Posts by tag: conti

Ducati August 2, 2019 posted by

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica

Update 8.1.2019: Joe has renewed his Featured Listings. Check out all of Joe’s bikes for sale on RSBFS! Many thanks for choosing us to help move your collection! -dc

In 1978 Mike Hailwood won the Isle of Man TT riding a Ducati. This was 11 years after his last motorcycle race, the previous period during which he was firmly on the Honda payroll. Everything about the event spelled disaster – an old timer long past his glory years on a make of bike nobody really associated him with – and nobody believed he would be competitive. But this was the stuff of heroes; and heroes always win. Hailwood went on to win what can only be considered the comeback of the century. This cemented the legend of Mike “the Bike” Hailwood’s connection with Ducati, and provided for some wonderful bikes. Today’s Featured Listing – a 1985 Ducati MHR – is one such factory offering that celebrated the success of Mike Hailwood.

The Ducati MHR is a bike built in the tradition of homage; it was built to celebrate the famous TT win. But given that the TT was for street-based machinery, the factory replica was not simply a graphics package. Yes, Hailwood won in 1978. Yes, the Pantah (which introduced the next generation belt-driven cams vs. bevel-driven) was introduced way back in 1980. Then why, you might ask, was a MHR being built in 1985 and based on the older hardware? The answer is that Ducati, still a relatively small company, focused on bevel drive for the big bikes (750 – 1000cc), while the Pantah was initially offered in 600cc and below variants. The bevel-drive motors were still very much in the forefront during this time, even though they may seem slightly archaic today. So the MHR is based on the “square case” 900SS of the day – which was a capable machine in its own right. But why still offer a homage bike in 1985 when Hailwood won the TT back in 1978? Simple: the public demanded it. While the MHR was a very limited edition, it was a tremendously successful marketing effort and a strong model for Ducati. Today’s seller has some good details about this bike, so I will let him take it over from here:

From the seller:
1985 Ducati Hailwood Replica

You should know that I am a serious collector, with a large motorcycle collection. I decided to sell some of the most valuable motorcycles in the collection. These motorcycles represent some of the most iconic motorcycles of the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Those motorcycles are now being offered up for sale one by one. These motorcycles were targeted by me for my collection many years ago when the best of the best were available and that is what I purchased.

In general, I do believe super rare Italian motorcycle of the 1970s and 1980s are the future Ferrari of motorcycle collecting. We all know what has happened to Ferrari.

More from the seller:
The Ducati Hailwood Millie shown here was made in two series. The first one being a short fairing and only 900 cc with a kick starter and this model, the Hailwood Millie (1000 cc) with the electric starter and the large fairing; one is one of the most beautifully designed fairings ever. It is a big bike not meant for the meek. Of course, it has the electric starter and exhaust note that will thrill any motorcycle enthusiast. It is in absolutely near perfect condition. It is always on a trickle charger and ready to give you a thrill of a lifetime as you wind through the gears and open it up on an open road. This is another Italian bike that, in our opinion, can be classified as the Ferrari of bikes of the future.

This is certainly a bike for the serious collectors. For those that don’t know all the details, the internet is just loaded with information. I can only suggest that you scrutinize the pictures and decide for yourself if this is another rare Italian collector bike that will eventually become as iconic as a Ferrari. Ten years ago, I spent a long time looking for the best Hailwood Millie and believe me this was the beat of the best, hands down.

Prefer phone calls 847-774-4857. Thanks for looking at one of the best!

These second generation MHR machines are truly beautiful motorcycles. Whereas the original offering utilizes a fiberglass cover over a stock SS tank, the latter bikes use a tank that is unique to the model. The rest of the bodywork is all MHE, evoking the spirit (and the livery) of the racer. And while the underpinnings are SS items, some performance items such as the Conti exhausts are model specific. The solo seat is a non-race item; in reality it is a rear pillion cover, making this a two-seater and enhancing the usefulness of the bike. But people who lust after a MHR are not concerned with practicality – they want the booming V-twin soundtrack and the waves of torque that have made Ducati victorious and famous. You may not be able to ride with the effortless agility of Mike Hailwood, but you can still rock the livery and the sound while paying homage to the great man with this stunning 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica. Interested parties should give Joe a call at 847-774-4857. Good Luck!!

MI

Featured Listing: 1985 Ducati Mike Hailwood Replica
Ducati July 4, 2017 posted by

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS

The 1975 Ducati 900SS is something every serious collector has on their list and given that 1975 production was less than 250 units, today’s post is quite an occasion.  This nice but not pristine version is located in Manhattan Beach, California USA but I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to see it go to an international sale.

1975 Ducati 900SS For Sale on eBay

To understand the significance of this bike and why it is so prized, you need to look back to 1970 when the top level GP racing class was pretty much a battle between MV Agusta (with legendary rider Agostini) and Japanese two-strokes.  Ducati had left racing over 10 years earlier due to budget constraints but was now flush with new backing and had a new series of larger displacement machines under development.  In 1970 the company decided it would be going back to the track, in part to help increase visibility to their new machines but also to help in development.

