Posts by tag: flat-slide

Triumph July 28, 2018 posted by

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

In the 90s, it was foolish to take the Japanese Big Four head on: they were on a roll, and if you wanted to compete, you needed to offer something else, something different. They had the high-tech theme down cold, but no one can be all things to all people, and there has always been room in the margins for players with something unusual to offer. And a reborn Triumph had just such a machine with the Daytona Super III.

Sheer economic necessity dictated the design. The bike’s spine frame meant versatility and the same basic component could be used as the foundation for a series of bikes with vastly different missions: sportbike, roadster, tourer, cruiser. But the downside was inherent compromise: that configuration carried weight high up and meant that the resulting bikes were generally heavier than more focused rivals.

Engines had the same issues: Triumph’s three and four-cylinder designs were versatile, but they could never be as light or as powerful as something designed for screaming revs and maximum aggression. But although inline fours are powerful, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha’s reliance on them to power sports motorcycles during this period made the whole class a bit same-y, which likely explains some of Ducati’s contrarian appeal.

Freed from the need to fit into displacement restrictions imposed by racing classes, Triumph was able to create a sportbike focused for the road. The Daytona came in two flavors originally, one powered by the three cylinder and one by the four. The triple was lighter and ultimately more popular, but was very outclassed in the performance stakes compared to Japanese rivals. So Triumph introduced the Super III to at least close the gap and make the bike a viable alternative to more focused sportbikes.

Cosworth tuning increased power from 98 to 115hp and gave the bike a 140mph top speed, along with six-piston brakes. Performance was at least within shouting distance of other sportbikes, but the Triumph offered that charismatic and torquey three-cylinder that had great midrange punch, stable handling, reasonable comfort, much higher build quality and paintwork, along with classic styling that was a complete 180°, compared to the wild graphics and lurid colors found on bikes like the GSX-R750.

From the original eBay listing: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale

Between 1992 and 1997 Triumph produced the much appreciated but ultimately underpowered 3 cylinder Daytona 900. This bike was a successor to the original Daytona 750 and boasted a more acceptable riding position designed to increase its sporting ability. But the power to weight ratio was still a problem, especially when compared to other bikes at the time such as the GSX-R and the ultra-light Fireblade/CBR. So for the 1994-96 model years Triumph produced the Daytona Super III, and exported a very limited production run of ~150 bikes to the USA (numbers are approx 1000 worldwide).

Having been bitten by the Triumph triple bug, I searched for 2 years for a Super III and was ecstatic when I came across this extremely clean and well cared for example. Sadly, priorities have shifted and looking to thin the herd. This is not a divorce sale, baby sale, or other emergency sale. I’d like this to go to someone who will appreciate it as I have.  

Bike details: 8779.3 miles although that may go slightly up. 1 season old Michelin Pilot Power tires with less than 1k miles. Forks serviced at the end of last season with fresh oil, seals, and .95kg springs. Everything on the bike is OEM except for e-code halogen headlights for better night vision. All bodywork and paint is original. All factory carbon fiber parts are present, original, and unbroken.  

Extras: extremely rare Sprint Fox Fairing and custom made carbon fiber fill pieces. Comes with an extra fairing mount. Sudco FCR39 carbs (true triple carb setup for the 885, not a re-rack). Spare seat for re-upholstering. Can include some German basketweave vinyl (60’s Porsche restoration supply) if desired. It is very similar to the 60’s Triumph seat covers, albeit much higher quality.  

Very minor cons: small scratches on each muffler, less than 2″. Right side lower fairing has a few light scratches. Some chipping on fairing V behind front wheel.  

This is one of the lowest mileage original Triumph Super IIIs in existence. Extras worth $2,500 alone. Will not separate at this point.  

Japanese sportbikes of this era are old enough that the splashy graphics and DayGlo colors have become cool again, but the simple lines of this bright yellow Super III still appeal. These are very rare and certainly the most valuable of the early Daytonas, but still pretty affordable compared to other exotic machines. The $6,500 asking price is pretty high for a Super III, but the bike appears to be in superlative condition and has been enthusiast-owned, with low mileage, and comes with some very desirable extras. Speaking of: the seller mentions “Sudco” carbs, but I’m assuming they’re actually Keihin flat-slides, since Sudco doesn’t actually make carburetors, they just sell them.

-tad

Tuned Triple: 1995 Triumph Daytona Super III for Sale
Suzuki May 31, 2018 posted by

Canadian Stroker: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

Suzuki’s RG500Γ “Gamma” didn’t actually use a detuned version of the racing RGB500’s engine, but at least shared that machine’s square four two-stroke configuration, so it looked and felt like it could have been developed from the real thing. The specifications were certainly unlike anything else on the road: twin cranks, disc valves, four cylinders and 498cc, surrounded by a lightweight aluminum frame.

A quartet of very compact Mikuni flat-slide carburetors tucked in on the sides of the engine and fed the liquid-cooled two-stroke, a six-speed cassette gearbox kept the engine on the boil, and Suzuki’s “Full-Floater” suspension system and anti-dive forks helped put the power to the ground.

That square four turns fuel and air into a combination of power and heavy smoke that dribbles out of the four separate exhausts at idle. Once “on the pipe,” it puts a claimed 95hp through the impossibly skinny 120-section tire, enough to easily motivate the 340lb dry weight. Handling and braking were both exemplary in 1986, but have obviously been far surpassed.

