear with the single sided “Pro Am” swing arm and you have a package that handles as well as it looks. And speaking of looks, the NC30 is nearly a direct copy of the RC30, complete with endurance racing inspired twin headlights.

From the seller:
1989 HONDA VFR400R NC30
VIN # NC301013367
45,000 KILOMETERS
TITLED IN ARIZONA, CLEAN AND CLEAR
GOOD CONDITION
NEW TIRES
RECENTLY SERVICED HAVE RECEIPTS
SERVICE WAS DONE ON SEPT 2020. IT INCLUDED OIL CHANGE, FORKS REBUILD, AND CARB CLEANING AND SYNC.
RUNS GREAT DON’T LET THE MILEAGE SCARE YOU
IF YOU ARE LOOKING AT THIS AUCTION YOU KNOW HOW RARE THIS MOTORCYCLE IS.
BUYER RESPONSIBLE FOR PICKUP.

Today’s tasty morsel of non-federalized fruit comes to us wearing the red, white and blue (and purple) robes that just seems to fit the U.S. perfectly. This is one of myriad color combos that the little VFR would wear during its run, although likely the most popular due to the resemblance to the RC30. None were ever officially imported into the United States, so that means you will have to do some quick math in your head to convert the all-metric clocks to actual speed. Aside from the miles, this bike appears to be wearing a non-stock, tinted windscreen. Other than that you might say this is a pretty good looking used bike. Short time left on the auction, with only a single bid at $5k at time of writing. There are a fair number of watchers, so something might play out near the tail end of this one. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Well Ridden: 1989 Honda VFR400R NC30
Honda March 6, 2021 posted by

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R

Let’s set the record straight right up front: The Honda VF1000R is not as rare as true homologation machines such as the RC30 or the RC45. It was not as hard to come by in the US as the NC30 or grey market two strokes such as the NSR250 or NSR400. Yet it still has a place on these pages as it is undeniably cool, packs a massive performance punch, and to find one in today’s condition is quite simply a treat. Interested? Read on!

1986 Honda VF1000R for sale on eBay

The VF1000R gains it’s good (if not slightly porky) looks from a long line of Honda endurance racers, and the model was meant both celebrate – as well as homologate – the gear-driven V-4 for production-based racers worldwide. The fact that the VF1000R was itself an accomplished endurance racer belies the fact that homologation never happened; the metamorphosis of the VF1000F block to accommodate gear driven cams was unusually complex – and heavy. The move to geared cams added significant weight, and the bloat did not stop there. Newly revised cylinder heads raised compression and altered the airflow into the chambers, resulting in an engine producing approximately 10 HP more than the lowly “F” model – and weighing about the same amount more.

From the seller:
Out of a Bob Weaver Collection from New York is this 1986 VF1000R classic from the past.
The was the fastest production bike of its time. This is the rare desirable 2 headlight version low VIN # and was the 23rd bike produced for this year. The pictures will state it all. This is not a clapped out old bike that you can buy for a few thousand dollars. Paint and condition is great. Most of the things you would have to mess with on an old bike has been done: New fork seals/oil, tires, brake pads, air filter, spark plugs, coolant, thermostat, brake fluids, carb rebuild, starter clutch, battery and hard to find fuel pump. Has been serviced by local dealer. Ready to ride.

This is not a beginners bike or a bike for a small person. This is big, heavy, fast bike and not for the timid.
This is a beautiful 80’s bike that is now on every sport bike collectors list and prices are climbing quickly. Get yours before its too late.

The dual-headlight VF1000R model is the last version in the line of a relatively short production run (the model launched in 1984), and really brought the Euro look to America. Remember, the early 1980s were a time that D.O.T. did not really allow two headlights on a motorcycle; by 1986 this was still a novelty. The overall livery of the bike helped to disguise some of the R model’s weight; all told you are looking at a 600+ lb sport bike. According to reviewers at the time, a lot of that weight is concentrated high up, making for some interesting riding dynamics. The seller is correct in that these are really not for the inseam or muscularly challenged. Nor is this a great first bike: With 122 HP and on tap and a 150 MPH top end, things can go wrong in a hurry.

While the VF1000R was not homologated nor offered in any sort of “Limited Edition” packaging (read: it was a mass produced Honda motorcycle), it remains relatively rare today. These were expensive in the day, and were outsold by the cheaper F model in the years they overlapped. To find one in excellent condition these days is not an every week occurrence. This particular example is far from a zero mile affair (the ad states 28K on the clocks), but does come out of a known collection. The pictures show an honest example of the breed rather than an abused rat bike. The VF1000R looks as stunning today as when it first dropped in 1984, and will continue to look great for decades to come. The Buy It Now is set at a rather high $10,750, but as these are sought after models the market may indeed go in that direction. Check out all of the details here, and Good Luck!!

MI

Fan Favorite: 1986 Honda VF1000R
Aprilia January 17, 2021 posted by

Turista Sportiva – 2001 Aprilia SL1000 Falco

Not every rider can see themselves on a race replica, and Aprilia obliged with the SL1000 with slightly relaxed performance, ergonomics, and pricing. Here’s a nice looking hi-vis edition with some nice updates.


2001 Aprilia SL1000 Falco for sale on eBay


Aprilia transferred their winning 998 cc V-twin from the RSV, but profiled the torque curve for 12 less peak hp ( but still 118 ! ), with a wider powerband.  The Rotax mill is quite advanced with gear-driven cams, dry sump lubrication, dual plugs, and water cooling.  The six speeds reviewed as smooth shifting, and the USD Showa forks with Sachs monoshock provided a sure if not race-bred ride.  A low seat height was part of the design, along with a pillion under cover, and a surprisingly effective 3/4 fairing.

Not enough pictures to not want more, but they do show a very clean, undamaged Falco.  The diamond-section mufflers are an interesting solution.  Oil change is so fresh that the old oil is still in the picture.  Notes from the eBay auction:

Fresh Dunlop GPR300 Tires, New Pads Front and Rear.
New Chain and Sprockets with 1 tooth drop on front.
New Adjustable levers in black.  Fresh plugs and Motul oil change, the Air filter is of course a K&N.
Fuel filter changed as well.  Fresh AGM Battery.
Bike came with factory Aluminum high mount exhaust and factory performance chip in ECM, I also have a tunable race ECM can download maps to for even more performance.
2 owner adult ridden bike. Fun bike but I barely ride any more so selling it for someone else to enjoy.

The Falco was said to generate more miles since it was more comfortable and still plenty quick.  The only fuel advisory was a warning light at the 5 liter point, funny for a bike with a 5-1/2 gallon tank, optional soft bags and longer distance aspirations.  Unfortunately the compromise solution didn’t generate lots of sales, though in the SL1000’s defense the Aprilia dealer network was still a work in progress.  With it’s low starting bid and inseam-saving seat, this ready-to-ride Falco might be a good entrée into the sportbike affliction.

-donn

Turista Sportiva – 2001 Aprilia SL1000 Falco