Ducati hit the track in 1970 with a new 500cc L-twin engine with two-valve desmo heads but the new machines were still no match for the then dominant Agostini and MV Agusta.   In 1972 Ducati announced a new 750cc machine that incorporated the lessons learned over the last 2 seasons along with special racetrack-oriented cams, twin spark plugs, 40mm Dell’Orto carbs and billet connecting rods.  Other top shelf bits included Marzocchi forks and triple-disc brakes.

The new 750cc machine was set to debut at Imola on April 23, 1972.   Did it work?  Well, here is what happened when GP rider Paul Smart (yes, THAT Paul Smart) took the new Ducati out for qualifying:

“On the last lap I wound it up as fast as I felt comfortable.  I wasn’t going completely flat out because it was basically just a safety-wired street bike..it still had the Dunlop TT100 street tires and even still had the centerstand lugs in place.   When I brought the bike back to the pits all the Ducati mechanics were jumping up and down…it turns out I had just broken Ago’s track record.”

 

The new Duc actually finished 1-2 at Imola and the public immediately clamored for a 750ss for the street.  At the end of the 1972 season Ducati promised to make replicas of the Imola winning machine available to the public but  Ducati was still a small manufacturer so this didn’t actually happen until 1974.  During this 2 year period the Japanese were undergoing a crash course in development and quickly catching up to its European rivals so when Ducati finally delivered the promised Imola replica 750cc machines they also introduced a new 860cc machine, the 900 SuperSport/SS.   The new “big” Duc was essentially the 750 series machine with more power and fortunately for Ducati, this wasn’t a case where more power upset the balance of the bike. The new 900ss was able to continue the performance success of the 750 for several years.  Consider this – it was on a 1978 900SS that a just-out-of-retirement 38 year old Mike Hailwood would ride to a legendary victory at the Isle of Mann TT.

Okay, we have covered the history and ties to famous racers like  Paul Smart and Mike Hailwood, but you may still be wondering why this bike is so high on so many collectors lists.  The answer is that not only is it a first year bike but it also had some unique to the year components    The 1975 edition actually had many of the same components as the the 750cc Imola race replicas.  These components were offered on the 900ss for the 1975 year only.

A quick comparison of the components for the 900ss model years is below as an example:

1975 900ss  1976 900ss
 Gas Tank  Fiberglass  Steel
 Carbs  40mm  32mm
 Exhausts  Conti Lafranconi
 Turn signals  No  Yes
 Shift  Right side  Left side

 

Simply put, for many Ducati fans and collectors the 1975 900ss is considered to be the closest you can get to the race bikes ridden by people like Smart and Hailwood.

One final factor to consider regarding the why the Ducati is so highly prized by collectors is the generally acceptance that the 750/900ss Ducati along with the Laverda 750SFC and the Norton Commando were the first modern “GP-bikes-with-lights and a horn.”  You could even think of the Ducati as the progenitor of bikes such as the Ducati 888SP3 and Desmosedici.

Now as for this specific example, here is a summary of what the seller has to say

  • #214 of 246 produced in 1974
  • Has only 12,000 kilometers/roughly 7,500 original miles in its 42 year lifespan.
  • Brembo disc brakes front and rear with all new brake pads, front forks were rebuilt and new seals added.
  • DMC electronic ignition installed as well as new voltage regulator.
  • It is a 42 year old survivor and it has some imperfections. At some point in the past Ethanol cause the gas tank to leak. It also caused a “bubble like” line at the base of the gas tank. It has since been treated by GTL of Los Angeles and DOES NOT LEAK anymore. The leaks caused paint to come off the swingarm, and some other areas of the frame.  There are also, “blemishes” on both side covers and gas tank.  
  • Also, the right underside of the muffler is scraped and the left has some light scratches.

So then, what’s this first year bit of Italian goodness going to cost?  A quick search of Classic Sport Bikes for sale  shows 1970’s 900SS going for around $32,000 USD a few years ago, but those weren’t first year bikes.  Bonhams had a pristine 1974 750cc version that went for about $50,000 USD a few years ago as well but that was in better condition and wasn’t a 900SS.   I am thinking  this one is going to attract attention from serious collections and wouldn’t be at all surprised to see this one go for between $45,000-60,000 USD right from the listing.

One final note- there is no Buy-It-Now option on this one.  While patience is a virtue for collectors, given the rarity of this bike I think someone is going to make the owner an offer they can’t refuse/the chances of this one being relisted are low.  To put in simply, if this one is on a list for your collection you might want to move quick.

-Marty/Dallaslavowner

 

Post Script:  Happy Canada Day and 4th of July ya’ll!!!

First Year Legend Alert: 1975 Ducati 900 SS
Ducati June 20, 2012 posted by

Beveled Beauty: 1978 Ducati SD900 Darmah

For Sale: DUCATI SD900 Darmah

From the green hills of Connecticut comes this wonderful period sportbike. One of the last of the bevel line, the Sport Desmo 900 embodied the segment known today as the naked bike. Intended to be unencumbered and less complicated – not to mention lighter – than a fully faired bike, the 900 Darmah was a good “all ’rounder” and equally at home in the canyons as on the boulevard.