The feeling is still there though and, in spite of Suzuki’ Automatic Exhaust Control power valve that helped give the lightweight machine a more manageable powerband, the bike was still a very raw experience. Which is exactly what makes it such a desirable bike today: it’s a race-replica that does more than just look the part.

From the original eBay listing: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale

The bike has never been plated or crashed.  Have owned it since 1990.  Very low mileage, very fast and reliable, 1 -2 kick starts (usually 1).  The only mar on the cosmetics is 4 small dimples , the result of a board sliding over and contacting the tank while in storage.  Can put the winning bidder in touch with the shop that did the engine work.  The shop owner races a gamma in vintage Class, he is the predominate specialist in Eastern Canada.  The entire engine, including the crankshafts and powertrain have been rebuilt and/or inspected, the invoices exceeded $6,000 US and can be emailed to the winning bidder.  My storage people can also do crating, export documents and shipping (Div. of Tippet Richardson Int.)  Shipping are dependent on destination, an advanced quote can be provided.

There hasn’t been much activity so far, but the opening bid was set at $18,000 and the seller is in Canada, which may be limiting interest in the bike. While I think this color and graphics scheme is very flattering, it may also be that purists prefer the classic blue-and-white Suzuki scheme. Hopefully, we’ll see some interest over the next couple of days!

-tad

Canadian Stroker: 1986 Suzuki RG500Γ for Sale
Suzuki September 4, 2014 posted by

Slab-Sided Survivor: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for Sale

Today’s bike, a very nice GSX-R 750 definitely falls into the “rare in this condition” rather than “genuinely exotic”: Suzuki sold boatloads of these when they were new. And it’s no surprise the original Gixxer sold like hotcakes: the GSX-R 750 was the very first mass-produced race-replica of the modern era, a truly affordable bike that you could thrash at the limit on track, and then ride to work on Monday morning without missing a beat.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 L Side Front

First-generation Gixxers are often referred to as “Slabbies” due to their very slab-sided styling. Engines featured air and oil-cooling that kept weight to a minimum but allowed maximum power and flat-slide carbs and a six-speed gearbox completed the package, helping the bike produce over 100hp in stock form. A lightweight aluminum box-section frame was state-of-the-art, although the bikes rolled on 18” wheels, making tire choice a bit limited today…

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 L Side Rear Wheel

Previous Japanese race-replicas like Suzuki’s own GS1000S were huge, heavy beasts that stressed power and durability over nimble handling. But the GSX-R had it all: power, light weight, handling, and rock-solid reliability.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 R Dash

It basically set the stage for the two-year production-cycle wars between the Japanese manufacturers that continued until the market crash knocked the bottom out of the motorcycle market. The Euro gained ground on the Yen, making formerly out-of-reach exotics from Italy a far more affordable prospect at about the same time those manufacturers realized that people wanted to actually ride their motorcycles, not take them in for service every 6,000 miles or wait for backordered parts to arrive…

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 R Side Rear Pipe

From the original eBay listing: 1987 GSX-R 750 for Sale

Up for auction is a very well prepped and maintained 1987 GSXR 750.  By “well-prepped”- I mean, at close to thirty years old- I wanted to make it reliable and safe.  So, there are brand new chain and tires (Michelin Pilots) (less than 50miles on both).  All hydraulics were professionally disassembled, cleaned, new seals and new pads in calipers and rebuild kits on all master and slave cylinders.  Forks serviced with new wipers, dust seals, Race Tech bushings and 5W oil.  Wheels have brand new wheel bearings.  Carbs- again, professionally rebuilt, new genuine part fuel floats, tuned and balanced.  New-Old stock (period correct) Kerker full system, (as the rubber intakes get old and hard- new intakes and exhaust gaskets to prevent air leaks) and brand new (not just re-oiled 20yr old) K&N filters.  Brand new black kevlar brake lines.  New battery, fresh Motul oil change/filter, etc…

For being almost a “vintage” bike-  she starts, rolls, pulls, turns and grips probably better than she did when new.

Tank -you can see in the pics- is rust free, bike still has original factory wind screen -not some lockhart replacement.  Still has original grips, rear view mirrors (bright, not scratched) and passenger foot pegs.  Comes with solo cowl -which I understand are worth a good $ all by themselves.  Gauges you can see are clean and bright -probably only 25% fade on the orange needles.

Everything was cleaned and detailed- so you won’t find 30years of chain grease and road grime under the sprocket covers.

The 1987 model year GSX-R introduced beefier 41mm forks and Suzuki’s New Electrically Activated Suspension [NEAS], along with a steering damper and a 21-liter fuel tank.

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 Front Wheel

By now, most Gixxers have been either been badly abused by several generations of squidly riders that followed the original owners, or are 0-mile collectables. While the 18″ wheels may make tire purchases more of a hassle when the time comes, this one won’t need those for a while, since the tires currently fitted still have the stickers on them! To find a first-generation GSX-R in this sort of well-used, but well cared for condition is really exciting if your goal is to use your new purchase as intended and terrorize local road and track. This one looks ready to go: the perfect usable, collectable sportbike.

-tad

1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 R Side Rear

 

Slab-Sided Survivor: 1987 Suzuki GSX-R 750 for Sale