Built in the day when men were men and bikes were started with a forceful kick, this classic Ducati shows what the brand was all about: good looks and great components. The bike is a veritable who’s who of the respected: Brembo brakes, beautiful Campagnolo wheels, and Conti mufflers working in conjunction with the latest 90 degree vee twin Bologna had to offer; a true taste of Italy.

From the seller:
Up for Auction is a DUCATI SD900 Darmah, Sport Desmo, 1978. I purchased this bike a year ago in the condition that is shown in the photos.
It is currently registered and insured by me in Connecticut. It runs very strong and shifts in all gears. Kickstart. Front Light not working. Will need rear brake pads.

The following was performed on the Ducati:
-Gas tank was removed and cleaned.
-New Fuel Petcocks installed, Have the original.
-Twin carbs were dismantled soaked and rebuilt.
-New Fuel Pump Diaphrams.
-Changed Engine Oil.
-Rear Brake Master Cylinder rebuilt.
-New Handgrips.
-New Clutch Cable.
-New Brake Pedal Spring.
-New Brake Fluid.

This bike has survived quite a few years to come to you in this condition. The seller notes that there are some minor issues to correct, but the bike presents well and provided that the mechanicals are in decent shape this could be a keeper for years to come. While we have not see prices on the “standard” bevels climb too high in recent years (price inflation has primarily centered around the green framed 750SS models and the Hailwood replicas), there is no reason to believe the SD models cannot achieve collector status from a monetary perspective. Until then, ride the heck out of it just like the Italians intended!

This auction is going on now and the opening bid is a cool $5k. It will be interesting to see how the market reacts to this one; there are not many clean Darmahs still around, much less in stock (or relatively stock) condition. As we know, condition drives the price – especially with the older bikes. While this is not one of “the” collectable models of the era, this is a nice model in presentable condition. Take a look and then share your thoughts!

MI

Ducati February 28, 2010 posted by

2001 Ducati MH900e on ebay

2001 Ducati MH900e #36 with low miles for sale on ebay.

The MH900e is one of my favourite Ducatis of all time, and this one – #36 0f 2000 ever made – for sale on ebay is a prime specimen with some tasteful and practical modifications done:

For sale #36 0f 2000 made for the world, most did not come to the USA.

The MH was stunning in stock form, but I felt there was room for improvement, and so I spent thousands of dollars, and countless hours to make it run and look even better….of course I saved all the original parts, even the sides of the crate as it had a graphic image of the MH painted on the side along with production number, unlike other Ducatis.

#36 has about 3500 careful miles, and is in excellent condition.

It has never been wet and always serviced by Ducati dealers in the Dallas Ft Worth area in the past where it was delivered, and spent most of its life.

I moved it last year to the pacific northwest as I completed our retirement house…I might be able to deliver it this spring to a buyer in the western half of the country, as I make one more trip to Texas for the last of our furniture, etc.

History of my mods, and why I did what I felt the factory should have.

One of the first things that bothered me after I unpacked the crate, and helped the dealer assemble, check and adjust things, was the stock exhaust and associated assembly…it was too quiet/restrictive/produced too much heat, and was way too heavy. (numerous owners have had cracking and breakage of the taillight/turn signal/license assembly attached to the exhaust) So I designed a lighter/stronger/better looking support bracket, had a friend weld it, and powder coated red to match the bike, along with tucking turn signals in the tailpiece with a smaller license plate bracket. This was made to hold the “conti-look” exhaust cans I sourced from BUB, as I liked the look and sound on my old beveldrives with original longer conti pipes.  There had to be small sections formed to mate the cans to the original header, and then I had the pieces, and black stock header “jet coated” and polished silver, which I think looks and transfers heat better.

The sound is glorious /more power/much less heat…mission accomplished, bike and rider are much happier (power on a dyno was within 1 hp of a full termi-factory optional system)

I added an Ohlins steering damper and rear shock…big improvement over stock, and at the same time a better chain , and new sprockets. The front turn signals and custom brake / clutch levers , and mirrors were Ducati optional items.  I also installed Ferracci clip-on bars for a little more comfort. The billet aluminum belt covers, and oil pressure sender cover were also sourced from a Ducati parts catalog. The little “winged-D” Ducati on the left case cover was machined by a Calif. Co.

The next change/mod was to get rid of the two batteries hanging below the tank shroud, and raise up the oil cooler from behind the front tire. To make this work required removal of the giant air box, and building a rack to hold a regular size bike battery (new Oddysey gel cell added this month) substituting two oiled foam filters, and k+n oil breather filter…like I said earlier, bike runs excellent with the new exhaust, and without the old airbox…at the same time I raised the oil cooler up to make it less vulnerable and look better, I had to have some longer braided stainless lines, and fittings made at the local airport.

This is one of the nicer MH900es that we have seen, so if you’ve been looking at one of these, .  For a list of MH900e that we have previously listed, click HERE.

phil